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Cora Masters Barry

Professor and civic leader Cora Masters Barry was born on May 7, 1945 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma to Isabell and Alfred Masters. She graduated from Paseo Academy in Kansas City, Missouri in 1962. Barry briefly attended Pasadena City College and Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri before graduating from Texas Southern University with her B.A. degree in 1969. She subsequently earned her M.A. degree in urban studies and public administration from Howard University in 1972.

In 1971, Barry began working on Walter Fauntroy's congressional campaign where she first met Marion Barry, whom she married in 1994. In 1976, Barry began teaching political science at the University of the District of Columbia, where she specialized in teaching “Black Politics, Comparative Political Studies, the Presidency, and the Constitution.” She was later hired as the northern Virginia minority coordinator for President Jimmy Carter's reelection campaign in 1980. That same year, Marion Barry, then mayor of Washington D.C., appointed her to the District of Columbia's Boxing and Wrestling Commission, making her the first woman in the United States to hold such a position. She later became chairwoman of the commission. Barry later ran a voter registration drive for Marion Barry's 1994 re-election campaign and chaired his inaugural committee. As First Lady of the District of Columbia, Barry founded the Recreation Wish List Committee (RWLC) in 1995 to support recreational activities and provide a nurturing learning environment for underserved youth in Washington D.C. That same year, she, with Dr. Dorothy I. Height, co-organized the “Women for the Million Man March.” In 2001, she founded the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center, a premier tennis and education facility.

Throughout her career, Barry has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the DC Chamber of Commerce Community Impact Award, being named the 2013 Washingtonian of the Year by Washingtonian Magazine, the USTA Founders Award, and the National Recreation and Park Association’s Robert Artz Citizen Advocacy Award. She was also inducted into the USTA’s Mid-Atlantic Tennis and Education Foundation’s Hall of Fame and the Black Tennis Hall of Fame.

Cora Masters Barry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 6, 2005 and June 16, 2012.

Accession Number

A2005.121

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/6/2005

6/16/2012

Last Name

Barry

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Masters

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Cora

Birth City, State, Country

Oklahoma City

HM ID

BAR07

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

West Africa

Favorite Quote

It's Not Gonna Turn Out Right.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

5/7/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Potatoes

Short Description

Professor and civic leader Cora Masters Barry (1945- ), as the First Lady of the District of Columbia, founded the Recreation Wish List Committee in 1995 and the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center in 2001, and co-organized the “Women for the Million Man March.”

