The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Carole Copeland Thomas

Motivational speaker and business consultant Carole Copeland Thomas was born on August 21, 1953 in Detroit, Michigan. Thomas graduated from Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan, and went on to earn her B.A. degree in music, with honors, from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1975. Thomas enrolled at Northeastern University, in Boston, Massachusetts, on a Martin Luther King, Jr. academic fellowship, earning her M.B.A. degree in 1985.

Thomas began her career working in sales for Mary Kay Cosmetics, eventually becoming an independent sales director in 1975. Thomas moved to Boston with her then husband and family, working for the Bank of New England and The Gillette Company as an assistant product manager. Thomas founded Temporary Solutions, a temporary employment agency, in 1987. By 1989, the agency had grown into a full service speaking, training, and facilitation company called C. Thomas and Associates, specializing in diversity, multicultural, leadership, and empowerment issues. Thomas served as a town coordinator for Governor Deval Patrick’s 2006 campaign. In 2008, Thomas started The Multicultural Symposium Series (MSS), a face to face, online, and on the air initiative designed to advance the cause of multiculturalism. She hosted the weekly radio talk show “Focus on Empowerment” on Boston’s WILD 1090 AM radio, and subsequently on WBNW 1120 AM and Internet radio, from 2003 to 2009. Thomas has spoken at the Federal Highway Administration, SHRM, Hewlett Packard, Verizon, and Cargill, and Monster.com.

Thomas authored several books, including 21 Ways To Bring Multiculturalism To Your Job Your Home and Your Community and Real Women, Real Issues: Positive Collaborations for Business Success. She also served as the executive coach for the Essence Magazine Leadership Summit. Thomas became a life member of the National Black MBA Association in 1986, serving as president of the Boston Chapter, national vice chair, and a co-founder of the Leaders of Tomorrow program. She served as the Tri State coordinator for Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and as the chair of the Multicultural Committee for the Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau. Thomas also served as an adjunct professor at Bentley University.

Thomas has three children: Lorna, Michelle, and the late Mickarl, as well as two grandchildren, Julianna and Gabrielle.

Carole Copeland Thomas was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 18, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.104

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/18/2016 |and| 11/15/2018

Last Name

Thomas

Maker Category
Schools

Emory University

Northeastern University

Cass Technical High School

Beaubien Middle School

Vandenberg Elementary School

George N. Brady Elementary School

First Name

Carole Copeland

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

THO25

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mombasa, Kenya

Favorite Quote

Those Who Cannot Learn From History Are Doomed To Repeat It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/21/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

Motivational speaker and business consultant Carole Copeland Thomas (1953 – ) founded the temporary employment agency Temporary Solutions in 1987, which grew into C. Thomas and Associates, a full service speaking, training, and facilitation company.

Employment

C Thomas & Associates

Mary Kay Inc

Gillette

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:290,3:2610,51:3170,59:4530,84:5090,95:5490,101:6050,109:6370,114:7250,137:8050,160:8930,172:10690,201:12610,236:13090,243:13410,248:18840,262:22172,294:23992,319:29658,332:33360,385:34215,401:34785,408:35545,419:36305,428:36970,437:38015,450:38775,461:39535,471:42606,485:46118,525:47538,544:49696,554:51076,571:51628,579:52364,588:52732,593:53468,605:56855,622:57989,642:59123,660:60905,693:61553,702:65970,752:66290,757:66690,763:67490,780:69330,822:70530,849:72610,886:76888,904:77490,912:79468,945:82560,960:83155,969:84260,997:84685,1003:85365,1011:88520,1029:88905,1038:90170,1055:90610,1064:94768,1108:96856,1144:108310,1280:110470,1324:110870,1330:111270,1336:116496,1378:123260,1607:136122,1878:139895,1938:140588,1949:145757,1992:146547,2011:148680,2077:148996,2082:154368,2291:154921,2299:158871,2375:160135,2399:170804,2542:172136,2563:173246,2589:174948,2633:176206,2659:176798,2668:177242,2675:178426,2700:179684,2737:180424,2753:180868,2760:181238,2768:184612,2776:187123,2837:189553,2868:189958,2874:190687,2884:207050,3031:208250,3078:208570,3083:209930,3098:210890,3113:214594,3142:215660,3162:218220,3181:221410,3203:222124,3212:225430,3232:226053,3240:226498,3246:231200,3278:233050,3283:233498,3291:243134,3474:243758,3483:246098,3534:246956,3546:248906,3577:256264,3694:256656,3706:257538,3716:258126,3723:259498,3742:270419,3901:270884,3907:273023,3935:273953,3946:275999,3975:278975,4046:280370,4110:281114,4117:286320,4139:286880,4148:287520,4164:291840,4247:294960,4264:297290,4311$0,0:2160,31:7528,130:7816,135:12445,204:12956,212:13394,219:14197,239:14708,248:15146,256:15657,264:16095,280:21351,428:21716,434:24709,480:30144,515:30552,523:31164,534:32252,562:32796,572:33272,583:34088,604:34700,616:38324,637:44044,752:44660,760:45364,770:45804,776:47300,790:50660,803:52074,872:52983,885:53892,906:54599,914:55407,923:56619,982:62140,1043:62560,1051:66200,1121:66550,1127:66830,1136:67320,1153:68510,1175:70400,1220:71730,1243:79779,1362:85273,1483:87015,1526:91218,1608:92459,1629:95160,1691:105274,1788:105538,1793:110806,1886:111266,1892:112094,1907:112830,1916:114670,1966:121530,2050:121830,2055:122430,2064:124080,2102:124605,2111:128420,2151:130596,2189:131108,2198:134350,2230:135186,2244:136782,2287:137922,2322:139214,2360:149674,2479:150534,2497:151222,2508:151910,2522:154318,2562:154748,2569:156038,2586:160246,2606:163098,2653:164202,2666:164662,2672:165214,2681:166962,2708:167882,2743:177120,2858:178030,2880:180778,2899:181082,2904:181538,2912:182222,2926:182602,2932:183210,2945:183894,2958:186174,2997:187922,3031:189670,3057:190354,3074:190962,3083:192178,3102:195525,3158:196146,3169:196560,3177:201459,3304:202287,3319:202563,3324:203460,3339:204219,3352:207600,3421:207945,3427:208704,3446:209049,3452:216510,3523:216810,3532:218190,3571:218910,3586:219390,3595:221130,3628:222330,3657:222630,3663:225194,3678:225738,3687:229416,3718:229990,3726:230646,3739:231138,3747:231958,3758:233352,3787:234664,3809:237124,3852:242401,3905:245687,3957:246635,3972:247741,3988:248057,3993:248373,3998:249795,4056:251138,4068:252560,4105:253113,4113:256500,4135:256908,4146:258880,4185:259968,4207:261736,4256:262144,4275:263504,4302:263912,4310:266972,4375:271326,4412:282160,4586:283216,4608:283810,4621:291922,4779:292486,4787:293990,4809:294366,4814:298610,4844:303590,4897:304150,4905:304920,4914:306740,4944:309330,4982:309610,4987:310660,5003:313360,5024
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carole Copeland Thomas' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carole Copeland Thomas lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her mother's family background, pt. 3

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers her maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her mother's upbringing in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her father's education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her father experiences as a Tuskegee Airman

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers her parent's careers

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her father's relocation to Ghana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her brother

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her schooling in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her childhood activities

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers the riots in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about the emergence of gangs in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes the arts program at Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers her friends from Cass Technical High School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about her early aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her experiences at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carole Copeland Thomas recalls the prevalence of racial terrorism in Georgia during the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers Juanita Jones Abernathy

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her experiences as a saleswoman for Mary Kay Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers moving to Norristown, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carole Copeland Thomas remembers her husband's transfer to Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carole Copeland Thomas recalls buying a home in Middleton, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carole Copeland Thomas recalls her M.B.A. degree from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about the community support for her graduate education

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carole Copeland Thomas describes her experiences at The Gillette Company

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carole Copeland Thomas talks about the benefits of an M.B.A. degree

