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Camellia Moses Okpodu

Research director and STEM educator Camellia Moses Okpodu was born on January 24, 1964 in Portsmouth, Virginia. Okpodu was the fourth of five children born to Frank Moses, a retired U.S. Navy veteran, and Luerevia Fullwood Moses. She graduated from West Brunswick High School in 1982, and then enrolled at North Carolina State University where she received her B.S. degree in biochemistry in 1987, and her Ph.D. degree in plant physiology and biochemistry in 1994. Upon graduation, Okpodu was awarded a postdoctoral research fellowship in plant molecular biology at the Virginia Institute of Technology. She also received certificates in Documentation and Record Keeping from the BioPharma Institute Program, in Forensic DNA Databases and Courtroom Consideration from the National Institute of Justice via the Forensics Training Network, and in Hazardous Communication from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

In 1996, Okpodu joined the faculty at Hampton University as an assistant professor in the department of biology. While there, she served as program director and principal investigator for Project O.A.K. from 1992 to 2002, and as chair of the department of biology from 1999 to 2000. In 2002, Okpodu left Hampton and joined the faculty at Elizabeth City State University where she was appointed to an endowed professorship and served for one year as the chair of the biology department. She then moved to Norfolk State University in 2003 where she was named professor and chair of the biology department. She also served as the director of the National Institutes of Health Extramural Research Office, director of the Intelligence Community Center of Academic Excellence, and as director of the Group for Microgravity and Environmental Biology (formerly, the Center of Microgravity and Environmental Biology).

Okpodu is a member of the Sigma Xi, Beta Kappa Chi, and the American Society of Plant Biology. Okpodu served as a reviewer for the Journal of Applied Phycology, and has published her research in the Journal of Plant Physiology and the Journal of Plant Science. Her academic and professional awards include the Gordon Research Conference Travel Award, the Intelligence Community Faculty Scholar Award, and both the Award of Recognition and the Special Recognition of Merit Award from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. In addition, she served as a National Institutes of Health Genome Fellow in 2006, an Extramural Research Associate Fellow in 2006, and as an American Council on Education Fellow in 2007.

Camellia Moses Okpodu was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 20, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.151

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/20/2013

Last Name

Okpodu

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Moses

Schools

North Carolina State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Camellia

Birth City, State, Country

Portsmouth

HM ID

OKP01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Holden Beach, North Carolina

Favorite Quote

I don't need nobody to get me nothin'. Just open the door and I'll get it myself. - James Brown

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

1/2/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hampton

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Asparagus

Short Description

Molecular biologist and plant biochemist Camellia Moses Okpodu (1964 - ) former chair of the Norfolk State University Biology Department, was the first Marshall Rauch Distinguished Professor at Elizabeth City University and the second director of the Norfolk State University’s Intelligence Community Center of Academic Excellence.

Employment

Norfolk State University

Elizabeth City State University

Hampton University

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Camellia Okpodu's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Camellia Okpodu lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Camellia Okpodu describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Camellia Okpodu describes her research on the Emancipation Oak pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Camellia Okpodu describes her research on the Emancipation Oak pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her mother's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Camellia Okpodu describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Camellia Okpodu describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Camellia Okpodu describes being raised by her uncle and aunt

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Camellia Okpodu describes the leaf collection that she submitted for a 4-H competition

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Camellia Okpodu describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Camellia Okpodu talks about Wilmington, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Camellia Okpodu talks about grade school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her extracurricular activities in school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her uncle Legrand incorporating North Myrtle Beach

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Camellia Okpodu describes her decision to attend North Carolina State University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Camellia Okpodu describes becoming Miss Brunswick County

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Camellia Okpodu describes her time at North Carolina State University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Camellia Okpodu describes why she became interested in biochemistry

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Camellia Okpodu talks about sports at North Carolina State University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Camellia Okpodu describes her time in graduate school at North Carolina State University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Camellia Okpodu talks about Arlene Maclin, Esther Terry, and Roseanne Runte

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Camellia Okpodu describes her doctoral dissertation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her doing her postdoctoral work at Virginia Polytechnic and State University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Camellia Okpodu describes her time as professor at Hampton University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Camellia Okpodu describes her projects at Hampton University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her books

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Camellia Okpodu talks about Dr. Douglas Depriest