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167915">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Cora Masters Barry's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167916">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Cora Masters Barry lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167917">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Cora Masters Barry describes her maternal family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167918">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Cora Masters Barry describes her mother, Isabell Masters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167919">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Cora Masters Barry describes her father, Alfred Masters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167920">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Cora Masters Barry describes her father's experience with racism in the U.S. Marine Corps</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167921">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Cora Masters Barry describes her maternal family ancestry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167922">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Cora Masters describes her maternal family ancestry and the Exodus of 1879</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167923">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Cora Masters Barry describes her parents meeting at Langston University in Langston, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167924">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Cora Masters Barry describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167925">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Cora Masters Barry talks about moving to Los Angeles, California in the second wave of the Great Migration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167926">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Cora Masters Barry describes her family life as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167927">Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Cora Masters Barry describes growing up in predominantly white suburbs of Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167928">Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Cora Masters Barry describes her experience at Cienega Elementary School in Los Angeles, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167929">Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Cora Masters Barry describes her neighbor, comedian Tim Moore who played Kingfish on 'Amos 'n' Andy,' pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167930">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Cora Masters Barry describes her neighbor, comedian Tim Moore who played Kingfish on 'Amos 'n' Andy,' pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167931">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Cora Masters Barry talks about her experience at Gompers Middle School in South Central, and Washington Junior High in Pasadena, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167932">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Cora Masters Barry describes living in a predominantly white neighborhood in Pasadena, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167933">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Cora Masters Barry describes her experience at John Muir, Manual Arts, and Paseo Academy High Schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167934">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Cora Masters Barry talks about de-facto segregation at John Muir High School and Manual Arts High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167935">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Cora Masters Barry talks about transferring to Paseo Academy High School in Kansas City, and being the first black performer in its student talent show</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167936">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Cora Masters Barry describes her experience at Pasadena City College, and explains how she got to Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167937">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Cora Masters Barry describes her freshman year at Lincoln University in 1964</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167938">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Cora Masters Barry describes leaving Lincoln University and working as a teacher's assistant in California's Head Start pilot program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167939">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Cora Masters Barry describes her first semester at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167940">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the influence of black-nationalism at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167941">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the 1968 shooting of unarmed students at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167942">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Cora Masters Barry talks about graduating from Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas in 1969</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167943">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the black power movement in northern California and the arrest of Black Panther chief of staff David Hilliard</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167944">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Cora Masters Barry describes Texas Southern University after Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination and anti-war demonstrations in Berkeley, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167945">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Cora Masters Barry talks about finishing her graduate degree in urban policy at Howard University in Washington D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167946">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Cora Masters Barry describes working on HistoryMaker Walter Fauntroy's 1971 campaign for congress with HistoryMaker Marion Barry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167947">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Cora Masters Barry talks about working with the National Council of Negro Women, and on HistoryMaker Marion Barry's campaign for the D.C. school board</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167948">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Cora Masters Barry describes working as the coordinator for "The Committee to Draft HistoryMaker Marion Barry for Chairman of City Council"</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167949">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the Home Rule Act and the election of HistoryMaker Walter Fauntroy as Washington, D.C.'s delegate for the U.S. Congress</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167950">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Cora Masters Barry talks about her teaching appointment in political science at the University of the District of Columbia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167951">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Cora Masters Barry talks about organizing a boxing fundraiser for athletic programs in Washington D.C.'s public schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167952">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Cora Masters Barry talks about working as the northern Virginia minority coordinator for President Jimmy Carter's reelection campaign, pt.1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167953">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Cora Masters Barry talks about working as the northern Virginia minority coordinator for President Jimmy Carter's reelection campaign, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167954">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Cora Masters Barry talks about her controversial nomination to the District of Columbia Boxing and Wrestling Commission, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167955">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Cora Masters Barry talks about her controversial nomination for the District of Columbia Boxing and Wrestling Commission, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167956">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Cora Masters Barry describes her experience of gender discrimination at her first weigh-in as boxing commissioner</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167957">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Cora Masters Barry describes chairing the District of Columbia Boxing and Wrestling Commission and her involvement with the International Boxing Federation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167958">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the 1988 court proceedings around allegations of "double-dipping," pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167959">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the 1988 court proceedings around allegations of "double-dipping," pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167960">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Cora Masters Barry talks about female government officials in boxing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167961">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Cora Masters Barry talks about her relationship with HistoryMaker Marion Barry, pt.1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167962">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Cora Masters Barry Cora talks about her relationship with HistoryMaker Marion Barry, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167963">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of the second session of Cora Masters Barry's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167964">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Cora Masters Barry talks about her relationship with HistoryMaker Marion Barry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167965">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Cora Masters Barry talks about support of HistoryMaker Marion Barry in Washington, D.C.'s black community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167966">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Cora Masters Barry talks about HistoryMaker Marion Barry's 1994 re-election campaign and 1995 inauguration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167967">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Cora Masters Barry explains the founding and function of the Recreation Wish List Committee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167968">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Cora Masters Barry talks about early supporters of the Recreation Wish List Committee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167969">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Cora Masters Barry describes conceiving the idea for the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167970">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Cora Masters Barry describes the first phase in development for the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167971">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Cora Masters describes the first phase in development for the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167972">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center campaign kickoff event</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167973">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Cora Masters Barry explains how she secured a developer for the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167974">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the Washington Tennis Foundation's effort to block the development of the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167975">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Cora Masters Barry talks about fundraising for the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167976">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Cora Masters Barry talks about Mayor Anthony Williams' contribution to the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167977">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center grand opening ceremony</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167978">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Cora Masters Barry talks about educational and athletic programming at the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167979">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Cora Masters Barry talks about celebrity philanthropists</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167980">Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Cora Masters Barry talks about educational and athletic programming at the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167981">Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the poverty and socioeconomic issues in Southeast Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167982">Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Cora Masters Barry talks about receiving an eviction notice from the Washington D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty's office, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167983">Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Cora Masters Barry talks about receiving an eviction notice from the Washington D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty's office, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167984">Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the involvement of HistoryMakers Dorothy Height and Maya Angelou in defense of the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167985">Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the eviction court proceedings of the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center building, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167986">Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the eviction court proceedings of the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center building, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167987">Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Cora Masters Barry describes former Washington, D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty's vision for the Southeast Tennis and Education Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167988">Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Cora Masters Barry talks about importance of the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167989">Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the talented players at the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center and hosting the National Junior Tennis League tournament</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167990">Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Cora Masters Barry talks briefly about her home church, Union Temple Baptist</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167991">Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Cora Masters Barry talks about the tenth anniversary of the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167992">Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Cora Masters Barry describes the social services available at the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167993">Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Cora Masters Barry describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167994">Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Cora Masters Barry talks the future of the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167995">Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Cora Masters Barry talks about her daughters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167996">Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Cora Masters Barry talks about her mother, Isabell Masters' presidential campaign and an interaction with former U.S. president William "Bill" Clinton</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167997">Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Cora Masters Barry talks about her friendship with HistoryMaker Marion Barry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/167998">Tape: 9 Story: 10 - Cora Masters Barry talks about how she would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$6

