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James F. Blue, III

Producer James F. Blue III was born on August 5, 1969 in Richmond, Virginia to James F. Blue, Jr. and Addie L. Wall. In 1991, Blue received his B.A. degree from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

In 1991, Blue was hired by NBC News as an editorial producer and guest booker for The Today Show. Two years later, he served as a field producer for a primetime magazine show at NBC News. In 1994, he was hired as a Nightline producer for ABC News in London, United Kingdom. During his twelve year career with Nightline, Blue produced stories on the Oklahoma City Bombing, the 1996 presidential elections, colorism within the Black community, and the auction of the estate of Jackie Kennedy. In 2006, he joined Discovery Communications as a producer with the Koppel Unit. The same year, Blue’s debut documentary for Discovery, Iran – Most Dangerous Nation, won the national Emmy Award for best long-form program. In 2008, Blue founded Public Affairs Media Group, Inc. in Baltimore, Maryland. He went on to serve as executive producer at BET Networks in 2011, where he produced the documentary "Michelle Obama on a Mission: Impact Africa." In 2013, Blue was appointed as the Washington Bureau Chief and White House Correspondent by ARISE News. In 2015, Blue joined PBS NewsHour as the senior content and special senior producer.

Blue served on the advisory board of The Samaritan Community beginning in 2008. In 2009, he was elected to the board of trustees of the Maryland Institute College of Art and the board of overseers of the Baltimore School for the Arts. In 2013, Blue became a member of the board of trustees of the Princeton Alumni Weekly. He was a member of the Overseas Press Club, the National Association of Black Journalists, and the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association.

Blue has won every major broadcast journalism award including eight national Emmy Awards, two Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia Awards, two George Foster Peabody Awards, and two Overseas Press Club Awards. In 2012, he received the NABJ Award for Overall Excellence. Blue was also twice a finalist for the Livingston Award for Young Journalists.

Blue and his husband have two children: Alden and Effie.

James F. Blue III was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 13, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.070

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/18/2019

Last Name

Blue

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

F.

Schools

Princeton University

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Richmond

HM ID

BLU03

Favorite Season

Autumn

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard and Cape Town, South Africa

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/5/1969

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Favorite Food

Shrimp from Nancy's

Short Description

Producer James F. Blue, III (1969- ) served as a producer for NBC News, ABC News in London, and BET Networks before becoming the senior content and special senior producer at PBS News in 2015.

Employment

NBC News

ABC News

Discovery Communications

Public Affairs Media Group, Inc.

Black Entertainment Television

ARISE News

PBS NewsHour

Favorite Color

Purple

Antonio Dickey

Photographer Antonio Dickey was born on July 6, 1955, in Chicago, Illinois, to Ceasar and Josephine Dickey. He attended Holy Angels Catholic Elementary School and St. Leo the Great Catholic School, graduating in 1966 and 1969. He went on to attend high school at De LaSalle Institute in Chicago, graduating in 1973. Later, Dickey attended Columbia College Chicago and Kennedy-King College in Chicago, where he studied photography and business.

Dickey began his career freelance photography career working with the photo bureaus United Press International and Associated Press. Covering sports and breaking news, he was also a stringer for the Chicago Sun-Times and the Chicago Tribune. From 1978 to 1980, he served as principal photographer and photo editor for the Chicago Daily Defender newspaper, where he covered news and sports. Dickey served as campaign photographer for the Harold Washington mayoral election team from 1982 to 1983. In 1983, he was named the official photographer for Harold Washington, the first African American to be elected mayor of the City of Chicago. He served in this role for four years, through 1987, when he was appointed chief mayoral photographer for the City of Chicago. In that capacity, Dickey served for the subsequent administrations of Eugene Sawyer, the second African American to serve as mayor of Chicago from 1987 to 1989, and six terms for Richard M. Daley, from 1989 to 2011. During his career, Dickey also photographed well-known figures including heads of state President Bill Clinton, President Barack Obama, South African President Nelson Mandela and China’s President Hu Jintao. Additionally, he covered a range of key events such as the National Basketball Association’s Chicago Bulls’ six championships, the National Hockey League’s Chicago Blackhawks’ Championships, the Chicago Marathon and several Democratic National Conventions.

Dickey’s photographic works are on permanent exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture and the Harold Washington Library in Chicago. He has been a member of the City Club of Chicago, the City of Chicago Alumni Network, and the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). Dickey received industry recognition for his work including the Best Photo of the Month Award from the Illinois Press Photographers Association in 1978, and the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) Best Photo of the Year Award in 1980.

Antonio Dickey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 9, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.059

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/9/2019

Last Name

Dickey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Brodrick

Occupation
Schools

Holy Angels Catholic School

St. Leo Elementary School

De La Salle Institute

Kennedy–King College

Columbia College Chicago

First Name

Antonio

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

DIC06

Favorite Season

Summertime

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

California, Puerto Rico

Favorite Quote

Don't Let Anyone Stop You

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/6/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Favorite Food

Cheeseburgers, Steak and Potatoes

Short Description

Photographer Antonio Dickey (1955 - ) served as the City of Chicago’s chief mayoral photographer from 1983 to 2011, including the mayoral administrations of Harold Washington, Eugene Sawyer, and Richard M. Daley.

Employment

Draper and Kramer

Chicago Defender

Harold Washington for Mayor

City of Chicago

Favorite Color

Brown

Bill Whitaker

Broadcast journalist Bill Whitaker was born on August 26, 1951, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Marie and William Whitaker, and raised in Media, Pennsylvania. He attended Media Elementary School and Media Junior High. Whitaker graduated from Penncrest High School in 1969. Whitaker went on to earn his B.A. degree in American history from the Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York in 1973. He then graduated with his M.A. degree in African American studies from Boston University in 1974 and enrolled in the Master of Journalism program the University of California, Berkeley.

Whitaker began his journalism career in 1979, serving as a news producer, researcher, and writer for KQED, a public television station in San Francisco. His first reporting job was with the CBS affiliate WBTV-TV in Charlotte, North Carolina, where he covered the contentious 1984 senate race between Jim Hunt and Jesse Helms. Whitaker was hired as a reporter at CBS News that same year and was based in Atlanta, Georgia, where he covered the 1988 presidential campaign of Michael Dukakis. The following year, Whitaker became the CBS News Tokyo correspondent, covering stories throughout Asia, including the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests. He was relocated to Los Angeles to serve as a regular reporter for CBS Evening News in 1992, and appeared in other CBS programs like Sunday Morning and The Early Show. He was CBS News’ lead reporter covering President George W. Bush’s 2000 campaign and also covered Mitt Romney’s 2008 campaign. Whitaker became a correspondent for the CBS newsmagazine 60 Minutes in 2014.

Whitaker served on the board of directors for the Hobart and William Smith Colleges starting in 2002. He was a member of the National Association for Black Journalists in the Black Journalists Association of Southern California Chapter.

Whitaker has received many awards and honors, including honorary degrees from the Hobart and William Smith College in 1997 and Knox College in 2015. He was awarded the News & Documentary Emmy Award for Outstanding Business and Economic Reporting in a News Magazine from the National Academy of Arts and Sciences, an Excellence Award from the National Association of Black Journalists, and the Leonard Zeidenberg First Amendment Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association. He also won an Emmy in 1988 for his coverage of the demise of Jim and Tammy Bakker’s television ministry

Whitaker and his wife, Terry, have two children, William and Lesley.

Bill Whitaker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 18, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.008

Sex

Male

Interview Date

01/18/2017

Last Name

Whitaker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Thomas

Schools

Media Elementary School

Media Junior High School

Penncrest High School

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Boston University

University of California, Berkeley

First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Media

HM ID

WHI23

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

The arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/26/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pasta

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Bill Whitaker (1951-) won an Emmy for his coverage of the demise of Jim and Tammy Bakker’s television ministry, and covered the Tiananmen Square protests. He became a correspondent for the CBS newsmagazine 60 Minutes in 2014.

Employment

The Franklin Institute

Boston University Productions

KQED-FM San Francisco

CBS Affiliate in Charlotte, NC

CBS News

Favorite Color

Fall colors: gold, burnt orange.

John E. Davis

Broadcast journalist and media executive John E. Davis was born on November 3, 1947 in Wichita Falls, Texas to Tommy Christian and Myrtle Donaldson. Davis was raised in Wichita Falls and graduated from Booker T. Washington High School in 1966. He went on to attend Henderson County Junior College in Athens, Texas before transferring to Washington State University, where he received his B.S. degree in broadcast communications in 1970.