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Camellia Okpodu describes her transition from Hampton University to Norfolk State University

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Camellia Okpodu describes her time as chair of a department at Norfolk State University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Camellia Okpodu talks about photosynthesis

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her work with undergraduate research pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her work with undergraduate research pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Camellia Okpodu describes her time as the director of the Office of Extramural Research

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Camellia Okpodu talks about genetically modified food

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Camellia Okpodu talks about the Dozoretz National Institute for Mathematics and Applied Sciences

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Camellia Okpodu talks about the Mid-Atlantic Consortium-Center for Academic Excellence

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Camellia Okpodu reflects on her career

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her concerns for parents and the next generation

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Camellia Okpodu reflects on her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Camellia Okpodu talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Camellia Okpodu talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Camellia Okpodu describes her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

5$6

DATitle
Camellia Okpodu describes her projects at Hampton University
Camellia Okpodu describes her time as the director of the Office of Extramural Research
Transcript
You're writing proposals there at Hampton [University, Hampton, Virginia]--$$Yes.$$--and for--what were some of the projects you were trying to fund?$$Well, I wrote a proposal to NASA [National Aeronautics and Space Administration] to fund my research in the microgravity research that I was doing, I wrote a proposal for my, National Science Foundation [NSF] for a Research Experience for Undergraduates [REU], I wrote one to NIH [National Institute of Health] as part of the MARC [Minority Access to Research Careers] proposal which was part of a larger group of proposals that we all wrote which we considered AREA Grant [National Institute of Health's Academic Research Enhancement Award], I participated in the writing of an ANPS, Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority in Science, so I was actively involved in a number of those proposals.$$Okay. Tell us a little bit about microgravity, now that's just something that NASA is interested in, right?$$Yeah.$$(Unclear) What happens to plants in low gravity situations, right$$Right, well I'm no longer doing that research but one of the things we know that plants have responsive genes that turn on a response to changes in gravitational pull, so right now you can take a--you've probably done this. You grow a plant, if you look at the plant on the side, you know--if you've probably seen this, and then plant will grow towards--grow up, so how does a plant know that's up? So we looked for genes that we could disrupt because those are gravity sensing genes, and we looked for that and that's what I was trying to do at Hampton. I designed something I called The Modular Plant, Plant Module PM--MPM; I never got to drop it in the drop tower, and what we were trying to do was look at those early events of development. What I had found over the years with the inositol enzymes is that those enzymes got turned on very early in, in development. So anytime you're sensing the change, they return normal within--actually within seconds, which--at the time when we were telling people this, they didn't believe it to be true, and then Dr. Bolson, along with others, have shown that this is really--a change in the transcript level occurs very quickly. So I--my question is what happens very early in microgravity? And so I had developed a way to study this; unfortunately, I never got a chance to do it, I left Hampton, went to Elizabeth City State [University, Elizabeth City, North California], by the time I got the thing in place--my contract moved to Elizabeth City State, I--the person I was working with at NASA retired or left, and so I was never able to fulfill that research but I did design the module and my understanding is that it works, so I did do that, and that's one of the things that was very successful.$$Tell us a little bit more about this module. I had a note about it here but what was it (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--I designed it in such a way that as it dropped through the tower, that you could actually slowly or quickly freeze the material so by the time it got to the end of the tower which was a thirty second drop, that you could take lapse times, so I had it designed where you could--it would kill plants after one second, it would kill some of the--it'll freeze other plants after five seconds, and so forth and so on. So you could do what we call a dose response. So you could look at--isolate the tissue and see what happened early on the first second of dropping and see what we call subtractive DNA analysis to see if there was any genes turned on or off as a result, as you would do the gravitational but I never got a chance to do it. So the thing is created, we showed it work, I never got to do the experiments.$$Did you ever get a chance to see the results of how it worked?$$Yeah, I got to do it, I just never got to do the experiments.$$Okay, all right.$$It worked. We designed it and it worked, we built it but I never got to--'cause the person I was working with got changed to a different mission and then NASA Glenn [Center for Research, Cleveland, Ohio] was not doing the drop tower research anymore.$$Okay. Now what was Project Oak at Hampton?$$That was the REU (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--That was the--$$(Simultaneous)--That was the Research Experience for Undergraduates.$$Okay.$$I named it Project Oak, Opportunity Alliance Network, after the fact that I was bringing students in--college students from all over the country, to come to an HBCU, spend eight weeks with us and do research centered around the Emancipation Oak that's a live--living laboratory. So we did pathology, we isolated whatever pathogen was from the leaves. We did micro-- molecular biology where did the isolation of DNA from both prepared and herbarium stored samples and we did some biochemistry in analyzing the different types of iso-enzymes that were seen in the leaves in response to different stresses. So it was just simply using the Emancipation Oak as the foundational research project for our--what we were doing.$In 2007, you were director of the NIH [National Institute of Health] Extramural Research Office [sic, Office of Extramural Research, OER] here. What did that entail?$$So when I became a department chair, I realized that part of the problem was--I did a survey and people weren't writing proposals, and it's because I learned about Vroom's expectancy theory. You're like, "What, you're a biochemist, what do you know about all this sociology work?" So Vroom's idea is to change an organization there's some intrinsic things that people come with that you're not gonna be able to do, you know? If I'm a runner, I'm wired to be a runner and--but there are some things that you can manage that's an expectation. So most of us are intrinsically motivated but we have an expectation that you would provide me the tools by which I can have--affect my own change, and so if you want to change organizational culture or outlooks, one of the things you can do is manage expectations by providing students--people with the proper tools. So what I, what I found--my idea was--this was hypothesis-driven research that I did was trying to figure out how to get people to write proposals and most people would wanna write. I mean most people wanna write but they felt like, "You didn't give us the infrastructure or the tools." And so I developed a training program when I would train people to write proposals and then I would actually work with them and actually draft the proposals. And so one of the ones that we had the most success with is this Mid-Atlantic Consortium that we had between Morgan State [University, Baltimore, Maryland] and Norfolk State [University, Norfolk, University] and that we brought a group of people together and we sat down through the OER office and we wrote a proposal together. And then we crafted that proposal such that when we submitted it for final submission, it was one of the--it was the top proposal. We were told by the agency our proposal ranked number one out of the forty-one applications that they got. And it was because of the approach we decided. I didn't have a work shop just to be having a work shop. I had a work shop with tangible outcomes that when they left, they actually had something that they could submit. They had to massage it a little bit more, and I helped them in the process. But--so that was what the OER office did. We were a research development office. And I did that up until last year where I found that it was just a little bit too much--too difficult. In managing that, I micromanaged a lot. I don't do well in micromanaging. I figure that you tell me what it is you do and I can manage my own expectations, so that was--I just decided that I couldn't be effective at doing it so I'm no longer doing that. I still help people. The other day, somebody called me and said "Can you help me write this proposal?" I helped 'em write it because in the end run, the long run, you want people to be able to get tenure. The other thing I saw is that a lot of the young women, I thought, were not getting tenure. I don't know the reason why they were leaving, but I know part of it was they weren't getting it because they didn't have funded projects. And so I opened up the competition for anyone who wanted to apply. I helped-- helped anyone, but a lot of the young women I guess came because they saw me, and I guess for some reason I was--that translated to them. I helped anyone who wanted to be helped however, but a number of them were successful in getting funded projects and were able to get tenure, and I think it was directly related to that early grant; because if they hadn't been there, the process--even though we have an officer-sponsored program, it's not an easy process to get through. So I kinda helped them get through the process and get a final project that they could submit. Yep.