DAStory

7$7

DATitle
Cora Masters Barry describes her experience at Pasadena City College, and explains how she got to Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Missouri
Cora Masters Barry describes conceiving the idea for the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center in Washington, D.C.
Transcript
After high school [Paseo High School, later, Paseo Academy of Fine and Performing Arts, Kansas City, Missouri], then where did you go--$$Went back to Pasadena [California], went to Pasadena City College [Pasadena, California] and promptly flunked out.$$Now what do you attribute that to?$$Not being interested. I made an A and--let me see, I made an A, and a F, and the rest were Ds. I think the A was in a cappella choir and the D was in the gym--the F was in gym, which it meant, of course, that I never went. The D was in all the rest of it.$$Okay, so what did you after that?$$You mean what did my mother [Isabella Arch Masters] do?$$Yeah, what did your mother do?$$She told me I was going to get a college education or get a job, which, of course, terrified me the thought of getting a job.$$All right. So what did your mother--(simultaneous)--$$Well I was quite all right with flunking out because I really--they used to have a thing at Pasadena College called, The Wall. I used to spend a lot of time on it.$$This is w-a-l-l?$$You know where you hang out and talk, and just, you know. I was having a ball. The problem was a lot of my friends from high school were going to PCC [Pasadena City College]. You know, Pasadena City College was probably the highest rated junior college in the United States at that time. I mean Pasadena was--you know.$$This is '62 [1962], '63 [1963]?$$Yes. But her thing was, "You're going to get a job or you're going to get back into college," which, of course, the job thing kind of terrified me because I wasn't used to that. So she wanted me to go to Langston [University, Langston, Oklahoma]. I did not want to go to Langston because everybody in my family--my mother graduated from Langston, my father [Alfred Masters] graduated from there, my uncle, my aunt. I wasn't going to do the Langston thing. So she--I think they turned me down anyway. I think she applied. My grades were so bad. She said, "You apply as a freshman, forget that first disastrous year," which I told her I was going to do, but I never did. So my brother, which I hadn't mentioned, was a child preacher, started preaching three years old. So he was on the road a lot. I used to travel with him, singing a lot.$$This was an older brother?$$Baby brother.$$Okay.$$He's a bishop right now in West Palm Beach, Florida. But he used to travel all over the country and he was a preacher and I was the singer. There's a lot of stuff in my life. I can't remember all of it at one time.$$Now, you sang gospel?$$Mm-hmm.$$Okay.$$So were on the road that summer. Mother stopped talking to me about what--I don't know I probably lied and said I had applied and had not heard back or whatever. So were just traveling around the country and then we got to St. Louis, Missouri and we were on the way to Kansas City, Missouri, I think he preached in St. Louis we were on our way to Kansas City, Missouri which is where my aunt lived, which I'm sure he had some appointments to preach there also. And when we got to a place called Jefferson City, Missouri, my mother drove up this long hill and we were at this school called Lincoln University [Jefferson City, Missouri]. She went inside the building, the administration building, came back out with the dean of students, and took my suitcase out and said, "You're going here to college."$$And what happened?$$I had a fit. I wouldn't talk to the man. She had not warned me. But, see, I had graduated from a high school in Missouri and this was a state school, so if you graduated, it didn't matter. You could just-and she had told him all this and he said, "Contingent on her records, I'm going to take your word for it that she is a graduate from a school in Missouri, so we can take her now because we're having freshman orientation." My mother dropped me off in the middle of nowhere at Lincoln University. They took me over to a dormitory hall called Anthony Hall, which was nothing but freshman and she took me to my room. I was furious. I didn't want to speak to her. I didn't even say good bye. She dropped me and my little suitcase off in the middle of nowhere is where I describe it. She went on about her business. Well, she tells the story that she went to Kansas City, where she was heading. Jefferson City, Missouri is almost in the middle between St. Louis and Kansas City, so like maybe 130 miles from one and about 140 miles from the other. So she went to Kansas City, Missouri and her plan was to check back and if I was still in that mode, she would come back and get me. So she left me there. She called back about seven or eight o'clock. I don't know what time. I didn't have time to talk to her. I had met some kids from Cincinnati [Ohio], from Chicago [Illinois], from Dallas [Texas], and from Oklahoma City [Oklahoma], and one of our friend's father--her name was Jamilla Gibson[-Bell] . Her father [Joseph Deighton Gibson Jr.] was Jockey Jack and they used to call him "Jack, the rapper." Before he died, everybody knew him around the country, he is well-known. But, at the time, he was with Motown. So she had this portable battery-operated record player and they had all the advanced, pre-released versions of all Motown songs and another girlfriend that I met from Oklahoma City named Sandra Biggers [ph.] had a jug and on it wrote "medicine," but in it was wine. So between the records and the wine and the cards I was having a ball. So my mother called back. I was like, "I'm having fun." You know, "Alright thank you, talk to you later." So that's how I ended up at Lincoln University.$Okay, so you had projects all over the city [Washington, D.C.] at first. And then--so when did you focus in on this particular project here?$$Well, I really didn't focus on it as a project initially, not to the extent that it is now. One day I was riding down the street and I saw this property, this land, and there were a lot of young people hanging out, looking like they could get themselves in a little trouble and I saw these poles that looked like they were tennis things. And I checked and said, "Yeah, there used to be courts there." They used to be called The Hart Court because it's right next to Hart Junior High School [later, Hart Middles School, Washington, D.C.], and I said, "I wonder if we renovate or build some courts, will the kids come?" So I did a little cursory marketing survey. We built six courts, and all the tennis organizations starting playing courts on them and having programs. The Washington Tennis [and Education] Foundation started using it for their Arthur Ashe [Children's] Program, the (unclear) Tennis Council used it, Totally Tennis, Tennis at Shiloh, all those different organizations that had junior tennis programs started using these courts and myself used to come and play tennis with my husband [HM Marion Barry] and also my coach was Dr. Arnold McKnight. And I would come and play tennis with Marion and then be coached by Arnold, and I started playing with some of the kids and I just took an interest in them. And I found out that through playing tennis with them and watching them--they could really play tennis because many of them were playing with the Washington Tennis Foundation at that time because they had an inner-city program, although they were up on 16th Street. They had a sort of busing situation, but those kids would settle their difference or their beef on the corner at the tennis matches or they would be flipping the birdie at each other, or call each other names. I began to do what I considered informal mentoring. For example, I would give them assignments. For instance, I would say, "Today, I want you to write when you go to school, good attitude, good results, bad attitude, bad results. Give me five things you did that when you had a good attitude, what happened, and five things that happened when you had a bad attitude." Then I'd be there the next day to collect it and talk with them. Finally, one day, I was standing on the corner with Dr. McKnight and I said, "You know what, doc?" I just put the racket--I just dropped my racket, and I said, "You know what? I want to build a building." I really believe to this day and I will believe it until the day that I die that was a vision from the Holy Spirit; just something came over me and said, "You should build a building." He looked over across there and he said, "What do you mean?" I said, "This is not enough. Tennis is not enough for these kids. These kids need--they need mentoring; they need homework assistance, they need guidance, they need more in their life. Tennis is not going to get them where they're going, not from this community." He always laughed because he said, "Okay, that's great but right now we gotta finish this tennis lesson because I gotta go," he was a principal up at [Ferebee-Hope Elementary School, Washington D.C.] and he needed to get to school. It was early in the morning. And that was my first inspiration about doing something here on this property that we are sitting in right now.$$Now about what year was that?$$That was probably about 1995.

