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Margaret Jordan

Healthcare executive Margaret H. Jordan was born on January 1, 1943 in Washington, D.C. to Ellen Hayes and Jerome Frederick Hayes. She attended Stevens Elementary School and Immaculate Conception Academy. In 1964, Jordan became Georgetown University’s first African American nursing school graduate upon receiving her B.S. degree in nursing. She went on to receive her M.P.H degree in public health from the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health in 1972.

In 1964, Jordan served as a nurse at the Community Hospital of San Bernardino. In 1971, she joined the U.S. Public Health Service, in San Francisco serving as branch chief and later as deputy director of the division of resources development. From 1979 to 1981, Jordan served as an associate director at San Francisco General Hospital, before joining Kaiser Foundation Plan, Oakland, CA as licensing and accreditation coordinator. In 1986, she was promoted to vice president and regional manager of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Texas. She was recruited by Southern California Edison in 1992, to serve as vice president of health care and occupational services. In 1995, Jordan joined Dallas Medical Resource as president and chief executive officer serving intermittently until 2020. She served as president and chief executive officer of Margaret Jordan Group LLC from 1997 to 2003, and executive vice president of corporate affairs of Texas Health Resources from 2000 to 2006.

Jordan is a founding director of the National Black Nurses Association in 1971. She serves on the boards of the AT&T Performing Arts Center, and James Madison’s Montpelier Foundation. Jordan is a former director of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, the American Public Health Association, the American Hospital Association, the Public Health Institute, the Dallas Museum of Art and several public companies.

In 1991, Jordan was named one of Black Enterprise’s 21 Women of Power and Influence in Corporate America. She received the Community Service Award from the Dallas Historical Society in 2012, and the Distinguished Health Service Award from Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council in 2016. Jordan also received the Dallas County Medical Society’s Robert Heath Award, the Alumni of the Year Award from the University of California, School of Public Berkeley and the Distinguished Alumnus Georgetown University, School of Nursing. In 2019, she was named one of University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health’s seventy-five most influential public health alumni in its seventy-five-year history.

Margaret Jordan was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 20, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.083

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/20/2019

Last Name

Jordan

Maker Category
Schools

Stevens Elementary School

Immaculate Conception Academy

Georgetown University

University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health

First Name

Margaret

HM ID

JOR08

Favorite Season

Christmas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Oak Bluffs, Massachusetts

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Speakers Bureau Region City

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Food

Okra

Short Description

Healthcare executive Margaret Jordan (1943- ) served as vice president and regional manager of the Dallas-Fort Worth region of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Texas before joining Dallas Medical Resource as president and chief executive officer.

Employment

Community Hospital of San Bernardino

U.S. Public Health Service

Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center

Kaiser Foundation Plan, Inc.

Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Texas

Southern California Edison

Dallas Medical Resource

Margaret Jordan Group LLC

Texas Health Resources

Favorite Color

Red

The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson

U.S. Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson was born on December 3, 1935 to Lee Edward Johnson and Lillie Mae White Johnson in Waco, Texas. She and her three siblings grew up attending Toliver Chapel Baptist Church, where her mother was an active church member. After attending A.J. Moore High School, Johnson graduated at the age of sixteen and moved to Indiana to attend Saint Mary’s College of Notre Dame, where she graduated in 1955 with her nursing certificate.

Johnson then began work as a psychiatric nurse at La Rue Carter Psychiatric Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana until she passed the boards. Then Congresswoman Johnson returned to Texas and started working at the Dallas Veterans Administration Hospital in 1956. While still employed at the hospital, Johnson earned her B.S. degree in nursing in 1967 from the Harris School for Nursing at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas. That same year, she was promoted to chief psychiatric nurse. She left the hospital in 1972 to run for public office in the Texas House of Representatives. There, she made a name for herself fighting for minority and women’s’ issues. In 1976, Johnson earned her M.P.A. degree from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, and in 1977, President Jimmy Carter appointed her as the principal official of Region VI for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (H.E.W.). She remained with the H.E.W. until 1981, when she left public office to found her own business, a real estate company. In 1986, Johnson was elected to public office once again, but this time to the Texas Senate, where she worked tirelessly to improve health care and to end racial discrimination. In 1992, Johnson ran for the U.S. House of Representatives and was elected.

As a U.S. Congresswoman, Johnson has led the battle on legislation to improve health care, the environment, civil rights, women’s issues, science research and education. She is a member of the Committee of Science and Technology and the Committee of Transportation and Infrastructure. In 2001, Johnson served as Chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus. In 1993 and 1994, she was named by Ebony magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential African Americans and in 2001, the magazine named her one of the 10 Most Powerful African American Women.

Johnson has one son, Dawrence Kirk Johnson, and three grandsons.

Eddie Bernice Johnson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 7, 2012

Accession Number

A2012.094

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/7/2012 |and| 6/18/2012 |and| 6/26/2012

Last Name

Johnson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Bernice

Occupation
Schools

Southern Methodist University

Texas Christian University

Saint Mary's College

East Waco Elementary School

A.J. Moore Academy

First Name

Eddie

Birth City, State, Country

Waco

HM ID

JOH39

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Hey! Gotcha!