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

4$5

DATitle
Carole Copeland Thomas describes her mother's family background, pt. 2
Carole Thomas Copeland recalls her M.B.A. degree from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts
Transcript
My mother's mother's [Nora Charleston] side of the family, that is the Branch [ph.] family. I don't know as much about them and I'll go back and give you some information about the Gaines side of the family, but the Branch side of the family also from Georgia, including the Savannah, Georgia area, other parts of, of Georgia. My grandmother, my great-grandmother who I did not know because she had passed away on my mother's side was biracial and grew up in Hamilton, Georgia. Her father was the plantation owner and her mother was a slave woman and this man had two sets of families from what I have been told and my grandmother was the black side of the family and he probably had white children also, so that's the lineage I know. I don't know much about that side of the family, but that's the Branch side of the family. One of the Branch members though, the Batchelor-Branch family, one of my distant cousins on the same side of that family who now lives in Detroit [Michigan], was the first African American admitted into the Daughters of the American Revolution because her mother's side of the family, she is related to me on her father's side, her mother's could trace their roots back to the Revolutionary time and the Pilgrims time and that constituted her being allowed to be part of the DAR. She was the first black member probably in the late '70s [1970s], early '80s [1980s].$$So she had roots that (simultaneous)--?$$(Simultaneous) Karen, Karen Batchelor [Karen Batchelor Farmer] is her name.$$Okay.$$Her name is Karen Batchelor, so--$$Karen Batchelor had roots that went all the way back to--$$To the--$$--to the settlement of Massachusetts--$$Correct.$$--to the Pilgrims or Puritans--$$Correct.$$--of the 1600s?$$Correct, yes, yeah.$$So here we are in Massachusetts, here we are full circle--$$(Laughter) Right.$$--too.$$Yes, in a way, yeah you can say that.$$Okay, so--$$So she, that's the Batchelor side of the family and that was her mother's mother's side of the family, this is my grandmother, my again, maternal.$$This is all of your father's of your father's side.$$No, this is all on my mother's [Gwendolyn Charleston Copeland] side of the family.$$Your--okay, okay.$$All on my mother's side.$$The maternal side of your mother's side of the family?$$Now I'm talking about the maternal side of my mother's side. The paternal side is the, the family that had the six hundred acres of land--$$Oh, okay.$$--the Gaines family, G-A-I-N-E-S.$$Okay, understood.$$Right.$$That's the paternal side, okay.$$Right. One aspect of the Gaines family, there are lots of things, with the Gaines family were sort of connected to the Thurgood Marshall family because we have roots in Baltimore [Maryland], that's another story. We, our family owned a bank in Baltimore that just closed about five years ago, five or six years ago, one of those little small community banks, Ideal Savings Bank [Ideal Federal Savings Bank], I believe that was the name of it and in 1865, I believe that's the year, January, 1865 as Sherman [William Tecumseh Sherman] was burning down Georgia and he decided not to burn Savannah, my, one of my ancestors, Reverend William Gaines was actually in a meeting that was recorded with other leading black people in Savannah and they met with General Sherman to discuss the outcome of blacks once they were going to be freed. I can pull that up online and show it to you, so it's, it's, it's Google searchable. But there were about nineteen leaders and he was one of them, he represented the ministerial community, the minister in the community, in Savannah and that was--$$Was he A.M.E. [African Methodist Episcopal] as well or--?$$He was not--he was part of the Methodist church because the A.M.E. church didn't get to the South until after the Civil War, for obvious reasons. So it started--the A.M.E. church was started in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] by freed blacks and did not and then affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal churches in the South after the Civil War.$$The southern Methodists--$$Right.$$--because they had split off because of slavery, yeah.$$Right, right. So that group lined up with the A.M.E. church after the Civil War, so Reverend Gaines was part of the Methodist Episcopal church I believe which ultimately became the, the A.M.E. church.$Now you pursued an M.B.A. from Northeastern [Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts] and you entered the program in 1983, what prompted that--?$$I was still in Mary Kay [Mary Kay Inc.], but I was looking beyond Mary Kay. I didn't have the kind of success that some of my colleagues had had, certainly didn't have the success that Juanita Abernathy [Juanita Jones Abernathy] had had or Lenny Woods [ph.], or some of the other great black directors and then national sales directors, and, and I wanted to go back to school and business was an area that I wanted to pursue. I just didn't have the money to go back to school. Dr. Virgil Wood [Virgil A. Wood], I don't know if you've interviewed him, another great civil rights leader, minister, Baptist preacher, still living, was a friend of my husband's [Copeland Thomas' ex-husband, Mickarl Thomas, Sr.] at that time and was also the dean of the African American Institute [John D. O'Bryant African-American Institute] at Northeastern, I talked with him and, and said I'd love to go back to school, Northeastern is a school I would certainly like to look at, I don't have the money (laughter) tuition wise to go to school and he said, "You, you know there are opportunities to get a scholarship, so apply," which I did. I did not do well on my GMAT [Graduate Management Admission Test] exams and they recommended I take them over again. I did not take them over again, but I was accepted to Northeastern and I won a full scholarship, so I won a Martin Luther King scholarship [Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Graduate Fellowship Program] to pay for everything except my books at Northeastern and that's how I was able to go back to school in 1983.$$Okay and at, at this juncture you're, you've really switched gears, you've gone into business right and not pursuing voice any longer--$$No.$$--singing career?$$No, no, I'm, I'm fully engaged in the business world (laughter).$$Okay, all right, well who were some of your professors at Northeastern and what did you learn there?$$It was a two year rigorous program and I guess one professor who comes to mind is Jonathan Pond who was one of my accounting professors I believe, very colorful person, but a very enthusiastic person, one-- somebody I could relate to. He also did a little bit of TV work. He does TV work now if he's still--I'm sure he's still in the area, he would do little segments about saving money or you know, building your wealth, or those kinds of things and that I think as a result of the work he did at Northeastern, but he was just a very encouraging person and I, I had some tough classes. I had, I, I, I failed two classes. My first year, my first semester, I failed a statistics class and an accounting class, failed them flat and remember I'd been a very good student. I'd never failed anything before, this was the first time I had ever failed in life and that drew me closer to the black students who were on that campus, other graduate students in the program; Willie Shellman who is a friend to this day, he is president of the Tuskegee Airmen New England Chapter [New England Chapter Tuskegee Airmen, Inc.] and others who took me under their wing and they said, "You're doing it wrong," (laughter). "First you all have to collaborate, you need to take this teacher, don't take that one, he's racist, take this one." So they schooled me in terms of who to take. There was a loose affiliation of the black students and they didn't really have an association per se, but it was like the forerunner of the I guess, the student version of the National Black MBA Association of which I became a part of immediately after college, after graduate school, but these students and African students who were my classmates from Mali, I had two African students who I was in school with and I used to bring them to my house, cook for them and we'd sit at the dining room table in Middleton [Massachusetts] and study. So I learned how to collaborate and work with others so that I could move ahead. As I moved ahead they moved ahead also and I didn't have to do that in college because I was, it was more of an independent thrust and work that I did independently, but in graduate school is where I really learned how to work as a team and work in a team and realize that my success was not necessarily based on just me, it was based on me collaborating with other people. So between the African students, the Jamaican students, a Seventh-day Adventists, I remember--oh he was brilliant. He was actually one time teaching, I can't think of his name right now, but he was teaching the class and the teacher was mesmerized and said, "Wait, wait a minute, I'm teaching this class," (laughter). So I had some brilliant people, a lot of guys, who were my friends and we helped each other to get through.$$Okay.$$Also, Dr. Bill Tita [William Tiga Tita], T-I-T-A, an African American from Africa originally, he is still living and he was my advisor in grad school and so I also give him credit.

Anthony Reed

Marathoner Anthony R. Reed was born in St. Louis, Missouri on July 2, 1955. At the age of eight, Reed was diagnosed with a pre-diabetic condition. He graduated from John Burroughs High School in St. Louis, Missouri in 1973. Reed graduated from Webster University with his B.A. degrees in mathematics and business management in 1978. After enrolling at Abilene Christian University in Dallas, Reed received his M.B.A. degree in business administration in 1982. He went on to earn his M.S. degree in accounting and his certification in supply chain management from the University of Texas at Dallas in 1992 and 2008, respectively. Reed is a Certified Public Accountant and certified Project Management Professional.

In 1977, Reed began his professional career as a computer programmer. He moved from St. Louis to the Dallas-Ft. Worth area in 1978, and worked in IT management and executive positions for various Dallas-based organizations. In these roles, Reed was responsible for overseeing US or worldwide information technology applications. As an adjunct professor, Reed taught management, IT, accounting, and project management courses; and has authored over fifty books and articles. Since 1994, he has managed his own international accounting and project management consulting firm, Anthony R. Reed, CPA P.C. In addition to his academic and professional achievements, Reed is an accomplished marathoner. He began long-distance running in 1975 to combat his pre-diabetic condition. Reed, a certified running coach, is the first African American to compete in marathons (26.2 miles/42.2K) on all seven continents, including Antarctica. He also completed over one-hundred and twenty marathons in forty-eight states, and won trophies in various age groups and weight divisions. Reed is also on the Dallas (formerly White Rock) Marathon board of directors.

Reed’s published memoir is Running Shoes Are Cheaper than Insulin: Marathon Adventures on All Seven Continents. Additionally, he has written for publications such as Runner’s World and Computerworld. Reed has been featured in Southern Living, Ebony, the Journal of Accountancy, the Black MBA Magazine, and Runner’s World, among others.

In 2004, Reed, along with Charlotte Simmons-Foster, co-founded the National Black Marathoners Association (NBMA), which is the nation’s largest not-for-profit organization that promotes distance running in the Black community. Reed is a charter member of the Black Data Processing Association’s (BDPA) Dallas Chapter and was active in the National Association of Black Accountants (NABA). Reed has worked as a professional speaker for corporations, educational institutions, and professional organizations and was a member of the National Speakers Association. Reed is a member of Transforming Life Christian Church, where his wife, Deborah, is a minister.

Anthony R. Reed was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 28, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.027

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/28/2013

Last Name

Reed

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

R.

Occupation
Schools

University of Texas at Arlington

Albilene Christian University

Webster University

Madison Elementary School

Ashland Elementary School

Clark Elementary School

Enright Middle School

John Burroughs School

Texas Christian University

Washington University in St Louis

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Anthony

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

REE07

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Hills Build Character.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

7/2/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spam

Short Description

Marathoner Anthony Reed (1955 - ) was the first African American to compete in marathons in all seven continents of the world. He also co-founded the National Black Marathoners Association (NBMA).