Upon graduation, Davis was hired as a news reporter for Fresno, California’s KMJ-TV. In 1977, Davis moved to KGW-TV in Portland, Oregon, where he served as a news reporter and anchor until 1982. Then, for the next twenty years, he worked as a general assignment reporter and later as a weekend anchor for Chicago, Illinois’ WBBM-TV. During his time at WBBM, Davis became the first United States news reporter to interview Nelson Mandela after he was released from prison in 1990. In addition to his work on television, Davis served as a news director and anchor for WVAZ Radio, and has hosted a real estate show on WLS-AM Radio and WIND-AM Radio.

In 2003, Davis founded and served as president of John E. Davis Media, a firm that serves politicians, corporate executives, celebrities and athletes by providing them high-end political consulting, media crisis management and public speaking coaching. Through his media company, Davis has worked on numerous political campaigns, including Scott Lee Cohen for Governor of Illinois; the Terrence J. O’Brien Campaign for Cook County Board President; Howard B. Brookins, Jr.’s Campaign for Cook County State’s Attorney; and Dorothy Brown’s Campaign for Mayor of Chicago.

Davis has earned many honors throughout his career, including a 1988 local Emmy Award for his coverage of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington’s death; an Ada S. McKinley Youth Services Mentor of the Year Award; the Better Communicator Award from the League of Black Women; and a Monarch Award for Outstanding Communicator. He has served as a board member of the Harold Washington Library and of the Greek-American Rehabilitation and Care Centre, and as a charter member of the Saltpond Redevelopment Institute and member of the We Care model program of the Chicago Public Schools and Chicago Police Department.

John E. Davis was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 21, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.259

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/21/2014

Last Name

Davis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Edward

Schools

Booker T. Washington Elementary School

Booker T. Washington Junior High School

Booker T. Washington High School

Henderson County Junior College

Washington State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Wichita Falls

HM ID

DAV36

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Thessaloniki, Greece

Favorite Quote

Can't Nobody Hurt You Like Them that Supposed to Love You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

11/3/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beans and Rice

Short Description

Broadcast journalist and media executive John E. Davis (1947 - ) , founder and president of John E. Davis Media, is best known for his Emmy-winning twenty-year career as a reporter and anchor for Chicago’s WBBM-TV.

Employment

John E. Davis Media

WVAZ Radio

WBBM-TV News

KGW-TV News

KMJ-TV News

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of John E. Davis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John E. Davis lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John E. Davis talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John E. Davis describes visiting his maternal great-grandmother in Cooper, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John E. Davis talks about his maternal great-grandmother's spirituality and the segregation in Cooper, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John E. Davis talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John E. Davis describes living with his maternal grandparents as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - John E. Davis describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - John E. Davis describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John E. Davis talks about his stepfather

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John E. Davis describes his two childhood homes in Wichita Falls, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John E. Davis talks about his school experience in Wichita Falls, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John E. Davis talks about his decision to attend Washington State University on a football scholarship

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John E. Davis talks about racial dynamics at Washington State University in Pullman, Washington during the late 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John E. Davis recalls conversations with black student union members at Washington State University in Pullman, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John E. Davis describes studying broadcast journalism at Washington State University during the late 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John E. Davis talks about reuniting with his father in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John E. Davis describes his and his father's disparate aspirations for a professional football career

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John E. Davis talks about the broadcast communications department at Washington State University in the late 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John E. Davis recalls the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy and Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - John E. Davis talks about joining the broadcast team at KMJ-TV in Fresno, California

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - John E. Davis talks about working at KMJ-TV in Fresno, California from 1970 through 1977

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - John E. Davis describes reporting on the Mount St. Helens eruption in 1980, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - John E. Davis describes reporting on the Mount St. Helens eruption in 1980, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - John E. Davis describes interviewing for CBS in Chicago, Illinois in 1982

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - John E. Davis talks about his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - John E. Davis details his wife's family history

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - John E. Davis talks about the early years of his marriage

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - John E. Davis describes the cross-cultural interaction in his home in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - John E. Davis talks about working as a reporter for CBS in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - John E. Davis recalls one black cameraman's positive reaction to his hiring by CBS in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - John E. Davis describes covering Harold Washington's 1983 mayoral campaign

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - John E. Davis talks about Harold Washington's relationship with black journalists and the media

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - John E. Davis talks about the death of Harold Washington and winning an Emmy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - John E. Davis describes traveling to South Africa to report on the end of apartheid in 1990

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - John E. Davis describes reporting on a February 1990 incident of police violence in South Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - John E. Davis recalls meeting Nelson Mandela the day he was released from prison in 1990

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - John E. Davis describes a series of interviews in South Africa after Nelson Mandela's release from prison

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - John E. Davis recalls the end of his career for CBS in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - John E. Davis talks about working as a media consultant for Chicago politicians

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - John E. Davis talks about the election of HistoryMaker Barack Obama as president of the United States in 2008

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - John E. Davis talks about his radio work in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - John E. Davis reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - John E. Davis talks about lessons he has taught his children and the regrets in his life

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - John E. Davis talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - John E. Davis talks about his annual visit to Greece

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - John E. Davis narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - John E. Davis narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
John E. Davis talks about joining the broadcast team at KMJ-TV in Fresno, California
John E. Davis describes reporting on a February 1990 incident of police violence in South Africa
Transcript
So, in 1968, which is the same year that [Reverend] Dr. [Martin Luther] King [Jr.] is assassinated, President [Lyndon Baines] Johnson created the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders [Kerner Commission], which was really indicting the broadcast community for not having, for excluding African Americans in the newsroom and not covering black life. So, this is at the same, so this indictment comes down in the midst of all the other things that are happening in our country while you were in school [at Washington State University, Pullman, Washington] preparing to, to move into broadcast. Were you aware of that and--$$Not at the time no.$$And when it comes time for you to graduate what are the opportunities available to a young black male graduating in broadcast journalism?$$I really didn't think that there was any opportunity. I never even sought it. I was, I had a little group in, in college and we were singing. We had a good time, didn't make much money of course. When I graduated, I went over to Seattle [Washington] in the summer, and I was pursuing a singing career. And we went over to American Recording and we slapped egg cartons against the wall for acoustics and we sang and we sang and we sang and we sang and nothing happened, so I was, was visiting Washington State, the campus, and this guy, [Eugene] Pat Patterson, who was a real mover and shaker in the legislature in Washington state. He asked me to, if I would give a call to a guy in Fresno, California. They were looking to hire an African American their first, but give them a call. This is something that, that you may be interested in. So I did and they agreed to fly me down to Fresno, California, on the hottest day of the world. I was picked up at the airport by a wonderful brother who was the only black cameraman at the time in all of central California named Earl Bradley. Earl Bradley picked me up in a station wagon with no air conditioning, took me to KMJ-TV, channel 24 [later KSEE] in Fresno, and I was interviewed there, went through all the departments, and I was interviewed and came back to the general manager's office after the interviews with the news director and others and his name was John Edwards, a diminutive little man, wonderful human being, knew Chet Huntley, Tippy Huntley, Chet's wife at NBC, and he said to me, "What do you think?" I said, "I like it, I like the place and I like the people. They seem nice." He says, "Well would you take the job?" I said, "Well I don't, I don't know." "Here's what I'mma promise you, said I'mma promise you that we will not embarrass you, ourselves, or the black community if you take this job. We will train you and you will be ever as professional as anybody else. Would you take the job?" I said, "Yeah, oh yeah I'm taking this job," (laughter).$And we, we took off and we went to, to South Africa and we get there and on the very first day that we're in Johannes- arrived in Johannesburg [South Africa], went over to the Carlton Hotel, checked in, went to over to the CBS bureau, got to meet the people there Larry Doyle who was a bu- bureau chief, great guy, and he says, "You guys wanna go out on the streets at all or?" "Well sure." So we, we went out, and he says, "There's a little celebration going on at St. Mary's Church [St. Mary's Anglican Cathedral] in downtown Johannesburg. It's an announcement that they're, they're celebrating the unbanning of the ANC [African National Congress] and other outlawed, you know, organizations." So Randall [Blakey] and I went over there and the people were coming out and they were so joyous, very peaceful, very orderly, but doing the toyi toyi, a little dance that they do--within seconds it seems there was a huge presence of South African police and one guy stepped forward and reading from this little booklet indicating that they were in violation of this particular, this particular law and you have two minutes to break up this illegal assembly, and I'm talking about less than thirty seconds he unleashed holy hell upon these people and a, we have footage of a, a young guy, tall strapping young man in South African police uniform, with the most cherubic face you've ever seen and he turned to be one of the most violent people you have ever seen. He took the barrel of his rifle upside, and he hit this man and killed him. There were three people killed that day in front of us on the first day that we were there for--(simultaneous)--$$Did you film it?$$--doing nothing more than celebrating coming out of a church to cel- celebrate peacefully.$$Did you get all that on film?$$We got it all on film, and when they came to confiscate our footage Randall popped the, the, the housing on the camera where the tape was and gave them the tape and I was incredulous. I said, "Randall why did you do that?" He says, "Just be cool, be cool," and he had actually dropped the original in the trash can and so they had a blank, and when we got back to the bureau Larry Doyle says, and [HM] Carole Simpson was there with ABC. Carole's producer had run off somewhere, but I had pinned her against the wall of the church. I pinned her--$$To protect her.$$--to protect her. She was just totally stunned. She says, "I'll never come back." Of course that mellowed after a few days, but we got back to the bureau and Randall was sitting in his chair and he was just numb and Larry Doyle says, "Well what did you guys see over there?" And we started describing you know how these people came out of the church peacefully and they were just celebrating and then all of a sudden the police came and just unleashed upon them this, this torrent of hate and Larry says and, "So that's not what you saw." And we said, "What do you mean that's not what we saw. We got it on tape." He says, "Look I'm not arguing here. I'm just saying that what you saw is the truth. What the rest of the world will either hear or be reported from the South African government as to what happened," he says, "Read this." He tore off the South African press wire and it says three police office- officers were slightly injured today by a rock and bot- a bottle-throwing mob outside of St. Mary's Church. He says, "That's what, that's the importance of what you shot today. That will negate what they are just saying here. Your footage will offset what they have been saying." No police officers were ever injured. Those people didn't throw anything. They ran. That was our introduction to South Africa and almost every day after that there was some violent occurrence, incident. There was bombings. There were bombings at, at, at bus stations. There were bombings at the ANC building, bombings every single day.$$And were you able to run that footage?$$Oh absolutely, every day.$$And each day?$$I did, I did two stories generally a day from South Africa.$$Did you fear for your life as you were do, running these counter-stories?$$I only, only one time. I made friends with--my father [Felley Donaldson] and mother [Myrtle Donaldson] as domestics always taught us to, to be nice to the people who bring the service. Oh you'll get to meet the kings and the queens, but you'll get to meet them maybe even faster if you're nice to the people who bring the service. So, when we'd had checked into, to the Carlton Hotel in Johannesburg, I met these, these bus, these bellmen and these, these, these young guys who carried our luggage up to the room and we invited them to stay and of course they couldn't stay. They were not allowed. So, but they said if you want to talk to us you know come after work and catch the jitney with us to go to Soweto [South Africa]. So, I did one day and it was a great experience. Riding on these jitneys, overcrowded, going to, to Soweto and not knowing how the heck I was gonna get back into Johannesburg at night. That was kind of frightening because I was dropped off probably about six blocks or so from the hotel and I had to walk and of course I got stopped, I got thrown against the wall, all of my belongings were taken out, and when they saw the American passport they called me kaffir and of course I scraped all my stuff and went back to my hotel.$$And you were by yourself at this point?$$By myself. That was the most fearful.