Kathryn Waddell Takara

Poet and professor Kathryn Waddell Takara was born in 1943 in Tuskegee, Alabama to Lottie and Dr. William Waddell IV. After graduating from George School in Newtown, Pennsylvania, she earned her B.A. degree from Tufts University in 1965. Takara went on to receive her M.A. degree in French from the University of California at Berkeley in 1969, and her Ph.D. degree in political science from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa in 1995.

In 1971, Takara joined the Ethnic Studies Department at the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa as an assistant professor, where she developed courses in African American and African politics, history, literature, and culture. During her thirty-one year career at the university, she rose to associate professor in the university’s Interdisciplinary Studies Program and taught French. Her poetry has been published in a variety of publications including; Interdisciplinary Studies Humanities Journal, Honolulu Stories, Words Upon the Waters, The African Journal of New Poetry, Arkansas Review, Africa Literary Journal, Julie Mango Press, Poetry Motel, Peace & Policy, From Totems to Hip Hop, Hawai`i Review, Chaminade Literary Review, All She Wrote: Hawai`i Women s Voices, and World of Poetry, An Anthology. Her essays have appeared in the Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race, The Black Scholar, Multi-America: Essays on Cultural Wars and Cultural Peace, The Western Journal of Black Studies, and The Honolulu Advertiser. She performed her poetry and lectured extensively throughout the Hawaiian Islands, the Continental United States, and in Beijing and Qingdao, China. In 2003, Takara launched Pacific Raven Press, serving as its owner, editor, and publisher. She published three books of poetry: New and Collected Poems in 2003, Pacific Raven: Hawaii Poems in 2009, and Tourmalines: Beyond the Ebony Portal in 2010. She also released a poetic trilogy, including the books Love’s Seasons in 2014, Zimbabwe Spin in 2015, and Shadow Dancing: $elling $urvival in China in 2016.

Takara was the recipient of the University of Hawai’i Board of Regents Outstanding Teacher Award and was a two-time Fulbright Fellow, in 1966 and 1996. She received the 2010 American Book Award for her published work Pacific Raven: Hawai`i Poems. She was knighted into the Orthodox Order of St. John, Russian Grand Priory in 2014, and received the Lifetime Achievement Award in Education and African American history and culture in Hawai’i from the NAACP in 2016.

Kathryn Takara was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 10, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.137

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/10/2019

Last Name

Takara

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Marie Waddell Brundage

Occupation
Schools

George School

Tufts University

University of California, Berkeley

University of Hawaii at Manoa

First Name

Kathryn

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

TAK01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Qingdao, China/Bordeaux, France/Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire

Favorite Quote

To Thine Own Self Be True

Speakers Bureau Region State

Hawaii

Birth Date

12/26/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Ka'a'awa

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Breakfast

Short Description

Poet and professor Kathryn Takara (1943- ), an award winning poet, has performed her works in Africa, Europe, Central America, Tahiti and China, and served as associate professor from the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa.

Employment

University of California Berkeley

Hawaii Pacific University

Chaminade College

University of Hawaii Lab School

University of Hawaii at Manoa

Winward Community College

University of Hawaii

University of Qingdao

Pacific Raven Press

Favorite Color

Aquamarine

Annette Gordon-Reed

Lawyer, historian, and professor, Annette Gordon-Reed was born on November 19, 1958 in Livingston, Texas to Alfred and Bettye Jean Gordon. She was the first to integrate her elementary school in Conroe, Texas, and later graduated with high distinction from Dartmouth University with her B.A. degree in history in 1981. Gordon-Reed then attended Harvard Law School where she received her J.D. degree in 1984 and was the first African American editor for the Harvard Law Review.