Employment

Texas Instruments

Efficient Networks

Motel 6, Accor North America

United Advertising Publications

Dallas Fort Worth International Airport Board

Ernst & Young

Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory, EG&G

Amberton University

DeVry University

El Centro College

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2822,65:3154,70:5893,155:6972,179:7387,185:12510,242:13710,264:15390,299:16190,310:18830,366:20750,391:21310,399:21870,408:25310,480:29517,495:29833,500:30307,507:30702,513:32632,525:33190,535:33562,543:35933,586:36238,592:36482,597:38068,639:38495,647:38922,656:44668,771:46768,806:48280,835:48616,840:53442,872:55000,896:58580,945:58980,951:60020,969:60580,979:60900,985:61380,992:62580,1010:63540,1026:72890,1146:73366,1151:75746,1201:77531,1240:78602,1250:79078,1259:85634,1330:86273,1342:88190,1384:92810,1418:93270,1424:94834,1448:98422,1521:99342,1535:112199,1659:112694,1665:113090,1670:119327,1768:119723,1773:120416,1781:123002,1794:127990,1850:128454,1855:131149,1865:131494,1871:131770,1876:132046,1881:132322,1886:132667,1892:133012,1898:133495,1906:135384,1922:137298,1957:137562,1962:138618,1986:138948,1992:143886,2038:144600,2049:145110,2055:146028,2071:150414,2121:153010,2126:158622,2316:160094,2336:162210,2375:173687,2534:174653,2553:176102,2584:176585,2595:176930,2601:177275,2607:181150,2620:190753,2745:191098,2751:196273,2848:197032,2861:201748,2886:202078,2898:202606,2907:207441,2953:209110,2968:217563,3121:220091,3161:220644,3172:221355,3181:221987,3190:222856,3207:223646,3237:224278,3246:226016,3334:240005,3499:240895,3509:241251,3514:247432,3602:249722,3628:249994,3633:251898,3670:260540,3758:261882,3794:262980,3869:273773,3987:276540,4012:278940,4052:280300,4073:281100,4092:303690,4377:304330,4386:306426,4405:306718,4410:308105,4441:311828,4480:312530,4490:314012,4524:314792,4535:316118,4559:319930,4658:320246,4663:320641,4669:322270,4693$0,0:2584,54:4624,106:7072,169:8704,206:9520,228:10132,239:10744,250:15510,283:16000,289:28054,525:28544,531:29230,540:29720,546:40260,648:41548,664:42928,687:45693,705:46017,710:46341,715:46746,721:47394,731:50592,760:51256,769:51671,775:53165,794:56315,815:56995,824:68623,951:69088,957:85490,1110:88040,1144:88754,1154:89876,1169:94814,1246:95318,1255:95678,1261:96470,1276:97334,1296:98486,1323:100070,1349:100646,1358:108000,1403:110635,1441:113925,1474:115336,1498:120283,1550:122555,1589:124401,1617:124685,1627:125821,1652:126815,1671:131650,1709:133600,1755:134650,1776:138528,1839:138838,1845:142454,1893:143138,1909:144810,1933:145494,1944:145874,1950:148154,2015:157736,2117:158064,2122:159048,2131:159868,2143:161426,2170:162082,2179:162820,2198:165034,2232:166592,2258:166920,2263:167658,2274:168068,2280:174944,2363:176092,2386:176584,2394:176912,2399:177240,2404:178470,2424:178798,2429:179290,2436:194469,2572:194804,2578:196010,2608:197015,2626:198870,2632:203242,2672:203582,2678:204262,2690:204738,2705:206548,2719:207020,2728:207964,2747:208200,2752:209085,2771:209970,2788:210206,2793:213580,2823:214090,2831:214430,2836:215875,2908:217150,2928:217490,2933:220648,2963:222508,2986:222880,2991:223531,2999:223996,3005:229370,3049:231900,3104:232340,3115:232780,3120:236849,3152:237965,3168:239081,3181:239825,3191:242010,3205:242610,3212:243800,3220:245590,3230:250465,3305:250797,3310:252125,3344:254710,3359:255760,3387:256040,3392:256460,3399:256740,3404:257020,3409:257510,3417:260826,3450:262118,3478:265507,3538:268170,3572
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Anthony Reed's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed talks about his maternal family's connection to the Windsor plantation

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed describes his paternal family's move to Dayton, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed talks about his father's young adult years and career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed remembers his uncle Prince Coleman, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed talks about his parents' separation

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed talks about his brother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed describes his childhood household

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed talks about his relationship with his brother

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed talks about his early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Anthony Reed remembers his childhood interests

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed remembers visiting Washington, D.C. after the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed remembers visiting Mississippi as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed describes his early interest in bowling

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed talks about his childhood in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed recalls his early interest in music

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed remembers his church activities

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed recalls attending John Burroughs School in Ladue, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed remembers being diagnosed with prediabetes as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed talks about overcoming his speech impediment

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Anthony Reed remembers the impacts of race and class on his experiences at John Burroughs School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed remembers influential figures from John Burroughs School in Ladue, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed recalls enrolling at Washington University in St. Louis in Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed remembers the death of a friend

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed describes how he managed his prediabetes condition through running

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed talks about his running habits during college

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed remembers influential peers from Washington University in St. Louis

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed recalls attending Webster University in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed remembers applying to Texas Christian University for graduate school

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed recalls transitioning from Texas Christian University to Abilene Christian University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed talks about working at Texas Instruments Incorporated in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed recalls studying business at Abilene Christian University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed remembers a business philosophy course at Abilene Christian University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed remembers his decision to run in his first marathon

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed talks about influential black marathoners

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed describes distance runner Ted Corbitt

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed talks about the technological changes in running gear

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed remembers training for his first marathon

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed talks about pacing himself while running

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Anthony Reed describes the phases of distance running

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed talks about his plans to run in the Boston Marathon

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed remembers running marathons in China, Antarctica and Kenya

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed talks about his sponsorship deal with Spira Footwear, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed remembers becoming the first African American to run a marathon on each continent

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed talks about his most challenging marathon

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed describes experimental running procedures

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed recalls competing in a biathlon

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed talks about his running mentors

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed recalls forming the National Black Marathoner's Association

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Anthony Reed describes his consulting and professional speaking work

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Anthony Reed talks about his book, 'Running Shoes are Cheaper than Insulin'

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Anthony Reed describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Anthony Reed shares his advice to young runners

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Anthony Reed reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Anthony Reed reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Anthony Reed talks about his children

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Anthony Reed describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Anthony Reed narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$2