John X. Miller

Journalist John Xavier Miller, Jr. was born on September 11, 1955 in Henderson, North Carolina to John Miller, Sr. and Betty Faison. Miller was raised in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where he graduated from R.J. Reynolds High School in 1973. He went on to receive his B.A. degree in journalism from Washington and Lee University in 1977.

Miller began his career with an internship at the Twin City Sentinel in the 1970s. From 1978 to 1982, he worked as a copy editor for The Roanoke Times & World News and as a sports copy editor for the Charlotte Observer. Miller then became an original staff member of USA Today when he was hired as the newspaper’s sports copy desk chief in 1982. In 1991, he was named executive editor of The Reporter in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. In 1996, he was appointed as the managing editor of The Sun News in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. From 1999 to 2007, Miller worked at the Detroit Free Press and the Detroit Media Partnership (DMP), first as the Free Press’ public editor, then as the DMP’s director of community affairs.

In December of 2007, Miller was named chief executive officer of The Heat and Warmth Fund, a Detroit, Michigan-based nonprofit organization. Three years later, in 2010, he moved to the Hickory Daily Record, where he served as editor. In August of 2013, Miller became the first African American managing editor of the Winston-Salem Journal.

Miller has served on numerous boards including the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, the Pew Center for Civic Journalism, the Michigan Humanities Council, and various American Society of News Editors and Associated Press Media Editors boards and committees. He was a founding member of the National Association of Minority Media Executives and former board chairman of ARISE Detroit!. He has been a Pulitzer Prize Juror, a facilitator at the American Press Institute in Reston, Virginia, and was the first Donald W. Reynolds Distinguished Visiting Professor of Journalism at Washington and Lee University in 2005. Miller received the Order of the Arrow Vigil Honor from the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) in 1973 and the Spark Plug Award from the Chicora District BSA in 1997.

John X. Miller was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 13, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.236

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/13/2014

Last Name

Miller

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Xavier

Occupation
Schools

St. Benedict The Moor

Wiley Middle School

R.J. Reynolds High School

Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee University School of Law

Greater Dimensions College of Theology

Search Occupation Category
First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Henderson

HM ID

MIL11

State

North Carolina

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

9/11/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Winston-Salem

Country

United States

Short Description

Journalist John X. Miller (1955 - ) , managing editor of the Winston-Salem Journal, has served as an editor for several newspapers, including The Reporter, The Sun News, the Detroit Free Press, and the Hickory Daily Record. He was also one of the original staff members of USA Today, and served as CEO of The Heat and Warmth Fund.

Employment

Winston-Salem Journal

Hickory Daily Record

The Heat And Warmth Fund

Detroit Media Partnership, L.P.

Detroit Free Press Charities

Washington and Lee University

Detroit Free Press

The Sun News

The Reporter

USA Today

Charlotte Observer

The Roanoke Times & World-News

Howard University

Art Fennell

Broadcast journalist Art Fennell was born and raised in Bennettsville, South Carolina. One of twelve children, he graduated from South Carolina State University with a communications degree.

Fennell began his broadcasting career as a radio announcer in Orangeburg, South Carolina. He went on to work in on-air positions at The South Carolina Educational Television Network; WBTW-TV in Florence, South Carolina; WCBD-TV in Charleston, South Carolina; WSAV-TV in Savannah, Georgia and WAVY-TV in Portsmouth, Virginia. Fennell then moved to WCAU NBC-10 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he served in various roles, including as anchor, reporter, host and producer. He was subsequently named principal anchor and managing editor for CN8 News on the Comcast Network based in Philadelphia, and hosted the nightly 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. newscasts. From 2006 to 2014, CN8-TV aired “Art Fennell Reports,” where Fennell was executive producer and anchor.

Fennell has also served on special assignments for TV-ONE and led the network’s live national coverage of “The Michael Jackson Memorial” from Los Angeles, “The Democratic National Convention” from Denver, “Election Night 2008” from Chicago, and the historic “Inauguration of President Barack Obama” from Washington, DC. In addition, he taught as an adjunct communications professor at Delaware State University.

Fennell served as president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) from 1995 to 1997. He also served on the boards of UNITY: Journalists of Color and the NABJ, as well as president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists, and founding president of the Hampton Roads Black Media Professionals. In 2001, he founded The Arthur Fennell Foundation, which is committed to raising funds and awareness to assist community based organizations dealing with disease, education and prevention in diverse, under-served populations.

Throughout his career, Fennell has been honored with more than seventy-five awards, including the prestigious Vanguard Award presented by the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. He also received the 2009 “Journalist of The Year Award” for his work in the Philadelphia region and the 2006 Emmy Award for “Outstanding News Anchor” in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Art Fennell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 12, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.173

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/12/2014

Last Name

Fennell

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Blenheim High School

South Carolina State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Arthur

Birth City, State, Country

Bennettsville

HM ID

FEN01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa, The Caribbean, West Coast, South

Favorite Quote

I Hope The Good News Is Yours.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

1/10/1961

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Art Fennell (1961 - ) was a principal anchor and managing editor for CN8 News, and served as executive producer and anchor of CN8-TV’s 'Art Fennell Reports' from 2006 to 2014. He was president of the National Association of Black Journalists from 1995 to 1997.