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/3/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salad

Short Description

U.S. congresswoman The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson (1935 - ) serves in U.S. House of Representatives, where she has been a leading voice on issues of civil rights, health care and science education.

Employment

United States House of Representatives

Texas House of Representatives

Eddie Bernice Johnson and Associates

Texas Department of Health, Education and Welfare

Favorite Color

Pink

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her mother's ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers her community in Waco, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers East Waco Elementary School in Waco, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her interest in geometry

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers her paternal grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her paternal grandmother's racial identity

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes the black business district in Waco, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls the tornado that destroyed the black business district in Waco, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her schooling

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her home life

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the demographics of Waco, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her aspiration to become a nurse

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers her admission to Saint Mary's College in Notre Dame, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her arrival at Saint Mary's College in Notre Dame, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her experiences at Saint Mary's College in Notre Dame, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about segregation in Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers moving to Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls becoming the first black nurse at the Dallas VA Hospital

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about politics in the State of Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her start as a civil rights organizer

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the segregated department stores in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the aftermath of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy's assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the black female civil rights leaders in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls the integration of Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers Barbara Jordan, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes the response to the Civil Rights Act in the South

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers her civic work at the Dallas VA Hospital

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers Barbara Jordan, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about Barbara Jordan's reputation in Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers Mickey Leland

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers her complaint against Robert S. Calvert

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her decision to run for public office, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her decision to run for public office, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers working at Neiman Marcus

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers her election to the Texas House of Representatives

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her work in the Texas House of Representatives

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the School Breakfast Program

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the renewal of the Voting Rights Act

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her experiences in the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson reflects upon President Jimmy Carter's administration

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her election to the Texas Senate

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her experiences of racial and gender discrimination

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the confirmation of Judge Craig T. Enoch

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the AIDS crisis

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the impact of AIDS in the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about minority representation on the Texas Board of Regents

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls implementing single member districts in Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the political changes in Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers her election to the U.S. House of Representatives

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her first term in the U.S. Congress

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the Republican Revolution in the U.S. Congress

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the attacks on the Congressional Black Caucus

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the importance of minority congressional caucuses

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her legislative mentors

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls working on President Bill Clinton's healthcare plan

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the midterm elections of 1994

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her experiences as a Democrat in a Republican majority Congress, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her experiences as a Democrat in a Republican majority Congress, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls the Women's Health Equity Act

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the opposition to President Barack Obama

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls becoming a senior member of her congressional committees

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the NAFTA superhighway

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson shares her perspective on the impeachment of President Bill Clinton

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson reflects upon the Clinton administration

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about healthcare legislation

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers working with President George Walker Bush

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about President George Walker Bush's policy initiatives

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the Trinity River project

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about President George Walker Bush's trade policy

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the decision to invade Iraq

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about A World of Women for World Peace

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the Texas Eleven

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the Iraq War

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the criticism of the Bush administration

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her position on the Iraq War

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her policy on climate change

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson reflects upon No Child Left Behind

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers Hurricane Katrina

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about running for reelection

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls the Renewable Fuels, Consumer Protection and Energy Efficiency Act

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about corporate influence on public policy

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the U.S. military

Tape: 11 Story: 9 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the presidential candidates in 2008

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her support for John Edwards' presidential bid in 2008

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her support for President Barack Obama

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers her role in the Barack Obama's presidential campaign

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson remembers the night of President Barack Obama's election

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about President Barack Obama and the Congressional Black Caucus

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson reflects upon President Barack Obama's first term

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about the Obama family

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson reflects on her legacy as a U.S. Representative

Tape: 12 Story: 9 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 12 Story: 10 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her home state of Texas

Tape: 12 Story: 11 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson reflects upon her career

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about her family

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson describes her philosophy and how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$10