DAStory

1$6

DATitle
Anthony Reed remembers influential figures from John Burroughs School in Ladue, Missouri
Anthony Reed describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood
Transcript
Tell us about Bernice [Bernice Curlett]?$$It's when I started at John Burroughs [John Burroughs School, Ladue, Missouri]. Like I said, I had a--had a job working there every day after school cleaning up the--cleaning up the paint room. And Bernice was a lady, a black lady there who worked on the janitorial staff. And so she was the one that was responsible for assigning me my work and looking over the different things that I was doing. And Bernice was what I would call a very strong--a very strong black woman. She basically took me under her wing. And I can remember my--my first year there at Burroughs. Bernice would see me walking down the hall and she would say, "Tony [HistoryMaker Anthony Reed], look up, don't look down at the ground. Don't let these people see you looking down at the ground." I mean she put her foot squarely up my rear end and was really pushing, she was saying, 'cause she knew black history and I knew black history, and it's like, you know, you're representing, you have to do good here. You can't let them see you sweat, you can't let them see you fail. And so Bernice was a person who drove me for four years while I was there. And I think without her being there, I probably would not have graduated from the school. When I left Burroughs she was the only reason that I would go back to the school, to check up on her and to see how she's doing. So she for me was a major inspiration while I was there at Burroughs.$$Now that raises another question too, was there any instructor or administrator or any--any adult at Burroughs that took any interest in you succeeding or recognized talent in you or?$$No. There were some teachers there that I liked, Mrs. Ferber [ph.], Mr. Schmertz [ph.], and ironically they were both English teachers. I think I liked them because of--with them wanting to--to read books. I think they read more books about African Americans and I think they were able to sympathize more with my plight then the other teachers.$$But there's no real relationship?$$Right, but there wasn't any real relationship. In fact, at Burroughs they wrote a book about the athletes there at Burroughs, 'The Athletes Through the Decades' [sic. 'Teammates for Life: A History of Burroughs Athletics, 1923-2011,' Jim Lemen and Jud Calkins] and they talked about the different football teams that they had that, for example, won state in track and all of that. And then they talked about famous athletes who had since graduated from Burroughs and went on to--to doing other great things. And ironically when they wrote the book, they never wrote about my--my achievements as a distance runner. And yet they were aware of me being the first black in the world to run marathons on all seven continents, being one of the few people in the world who has run over 100 marathons, who has won trophies for running marathons. They never wrote anything about it. So to me that said a lot about the school.$$Yeah, well it's not much of a relationship there so, I guess. But, now did you make the National Honor Society yourself?$$No I didn't. It was just--it was a struggle for me to keep up there at the school. I made the national accounting honor society [Beta Alpha Psi] as a graduate student [at the University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, Texas], but again that was years after I left Burroughs.$$Okay, at Burroughs, so at the time of graduation from Burroughs, you had played soccer, you ran some track, you were taking, you know, math courses. What were you, what was your counseling? What did the counselor tell you at Burroughs?$$Not much. They were, I think they were pleasantly surprised that I was still there. I was like--I was in the bottom 10 percent of my class. And so they were just, I think shocked and surprised that I made it there for four years. And like I said, the thing I learned there was just how to fight, just how to stick in there. You know, when other kids were able to go out and you know, have fun, I was going to school full time, working two part time jobs and studying as much as I could in order to try to keep up. I will kind of compare it to being in a 100 yard race and I have to start 125 yards back. So it was just struggling to stay up and catch up. All the students there graduated and went to college. It was like as soon as you set your foot in the door in your freshman year, you know, in high school, everyone there goes to college, it's just a given. So when I graduated from Burroughs, I got accepted to Washington University there in St. Louis [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri]. And I stayed there for two and a half years before I got kicked out.$Okay so it was a lot of moving too involved. And one question we always ask and just considering all the places you moved in St. Louis [Missouri], just kind of tell us about some of the neighborhoods, and what were some of the sights and sounds and smells of growing up?$$Okay. My first recollection of where we lived was when we lived in the Blumeyer projects in St. Louis [Arthur Blumeyer Village].$$That's Blue--$$Blumeyer.$$M-I-R-E?$$I believe it's M-Y--$$M-Y-E-R?$$--I believe it's M-Y-R-E [sic.].$$M-Y-R-E.$$Yes. So there were two major housing projects in St. Louis, there was Pruitt Igoe and there were the Blumeyer projects. And I can remember we had concrete floors in the projects, I think they were about twelve to fifteen stories tall. I can remember there being fires in the trash chutes. I can remember smelling urine in the elevator having to go up to our apartment. It was--it was rough. Then we moved from there to north St. Louis where we lived in a duplex, and I can remember walking to school, which was kind of interesting 'cause a lot of kids today don't walk to school. And it would be snowing outside and they still had school. I can remember at Ashland [Ashland Elementary School, St. Louis, Missouri] when it would be heavy snowfall, we'd still go outside to play and I can remember us building forts and having snowball fights between the forts in the schoolyard. When I returned to St. Louis to run a marathon, unbeknownst to me, the course literally ran by places in St. Louis I used to live. And I remember running by the area where the Blumeyer projects used to be at that time, and they had since torn them down and built low rise government housing there. And I remember running by there and there were some black kids that were sitting on the curb. And they got up and they started running along with me. And I got real emotional 'cause I was thinking, oh my goodness, am I being an example to these kids, kind of being a role model to them, and they're sitting up there thinking, wow, you know, if this black guy can run this marathon, maybe we can run it too. And that actually planted the seed for us organizing the National Black Marathoners' Association, was if we can be out there en masse, we can be role models for black kids to get out of their communities and to start seeing the rest of the world and realize that there was more to life than just, you know, the half square mile that they were growing up in. So for me that was really emotional. Other parts of St. Louis we lived in, it was--it was pleasant being there, and I guess one of the things that I say about growing up not--not having a lot is you never realize how much you don't have. 'Cause everyone around you has the same thing, everyone is experiencing the same things, but it wasn't until I went to high school, went to John Burroughs [John Burroughs School, Ladue, Missouri] that I realized how much more was out there and got an opportunity to see how very wealthy white people lived and how--$$Well, before we get there, I just want to have you just describe like, you know, some more about where you grew up?$$Okay, because we were moving every couple of years, it was really hard to establish friends with people in the neighborhood. It's--I can almost compare it to some people who--who are in the [U.S.] military. You really don't want to get to know people very well because they may be dead. So it was the same thing as we would move into a neighborhood. We really didn't get to know a lot of people that were living around us.

Patricia Russell-McCloud

Motivational speaker Patricia Russell-McCloud was born on September 14, 1946, in Indianapolis, Indiana to Willie and Janiel Russell. The youngest of three daughters, Russell-McCloud delivered her first major speech at the age of eight, before the convention of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church convention in Los Angeles. In 1964, Russell-McCloud graduated from Shortridge High School in Indianapolis and went on to receive her B.A. degree in history in 1968 from Kentucky State University in Frankfort, Kentucky. In 1970, she enrolled at the Howard University School of Law and received her J.D. degree in 1973.

In 1973, Russell-McCloud began working for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in Washington D.C and by 1974, she was involved in a recommendation to the U.S. Department of Justice that eventually led to the Supreme Court case United States vs. AT&T , which broke up what was then the largest monopoly in the United States. Russell-McCloud received several promotions, eventually becoming the head of the Complaints Branch within the Broadcast Division of the FCC. In 1982, she met E. Earl McCloud, a minister and military science instructor at Alabama A&M University and they married in 1983. That same year, she left the FCC to begin her own motivational speaking business, Russell-McCloud Associates.

Over the past 27 years, Russell-McCloud has become one of the most sought-after motivational speakers in the nation. Her clients include McDonalds, the United States Navy, Coca-Cola, United Auto Workers and a host of other prominent companies. Black Enterprise Magazine named her the fifth best motivational speaker in 1998. From 1994 to 1998, Russell-McCloud served as president of the Links, Inc. Her book, A is for Attitude: An Alphabet for Living was published in 1999, and she has released an audio CD of her speeches entitled Never Give Up and a separate recording of her speech The Power of Connecting . Russell-McCloud has received numerous honors, including the keys to more than 300 cities.

Accession Number

A2011.028

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/20/2011

Last Name

Russell-McCloud

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Shortridge High School

Kentucky State University

Family Development Services

Howard University School of Law

Howard University

First Name

Patricia

Birth City, State, Country

Indianapolis

HM ID

RUS08

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa

Favorite Quote

Whatever You're Going Through It's A Temporary Inconvenience For A Permanent Improvement.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

9/14/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salad

Short Description

Motivational speaker and lawyer Patricia Russell-McCloud (1946 - ) was a Federal Communications Commission attorney, the president of The Links, Inc. and a motivational speaker.

Employment

Russell-McCloud Associates

Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

Indianapolis Public Schools System

Detroit Public Schools System

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:486,14:1053,23:2592,49:9258,129:14006,203:14838,212:16190,304:16606,309:17334,317:17750,324:18478,333:22866,366:24998,411:26556,444:27212,454:27622,461:28032,467:29016,484:31148,516:32542,536:33198,547:33936,557:35002,576:42500,635:43592,650:44348,661:51931,791:52735,805:55445,827:60336,883:67664,954:68432,967:78137,1075:81350,1099:82442,1113:87902,1190:88406,1198:88826,1204:89498,1214:91850,1262:92354,1272:100444,1363:103301,1391:104273,1408:105731,1432:111186,1491:117490,1527:118192,1537:118504,1542:118816,1547:119518,1558:120454,1572:121156,1582:121468,1587:123262,1619:123886,1626:124198,1642:124666,1653:124978,1658:126304,1685:129892,1752:133290,1766:134280,1780:134640,1785:138780,1876:141888,1894:142370,1900$0,0:4884,121:5316,128:7476,171:8196,182:10068,223:15548,268:18584,334:20033,360:24794,485:29458,511:39508,640:41089,671:41461,676:48250,837:50761,873:55797,891:58610,935:59483,944:60453,956:65012,1024:66079,1039:67340,1064:67728,1069:71960,1084:72506,1093:76406,1185:84480,1247:84980,1254:93060,1369:98400,1500:105530,1560:105822,1565:113694,1686:149532,2234:150568,2251:151420,2283
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Patricia Russell-McCloud's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Patricia Russell-McCloud lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes her father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Patricia Russell-McCloud lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes the Haughville neighborhood of Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers the Woodrow Wilson School No. 75 in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls her social activities

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers speaking at a national meeting of the A.M.E. Zion church, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers speaking at a national meeting of the A.M.E. Zion church, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about segregation in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes the music of her childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about Revered Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes the music of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her experiences at Short Ridge High School in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls her decision to attend Kentucky State College in Frankfort, Kentucky

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers joining the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes her academic experiences at Kentucky State College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's service activities

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her decision to attend the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls her time at the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers her peers and professors at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls joining the Federal Communications Commission

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes her work at the Federal Communications Commission

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes her role as the chief of complaints at the Federal Communications Commission

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers organizing a conference of black-owned broadcast networks

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers her retirement from the Federal Communications Commission

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her membership in The Links

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls the history of The Links, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Patricia Russell-McCloud reflects upon her legacy at The Links, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes programs during her presidency of The Links, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about meeting Elizabeth Catlett

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls her changes to The Links' policies

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls her decision to become a motivational speaker

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls her start as a motivational speaker

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her mentorship program

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers writing 'A Is for Attitude: An Alphabet for Living'

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her stage play, 'Keep Rising'

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Patricia Russell-McCloud describes her philanthropic activities

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her inspirational CD, 'Never Give Up'

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her role as a bishop's wife

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her favorite motivational speakers

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Patricia Russell-McCloud talks about her awards

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Patricia Russell-McCloud reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Patricia Russell-McCloud shares a message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Patricia Russell-McCloud reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Patricia Russell-McCloud narrates her photographs.