Employment

Comcast NBC Universal

WCAU

WAVY

WSAV

WCBD

WBTW

SC ETV

Fennell Media

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Art Fennell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Art Fennell lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Art Fennell describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Art Fennell describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Art Fennell talks about his maternal grandparents' life in South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Art Fennell describes his maternal grandparents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Art Fennell talks about his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Art Fennell describes his paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Art Fennell describes his paternal grandfather's occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Art Fennell talks about his father's education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Art Fennell remembers his family's ghost stories

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Art Fennell talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Art Fennell describes his father's occupations

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Art Fennell describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Art Fennell lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Art Fennell describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Art Fennell remembers the tornado that destroyed his home, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Art Fennell remembers the tornado that destroyed his home, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Art Fennell describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Art Fennell remembers Blenheim High School in Blenheim, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Art Fennell remembers the ginger ale factory in Blenheim, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Art Fennell remembers the integration of Blenheim High School in Blenheim, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Art Fennell describes his early interests

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Art Fennell recalls his decision to attend South Carolina State College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Art Fennell recalls his start in the broadcasting industry

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Art Fennell remembers working at WDIX Radio in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Art Fennell talks about Max Robinson

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Art Fennell recalls the newscasters of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Art Fennell talks about his influential professors

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Art Fennell remembers studying under Eloise Usher Belcher

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Art Fennell recalls his start as a photographer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Art Fennell talks about the civil rights history of Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Art Fennell remembers his training at SCE-TV in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Art Fennell describes the lack of African American politicians in South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Art Fennell remembers Armstrong Williams

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Art Fennell describes his experiences at WBTW-TV in Florence, South Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Art Fennell remembers anchoring at WSAV-TV in Savannah, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Art Fennell remembers moving to WAVY-TV in Portsmouth, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Art Fennell talks about the Hampton Roads Black Media Professionals

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Art Fennell recalls founding the Hampton Roads Black Media Professionals

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Art Fennell talks about being recognized in public

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Art Fennell remembers joining WCAU-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Art Fennell talks about the change in network affiliation at WCAU-TV

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Art Fennell describes his experiences as a talk show host

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Art Fennell recalls becoming president of the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Art Fennell remembers hosting President Bill Clinton at the NABJ national convention

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Art Fennell recalls President Bill Clinton's arrival at the NABJ national convention

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Art Fennell talks about the speakers at the NABJ national convention

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Art Fennell recalls the founding of the NABJ Media Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Art Fennell talks about his time at WCAU-TV

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Art Fennell remembers founding a media consulting company

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Art Fennell remembers his awards and accolades

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Art Fennell remembers developing 'Art Fennell Reports'

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Art Fennell recalls his special assignments with TV One

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Art Fennell remembers the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Art Fennell talks about 'Murder in Memphis: Timeline to an Assassination'

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Art Fennell recalls the acquisition of NBC Universal by the Comcast Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Art Fennell remembers the cancellation of 'Art Fennell Reports'

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Art Fennell describes his plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Art Fennell talks about his interest in photography

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Art Fennell reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Art Fennell talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Art Fennell describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Art Fennell reflects upon his professional legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Art Fennell describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

7$3

DATitle
Art Fennell remembers the tornado that destroyed his home, pt. 1
Art Fennell remembers joining WCAU-TV in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Transcript
The most vivid childhood memory came in April of 1969 I think it was. It may have been '68 [1968] or--I think it was '68 [1968] or '69 [1969]. We had just gotten off the school bus coming home from school. And the weather was ominous, and it was just starting to rain very lightly. And me and my brother Dennis [Dennis Fennell] were the only ones on the bus. My other brothers--they had done an experiment. And I won't digress too far with this, away from the story, but they were doing an experiment back then in, in, in Bennettsville [South Carolina] and Blenheim [South Carolina], another small town, where they wanted to test integrating the schools. But for that year, they were asking for volunteers from families, to volunteer children to see if this would work in rural South Carolina. So my next two brothers, Jeffrey [Jeffrey Fennell] and Tommy Lee [Tommy Fennell], were volunteered by my parents [Sarah McLeod Fennell and James Fennell], because they were bigger and older, and they could probably deal with it better than Dennis and myself, who were much younger. So we were still in the segregated school. We were coming home from, from, from school this day, Dennis and I. We get off the bus, and we're walking down the dirt road. And it was this--clouds were getting a little dark. And as we got to the house, my mother was taking in the clothes, 'cause it was obviously just starting to rain. And she said, "Children, help me with these clothes to get 'em off the clothesline, because bad weather is coming." And as we were taking in those clothes, the winds began to pick up more and more and more. And, and it, it became fun for me and my brother because this was an adventure. But I remember going out on probably the last trip to the clothesline. And I looked across the cotton field, and I saw a tornado coming. It was as clear as day, and it was happening now, and it was coming right for us. And so we gathered the last bit of clothes, and we rushed into the house. And as we closed the door, because the winds were very strong, it took all three of us by the way to push and close that door from the force of the wind. But we did close it. And it stayed closed for about five to ten seconds before it exploded open, because at this point the tornado was right on top of us, and we couldn't close that door again. Windows began to explode, and air was all through the house. The tornado was on top of us. And so my mother grabbed me and my brother. And on a, a small little sofa--and I have a picture of us on this small sofa, and it was in the corner of the room by the stove--and she huddled us together like a mother hen gathering her biddies. And she said, "Pray children pray." And we started praying while that tornado sat down upon us. It destroyed our whole house. When it was over, there was nothing left in the house. The roof was gone. All of the other furnishings in the house were gone. The wall behind us was still there, but on the other side of the wall was nothing. But that sofa with myself, my brother, and my mother was still intact with us on it. And I remember looking up at as small boy, and I could see the sky. And I looked around, and we were in a daze, but we were unharmed, not a scratch. So I knew right then about the miracle of God. Because we were there praying and--you know, small children, you know, we were praying. But I was peeping, 'cause I wanted to see this phenomenon happening around us. But we were un- we were unhurt. And so that was--that was a very vivid moment for me, for everyone. The community--once the story had passed, people were rushing to our aid to see if we were okay, if anyone had been harmed, and to see how they could help, 'cause that's what communities do in those types of times.$$That's quite a story.$$Yeah.$$I mean--did you close your eyes while it was going? Did you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Some of the time. I have to admit I was peeping. I remember peeping. But we had an old iron stove that was no more than five feet away from where I was. That was where we put the, the wood in and you know to warm the house. And I saw that old iron stove with the, the tin pipe that went up to the chimney started to bounce and rock as it was sitting there. It bounced like this, 'cause I was praying and peeping. And then I saw that stove lift off. I've never seen that stove again. It was five feet from me.$$Yeah, that's--$$So, yeah, I think after I saw that, I, I started praying harder than ever because I, I didn't wanna follow the direction of where that, that--where that stove had gone.$Nineteen ninety [1990] now, how, how did the op- opportunity come to--come to--come, come about to come to WCAU-TV in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania]?$$Well, I, I was doing the news one night and I got a phone call. And it was from a gentleman named Paul Gluck, who had been visiting his mother who lived in the Hampton Roads [Virginia] area. Paul Gluck I didn't know from a can of paint, but he was the news director in Philadelphia. And he said, "I've watched you; I, I like what I see; when is your contract over in Virginia [WAVY-TV, Portsmouth, Virginia]?" It just so happens that my contract was coming to an end in the next couple of months, and I told him. And so he said, "I'd like to bring you to Philadelphia to take a look around and to see what we do here, and to see if it's something that you and I can come to terms with." And so I do, came to Philadelphia and, and loved it. This was big time TV. This was a completely different animal than anything that I had been accustomed to up until that point. But at least for me by then I'd already worked in several other TV markets. I was used to moving around. I was used to starting from scratch, and so that experience helped me to, to get acclimated in Philadelphia early. I was brought on as the, the five o'clock evening news anchor. I was young, but didn't carry myself in a young way. It became clear that I knew my way around a story in the field, and I knew my way around the anchor desk in the studio, 'cause I'd--by that point I was seasoned. And I wasn't intimidated, but yet, again, I didn't present myself in an arrogant type of way. One thing about Philadelphia that I learned very early, and it's--was true then, and it's true now. In this town, if people like you they will let you know. And if they don't like you, they will let you know. And if they don't like you, you are not long for this city. I'm fortunate that they like me, and so I was able to survive. And as they say, the rest is history. I've had a very good tenure here.

Bryan Monroe

Journalist Bryan Monroe was born on August 22, 1965 in Munich, Germany to MG (ret.) James W. Monroe and Charlyne Monroe. In 1987, Monroe earned his B.A. degree in communications from the University of Washington, where he was the first African American editor of the University of Washington Daily.

Monroe interned as a photojournalist at United Press International, The Roanoke Times, and The Seattle Times before becoming director of photography and graphics editor at Myrtle Sun Beach News. In 1989, Monroe directed Knight Ridder’s 25/43 Project, which aimed to revamp newspapers in order to appeal to a younger audience. In 1991, he served as deputy managing editor of Knight Ridder’s flagship paper, The San Jose Mercury News, until he became a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 2002. During his fellowship, Monroe examined leadership and creativity in the newsroom, and after the fellowship, he became assistant vice president of news at Knight Ridder. In 2006, Monroe led the team of journalists from Knight Ridder and the Biloxi Sun Herald who won the Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal for Public Service for coverage of Hurricane Katrina. Then, after Knight Ridder was sold to the McClatchy Company, Monroe went to work for the Johnson Publishing Company, where he served as vice president and editorial director of Ebony and Jet from 2006 to 2009, conducted the first interview with then President-elect Barack Obama following his November victory, and had the last interview with pop star Michael Jackson before he died. In 2011, Monroe became the editor of CNNPolitics.com and in 2014 was named the Washington Editor/Opinion for CNN.