In 1984, Gordon-Reed was hired as an associate at the law firm Cahill Gordon & Reindel in New York. She subsequently became general counsel for the New York City Board of Corrections in 1987 where she wrote minimum standards for New York City’s jails. Gordon-Reed served here until 1992, when she became a professor at the New York Law School. She published her first book, Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy in 1997. Four years later, she published Vernon Jordan’s memoir, Vernon Can Read!, which received the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and the 2002 BCALA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction. In 2003, she contributed to Howard Dodson’s Jubilee: The Emergence of African-American Culture. Gordon-Reed was hired by Rutgers University in 2007 as a professor of history, and the following year she published The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. This book won over ten awards, including the 2008 National Book Award, the 2009 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Nonfiction, and the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in History, of which she was the first African American recipient. Gordon-Reed left New York Law School and Rutgers University in 2010 upon joining Harvard University as a professor of history and American legal history. The same year she was named the Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, a role she held until 2016. In 2011, Gordon-Reed released her book, Andrew Johnson; and, in 2017, she published Most Blessed of the Patriarchs: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination which was a New York Times Bestseller, and won numerous awards including being named a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice Selection.

Gordon-Reed has been a member of the Council of Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Humanities Center, the American Philosophical Society, and was the 2018-2019 president of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.

In addition to her book’s awards, Gordon-Reed received the 2009 National Humanities Medal, the Woman of Power & Influence Award from the National Organization for Women in New York City, as well as an honorary degree from Ramapo College and the College of William & Mary. She has also been awarded New York Public Library’s Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers Fellowship, the Guggenheim Fellowship in Humanities, and the 2010 MacArthur Fellowship Genius Grant.

Gordon-Reed resides in Manhattan with her husband, New York Supreme Court Justice Robert Reed. They have two children, Susan and Gordon.

Annette Gordon-Reed was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 21, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.113

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/21/2019

Last Name

Gordon-Reed

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Dartmouth College

Harvard Law School

First Name

Annette

Birth City, State, Country

Livingston

HM ID

GOR08

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

United Kingdom

Favorite Quote

To Everything There Is A Season, And A Time For Every Purpose Under Heaven

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

11/19/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

French Fries

Short Description

Lawyer, historian, and professor, Annette Gordon-Reed (1958- ) is a professor of law and history at Harvard University, and was the first African American to receive the Pulitzer Prize in History for her 2008 publication, The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family.

Employment

Harvard Law Review

Cahill Gordon & Reindl

New York City Board of Corrections

New York Law School

Rutgers University

Harvard University

Harvard University, Radcliffe Institute

Conroe Courier

Favorite Color

Blue

Jeh V. Johnson

Professor and architect Jeh Vincent Johnson was born on July 8, 1931 in Nashville, Tennessee to Marie Antionette Burgette and Charles Spurgeon Johnson. He graduated from Pearl High School in Nashville, Tennessee in 1949. Johnson received his A.B. degree from Columbia University in New York in 1953 before being drafted to serve in the Counter Intelligence Corps of the U.S. Army until 1954. He then earned his M.A. degree in architecture in 1958 from Columbia University.

In 1956, Johnson was hired by Paul R. Williams as a designer. After graduate school, he received the William Kinne Fellows Fellowship and traveled throughout Europe studying architecture. He later joined the architectural firm of Adams and Woodbridge Architects in 1958. In 1962, Johnson co-founded Gindele and Johnson, along with William Gindele, where the focus of their work was on single and multi-family housing, community centers, churches, and schools. Two years later, Johnson accepted a faculty position in architecture and design at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. In 1967, he was appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson to serve on the National Commission on Urban Problems. He also served as chair of the National Committee on Housing for the American Institute of Architects (AIA). In Detroit in 1971, Johnson co-founded the National Organization of Minority Architects along with several fellow members of AIA. In 1977, he was elected to the AIA’s college of fellows. Johnson later served as partner at the architectural and design firm of LeGendre, Johnson, McNeil Architects from 1980 to 1990. Johnson’s many architectural projects include the former Poughkeepsie Day School building, the Susan Stein Shiva Theater, the Poughkeepsie Catharine Street Center and Library, and the ALANA Center on the Vassar College campus. He retired from Vassar College in 2001 after thirty-seven years of teaching.

In 1997, Johnson was awarded a special citation from the New York chapter of the AIA for his advocacy on behalf of equal opportunity and housing issues.

Johnson and his wife, Norma Edelin Johnson, have two adult children, Jeh Charles Johnson and Marguerite Marie Johnson.

Jeh Vincent Johnson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 8, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.028

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/8/2019

Last Name

Johnson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Vincent

Occupation
Schools

Columbia University

Pearl-Cohn Entertainment Magnet High School

St. Vincent School

First Name

Jeh

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

JOH56

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Goodness Gracious

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/8/1931

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fresh Fruit

Short Description

Professor and architect Jeh Vincent Johnson (1931 - ) served as a professor of architecture at Vassar College for thirty-nine years and co-founded the National Organization of Minority Architects in 1971.

Employment

Vassar College

LeGendre, Johnson, McNeil Architects

Gindele and Johnson

Adams and Woodbridge, Architects

Paul R. Williams

Favorite Color

Dark Blue

Robert Stepto

Professor Robert Stepto was born October 28, 1945 in Chicago, Illinois to Dr. Robert and Anna Stepto. He attended the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, graduating in 1962. He then attended Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, where he earned his B.A. degree in English in 1966. Stepto went on to attend Stanford University, where he received his M.A. degree in English literature in 1968, and his Ph.D. degree in English and American literature in 1974.