William Walden

Molecular biologist and biology professor William Walden was born in 1954 in Washington, D.C. to George Ray Walden and Erma Lucille Walden. After graduating from Suitland High School in 1972, he received his B.S. degree in biology from Morgan State University in 1976. During college, Walden worked as a research assistant for the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Baltimore Cancer Research Program. Walden went on to earn his Ph.D. degree in molecular biology from Washington University in St. Louis in 1983. His final dissertation was entitled," mRNA Competition in vivo."

In 1987, Walden started his over twenty-year career at the University of Illinois at Chicago as an assistant professor in the College of Medicine's Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He was a recipient of the Schweppe Foundation Career Development award from 1988 to 1991. In 1992, Walden was promoted to associate professor and associate department head of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He began working with the Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) in 1994, where he chaired the steering committee. Since 2004, Walden has held the position of full professor. In 2006 and 2007, he served as co-chair of the Campus Promotion and Tenure Committee. Walden was a fellow of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation-Academic Leadership Program from 2006 to 2007, which mentors administrators for higher leadership opportunities. Since 2006, he has served as director of the Office of Graduate Diversity Programs, which works to increase the number of underrepresented students who successfully earn a Ph.D. degree in the College of Medicine. In 2007, Walden became the Special Assistant to the Provost for Diversity. His research focuses on cellular iron regulation and iron-related gene expression in eukaryotes. Walden has published numerous scientific research articles including his 2006 paper, "Structure of Dual Function Iron Regulatory Protein 1 Complexed with Ferritin IRE-RNA," which was published in the journal, Science .