Monroe served as the sixteenth president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) from 2005 to 2007. He has won numerous regional, national, and international journalism awards and lectured globally from Cape Town, South Africa to Sydney, Australia to Dubai, UAE. He was recognized by Presstime magazine as one of the “20 Under 40” — the 20 top American journalists under 40 years old; MediaWeek magazine as one of the nation's “Media Elite”; and San Francisco’s CityFlight as one of the “10 Most Influential African Americans in the Bay Area.”

Monroe lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland with his two children, Seanna and Jackson.

Bryan Monroe was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 18, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.138

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/18/2014

Last Name

Monroe

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

University of Washington

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Bryan

Birth City, State, Country

Munich

HM ID

MON09

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

8/22/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

Germany

Short Description

Journalist Bryan Monroe (1965 - ) was Washington Editor/Opinion for CNN, served as deputy managing editor of Knight Ridder’s flagship paper, The San Jose Mercury News, and was vice president and editorial director of Ebony and Jet magazines. Monroe led the team of journalists who won the Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal for Public Service in 2006. He also served as the president of the National Association of Black Journalists from 2005 to 2007.

Employment

The Roanoke Times

United Press International

The Seattle Times

Myrtle Sun Beach News

The San Jose Mercury News

Knight Ridder Newspapers

Johnson Publishing Company

CNNPolitics.com

CNN

Jose Griñan

Broadcast journalist José Griñán was born on July 24, 1952 in Tampa, Florida. His father was a native Cuban; his mother, a first generation Cuban-American. Griñán studied speech and theatre at the University of South Florida, but his interest in broadcasting resulted from his filming and helping to produce documentaries for the U.S. Army.

In 1975, Griñán was hired as a reporter and weekend anchor for KTSM AM-FM-TV in El Paso, Texas. From 1978 to 1982, he worked as a news reporter and anchor for Miami, Florida’s WCKT-TV (now WSVN-TV). Griñán worked as a news anchor for the now defunct Satellite News Channel in 1982 and 1983, before being hired by WTVJ-TV in Miami in 1984, where he stayed until 1990. From 1990 to 1993, he was a correspondent/host for Crime Watch Tonight, and served as a freelance correspondent and researcher for CNN, and other broadcast services. In 1991, he anchored and reported for KDFW-TV in Dallas, Texas, and then, in August of 1993, Griñán joined FOX’s KRIV-TV in Houston, Texas, where he is the senior morning news anchor for the 6:00 a.m., 7:00 a.m., 8:00 a.m. and 12 noon newscasts.

Throughout his career, Griñán has covered major events of all types, including floods, hurricanes, the sewer explosion in Guadalajara, Mexico, and the Branch Davidian siege in Waco, Texas, where he was one of the first reporters on the scene. In addition, Griñán has produced a variety of special series reports, and has hosted two public affairs programs for KRIV-TV: “The Black Voice” and “Hola Houston.”

Griñán has been active in the community and has served as a volunteer for the National Kidney Foundation, The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Special Olympics and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, among others. Griñán is also a board member of the Dive Pirate Foundation, the Houston READ Commission, and Keep Houston Beautiful/Clean City America.

Griñán has been a member of the National Association of Black Journalists since 1978, and maintains membership in the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Southwest Alternate Media Project. He is the father of two adult girls.

José Griñán was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 8, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.132

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/8/2014

Last Name

Grinan

Maker Category
Schools

University of South Florida

Henry B. Plant High School

Jesuit High School

George Washington Carver Junior High School

Meacham Alternative School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Jose

Birth City, State, Country

Tampa

HM ID

GRI10

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cayman Brac

Favorite Quote

For All Your Days Prepare, And Meet Them Ever Alike; When You Are The Anvil, Bear; When You Are The Hammer, Strike.$

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

7/24/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Latino, Creole

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Jose Griñan (1952 - ) was the senior morning news anchor on KRIV-TV Fox 26, where he worked from 1993.

Employment

KTSM

WCKT-TV (WSVN-TV)

Satellite News Channel

WTVJ-TV

Crime Watch Tonight

CNN

KDFW-TV

KRIV-TV

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jose Grinan's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jose Grinan lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jose Grinan describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jose Grinan describes his community in Tampa, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jose Grinan describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jose Grinan talks about his experiences of discrimination as a black Cuban American

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jose Grinan describes the history of racial discrimination in Cuba

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jose Grinan talks about the experiences of black Cubans under Fidel Castro and Fulgencio Batista

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jose Grinan describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jose Grinan talks about his family's roots in Cuba

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jose Grinan talks about the Spanish American War

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jose Grinan talks about Antonio Maceo Grajales

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jose Grinan talks about his mother's education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jose Grinan describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jose Grinan describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jose Grinan talks about his father's education and career

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jose Grinan talks about the brutality of slavery in Cuba

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jose Grinan lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jose Grinan describes his home life in Tampa, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Jose Grinan describes the sights and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Jose Grinan remembers Meacham Elementary School in Tampa, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Jose Grinan remembers visiting Cuba

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jose Grinan talks about the history of baseball in Tampa, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jose Grinan describes his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jose Grinan remembers his godfather, Francisco A. Rodriguez

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jose Grinan talks about his experiences at Jesuit High School in Tampa, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jose Grinan talks about his mentors and his aspirations to become a lawyer

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jose Grinan remembers his mentor at Jesuit High School in Tampa, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jose Grinan recalls his early exposure to black theater and screen acting

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jose Grinan remembers the growth of the Black Power movement

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jose Grinan remembers moving out of his parent's home

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jose Grinan talks about the counterculture of the early 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jose Grinan recalls his draft orders from the U.S. military, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jose Grinan remembers appearing in 'The Daredevil'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jose Grinan recalls his draft orders from the U.S. military, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jose Grinan describes his start in film production, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jose Grinan describes his start in film production, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jose Grinan describes the film production process

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jose Grinan describes his duties at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Jose Grinan remembers becoming a reporter at KTSM-TV in El Paso, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jose Grinan remembers becoming a radio host at KTSM Radio

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jose Grinan remembers advocating for undercover officer Frank Percy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jose Grinan recalls joining WCKT-TV in Miami, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jose Grinan talks about the migration of Cubans to Miami, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jose Grinan remembers the riots of 1980 in Miami, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jose Grinan recalls working for the Satellite News Channel in Stamford, Connecticut

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jose Grinan remembers his work on 'Crime Watch Tonight'

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jose Grinan talks about his first marriage

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jose Grinan talks about his role as an advocate for minority communities

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Jose Grinan remembers the drug wars in Miami, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jose Grinan talks about the height of drugs and crime in Miami, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jose Grinan talks about the Mariel boatlift in Miami, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jose Grinan remembers Bishop Agustin Roman's peace negotiations at the federal prison in Oakdale, Louisiana

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jose Grinan recalls the aftermath of the prison riot in Oakdale, Louisiana

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jose Grinan recalls his transition to KDFW-TV and KRIV-TV in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jose Grinan remembers the mass killings of the early 1990s

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jose Grinan remembers the Branch Davidian siege in Waco, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Jose Grinan remembers joining KRIV-TV in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Jose Grinan talks about the local stations affiliated with FOX

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Jose Grinan talks about working at KRIV-TV in Houston, Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Jose Grinan talks about his work with minority journalist organizations

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Jose Grinan remembers covering the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Jose Grinan reflects upon his career as a journalist

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Jose Grinan remembers saving a woman from a burning car

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Jose Grinan talks about the aftermath of saving a person's life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Jose Grinan remembers Hurricane Ike and Hurricane Katrina

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Jose Grinan remembers experiencing a stroke on the air

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Jose Grinan talks about working at KRIV-TV in Houston, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Jose Grinan talks about the importance of community relationships

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Jose Grinan remembers interviewing Minister Louis Farrakhan

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Jose Grinan describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Jose Grinan talks about his father's legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Jose Grinan talks about his plans to write a book about his mother

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Jose Grinan reflects upon his life and legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Jose Grinan talks about his daughters, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Jose Grinan remembers vacations with his daughters

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Jose Grinan talks about his daughters, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Jose Grinan talks about his wife, Kathryn Griffin Grinan

Tape: 8 Story: 12 - Jose Grinan describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