DAStory

8$5

DATitle
The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson recalls her start as a civil rights organizer
The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson talks about A World of Women for World Peace
Transcript
But you all had a--kind of a different Democratic leader in Texas, Lyndon Johnson [President Lyndon Baines Johnson], right? Who was a little bit different. Is that the--$$Yeah, um--$$Is that true? Or--$$Well I, I got a chance to know Lyndon Johnson on a personal basis. His family was very, very supportive of me. And I'm still very close to his daughters [Lynda Bird Johnson Robb and Luci Baines Johnson]. I was close to Mrs. Johnson [Lady Bird Johnson] as well. As a matter of fact, I had just seen him the day he had that heart attack.$$Well, I want to go back to when you were, back in the '60s [1960s], you know, just before you--$$The '60s [1960s]?$$Yeah. Nineteen sixty [1960]. So you, did you, were you aware of them then? I mean as a politician?$$Yes. I became aware of Lyndon Johnson. I worked as a volunteer in his campaign, but I was also working for the government. So I wouldn't do too much partisan stuff. But I was still active with school board elections and (unclear) elections. I was always involved, civically, but during the days of desegregation. What they call open accommodations. I always volunteer-- I was always the youngest one of my peers, and my bridge club members used to tease me. But I always felt an obligation to do volunteer work. So during the time we were going through desegregation, I worked on a committee that was made up of the YWCA [Young Women's Christian Association], National Council of Jewish Women, National Council of Christian Women [sic.], kind of the leaders of the heads of different organizations. And we would dialogue around the city on how to approach open accommodations. And I remember one night, we were in a meeting, and sometimes I started the meeting. The police would stop wanting to know why I'm in their neighborhood. But the three people that were killed in Mississippi were found one night that we, while we were in the meeting. It came over the news that they had been found murdered.$$This is 1964 you're talking about?$$I think.$$Goodman [Andrew Goodman], Schwerner [Michael Schwerner], and Chaney [James Chaney]?$$Yeah.$$Sixty-four [1964], yeah.$$And, and we stopped and held hands and did a little prayer and everything. But we, we began to try to open and study the venue. But we, as we would go and visit these restaurant owners and everything, you know, everybody was saying that they were open. But what we would discover, we discovered once that in one restaurant, they had one menu for whites, and one for blacks. And the menu for blacks had ten dollars added to every, every price. And it was that kind of thing that we would try to work out. Well, frankly, the first downtown store that opened was Neiman Marcus. And it was the most exclusive store downtown Dallas [Texas]. As a matter of fact, later it was Marcus' that provided me the opportunity to run for office. But during that time, most of our major stores, Dallas has always been a city with a lot of money. Most of those downtown stores were family owned. Vogue [ph.], Sangers [Sanger Brothers; Sanger-Harris], Titche [Titche-Goettinger], A. Harris [A. Harris and Company; Sanger-Harris], very exclusive stores. And we just didn't seem to be able to get a solid commitment. So I went, I along with several other women, well we were active in the YWCA and membership drives and all. We organized a fifty sensitive black women, and we decided that we would test these stores to see if they were open. When they were not open, we sent the word out that we were boycotting.$Now tell us about--now that same year that 9/11 [September 11, 2001] took place, you began an initiative called A World of Women for World Peace.$$Yes.$$Tell us about that.$$Well, it was somewhat related. That encouraged it. I had been to Bosnia, and that was the first time that I'd experienced what a war torn country would be like, and it really troubled me. And then we had 9/11, which was even more troubling. About two weeks after 9/11, I picked up a magazine that had on the cover these two African kids dressed in war garb with machine guns in their hands. And I just thought to myself, this has just gone too far. And it stayed with me. And, and I was trying to figure out what I could do to see if we could help with a culture of peace in the world. And it just came to me to start working with women and mothers. Because I remember Another Mother for Peace, way back in my early career, that there were a group of peace oriented women started, I was working with in Texas. And I thought of that, and I hadn't heard of them, and I started to ask questions about what groups were involved in trying to bring about peace. And so my idea, I thought it was just too big for me to try to tackle, but then I thought about the fact that to achieve anything, it takes little pieces and steps at a time. So I thought about trying to establish a group that would work toward developing a culture of peace in the world. And that was the beginning. The name came to me as I woke up one morning, A World of Women for World Peace. And researching, I found that Mother's Day came out of the, a little bit of Mothers for Peace [sic.] after the Civil War. They didn't want to see all their sons get killed again in war. And so I had to put an infrastructure together that would help to direct steps at a time. And that's when I decided to do some educating here and to start to do some educating around the world. Bosnia was a, one of the first countries, 'cause that was the first time I had seen real war torn when I went there in the '90s [1990s], and I still work with Bosnia. When I saw the strong feelings that mothers, primarily women had a town hall meeting with them there. How strongly they felt about everything being torn up around them, what have you. And so I wanted to keep touch with them. I started to have dialogues here on the Hill [Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C.]. I was in touch with the peace center there in Dallas [Texas] who told me about the peace program at Harvard [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts]. That a Dallasite was running, Swanee Hunt. So I went in and visited with Swanee. We continued to stay in touch with each other. She's been very supportive of me and I've been very supportive of her program. So I wanted to join hands with every peace group and in the world that I could make contact with. I contacted the UN [United Nations], started working with the UN. They had a curriculum that had been developed in The Hague [the Netherlands] that taught techniques. They would be integrated into schools that would teach young children growing up. Conciliation and, and attempting to dialogue and understand respecting differences rather than going to fight for every different thing that came up. So that's how we initially got started.$$Okay.$$And the way I have continued it is I visit other countries, I make the requests before we leave here to, through the embassies to meet with the leading women in the various countries to talk about what the crux of peace might be and what leadership from women would impact. And so I admit with people all over the world, I've used Voice of America, I've used Radio Free Europe [Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty] and dialogue back and forth interactively as well as visiting.$$Okay, and it's still, it's--this program's still going on over there today (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yes.