In addition to his research, Walden has mentored many graduate researchers, and has served on NIH grant review panels and as a peer reviewer for top scientific journals including, Science, EMBO Journal, Blood, and Journal of Biological Chemistry . William Walden lives in Oak Park, Illinois and has two adult children, William A. Walden and Michael D. Walden.

William Walden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 21, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.004

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/20/2012

Last Name

Walden

Marital Status

Married

Schools

Morgan State University

Washington University in St Louis

Brooks Road Elementary

Suitland High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

WAL16

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

10/13/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Interesting Food

Short Description

Biology professor and molecular biologist William Walden (1954 - ) has been a leader in the area of cellular iron regulation and iron-related gene expression in eukaryotes. He has served as a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago since 1987.

Employment

University of Illinois, Chicago

Washington University

United States Drug Administration

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center

NIH, NCI, Baltimore Cancer Research Program

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of William Walden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - William Walden shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - William Walden talks about his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - William Walden talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - William Walden discusses his paternal family's way of life

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - William Walden explains his paternal family's influence in the church

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - William Walden talks about his father's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - William Walden explains his father's experience in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - William Walden discusses his father's return from Navy service

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - William Walden describes how his parents met in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - William Walden describes his parents' personalities and his mother's dedication to her family

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about his siblings and describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - William Walden reflects upon his father's character and disposition

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - William Walden talks about his elementary school experience in Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - William Walden describes his first exposure to science and the natural world

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - William Walden talks about his interests as a high school student

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - William Walden describes his experience with integration in junior high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - William Walden describes his introduction to running the 400 meter race on the junior high school track team

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - William Walden talks about his experience on the high school track team

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about his childhood scientific influences

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - William Walden discusses the scientific views of his parents, friends, and the church

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - William Walden talks about his social experience in high school and applying to college

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - William Walden talks about the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his high school black student union

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - William Walden describes his experience at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - William Walden describes his interest in biology at Morgan State University and the National Institutes of Health

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - William Walden describes his general chemistry professor at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about cafeteria food and religious discourse at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - William Walden talks about his history class at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - William Walden describes his decision to pursue a Ph.D. degree after college

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - William Walden describes his decision to attend Washington University in St. Louis for graduate school

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - William Walden describes the flexibility of his graduate program at Washington University

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - William Walden describes his interest in the control of iron metabolism by cells

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - William Walden describes the cellular response to a surplus of iron

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - William Walden discusses iron deficiency and nutrition - part one

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - William Walden discusses iron deficiency and nutrition - part two

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - William Walden describes his Ph.D. dissertation research on the rate of protein synthesis

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - William Walden describes the significance of his Ph.D. dissertation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - William Walden describes his decision to work at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - William Walden talks about balancing his research and teaching responsibilities at the University of Illinois, Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - William Walden talks about the future of his research on the regulation of iron metabolism

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - William Walden relates his involvement in studying the role of metals in human health

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - William Walden discusses the metal silver as a health food fad

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - William Walden talks about his research on a national level

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - William Walden discusses the challenges of funding research

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - William Walden talks about his involvement in university administration and diversity development - part one

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - William Walden shares his love for the city of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - William Walden talks about his involvement in university administration and diversity development - part 2

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - William Walden talks about the leaders in the field of cellular iron metabolism

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - William Walden talks about his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - William Walden reflects on his legacy and his life choices

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - William Walden talks about his membership on the Molecular Cellular Hematology Review Committee

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - William Walden reflects on the supportive nature of his parents

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - William Walden recalls his brother-in-law as a mentor during graduate school

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - William Walden shares his interest in golf and how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