11$3

DATitle
Jose Grinan remembers visiting Cuba
Jose Grinan remembers Bishop Agustin Roman's peace negotiations at the federal prison in Oakdale, Louisiana
Transcript
Okay. And meanwhile, now, you're born in '52 [1952]?$$Yes.$$But in, was it '56 1956], that's when the Cuban Revolution ends?$$In '59 [1959].$$Fifty-nine [1959], yeah.$$Yeah.$$The traffic back and forth, you know.$$Well, you used to travel back and forth. In fact, I was there in '58 [1958].$$Okay.$$Before--because my father [Jose Grinan] (laughter)--it's very strange and unusual right now. Because, okay, last year I went to Cuba looking for distant relatives. Because I had addresses and phone numbers that I hadn't called and used in more than twenty years. But I went with the hope that they would still be in the same place. I go back. Yes, I find the grandchildren of the people I knew. And they're amazed that I know so much about them. I knew so much about their grandmother. But what I haven't told them is that, "I think your grandmother was my daddy's girlfriend for a while before he got married to my mother [Sylvia Grillo Grinan]." Because they both came from the same town, Remedios [Cuba], and they both moved to Havana [Cuba]. And they just stayed in touch when they were students going to school, and afterwards. And when I went as a journalist in 1978, I think we had gone to a Cuban prison called El Combinado del Este [Havana, Cuba]. I had gone through a lot of high school yearbooks in Miami [Florida] just to look to see, and see what names--, "Okay, he was captured." So when I went to the prison I could say, "Your name is Yoenio [ph.], no?" "Yes, how do you know that?" "Well, your daddy told me to tell you hello, and he's looking forward to your returning." Emotional moments in a prison. Coming back from the prison we were staying in el Hotel Nacional [Hotel Nacional de Cuba, Havana, Cuba]. At that time, Cubans were not allowed inside. So, we were getting off the bus and this little old lady just stood right in front of me, stopped my path, "You look just like your papa." "Excuse me?" And then she started running down my pedigree. She knew my grandfather [Antonio Grillo], she knew my mother's mother [Amparo Valdez Grillo]; she knew my grandmother on my father's side [Luisa Falero Grinan]. She just knew everybody. And it's like, "Who are you?" "Well, I'm Amelia [ph.]. Don't you remember coming to my house as a child?" "Are you the lady who had canaries?" "Yes, yes." You don't know what stuff like that does to somebody's mind. Very, very, emotional. Because it's tapping into a past that you really didn't know about. Now, I had to bribe a taxi driver to go to her neighborhood, because this was in 1978. You weren't supposed to walk around in Cuba if you were an American. You know, everybody's going to be watching you. And I could tell you some stories about being watched in Cuba. Amelia cooked me rice, beans and pork. And I had to ask her, "Where did you get all of this?" "We have our ways, Jose [HistoryMaker Jose Grinan], we have our ways." And she gave me a silver dollar, a Jose Marti silver dollar [Cuban peso] to give to my father, and I did that when I came back. But Amelia, interesting story. In I want to say the late '30s [1930s] or early 1940s, Communists had truckloads of food, and they would go through neighborhoods. "You want a bag of food? You could feed your family for two weeks with this, but you have to sign this paper." A lot of people signed the paper. In 1960 when Amelia left her house with her bags and went to the airport to get on a plane to go to Miami, they pulled out this piece of paper and said, "Is that your signature?" "Yes, but that was so long ago." "We don't admit Communists to the United States." So, she had to turn around and go back home. Now, if she didn't have her son staying in that house and her grandchildren staying in that house, she would have been homeless, have no place to go to. I asked her in 1980 when I was there, "What happened?" That was '78 [1978]. "What happened to the canaries? You know, I remember some, you know, all these canaries. You had a patio, you had all of these cages--big, two big cages." She said, "Jose, I was not going to let that man profit off my hard work." She's talking about Castro [Fidel Castro]. So, what she did was open all of the cages and let the birds go free. Because she was not, she wouldn't have been able to make any money on them, because the society was changing into a Socialist society.$$Okay.$$So, she said, "You know, I can't be free, but I'll let them go."$So, do you think the drugs and the, you know, there's the connection here (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) The Cocaine Cowboys?$$Yeah, the Cocaine Cowboys and the Mariel situation [Mariel boatlift].$$Because many of those who came from Mariel--and this was, okay, let me explain this. Many of those who came were criminal, but some were not. But they had to engage in criminal activity here in order to feed their families. The guy who negotiated the peace at--it was a federal prison in Oakdale, Louisiana [Federal Correctional Institution, Oakdale]. The guy who negotiated the peace was a lieutenant in the Cuban Navy [Cuban Revolutionary Navy] who defected to come to the U.S. But he couldn't find a job because he didn't have any documents. So, he dealt cocaine. He got arrested, sent to prison. He was getting ready to be sent back, but then they stopped that, because those who were going to be sent back were going to be persecuted. He was a good man, but he had to feed his family, so he did something wrong. And there were a lot of folks who were in the prison who did something like that, got caught, and they were thrown in prison. Now, if they had a job, if they had all of these other things, they would not have had to go to prison. But it was, it was, that was an interesting time. I think that was '88 [1988].$$Okay.$$And then in fact, that ended with Bishop Agustin Roman who--remember when I said sometimes you just have to help people? I should not have done something as a journalist, but I did it as a human being. People in Oakdale, Louisiana, they didn't have Bishop Agustin Roman's personal number. I did, because he was the bishop for the Cubans in Miami [Florida]. I had to have it, because he was one of my contacts. So, I wrote the number down in my book, and I put my book at the end of the table and told Carla Dudeck--and I remember her name because she was the attorney who was representing all of them, "Carla, there may be something down at the end of the table that you could use." And they went, looked, called the bishop, and he was there the next day. And it ended that day. Nobody else got hurt. And it was an amazing thing to see all of these hard core inmates--I mean they had ripped up the inside of the prison. They had made weapons out of the beds; they had done everything. And they were really ready to fight the corrections officers, National Guard [National Guard of the United States], anybody. But they didn't. And when the Bishop came, he got on the back of a pickup truck and rode the circumference around the gate. And it was amazing to see all these tough guys drop their weapons in a pile, get on their knees. And the Bishop blessed them all, went to another group--blessed them all. And they dropped the weapons. Was I wrong in leaving the number? I think I did the right thing, because I didn't want to see a blood bath, and they were ready for a blood bath (pause). I guess I'd think twice about doing it now, but I thought I was helping people. I didn't want to see a massacre, because that's what the National Guard would have done.

Sandra Long Weaver

Journalist Sandra Dawson Long Weaver was born on June 25, 1952 in Annapolis, Maryland. She attended the University of Maryland, where she worked for the Black Explosion college newspaper and received her B.S. degree in journalism in 1974. She also worked as an intern for Newsweek, and went on to attend the Advanced Executive Program at the Northwestern Media Management Center.

Upon graduation from the University of Maryland in 1974, Long Weaver was hired as a staff reporter for the News Journal in Wilmington, Delaware. She then went on to work for Philadelphia’s Evening Bulletin as a reporter, copy editor and editorial writer before joining the staff of The Philadelphia Inquirer as a correspondent in 1984, where she went on to become the first African American female managing editor. There she held several executive positions, including deputy managing editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer from 2005 to 2007, and managing editor for Philadelphia Newspapers, LLC and the Philadelphia Inquirer from 2007 to 2008. Then, in 2008, Long Weaver was named vice president of newsroom operations for Philadelphia Media Holdings, and worked in both The Inquirer and The Philadelphia Daily News newsrooms.

In 2010, she established and became president and chief executive officer of the Dawson Media Group, a multi-media communications and consulting practice. Long Weaver left her position with Philadelphia Media Network in 2011, and went on to work as communications coordinator for United Methodist Communications and editorial director for the Tennessee Tribune. She created “Take 10 on Tuesdays” with the Tennessee Tribune, a weekly video series featuring African Americans in the Nashville area; and, in 2014, she launched Tea and Conversations with African American women, a networking and communications event.

Long Weaver is a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), and has served for many years as chairperson and publisher for the Acel Moore Minority Career Development Workshop at The Philadelphia Inquirer. In 2011, she organized the first Founders Reception and the first “Divine Nine” breakfast for NABJ members. Long Weaver has served on the boards of African Women’s Development Fund USA and the Phillip Merrill School of Journalism at the University of Maryland. She also acted as the secretary-treasurer of the Pennsylvania Society of Newspaper Editors.

Long Weaver has received multiple awards, including the 2008 Woman of The Year Award given by the Philadelphia Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, the 2007 Trailblazer Award from the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists, and the 2007 Courage Award from the Philadelphia Chapter of the American Cancer Society. In addition, she was a juror for the Pulitzer Prizes in arts and journalism.

Sandra Long Weaver was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 23, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.066

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/23/2014

Last Name

Weaver

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Long

Occupation
Schools

Annapolis Elementary School

Annapolis Junior High School

Annapolis High School

University of Maryland

Walter S. Mills-Parole Elementary School

First Name

Sandra

Birth City, State, Country

Annapolis

HM ID

WEA02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

I'm Doing The Best I Can With What Little I Have.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

6/25/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Nashville

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Crab

Short Description

Journalist Sandra Long Weaver (1952 - ) was a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists. She worked at The Philadelphia Inquirer for twenty-nine years.