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

10$3

DATitle
Patricia Russell-McCloud recalls her decision to attend Kentucky State College in Frankfort, Kentucky
Patricia Russell-McCloud remembers writing 'A Is for Attitude: An Alphabet for Living'
Transcript
So how do you begin to prepare for college? You think you may want to be an attorney, but you're not sure. How do you begin to prepare to go to college? Who's there to help you?$$My godmother went to Kentucky State [Kentucky State College; Kentucky State University, Frankfort, Kentucky], and she was very hopeful that I would be willing to be interviewed by the recruiter when he came. She was telling him that I was a speaker, that I was smart and that I could sing, and that I could be on any or all of those scholarships and it would be a wonderful experience. So I listened and I met the recruiter when he came, among other recruiters who came to my school [Shortridge High School, Indianapolis, Indiana], but I met him. But he told me about a man named Dr. Henry E. Cheaney and that he was a history and political science professor at Kentucky State. So I did all this research on Dr. Henry E. Cheaney. Excuse me. He was renowned. And I said, "Oh, I have to study under him, I just have to go there." And the choir, the concert choir of Kentucky State, was traveling all over and, including New York, inclu- I mean everywhere. And they were under a master director. And many of those people in that choir have gone on to be in operas and all that. So then I said, "Oh, I want to be in that choir." And, so then I looked at some of the other professors. One of the top speech and drama persons, Dr. Winona Lee Fletcher, was at Kentucky State. And when I went to their campus, I loved it. Rolling hills, buildings that were welcoming, attitudes and behaviors that were embracing. I'd never been around that many black people who were educated and had a mind to encourage me to be my best and to achieve against the odds and all that. And it wasn't so far from Indianapolis [Indiana] that if, if anything else, you could catch a bus and go home. So I selected Kentucky State.$You also are an author?$$Yes, yes (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Tell me about your book.$$I--one day I received a call from a literary agent and she asked me had I ever considered writing. I said, "I consider it all the time, but I just haven't had time." And she said, I said, "The only thing I can think of offhand--." She was thinking a compilation of speeches would be a book. And I said, "I'm sure that's true, but I don't have time to put all that together." I said, "One thing they love, they, my audiences, they love this thing I wrote called the alphabet." She said, "What is it?" I said, "It's A to Z, and it is the walk away." Even at, even when I'm with corporations, they said, "Will you do the alphabet?" I said, "The alphabet is not in this speech." They said, "But would you just do it?" I said, "You're the client, of course I'll do it." And every letter is a word of empowerment, attitude, brain power, courage, dedication, preparation, now, all of that. And it just goes (makes sound) like that. It goes very quickly, and people just cannot believe that I'm going through the whole alphabet in a new form and way. So she said, "I believe that every chapter is a letter." And I said, "Really?" Attitude, brain power, courage. So she said, "Write me an outline of three chapters. Write me an outline of your book and then write me three chapters and then I'll shop it." And she did, and the book became bestselling. And she said, she called me one day and she said, "I don't want to blow your mind." And I said, "Okay, what happened?" Like I said, I had dismissed it, you know, what's this? She said, "We shopped it to five houses, publishing houses in New York [New York], and--," I'm sorry, "--we shopped it to seven, and five bought the book. Five bid the book."$$Tell me the name of the book again.$$'A Is for Attitude: An Alphabet for Living' [Patricia Russell-McCloud].$$And what year was it published?$$Ninety-nine [1999].$$Ninety-nine [1999]$$And that--then it was re-launched last month, because it was bestselling. And then they changed the cover, the forward, and the acknowledgements.$$Who wrote the forward?$$Margot James Copeland [HistoryMaker Margot Copeland], the national president of The Links [The Links, Incorporated].

The Honorable Les Brown

Motivational speaker Les Brown was born Leslie Calvin Brown on February 17, 1945, in Miami, Florida. After giving birth to Brown and his twin brother, Wes, on the floor of an abandoned building, Brown’s biological mother gave her sons up for adoption when they were six weeks old to Mrs. Mamie Brown. When he was in fifth grade, Brown was forced back a grade by the school’s principal after being disruptive in class. Brown’s demotion subsequently led him to being placed in special education classes and labeled as mentally retarded. As an adolescent, Brown attended Booker T. Washington High School where he was influenced by a speech and drama instructor who encouraged him to pursue a career in radio broadcasting.

After graduating from high school and briefly working for the Department of Sanitation, Brown worked as an errand boy for a Miami Beach radio station. At the station, Brown observed the disc jockeys with hopes of one day becoming an on-air personality. His break came when one of the disc jockeys became inebriated. Brown stood in for him and then was hired as a disc jockey. In the late 1960s, Brown moved to Columbus, Ohio, to work for WVKO Radio, where he became active in the community. Brown’s political activism in Columbus won him a seat with the 29th House District of the Ohio State Legislature. In his first year, Brown passed more legislature than any other freshman representative in Ohio State legislative history. In his third term, Brown served as chair of the Human Resources Committee.

In 1981, Brown left the Ohio State House of Representatives to care for his ailing mother back in Florida. While in Miami, he continued to focus on social issues by developing a youth center training program. In 1986, Brown entered the public speaking arena on a full time basis and formed Les Brown Enterprises, Inc. In 1989, Brown received the National Speakers Association’s highest award, the Council of Peers Award of Excellence (CPAE). In 1990, Brown recorded the Emmy Award-winning series of speeches entitled You Deserve, which became the lead fundraising program of its kind for pledges to PBS stations nationwide. In 1991, Toastmasters International selected Brown as one of the world’s best speakers and awarded him the Golden Gavel Award.

Brown ranks amongst the nation’s leading authorities in understanding and stimulating human potential; he is a featured guest on many radio broadcasting stations and is often hired by professional corporations to teach and inspire new levels of achievement.

Accession Number

A2007.292

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/17/2007

Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

Frederick R. Douglass Elementary

First Name

Leslie "Les"

Birth City, State, Country

Miami

HM ID

BRO49

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

George Fraser

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

New York, New York

Favorite Quote

Stand Up For What You Believe In Because You Can Fall For Anything.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

2/17/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pie (Sweet Potato)

Short Description

State representative The Honorable Les Brown (1945 - ) formed Les Brown Enterprises, Inc. in 1986. In the late 1960s through the 1970s, Brown served as an Ohio state representative. As a motivational speaker, he was a featured guest on many radio broadcasting stations and in corporate venues.

Employment

WMBM radio

WVKO radio

Ohio State House of Representative

WEDR radio

Les Brown Enterprises

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:6030,125:6930,136:7920,194:20790,394:22950,422:25020,446:26280,462:35740,514:39819,544:41728,579:43720,625:44218,632:44882,643:45214,648:46542,677:46957,683:49032,719:49364,724:53026,743:53602,752:55330,792:56770,823:57058,828:57490,842:58714,867:59074,873:59506,880:60298,893:60586,898:61090,907:65870,949:66554,960:68986,1010:69518,1018:70810,1045:73394,1089:74078,1100:74382,1105:74686,1139:78486,1216:79246,1238:80006,1248:82818,1288:83426,1299:83882,1307:84186,1312:84490,1317:84794,1322:85098,1327:86086,1345:87302,1368:87758,1375:88518,1397:89734,1425:96950,1431:97440,1439:101570,1535:103250,1572:106330,1650:106610,1655:106890,1660:107450,1670:107870,1678:108850,1686:109480,1697:109970,1706:110950,1727:115920,1847:126862,1966:127972,1986:131080,2052:132560,2091:135816,2165:136556,2182:140320,2190:141013,2209:143924,2229:144536,2240:145556,2259:145964,2266:146644,2279:146916,2284:147324,2291:149588,2314:154484,2385:156116,2403:156788,2411:164564,2517:164852,2548:165572,2561:172040,2642$0,0:5460,155:5700,160:8700,233:8940,238:9360,246:9840,256:13440,330:13980,342:14880,363:15120,368:15480,373:16620,409:18780,459:19020,464:20340,507:20760,515:21360,527:21840,536:22080,541:22320,546:22680,559:23040,567:23640,579:31396,656:31837,665:33034,694:33601,706:34672,725:35995,757:36373,764:36877,773:37318,783:37822,792:38326,802:38956,813:39460,828:39712,833:42358,901:42610,906:44185,950:45886,980:46138,985:46831,1000:54250,1043:56150,1078:58450,1148:59150,1156:69050,1293:70250,1323:71050,1332:74605,1413:74985,1418:75460,1424:80140,1512:80844,1521:81724,1539:96810,1806:98650,1836:99290,1845:107518,1978:113434,2070:115238,2098:118471,2129:122658,2221:133718,2504:138616,2698:140038,2723:140670,2732:141460,2806:151168,2898:156412,3055:157856,3074:159832,3134:160136,3149:172072,3393:183710,3568:184438,3577:184984,3584:185712,3670:187441,3686:192355,3755:201923,3914:207512,4021:210347,4075:216662,4105:217880,4125:218750,4137:221186,4182:222143,4194:224610,4203
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Les Brown's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Les Brown lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his adoption

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Les Brown talks about his learning disability

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Les Brown talks about his adopted sister, Margaret Ann Sampson