5$8

DATitle
William Walden describes his decision to pursue a Ph.D. degree after college
William Walden talks about his involvement in university administration and diversity development - part 2
Transcript
Now did you--now at a certain point did you sort of see a path, a career path out of what you were doing at Morgan [State University, Baltimore, Maryland]?$$No. Well yes I did, but it was really quite late. It was--I, I was a, you know, member of the biology club and very interactive with other biology majors there. Virtually all of them were planning to go to medical school and so I went through a period of thinking okay, this is what I'm going to do, I'm going to apply to medical school and see if I can get in and go down that road. And so I was moving in that direction and in my senior, the fall of my senior year as I'm preparing all of these applications, getting ready to take the MCAT [Medical College Admission Test] and all of that, and just one day I stopped and I said why are you doing this? Don't--the way I put it to myself, which I often times will say to students as they're talking about what they want to do now is you know I really realized that I have no patience for patients. I, I cannot in my personality; I can't deal with people at that level every day, virtually twenty-four hours a day. And if I had not realized that and gone down that road, it would have been a very, very different outcome for me now, and may not have been a pleasant or positive one because it's not what I like to do. It's not what I'm comfortable doing, so why do it? And so once I came to grips with that, embraced that whole notion, then I could see a career path at that point, but not until. So it was fairly late then--$$Okay.$$That I saw that I wanted to go to graduate school and I wanted to go directly for the Ph.D. I was never interested in getting a master's [degree] and I actually looked at programs for whether they required you to do a master's first and favored those that did not because--and this was something that some of my instructors at Morgan had also pointed out to me was that there, there isn't a whole lot more that you can do with a master's if you want to do research with a master's than you can do with a B.S. [Bachelor of Science degree] if you really want to do research and you want to be more in control of your own path of research, what you're doing, then you have to get the Ph.D., and so that, that sort of crystallized that path for me.$$Okay so control and latitude to do what you want to do.$$Do what you want to do.$$Comes with the, the license is the Ph.D.$$That's right, that's right. That's minimal. And then, then it is developing the ability to do that and then demonstrating that you actually can do that and you can think of important questions and start working on important questions that people, other people want to know the answers to.$Okay now what are some of your responsibilities right, right now as an assistant to the provost?$$The main responsibility is to develop a diversity strategic plan for the campus. And that's almost complete at this point. But that has been the main responsibility, that's the main task. It's been a long process because I've decided to take the approach that the plan itself is irrelevant. It's really changing the culture of the campus, and that's through communication, through conversation, through dialogue that one begins to change the mindset of the campus about diversity. And that's taken some time but I'm, I think that we're seeing that take hold now. The other part of the responsibility though is to, is to really bring diversity into as many of the activities that come through the provost office as possible. So to bring diversity to the table when we're talking about curriculum, when we're talking about certainly student demographics and recruitment and retention, to bring a perspective that may be a little bit different to efforts to change the outcomes for students, to improve outcomes for students, to think about how to improve faculty diversity and success of faculty, the environment and climate that faculty experience at the university. And then the most difficult one is to, to really start to address issues around the staff that are at the university. I mean the university is, is a jobs place, but how do people feel about working at the university, and how do the talents and skills and, and benefits that each individual bring to the university get realized in their activities, in the way that the university interacts with them. So those are things that, that fall into the realm of my responsibility for, with the provost.$$Okay now do you have any responsibility in advising the various student associations? I don't know if there's an association of African American scientists or Hispanics or you know.$$There, there are offices and activities that might deal with African American students, Hispanic students, Native American students and so forth, and I do engage in, in conversations with them about how to do certain, different things and so forth, and, and provide any leadership or guidance that I might there, or listen to what their concerns are and then bring those concerns to the provost so that the actions can be taken and that sort of thing. But these are still more at the level of, of more of an official administrative structure within the university. I don't interact so much with the student organizations that are centered within the student body itself. I really leave that up to the other bodies that I might interact with to do that. But it is something that--from a university perspective and as we think about this position evolving into the future, where its best positioned in that regard is, is something that we ought to consider. I don't think it would be at the level of the student or the--if we truly want to make--I mean one of the goals of this initiative is to truly drive diversity to the core of the university as much as research and teaching and learning are at the core of what a university is about, so diversity should be sitting there along side. That means that everybody has to be engaged in bringing diversity into the activities of the university. If you place too much on one office in terms of being responsible for that, we don't move it into the core. We really simply have it as a surface layer for the university that can be stripped away as the individual goes away.