Employment

United Methodist Communications

The Dawson Media Group

Philadelphia Media Network

The Philadelphia Bulletin

The News Journal

Temple University

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sandra Long Weaver's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her relationship with her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the history of Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her mother's upbringing and education

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers meeting her father for the first time

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her paternal family reunions

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sandra Long Weaver describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the demographics of Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her likeness to her parents and grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her community in Annapolis, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her community in Annapolis, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers segregation in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her early education in Annapolis, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her early education in Annapolis, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her childhood activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her early aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls working at the United States Naval Academy library in Annapolis, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers applying for college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls writing for the Black Explosion student newspaper

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her experiences at the University of Maryland in College Park, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers reading African American publications

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers interning at Newsweek in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her decision to pursue a career in journalism

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the start of her journalism career

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls her experiences at The News Journal in Wilmington, Delaware

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the founding of the National Association of Black Journalists, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the founding of the National Association of Black Journalists, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver describes the community of the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls the publication of Alex Haley's 'Roots'

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her colleagues at The News Journal

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her experiences at the Evening Bulletin

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about writing news headlines

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the black journalists in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the politics of the Philadelphia Bulletin

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers her career at the Philadelphia Bulletin

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls being hired as a reporter at The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers the bombing of MOVE in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her career at The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver remembers the Janet Cooke scandal

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the credibility of news media

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls her work as editor of finance and administration at The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the changes at The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls her role as managing editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver recalls becoming vice president of newsroom operations at Philadelphia Media Holdings

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about leaving the Philadelphia Media Network

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver describes the Take Ten on Tuesdays video series

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about the Tea and Conversations networking event

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her journalistic philosophy

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sandra Long Weaver describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Sandra Long Weaver reflects upon her career

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Sandra Long Weaver reflects upon her legacy and her hopes for African American journalists

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her family and recent activities

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her stamp collection

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Sandra Long Weaver talks about her admiration of Ida B. Wells and Robin Roberts

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Sandra Long Weaver describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Sandra Long Weaver narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

1$6

DATitle
Sandra Long Weaver recalls the start of her journalism career
Sandra Long Weaver describes the Take Ten on Tuesdays video series
Transcript
So this time, correct me if I'm wrong, but I think there was a lot of information available especially about black thought and black ideas in those days in the public media--$$Right (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) music and radio, TV. I mean, a lot black reporters were trying, were starting to make a noise; you had like Tony Brown on.$$Right, the- 'Tony Brown's Journal.' When I went to the Phil- and some of this grew out of the Kerner Commission report and looking at the fact that there were hardly any black reporters available to cover the news in 1968. So there was this big push in the early--late--the very late '60s [1960s] and early '70s [1970s] to do more public affairs talk shows. And so coming into Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] I watched 'Tony Brown's Journal.' There was a show with--oh gosh I'm blanking on his name, and it's right over there--but it was a black talk show in Philadelphia with [HistoryMaker] Acel Moore and with, he's dead now, oh, I can't think of his name but it will come to me. But anyway their talk show was very popular and it was 'Black Perspectives on the News,' and that's what it was. It was a black perspective looking at the events of what was going on and covering it. Vernon Odom, a television reporter in Philadelphia also had a TV show that he did that looked at issues going on in the community. So there were a number of people who did that. In newspapers in Philadelphia, one of the things was [HistoryMaker] Chuck Stone was a columnist at the Philadelphia Daily News; Claude Lewis was a columnist at the Evening Bulletin [Philadelphia Bulletin]; and Acel Moore was a columnist at The Philadelphia Inquirer. So the city had three major newspapers--actually four, there is a Philadelphia Journal. But there were three black columnists who were writing all the time about issues going on in the black community. And that's one of the things that attracted me to Philadelphia, and to that whole area. I spent--$$Wilmington's adjacent to Philadelphia.$$Exact- yeah, so.$$(Unclear) like how many miles, what--?$$About thirty--$$Thirty miles.$$--about thirty miles. So I, I get to Wilmington [Delaware] in 1974, and I'm the only black reporter on the staff [of The News Journal]. (Laughter) And the- I used to talk to a woman who worked in the newspaper library and black janitor at night, because I worked at night when I first got there. But you know I used the opportunity to cover as many stories as I could. I would fight to get my stories on the front page. And in--I wanted to connect with other black journalists to talk about their experiences, what could I do--because I was very young and did not know how to you negotiate in the newsroom, how do you get to these other points? So Philadelphia, I think I met [HistoryMaker] Joe Davidson somehow, and he invited me to a meeting of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. So I would drive up from Wilmington to Philadelphia; and at this point they hadn't connected 95 [Interstate 95] between Wilmington and (laughter) Philadelphia so you had to wind your way through the City of Chester [Pennsylvania]--very interesting (laughter). But I would go to the meetings and that's how I met Claude, I met Acel and Chuck and they all became mentors to me in various ways. And Acel was very helpful in me getting to The Philadelphia Inquirer; and I met--I worked at the Evening Bulletin before The Inquirer, and Claude Lewis always had an open door to talk to black journalists, and I would go in just about every day to talk to Claude. And, of course, I met Chuck through the meetings of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists. Now the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists is considered the founding chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists because much of what's in the bylaws is based on what we had in Philadelphia. And Philadelphia was--Journalists was started while I was still in college [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland], so I didn't join it at the beginning but I'm one of their early members that came into the organization.$You're currently in Tennessee and--you're in Tennessee because you got married [to Lance Weaver], right, in?$$Yes.$$Right.$$I moved to Tennessee in 2011. I was let go [from the Philadelphia Media Network] in July, and I got married in September 2011; and moved here then and decided I really did not want to go back into daily newspapers. So I n- haven't pursued doing that at all, but I was interested--there is a black newspaper that was thriving, came out once a week, The Tennessee Tribune, so I do some freelance work for them. I do freelance editing, looking at the design of the paper, the stories that they have. I created a video series for the newspaper it's called Take Ten on Tuesdays with The Tennessee Tribune because I like alliteration, but the idea is to extend the brand beyond Thursdays. The paper's published on Thursdays, but on Tuesdays we put up a video and it's an interview with someone from the Nashville [Tennessee] area who may be starting a business, who's been in the area for a while but usually it's with someone who is African American to let people know what other people are doing. And sometimes we interview people who come into Nashville who may be notable African Americans and they are connected to Nashville for some reason. And we've now done it for just about a year and a half; it started in January 2013. I host it sometimes, there is a young man, Jason Luntz who also will host it and we just do a video; and the idea is that it's ten minutes--taking ten minutes out of your day with The Tennessee Tribune to watch an interview with someone you may or may not know. It's been pretty successful. The view- the viewership has gone up steadily over the course of a year and half and we now get requests from people that say can you do a Take Ten about this issue or a Take Ten you know interviewing this person. So it's growing and it's a little bit different--I think we're the only black newspaper in the country that does a video series like this.$$Okay, okay it's the first I've heard about. So this is on the website of The Tennessee Tribune?$$Yes, you access it through The Tennessee Tribune's website: tntribune at--tr- tntribune.com--$$Okay.$$--that's how you can access it.$$All right.

Norma Adams-Wade

Journalist Norma Adams-Wade was born in Dallas, Texas to Frank and Nettie Adams. She attended public schools and graduated from Lincoln High School in South Dallas, Texas. Adams-Wade went on to graduate from the University of Texas at Austin in 1966 with her B.S. degree in journalism. She also pursued graduate studies at Amber University in Garland, Texas and completed the Institute for Journalism Education’s summer editor training program at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

In 1966, Adams-Wade was hired by Collins Radio Company as a copyeditor for technical equipment manuals in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Apollo Space Program. From 1968 to 1972, she worked for Bloom Advertising Agency as an advertising copywriter and production assistant. From 1972 until 1974, she served as a reporter and editor’s assistant at The Dallas Post Tribune. Then, in 1974, Adams-Wade was hired as the first African American full-time general reporter for The Dallas Morning News, where she has served as a senior staff writer and columnist. As a senior staff writer, she covered general assignments, federal courts, consumer affairs, ethnic affairs, and neighborhood news. Adams-Wade created The Dallas Morning News’ Black History Month series in 1985, and, in 1988, helped launch The News’ Metro South Bureau. She retired from her position in 2002, but has continued to work as a contract columnist.