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers his mother's arrest

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers his godmother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls his early influences

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Les Brown describes the Overtown neighborhood in Miami, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Les Brown describes the sights of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls his introduction to motivational speaking

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - The Honorable Les Brown describes the smells and sounds of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his early aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - The Honorable Les Brown lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers Douglas Elementary School in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls his early mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Les Brown describes segregation in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls his brief involvement in football

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his twin brother

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls his start as a radio disk jockey

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers working for WMBM Radio in Miami Beach, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls transitioning to WVKO Radio in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his start at WVKO Radio

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Les Brown describes the qualities of a successful disk jockey

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Les Brown describes the African American radio community

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls the conservative attitudes in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls his early community organizing

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Les Brown talks about police brutality

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls his termination from WVKO Radio in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers becoming the program director of WVKO Radio

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls running for the Ohio General Assembly

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers C.J. McLin

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers retiring from the Ohio General Assembly

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls studying the oratory of Reverend Dr. Johnnie Colemon

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers lessons from his time as a state legislator

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls building alliances as a state legislator

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Les Brown talks about political campaigning in the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Les Brown talks about political campaigning in the white community

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers protesting against police brutality

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls founding the Les Brown Youth Enrichment Seminar, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls founding the Les Brown Youth Enrichment Seminar, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls joining WEDR radio in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls the Liberty City uprisings in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls being targeted by the state attorney general

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Les Brown talks about the Les Brown Youth Enrichment Seminar

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers the mentorship of Mike Williams

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Les Brown describes the influence of Mike Williams

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls the encouragement of Horace Perkins

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Les Brown talks about his relationship with Mike Williams

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Les Brown describes the black community in Miami, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Les Brown describes Miami's African American political leadership

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers his program for African American and Haitian children

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls working with Clarence King in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his decision to become a motivational speaker

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls training as a motivational speaker

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - The Honorable Les Brown talks about his honors and awards

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Les Brown talks about his success as a motivational speaker

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his oratorical strategies

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Les Brown remembers funding his early speaking career

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls opening an office in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Les Brown describes the motivational speaking industry

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his speech writing technique

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls his experiences of discrimination as a motivational speaker

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Les Brown describes his advantages as a motivational speaker

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - The Honorable Les Brown recalls his appearances on PBS

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

2$5

DATitle
The Honorable Les Brown talks about police brutality
The Honorable Les Brown recalls founding the Les Brown Youth Enrichment Seminar, pt. 2
Transcript
But Les [HistoryMaker Les Brown], let's talk about that, that period a little bit more and the reason I wanna do it, I wanna understand what is sort of happening with you--$$Um-hm.$$--as you're sort of growing and maturing--$$Um-hm.$$--and then I wanna understand also the context of--$$Yes.$$--what Columbus [Ohio] was like you know besides Woody Hayes. So what is the black community like? What is the white community like? You know besides just umbrage of this conservative town?$$Police brutality was very, very flagrant and very bold. They did not hide it then. I mean people could stand around and they would beat people publicly. That infuriated me. So I was the first person to do editorials on that and held demonstrations and demanded that the cops be fired. Brought enough pressure to get them fired and then they would go before a review board of other police officers and they would be reinstated. But we, we knew that we were fighting a losing battle but we said we need to fight anyhow because this is the Gestapo of our community. And they knew how to intimidate people and they knew they had carte blanche. All they had to say as they do today, I thought he had a gun and they would kill people. And that so, that was, that was a very tough issue and even to this day I have to walk away from some things that I see because it number one, people feel powerless in the face of it which I think is crazy because nobody is invincible although they're very powerful, they're the only licensed assassins in our community, but it's a very difficult situation because you need them to protect you from criminals and then at the same time there are many of them 35 percent of them are mentally ill and are criminals themselves with a badge and a gun you know. Look at the newspaper coming through the airport. Young guy was arrested for nothing and a cop struck--I mean stuck a screwdriver up his rectum. I mean that's that's sick and that's just the tip of the iceberg. What has happened--so that's that's been one area of my life I had to shut down. I've seen it most of my life. I have a strong passion about it and perhaps one of the reasons that I'm leaving Chicago [Illinois] because of the, the feeling of powerlessness that people have for the past twenty years police have used cattle prods on the gums, the lips, the penis and testicles of African American males to extract confessions and for crimes they did not commit. It was proven by a panel and they sat on the findings of that panel until the policemen could not be prosecuted and the city could not be sued and the statute of limitations ran out.$And then I put my name on the, on the register and they called, the Les Brown Youth Enrichment Seminar. "Members of the committee thank you very much for this opportunity to speak to you today." I said, "As you can see here I have five hundred sheets of paper and it would not be cost effective to duplicate this and give it to each of you because you wouldn't have time read it anyhow. So let me tell you about the Les Brown Youth Enrichment Seminar. We have gathered here as I have listened to you to provide funding for programs that will help kids to make it through the summer. The Les Brown Youth Enrichment Seminar is designed to give kids the tools to make it, not only during the summer, but during life. So I believe that we can have Little League football teams and baseball teams and basketball teams. We can also have little league dermatologists and cardiologists and that's what this program is designed to do. To let our kids know they're molding now what they will be in the future." So they said, "Whoa." No one had ever come up there and they talked about it from that perspective. They said, "Well, how much will your program costs?" I didn't know. I played bid whist and I'm very good and we always say come high or stay home. All the other programs like one hundred thousand, two hundred thousand dollars, so I said, "$350,000." And they said, "$350,000?" I said, "Yes." And they spoke among themselves. They said, "Mr. Brown [HistoryMaker Les Brown], what about a hundred thousand dollars? It's the first program?" I didn't speak immediately because I didn't want to speak in unknown tongues. I was excited. I said I can't believe this. So I paused. I said, "That'll be good to start it off." And they said, "Very good, go to the clerk and they will cut you a check tonight for thirty-five thousand dollars for startup. Mr. Brown?" "Yes." "Go to the clerk, he's to your left and they will cut you a check tonight for thirty-five thousand dollars as startup." I said, "Yes." I went over to the clerk. They asked for my name, my address, my social security number. I gave it to them and they gave me a check. And I'm saying oh my god. I became paranoid as I'm walking into the elevator. I thought that somebody was following me so I wouldn't get on the elevator with anybody for fear that somebody would rob me. And then when nobody was around, I got on the elevator, I went downstairs. My heart is beating real fast. I go to a payphone booth and called my sister. I said, "Margaret Ann [Margaret Ann Sampson], come get me quick." She said, "Why?" I said, "I'm at Dade County Auditorium [Miami Dade County Auditorium, Miami, Florida] and they gave me thirty-five thousand dollars." And she said, "For what?" I said, "For a youth program." She said, "You don't know anything about training youth." I said, "I know but we can go to the library tomorrow." (Laughter) And so my sister came by there. She said, "Where will you be?" I said, "I'll be in the payphone booth." She said, "Why?" I said, "I just feel like somebody's watching me." So she came by there and she said, "Leslie? Leslie?" And I was in this payphone booth. I had (unclear) the payphone booth and I, and I opened the door a little bit so the light would be on. She said, "Leslie?" I said, "I'm down here." She said, "Where are you?" I said, "Here." She said, "Look at you sweating. Why are you in there?" I said, "I don't know. I just felt like somebody was watching me." She said, "For what?" I said, "I got a thirty-five thousand dollar check." She said, "Why?" "To train to some youth." She said, "You are kidding." I said, "Yes." I said, "Could you take off from school tomorrow and go to the library with me and help me find a program so we can start?" She said, "Yes," so she took off the next day. We went to the library to find various programs that was existing across the country. We got the best ideas and put that program together and then I started doing that and I did a youth training in Miami, Florida and that was a new beginning in a special kind of way because the activist in me went down in Miami and became politically involved.

Donna Satchell

Donna Satchell was born on December 20, 1951 in Brooklyn, New York to Jennie and J.C Horton. The family moved to Mount Vernon, New York where she attended public school. After high school, Satchell worked for over ten years in various administrative positions for Booz Allen Hamilton, the American Stock Exchange, and Mutual of New York.

Satchell’s career began with the Bristol Myers Squibb Company-Clairol Division in 1984. While working at Bristol Myers, Satchell was promoted from administrative assistant to category development manager in 1998. She also attended Mercy College at night to receive her B.S. degree in business administration in 1989.

Her twenty-plus years of corporate experience combined with her desire to help firms develop their employees helped her build a business based on her professional and personal business ethics and experiences. In 2001, Satchell founded STARR Consulting and Training. Her workforce training programs focus on customer service, team work, time management, principles for workplace success, and public speaking. Her clients include the Coca-Cola Company, The City Atlanta, Cox Communications, the Centers for Disease Control, and the Internal Revenue Service.

The Lessons Learned in Corporate America and How to Make the Most of Your 9 to 5 are just two popular titles among her DVD lecture series. Satchell is also the co-author of The Power of Motivation and a five-part series entitled 303 Solutions. She is one of the co-founders of Women Aspiring Together to Succeed and a member of the National Speakers Association, Les Brown Speakers Network, and the American Society for Training and Development.

Satchell currently resides in Stone Mountain, Georgia.