From 1971 to 1974, Stepto was an assistant professor of English and American civilization at Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. He was hired by Yale University in 1974 as an assistant professor of English, American studies, and African American studies. Stepto served as the first director of graduate studies in the African American studies department from 1978 until 1981. In 1984, he became a tenured professor in the English, American studies, and African American studies departments. His focus areas were American and African American autobiography, fiction, poetry and visual arts since 1840. Stepto also began teaching summer classes at Bread Loaf School of English at Middlebury College in Ripton, Vermont in 1990. He released his first book, From Behind the Veil: A Study of Afro-American Narrative in 1979. In 1998, he published his memoir, Blue as the Lake: A Personal Geography. From 2005 to 2008, Stepto chaired the African American studies department at Yale University. He later published a series of essays in 2010 that analyze works ranging from Frederick Douglass to W. E. B. Du Bois and Toni Morrison, which he titled A Home Elsewhere: Reading African American Classics in the Age of Obama. Stepto retired from Yale University after forty-five years.

Over the years, Stepto received numerous awards for his writings, which included: Notable American Essay of 2001 and Pushcart Prize nomination for “Greyhound Kind of Mood,” published by the New England Review; Notable American Essay of 1997 for "Hyde Park," published by Callaloo; Notable American Essay of 1996 for "Black Piano," published by Callaloo; and Notable American Essay of 1995 for "Woodlawn," published by the New England Review. Other awards included the Bread Loaf School of English’s Frank and Eleanor Griffiths Chair Professor of English in 2007 and 2017, as well as its Robert Frost Chair Professor of English in 1995. In 2018, Yale University named Stepto its John M. Schiff Professor of English. Trinity College also presented Stepto with its 175th Anniversary Alumni Award in 1999, and the Alumni Medal for Excellence in 1986.

Stepto resides in Connecticut with his wife, Michele L. Stepto. They had two children: Rafael Stepto and the late Gabriel Stepto.

Robert Stepto was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 24, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.095

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/24/2019

10/25/2019

Last Name

Stepto

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Burns

Occupation
Schools

University of Chicago Laboratory Schools

Trinity College

Stanford University

First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

STE24

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

You Won't Believe This

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Connecticut

Birth Date

10/28/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New Haven

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Corn

Short Description

Professor Robert Stepto (1945- ) served as an English and African American studies professor at Yale University since 1974.

Employment

Yale University

Williams College

Favorite Color

Blue

Sheryll D. Cashin

Professor Sheryll Cashin was born on December 15, 1961 in Huntsville, Alabama to Joan and John L. Cashin, Jr. She received her B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee in 1984, her M.S.c degree in English Law from Oxford University in England in 1986, and her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1989.

In 1989, Cashin served as a law clerk for Judge Abner Mikva for the U.S. Court of Appeal, D.C. Circuit. The following year, she served as a law clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. In 1993, Cashin served as director of community development for The White House during the Clinton administration. As director of community development for the National Economic Council, she oversaw urban policy and community development initiatives and advised on community development in inner-city neighborhoods. She also worked as an advisor on urban and economic policy with a focus on community empowerment programs. As staff director for the Community Empowerment Board in the Office of Vice President Al Gore, Cashin worked on community-based revitalization strategies for urban and rural communities. In 1996, Cashin left public service and joined the faculty at Georgetown University Law Center, where she has taught Constitutional Law, Race and American Law, and other subjects. In 2018 she was installed as the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Civil Rights and Social Justice.

In 2004, Cashin published The Failures of Integration: How Race and Class Are Undermining The American Dream. Then, in 2006, she published The Agitator’s Daughter: A Memoir of Four Generations of One Extraordinary African American Family, which chronicles her family history from slavery to the post-civil rights era. In 2014, she published Place Not Race: A New Version of Opportunity in America; and, in 2017, Cashin published Loving: Interracial Intimacy in America and the Threat to White Supremacy. The following year, her book The Descendants, which focused on the role of segregation in subordinating African Americans, was released. She has also written commentaries for the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Salon, The Root, and other media.

In 2004, her book, The Failures of Integration was an Editors’ Choice in the New York Times Book Review. Cashin is also a three-time nominee for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for non-fiction in 2005, 2009, and 2018. In 2014, her book Place Not Race was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Non-Fiction.

Sheryll Cashin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 21, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.006

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/21/2019

Last Name

Cashin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Denise

Schools

Vanderbilt University

University of Oxford

Harvard Law School

First Name

Sheryll

Birth City, State, Country

Huntsville

HM ID

CAS04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Morocco

Favorite Quote

Power Concedes Nothing Without A Demand, Never Did Never Will

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/15/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Cuban

Short Description

Lawyer and professor Sheryll Cashin (1962 - ) served as the White House’s director of community development during the first Clinton administration before publishing several books and becoming a professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center.