Adams-Wade was a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) in 1975. She was also the founding director of NABJ’s Region VII, a founding coordinator of Blacks in Mass Media of Dallas and Fort Worth, and served as scholarship chair for the Dallas-Fort Worth Association of Black Communicators. Adams-Wade is a lifelong member of Mt. Horeb Missionary Baptist Church in South Dallas, where she has served as a chair soloist, Sunday School and Baptist Training Union pianist, Junior Church director, and member of the church Scholarship Committee. She also founded the church’s Save the Children family organization that offers parent training seminars.

Adams-Wade’s many awards and honors include the Dallas-Fort Worth Association of Black Communicators’ Lifetime Achievement Award, the Bronze Heritage Award for preservation of African American history, Girls Inc. of Metropolitan Dallas’ “She Knows Where She’s Going” Award, the NAACP Dallas Chapter’s Juanita Craft Award, the Dallas Urban League’s Legacy Award, The Dallas Morning News Joe Dealey Publisher’s Award, the Southeast Dallas Business and Professional Women’s Club’s “Dreammaker” Award, the Top Ladies of Distinction’s Humanitarian Award, the St. Phillip’s School and Community Center’s Destiny Award, and the Maurine F. Bailey Cultural Foundation’s first outstanding community service award.

Adams-Wade lives in Dallas, Texas.

Norma Adams-Wade was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 6, 2014 and March 14, 2017.

Accession Number

A2014.083

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/6/2014 |and| 3/14/2017

Last Name

Adams-Wade

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Occupation
Schools

H S Thompson Elementary

Lincoln High School

University of Texas at Austin

University of North Texas

The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education

Amberton University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Norma

Birth City, State, Country

Dallas

HM ID

ADA13

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Country Setting

Favorite Quote

As you leave this place remember why you came

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

6/14/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti and Cornbread

Short Description

Journalist Norma Adams-Wade (1944 - ) was the first African American full-time general reporter for The Dallas Morning News. She was a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), as well as the founding director of NABJ’s Region VII.

Employment

The Dallas Morning News

Institute for Journalism Education

The Dallas Post Tribune

Bloom Advertising Agency

Collins Radio Co.

The Daily Texan Student Newspaper, U TX

Dallas Post Tribune

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Norma Adams-Wade's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her family's roots in East Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the Juneteenth tradition in Mexia, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the history and genealogy of black families in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the significance of the Juneteenth tradition

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her mother's upbringing, and the traditions of her mother's family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her mother's upbringing, and the traditions of her mother's family, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her mother's job at a beauty parlor in an affluent white neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade compares the personalities of her mother, aunts, and grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's opportunity to play baseball in the Negro League

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade gives a summary of her father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's military service during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's education and career with the U.S. Postal Service after World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her sister, Doris Adams Serrell

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her childhood household

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her family moving out of her grandparents' home into their own home

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the role of the church in her community

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her experiences in elementary school, and early influences in literature and writing

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about a pivotal moment that shaped her character and influenced her writing

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about television shows in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about what influenced her to become a reporter and meeting her mentor, Julia Scott Reed, in the early 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her experiences at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade recounts running for Ms. Lincoln at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about a childhood friend who had polio

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her father's reaction to the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about race relations in Dallas, Texas and the arrest local civil rights leader Ernest McMillan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the black press in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about race relations and her experiences at the University of Texas at Austin

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her decision to attend the University of Texas at Austin

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade describes her experiences with integration at the University of Texas at Austin seeing Marian Anderson perform

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about being a black student at the University of Texas at Austin in the late 1960s

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the professors who influenced her at the University of Texas at Austin

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Norma Adams-Wade compares courses at the University of Texas at Austin with those at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her first attempt to work for 'The Dallas Morning News'

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her summer internships at the 'The Dallas Post Tribune' and her first job at Collins Radio Company

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the Charles Whitman shooting at the University of Texas, Austin, and President Johnson speaking at her graduation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about her personal philosophy as a reporter

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about working for The Sam Bloom Agency

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about working at The Dallas Post Tribune

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Norma Adams-Wade talks about the news article that got her hired at 'The Dallas Morning News'

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$5

DAStory

1$9

DATitle
Norma Adams-Wade talks about the professors who influenced her at the University of Texas at Austin
Norma Adams-Wade talks about the news article that got her hired at 'The Dallas Morning News'
Transcript
Alright. Okay so you said that you were--who were some of your favorite teachers or role models at the University of Texas [Austin]?$$Well, the one that comes to mind is Professor Gardiner, I forget her last name but she was a former military person and that's the way she lived her life. Very, very authoritative and I remember one of her rules was that no matter how good your writing was, if you misspelled one word, you got an automatic F. She was a little person about my size, an Anglo but very authoritative. And boy she ran her classroom like a military operation and we were terrified of her and terrified of misspelling a word because nobody wanted to get an automatic F. And, so she really sticks out in my mind because it really taught me to be at my best and I was always a very perfectionist type person, that's a syndrome, I guess perfectionist syndrome. And I don't thing I ever got an F but I was terrified of getting an F and she's just a-professor Gardiner is just a real big memory. Now, oh gosh I'm embarrassed, I just forgot his name but one of the deans of the journalism school and I'm embarrassed that I've forgotten his name but he sticks out because he was a person I could--I went to, I guess, a couple of times and--for just kind of counsel on what to do about difficult subjects that I was wrestling with. I remember I wrestle with government and never made good grades but I managed to get out of government and--oh I'm embarrassed I can't remember his name.$$He was the dean of journalism?$$Right, and he was big in my life at the time and he was a very empathetic person, Anglo. But he was a good listener and he would just listen and he was not judgmental and he was very helpful to me and so I had an emotional tie to him because he helped me. I felt that he was a life line and I remember when it was graduation time, I wasn't sure, I was sweating one of those courses and it was something like a government course. I was sweating it and whether I would be able to graduate and I mean it was eleventh hour. My parents [Frank McLeod Adams and Nettie Ivory Adams] had come to town and my dad had told me, chief I don't know if I'd be able to economically do this--continue to do this. You're really going to have to come out and so I was sweating graduation. And, so they were already in town and I went to the dean and he did tell me that I made it and I remember going back to the co-op house and when I told my dad, he went out on the porch and he walked to the balcony of it and he looked up and I could just see him--my dad was not really a demonstrative religious person, my mom was. But I could tell that he was thanking God that his daughter was going to graduate and I just remember this scene of seeing him standing there, his back was turned to me and he just had his quiet time there on the porch. And I could tell that it was a load off his shoulders because I can imagine he was saying if she doesn't come out of here, what are we going to do. I guess whatever finances in the family were going on he knew that he just couldn't financially do it anymore. And so when I graduated, it was just a big relief and I remember the scene of him out there on the porch and I graduated. It was a close call but the dean was the one who gave me the news that I had made it.$Now Buster Haas who was he now?$$He was over hiring in the newsroom. He was an exec in the newsroom.$$This was in Dallas [Texas]?$$'The Dallas Morning News.' So there was a series of murders in the black community. Convenient store owners were being murdered and it was a big story. So this would have been the early '70s [1970s] and it was affecting the city because whites were being killed too but it was largely happening in a lot of stores in the black community but white store owners were being killed. 'The Morning News' wanted to cover the story and they needed someone within the community--they wanted to do a piece that told how this series of murders was affecting not only the city but the black community as well. Somehow Buster--I guess--well I had applied for it so Buster Haas knew of me and he really did have my interest at heart. Buster Haas was a good person. He was a great person. He reminded me of my dean back in school, same personality and I think he really did look for an opportunity to get me in. So anyway they wanted to do this story and so, you know, the story is opportunity doesn't knock on your door, you have to go out and get it. Opportunity came to my house, Buster Haas came to my house where I lived and knocked on my door and told me they wanted to do this piece and that I could do it as a freelance writer and I went out and interviewed a lot of people in the community, store owners and neighborhood people and put the story together and did it and submitted it and it ran banner across page one and I was hired that week and that's how I got hired because they were very impressed with the story and the perspective that I was able to bring to it. The value of being an African American reporter was that I could get into the community, I knew where the bodies--well not the literal bodies were buried, bad pun but I knew where all the players were and I could get to them and that's what I did. So they saw my value and I was hired and that's how I got on, that's how I got hired.$$Did the police ever solve the case?$$I don't remember who it was but the case was ultimately solved. That's a good question, I'd like to back and research that but it took--I remember it took awhile because when it was happening, I mean nobody had a clue and I did not do the final story, whoever did the final story I don't know it would be good to research that. But my story was to give the inside view, the view from inside the community which is what I did.$$Okay what did the community think about that?$$Everybody was terrified, mystified, baffled, terrified, scared. It was a scary situation because nobody knew where they would strike next. People were serious; they were killing the store owners, the clerks. They were killing clerks not store owners but the clerks. A lot of owners did clerk their own stores.$$Were they being robbed or just killed?$$They would rob them and shoot them, fatally shoot them.