Accession Number

A2007.014

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/18/2007

Last Name

Satchell-Kimbell

Maker Category
Schools

Mount Vernon High School

Washington Junior High School

Robert Fulton Public School

Westchester Community College

Mercy College

First Name

Donna

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

SAT02

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

It Is Never Too Late To Be All That You Can Be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

12/20/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Macaroni And Cheese

Short Description

Business consultant and motivational speaker Donna Satchell (1951 - ) founded STARR Consulting and Training, a workforce training program.

Employment

Clairol, Inc.

Booz Allen Hamilton

New York Mutual Life Insurance Company

American Stock Exchange

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:3807,89:5427,112:7533,147:8019,159:8586,169:9234,179:10854,205:12798,252:13851,267:20390,339:20908,347:21500,357:21944,365:22832,380:26140,454:26460,460:26716,466:27804,488:28700,506:31386,540:32034,550:34368,569:34632,574:35622,593:36414,606:37272,634:38064,649:40044,708:40572,717:41100,726:42618,747:42882,752:43278,759:51112,814:55140,834:59423,907:60227,920:67396,1189:81532,1460:82528,1475:88396,1556:88864,1590:89176,1599:89488,1604:89956,1611:90970,1635:91282,1640:92140,1660:92608,1667:93154,1675:95260,1723:105130,1878:105760,1893:106390,1914:107090,1925:107440,1931:109120,1971:118446,2212:119066,2226:123400,2294:124840,2314:140520,2487:141795,2508:144090,2547:144430,2552:148762,2620:149650,2635:150538,2650:150834,2655:153698,2681:155231,2728:156107,2746:157275,2769:162702,2837:163104,2847:163975,2871:168062,2962:168330,2967:168732,2974:169871,3004:170139,3009:174829,3193:175298,3201:179184,3284:179519,3291:185330,3304:185816,3311:186140,3316:186869,3347:187355,3354:192944,3459:194726,3494:205940,3673:206700,3689:207156,3697:216183,3783:216876,3802:217254,3812:220782,3897:222042,3923:222420,3930:223050,3941:226100,3958:226520,3966:228270,3996:228690,4003:228970,4008:230180,4017$0,0:255,11:765,18:1615,32:3910,156:4505,168:5270,178:9860,282:15460,357:16860,367:24360,522:25160,531:36388,625:36969,633:38380,660:40704,699:44605,781:50000,863:56454,986:56972,995:57564,1004:57934,1010:59118,1028:59710,1038:60154,1045:61486,1068:62522,1086:80788,1356:86930,1463:87744,1484:90334,1527:95784,1550:99888,1632:115854,1883:122622,2008:123054,2017:124134,2035:130560,2080:133527,2142:134079,2151:139047,2249:139392,2255:139737,2261:147800,2371
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Donna Satchell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell describes her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell describes her maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell remembers her father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell talks about her paternal aunt

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell talks about her mother's relationships

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Donna Satchell describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Donna Satchell recalls playing games with her sister

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Donna Satchell remembers Washington Junior High School in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell describes her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell remembers the Mount Vernon High School Annex in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell recalls President John Fitzgerald Kennedy's assassination

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell remembers Mount Vernon High School in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell describes her mother's opinion of activism

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell recalls Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell remembers her early work experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Donna Satchell recalls her modeling school experiences in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Donna Satchell recalls her work at the American Stock Exchange in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Donna Satchell describes her professional ambitions

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Donna Satchell remembers her decision to attend college

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell remembers leaving Booz Allen Hamilton Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell remembers Westchester Community College in Valhalla, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell recalls being hired at Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell describes her career at Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell recalls the support of her education at Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell recalls meeting the president of U.S. operations at Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell recalls her promotion to marketing at Clairol, Inc., pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Donna Satchell recalls her promotion to marketing at Clairol, Inc., pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell recalls joining the sales office of Clairol, Inc. in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell recalls her business, Cultural Art Works, in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell recalls founding Women Aspiring Together To Succeed

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell recalls her decision to leave Clairol, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell remembers founding her business, Success Can Be Yours, LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell recalls her work in change management for the City of Atlanta

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell describes her work with Les Brown

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Donna Satchell talks about her writing projects

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Donna Satchell describes her motivational speaking engagements

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Donna Satchell talks about Dennis Paul Kimbro

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Donna Satchell reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Donna Satchell shares a message for future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Donna Satchell describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Donna Satchell reflects upon her legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Donna Satchell reflects upon her legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Donna Satchell narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$2

DAStory

6$9

DATitle
Donna Satchell remembers founding her business, Success Can Be Yours, LLC
Donna Satchell recalls her modeling school experiences in New York City
Transcript
And so how does your business work?$$Well it started and it's, it's funny because when I started I truly had no idea what I was doing.$$What's the name of the company?$$Right now it's Starr Consulting and Training [Stone Mountain, Georgia], S-T-A-R-R, Consulting and Training, but it didn't even start as Starr Consulting and Training, it started under the name of Success Can Be Yours [Success Can Be Yours, LLC, Stone Mountain, Georgia]. That was the first name, Success Can Be Yours, everyone can be a success. And I was talking about workplace success, but I was just looking at being a motivational speaker, I didn't even know anything about training, I knew so little it's amazing. But I joined the National Speakers Association, learned some things about speaking, joined--then I--a turn, a kind of like turning point was I became associated with [HistoryMaker] Les Brown, motivational trainer, a motivational speaker, a friend ran into him at the airport, the Atlanta airport [Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia], she didn't live in Atlanta [Georgia]. And she told him about me and she was telling him how I was passionate about what I did, her name is Stephanie Townsend [ph.]. She, she called me one day--no one day I come home, you have to realize I don't know what I'm doing with my business. And I, I pick up the phone and there is this message on there, it's like, "Yes, Donna [HistoryMaker Donna Satchell], success can be yours 'cause you have--." And the voice is going on and on and on I'm trying to think who is this, I'm thinking I know who this sounds like but it wouldn't be that person because that person doesn't know me and it wouldn't make any sense for that person to call me, well it actually it ended up being Les Brown. He had run into my girlfriend Stephanie at the airport, she told him about me 'cause she said, "I know, nobody else who's as passionate about what they're doing, and they don't know what they're doing, they're not making any money." She said, "I don't know anybody else who every time I call you're excited, you don't know what you're doing, you're telling me you're not making any money, but you're excited," so she told about me. He called me and then I had a conversation with him and he had, he was starting a speakers program. So I took my hard earned money and after arguing with him for hours on the phone, I packed up everything I had on my business and sent it to him. With what, with what I thought was a huge check that was like you be out of your mind to pay this amount of money, but I sent it to him. And in the meantime I was starting to do some training and I had, I had joined Fred Pryor [Fred Pryor Seminars], their national training company, I'd done some training for them. And that's contractual work, so you do it for a couple of months and then I found that the traveling was just wearing me down I wasn't sure if they were paying enough. And that wasn't working, so you're, you're in this business but you don't--it's really kind of strange, you don't know what you're doing. You're doing this, this is working, you're get paid you know, not getting paid a lot over here, getting paid a little bit over here. You know, you, in your mind, you never thought you'd have a business but slowly some things are coming together but coming together real slow but you know you love to do this. So through the Les Brown training program, this is like you're talking about a slight turning 'cause I'm still trying to figure out my business, he, he had somebody on the--we were having a conference call, he had someone on the phone who was fulfilling a training contact for the City of Atlanta. And her name was Pam Evans [ph.] and she was trying to bring on trainers to work for I guess a couple of months for the City of Atlanta. So I met with her and she accepted me as one of the trainers, and I was doing change management training for the City of Atlanta. Then I found out, I really love training.$One of the things that happened when I was in, at Mutual of New York [Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York; The MONY Group, Inc., New York, New York], after I had graduated from high school [Mount Vernon High School, Mount Vernon, New York] was I wanted t- I got involved with taking different kind of classes. I remember taking, I, I was reading the paper and they had a school, it was Robert Powers or something school for [John Robert Powers School, New York, New York]--I'm not even sure how--it wasn't really a modeling school, but it was more on culture, or--the term escapes me right now. But I remember taking classes there for about a year and they taught you how, taught you how to walk and talk and maybe it was kind of like a modeling school. So I took classes there, then like a year later I took classes with Oph- at Ophelia DeVore modeling school [Ophelia DeVore School of Self-Development and Modeling, New York, New York] 'cause I thought--there was part of me that was thinking about being a model, or wanted to pursue modeling. And I loved learning, I loved learning about how to put on makeup. I loved learning--also a lot of modeling is how to think better. And I guess I was looking to grow my, my self-esteem, in some ways, so I, oh I remember going to Ophelia DeVore modeling school, loved it, loved it.$$What did, what, what can you remember about that?$$There were different classes we were taking, one class is about makeup, classes about how to think better, classes about attitude. The graduation was held at this hotel and you had to--I actually made the dress that I end up wearing in the graduation. I'll never forget it was a very--I guess a political statement, it was a red, white and blue dress--no not red, white and blue, my goodness, red, black and green. One side it was red, the middle black and side was green and it was this, this gown I had made. And we had a graduation ceremony it was just, it was just a lot fun it was--I remembering learning so much and trying to, to, to stretch my mind to understand who I was as a person, or who I was as a woman. And I would still, still my greatest dream I guess in a way that I thought was achievable was to be a secretary. But I was taking all these other classes and doing all these other things. So it was a kind of conflict I guess one would have, one would say.