Employment

U.S. Court of Appeals

U.S. Supreme Court

The White House

National Economic Council

Office of the Vice President of the United States

Georgetown University Law Center

Favorite Color

Aqua

Paula Giddings

Professor Paula Giddings was born on November 16, 1947 in Yonkers, New York to Virginia Iola Stokes and Curtis Gulliver Giddings. She received her B.A. degree in English from Howard University in Washington, D.C. in 1969, where she served as editor of the university’s literary magazine, The Promethean.

In 1969, Giddings worked as an editorial assistant for Random House and later as a copy editor until 1972. She then became an associate book editor for the Howard University Press. Giddings then moved to Paris, France in 1975 where she served as the Paris bureau chief for Encore America/Worldwide News. In 1977, she was transferred to the New York office and served as an associate editor until 1979. Giddings published her first book, When and Where I Enter: The Impact of Black Women on Race and Sex in America, in 1984. The following year, she served as a contributing editor and book review editor for Essence magazine. She then became a distinguished United Negro College Fund (UNCF) scholar at Spelman College. In 1988, she published In Search of Sisterhood, and subsequently joined the faculty of Douglass College at Rutgers University where she held the the Blanche, Edith, and Irving Laurie Chair in Women's Studies from 1989 to 1991. Giddings also served as a visiting professor at Princeton University and Duke University. In 2001, Giddings joined Smith College as the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor of Africana Studies. She also served as the editor of Meridians, feminism, race, transnationalism a peer-reviewed feminist, interdisciplinary journal. She then became Smith College department chair and honors thesis advisor for the department of Africana studies. In 2002, she edited Burning All Illusions: Writings from The Nation on Race 1866-2002; and, in 2008, she published Ida, A Sword Among Lions: Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching. Giddings retired from Smith College in 2017.

Giddings has also written extensively on international and national issues and has been published by the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jeune Afrique (Paris), The Nation, and Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, among other publications.

In 1982, she received a Ford Foundation Grant; and, in 1985, Giddings was the recipient of the Candace Award from the National Coalition of 100 Black Women. That same year, she received the Alumni Award from Howard University; and, the following year, Giddings won the Westchester Black Women’s Political Caucus Award and the Building Brick Award from the New York Urban League. In 1990, she received the Anna Julia Cooper Award from Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, and an honorary doctorate degree in humane letters from Bennett College. In 2008, her book Ida, A Sword Among Lions won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Biography and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award.

Paula Giddings was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 8, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.226

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/8/2018

Last Name

Giddings

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Paula

Birth City, State, Country

Yonkers

HM ID

PAU01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/16/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Breakfast

Short Description

Professor Paula Giddings (1947- ) served as the Elizabeth A. Woodson 1922 Professor Emerita of Africana Studies at Smith College and authored When and Where I Enter, In Search of Sisterhood, and Ida: A Sword Among Lions.

Favorite Color

Blue

Willie L. Hill, Jr.

Professor and musician Willie L. Hill, Jr. was born on July 29, 1946 in Mobile, Alabama to Rennetta and Willie Hill, Sr. After graduating from Williamson High School in Mobile, Alabama, Hill received his B.S. degree in music education from Grambling State College in Grambling, Louisiana in 1968. He went on to receive both his M.M. Ph.D. degrees in music education from the University of Colorado, Boulder in 1972 and 1987.

In 1968, Hill began teaching instrumental music in the Denver Public Schools, where he remained for sixteen years and was an instrumental music supervisor for four years. In 1984, Hill was a member of The Colorado Clarinet Choir touring organization, which represented the United States in London, England at the International Clarinet Symposium. He then joined the faculty at the University of Colorado, Boulder College of Music, where he served as assistant dean and professor of music from 1988 to 1999. During that period, he also served as the director of education for the Thelonious Monk Institute in Los Angeles, California. In 1999, Hill was named professor of music education and director of the Fine Arts Center at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. As a woodwind specialist, he was also a faculty member of the Clark Terry Great Plains Jazz Camp. He founded and served as co-director of the Rich Matteson-Telluride Jazz Academy, and later founded the Mile High Jazz Camp in Boulder, Colorado. He also worked as musical director at The Schwayder and Bonfils Theaters. Hill was a member of the Denver Broncos Jazz Ensemble and a regular performer at the Denver Auditorium Theater, Paramount Theater, and Boettcher Concert Hall. Hill performed with George Burns, Liza Minnelli, Lena Horne, Lou Rawls, Ben Vereen, Lola Falana, Johnny Mathis, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dizzy Gillespie, James Moody, Jon Faddis, and many others.

Hill served as president of The National Association for Music Education (MENC) and the International Association for Jazz Education (IAJE). He was also a member of the writing team for MENC's Vision 2020 program and a member of the national board of directors for Young Audiences, Inc. Hill later served as president of the Colorado Music Educators Association and Pi Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society.

In 1998, he was inducted into the Colorado Music Educators Hall of Fame. In 2001, Hill was the recipient of the Lawrence Berk Leadership Award presented by the IAJE. Hill co-authored Learning to Sight-Read Jazz, Rock, Latin, and Classical Styles, and was the author of The Instrumental History of Jazz, Approaching the Standards, and Jazz Pedagogy: The Jazz Educator's Handbook and Resource Guide. Hill is listed in the first edition of Who's Who among Black Americans, Who's Who among International Musicians and was a 2003 Lowell Mason Fellow.

Willie L. Hill, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 5, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.221

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/5/2018

Last Name

Hill

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Willie

Birth City, State, Country

Mobile

HM ID

HIL19

Favorite Season

October

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Carribean

Favorite Quote

Never Put Off for Tomorrow What You Can Do Today

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

7/29/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Northampton

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Fish

Short Description

Professor and musician Willie L. Hill, Jr. (1946- ) served as assistant dean and professor of music at the University of Colorado, Boulder and was named professor in music education and director of the Fine Arts Center at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Favorite Color

Purple

William Banfield

Professor and composer William Banfield was born on March 24, 1961 in Detroit, Michigan to William Banfield and Anne Banfield. He attended Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan and graduated in 1979. Banfield enrolled at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Massachusetts and graduated with his B.M. degree in jazz studies in 1983. He later received his Th.M. degree from Boston University in 1988, and his D.M.A. degree from the University of Michigan in 1992.

Banfield accepted his first teaching position at Madison Park High School in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1983, he resigned from his position and founded BMagic Records. Two years later, Banfield founded Young Artists Development, Inc. After he received his D.M.A. degree in 1992, Banfield served as assistant professor of African American Studies/Music at Indiana University. In 1997, Banfield served as the endowed chair of humanities, professor of music, director of American cultural studies/jazz, popular, world music studies at the University of St. Thomas, Minnesota. He then became the W.E.B. DuBois fellow at Harvard University in 2002. The following year, Banfield was the visiting Atelier artist at Princeton University; and, in 2005, he was hired as a visiting professor of composition at the University of Minnesota. Banfield subsequently accepted an appointment at the Berklee College of Music as a professor and director of the Africana Studies program. In 2010, he was hired by Quincy Jones’ foundation called the QFoundation, to write a national music curriculum for American popular music.

Banfield has also released a number of albums which include Extensions of the Tradition in 1996, Striking Balance in 2004, Spring Forward in 2009, and Playing with Other People’s Heads in 2014. He was also the host of National Public Radio’s “Landscapes in Color: Conversations with Black American Composers” and an original program on WCAL at St. Olaf College entitled, “Essays of Note.” Banfield has authored seven books, completed six symphonies and two operas. In 2014, Banfield launched JazzUrbane, a contemporary jazz recording label. He has also served on the Pulitzer Prize composition panel.

William Banfield was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 17, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.218

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/17/2018

Last Name

Banfield

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

BAN06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

It Don't Mean A Thing, If It Ain't Got That Swing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

3/24/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Professor and composer William Banfield (1961- ) was made director of Africana Studies at the Berklee College of Music in 2006, and has released several albums as a recording artist, wrote six symphonies and two operas, and published seven books.

Favorite Color

Blue

Steven Rogers

Professor Steven Rogers was born on June 14, 1957 in Chicago, Illinois to J.P. Rogers and Ollie Mae Rogers. He was accepted into A Better Change program and attended Radnor High School in Radnor, Pennsylvania, graduating in 1975. He went on to receive his B.A. degree from Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts in 1979, and his M.B.A. degree from Harvard Business School in 1985.

After graduation from Williams College, Rogers worked at Cummins Engine Company and later moved to Rocky Mount, North Carolina to work for Consolidated Diesel in 1981. He went to work for Bain and Company; and, in 1989, Rogers and his wife Michele Rogers purchased their first company, Fenchel Lampshade Company in Chicago, Illinois. In the following years, the couple purchased another lampshade company and a retail store. In 1995, Rogers sold his ventures and joined the faculty at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. During his tenure, Rogers became the director of the Larry and Carol Levy Institute for Entrepreneurial Practice. After seventeen years at the Kellogg School of Management, Rogers joined the faculty at Harvard Business School in 2012. The following year, Rogers became the faculty director for the Inner City Initiative for Competition. In 2016, he was a volunteer visiting professor at the United States Military Academy for the Army at West Point. Rogers also served as strategic advisor at OCA Ventures.

Rogers joined the board of directors of SuperValu, Inc. as director in 1998. He also joined the board at S.C. Johnson & Wax and Oakmark Mutual Funds. Rogers was named one of the top twelve entrepreneurship professors at graduate business schools in the U.S. by BusinessWeek in 1996. The following year, he was named one of the fourteen “New Stars of Finance” by BusinessWeek. In 1998, he was selected as Entrepreneur of The Year by Ernst & Young and received the Bicentennial Medal for Distinguished Achievement from Williams College in 2000. In 2005, Rogers received the Bert King Award for Service from the African American Student Union at Harvard Business School. Rogers was also named one of the top 150 influential people in America by Ebony Magazine. Rogers was also the most decorated professor in the Kellogg School of Management’s history and received the Outstanding Professor Award for the Executive Program 26 times and the M.B.A. Lawrence Levengood Outstanding Professor of the Year award twice.

Rogers has two daughters: Akilah and Ariel.

Steven Rogers was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 16, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.212

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/14/2018

Last Name

Rogers

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Steven

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

ROG10

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas

Favorite Quote

Pigs get fat and hogs get slaughtered.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

6/14/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Grits

Short Description

Professor Steven Rogers (1959 - ) taught at the Kellogg School of Management for seventeen years and at Harvard Business School for seven years.

Favorite Color

Brown