Audrey Lavinia Smaltz

Fashion show manager Audrey Lavinia Smaltz was born on June 2, 1937 in New York City. Growing up in the Harlem River Houses with neighbors such as Dr. Alvin Poussaint, Bob Moses and David Scott, Smaltz attended P.S. 46 and the Harriet Beecher Stowe Girls Junior High School. Accepted into New York City’s High School of Music and the Performing Arts, she took her first professional modeling job from baseball’s New York Giants. After graduating high school in 1955, Smaltz worked as a model and fashion commentator. An art major at the City College of New York, Smaltz also worked for Metropolitan Life Insurance and the Rueben H. Donnelly Corporation.

In 1962, Smaltz worked as a model and salesperson at Bloomingdale’s and she became an assistant fashion coordinator for the store in 1964. Hired by Lane Bryant Clothing in 1965, she worked as a model and buyer and also as a fashion coordinator. Moving to Chicago in 1969, Smaltz joined the Ebony Fashion Fair in 1970 as a commentator and fashion editor. In 1977, Smaltz organized her Ground Crew team, a backstage management group which has staffed many fashion shows including those by Vera Wang, Giorgio Armani, Betsey Johnson, Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass, Alice Roi, Michael Kors, Luca Luca, Nanette Lepore, Tommy Hilfiger, Kenneth Cole and Ralph Rucci. Smaltz has also worked with corporations like Nike, Vogue, Saks Fifth Avenue, Macy’s, and J. Crew.

A contributing editor to Vogue, Mirabella and Mode magazines, Smaltz appears frequently on QVC and the Oprah Winfrey Show. She is a board member of the Black Fashion Museum, Dress for Success, the Gracie Mansion Conservancy and Fashion Group International.

Accession Number

A2005.060

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/8/2005

Last Name

Smaltz

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Lavinia

Schools

City College of New York

New York University

Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts

First Name

Audrey

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

SMA02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Divine Love Always Has Met And Always Will Meet Every Human Need.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

6/2/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Fashion show stage manager Audrey Lavinia Smaltz (1937 - ) is the founder and organizer of Ground Crew, a backstage management group which has staffed many fashion shows including those by Vera Wang, Giorgio Armani, Oscar de la Renta, Michael Kors, Kenneth Cole and Ralph Rucci. Smaltz has also worked with corporations like Nike, Vogue, and Saks Fifth Avenue.

Employment

The Ground Crew

Johnson Publishing Co.

Lane Bryant

Bloomingdales

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:696,30:4002,79:5829,103:10005,283:30415,636:38530,741:39720,757:40060,762:42185,795:57302,1040:58112,1128:98205,1636:99255,1706:99555,1711:100980,1743:117470,1978$0,0:11040,217:11520,223:14016,251:18414,277:21634,363:25958,435:26326,440:37447,562:40216,678:63003,971:64267,988:64583,993:64899,998:88591,1346:89242,1354:93085,1376:93450,1382:97465,1454:129925,1915:131200,2076:160122,2361:189590,2688
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Audrey Lavinia Smaltz's interview, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes the history of her family name

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Slating of Audrey Lavinia Smaltz's interview, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes the beginnings of her business, The Ground Crew

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Slating of Audrey Lavinia Smaltz's interview, pt. 3

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes meeting relatives during a visit to Hilton Head, South Carolina as an adult

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes her father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes her father's places of employment

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about her father and being born in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about her parents' wedding and honeymoon

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls her earliest childhood memories of living in the Harlem River Houses

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls childhood gifts

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls the sounds, sights, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls her childhood in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about growing up with SNCC leader Robert Parris Moses and others in Harlem, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about attending P.S. 46 Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about attending the High School of Music and Art in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls her school teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes the High School of Music & Arts, Devore's School of Charm and modeling

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about being a "Say Hey" kid for baseball player Willie Mays, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about becoming a fashion show commentator

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about staying in New York City after graduating from high school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about her family's move to Harlem's Washington Heights

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about attending City College of New York and working

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls working as an advertising art director

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about her brief career as a stock broker at Bache & Company

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls being hired at Bloomingdale's

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls being beauty pageant contestant

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about being the second African American on Bloomingdale's training team

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about becoming an assistant buyer at Bloomingdale's working with Doris Salinger

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls employers underwriting her costs to attend the March on Washington and Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s funeral

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls being discriminated against and arrested in Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about Ebony Fashion Fair

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about working at Lane Bryant as a model, then buyer

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes being introduced to Dr. Stanley Hughes by model Dorothea Towles and marrying him

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about being hired by Johnson Publishing Company

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about working for Ebony Fashion Fair

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls how she commented for Ebony Fashion Fair shows

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about leaving Ebony Fashion Fair and Johnson Publishing Company

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes her role at Johnson Publishing Company

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about starting her own business after leaving Johnson Publishing Company

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about working as a Fashion Fair consultant and starting The Ground Crew

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about the services The Ground Crew provides

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about lack of diversity in the modeling industry

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz declines to name her favorite models

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes her future plans for The Ground Crew

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about her mother's sense of style

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz recalls being hired by the grandson of Steve Kaplan, the man who hired her at Lane Bryant forty years before

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz reflects upon how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Audrey Lavinia Smaltz narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about becoming a fashion show commentator
Audrey Lavinia Smaltz talks about working for Ebony Fashion Fair
Transcript
So that was that, led to my-- that was my first modeling assignment, and after that I didn't really do that much [as a model], you know. It was, there was not much of an outlet. You do fashion shows, that's what you would do, fashion shows at churches. And one particular fashion show they needed a commentator and the commentator I believe was going to get twenty-five dollars and the models were getting ten, so I became the commentator. I just said, I'll be the commentator, just like that. I'll be the commentator. And then they heard me do the commentary. My mother [Rebecca Dora Capers-Smaltz] came with me to make certain that I did the right thing and she was my critic. Oh god was she the critic. And she told me, well you said pretty too many times and you said this too many times and you licked your lips, you know, don't you lick your lips, you know. You black folk always licking your lips. Stop licking your lips and make certain you smile and take--oh, did she give me cree--feedback and criticism all the time. That was funny. So she was my first critic and I became a well-known commentator after that. People would hire me. I just started getting hired all the time. Then I went up to thirty-five dollars an hour--I mean for the show, not an hour, for the show.$$That was pretty good.$$Oh, it was big money, big, big cause you could have a whole dress made to order for twenty-five. So that was great. You know whatever I made I had a new dress made. I didn't save any money. I was living at home and I spent my money, fun, all in Harlem [New York]. Everything was Harlem.$$So this is all during high school [High School of Music & Art, New York, New York], right?$$High school, um-hmm, all during high school. Wow, yeah. And then when I went on to CCNY [City College of New York, New York City] I just kept on modeling and--well it wasn't full time you know. Not like today you know, it was the weekends. You didn't have to take off.$Now the Ebony Fashion Fair was the idea of Eunice Johnson, right? I mean what started the--$$Actually it was the idea of Freda DeNight. It was Freda DeNight's--well you know it's a lot of stories mixed up now after forty eight years. But Mrs. Dent from New Orleans, Dillard University [New Orleans, Louisiana], she needed a fundraiser and she called--she, she said she called Freda [DeNight], Freda spoke to [HM] John [H.] Johnson, John Johnson said fine and Freda got a fashion show together cause Freda was the Fashion Editor or the Home Director Editor or something. And Daviera Edwards [ph.] knew about fashion shows who was Freda's assistant, and so they got a fashion show together. They picked up the girls out of New York. Those are all basically New York girls I think, cause two of my friends are--I'm sure there were some other girls in there and they hit the road with six shows in 1958. And they went by plane and then they realized it's--then it was thirty shows and then they needed a bus and then from then on it's now 160 shows. So when I went there we were doing about seventy-eight shows and then into the third year with me, we doubled those shows. So we went from January to December, we had a break and then we went, we were--excuse me, we went from September through December, then we had a break and we went from January through April. And I think basically they still do that same schedule, I'm not sure, but it was an incredible time. I met Yves St. Laurent, I met Givenchy, Hubert de Givenchy, Emanuel Ungaro, Bill Blass, Oscar de la Renta, Pauline Trigere. I met all the top designers of the world. I went to their ateliers. We purchased clothes. Eunice had an unlimited budget to buy anything she wanted. We purchased all the clothes for the Ebony Fashion Fair. We'd come back, I would organize the show. I was the fashion coordinator. We hired the models, we'd have model exhibits where the--auditions where the models would come from all over cause there are thousands of girls and guys who wanted to be an Ebony Fashion Fair model. And I--all those young ladies, not all, but so many of them are still my friends. And the most beautiful people you can imagine I met on the road with the Ebony Fashion Fair, doctors, lawyers, Indian Chiefs, bus drivers, sanitation workers, you name it. And people even till this day, "Audrey, I remember you from the Ebony Fashion Fair." I say, "oh, you must be very old. That was thirty years ago." But so many people always remember me from the Ebony Fashion Fair. I had fun. I was a fun commentator. I would just sit up there in a high chair and just talk.$$Can you give--$$Make people laugh.