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Dr. Janice Hutchinson

Pediatrician and child psychiatrist Dr. Janice Gertrude Hutchinson was born on September 22, 1947, in Chicago, Illinois to Dorothy and James Hutchinson. She and her twin brother Jamal J. Hutchinson began their education at the Catholic school, Holy Name of Mary. They then attended Morgan Park High School, graduating in 1965. Hutchinson enrolled at Stanford University, where she took pre-medical courses but majored in sociology. After receiving her B.A. degree in 1969, she attended the University of Cincinnati Medical School, earning her M.D. degree in 1973. During her final year of medical school, she worked at the John F. Kennedy Hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. She completed her residency in pediatrics at Montefiore and Rush University Medical Centers before returning to school to earn her M.P.H. degree from the University of Illinois.

In the early 1980s, Hutchinson joined the Rush University Medical School as adjunct faculty. Disinterested in private practice, she joined the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps before taking a leave of absence to work in a refugee camp outside of Bangkok, Thailand. When she returned to the United States, she completed a child and adolescent fellowship at the Institute for Juvenile Research (IJR) at the University of Illinois. At the same time, she served as a public health doctor at the American Medical Association (AMA) where she worked on issues of teen pregnancy and child abuse. When the HIV antibody was identified in 1982, she was concerned about the devastating effect of the disease on children and helped to organize the AMA's first major HIV conference in the mid-1980s.

After Hutchinson completed her residency in adult psychiatry at the University of Cincinnati and at St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, D.C. , she was selected as the medical director and administrator for Children's Mental Health Services in Washington D.C.'s Department of Mental Health. Hutchinson currently works at Howard University where she is an associate professor of psychiatry and pediatrics and the residency training director in psychiatry for the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Board certified in pediatrics, adult and child psychiatry, Hutchinson has taught and written about child abuse, domestic violence, teen pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, children’s impulsivity and aggression, incarcerated juveniles and mental illness, the use of antidepressants with children and youth suicide. In 2005, she received the American Psychiatric Association’s Irma Bland Excellence in Teaching Award. Hutchinson co-authored Losing Control: Loving a Black Child with Bipolar Disorder with Cassandra Joubert and Linda Thompson Adams in 2007. Hutchinson is a member at large of the Washington Psychiatric Society.

Dr. Janice Hutchinson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 26, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.095

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/26/2008

Last Name

Hutchinson

Schools

Holy Name of Mary School

Morgan Park High School

Stanford University

University of Cincinnati

University of Illinois at Chicago

First Name

Janice

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

HUT02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Acknowledge God In All Thy Ways And He Will Lead Thy Paths. Lean Not On Your Own Understanding.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/22/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Fish, Fried Chicken

Short Description

Medical professor, pediatrician, and psychiatrist Dr. Janice Hutchinson (1947 - ) is an associate professor of psychiatry and pediatrics, and the residency training director in psychiatry at Howard University College of Medicine. In 2007, Hutchinson co-authored the book, "Losing Control: Loving a Black Child with Bipolar Disorder."

Employment

Rush University Medical Center

United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps.

American Medical Association (AMA)

District of Columbia Department of Mental Health

Howard University Hospital

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Janice Hutchinson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about the land owned by her maternal grandparents in Paducah, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her mother's adolescence in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about her father's experience as a Pullman porter in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her mother's personality and how she takes after her

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her childhood in Chicago, Illinois and her father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson recalls the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about her experience at the Holy Name of Mary School and Morgan Park High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her childhood love for reading

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes life in her childhood home in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about what inspired her to become a pediatrician

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson recounts her decision to attend Stanford University in Stanford, California

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about her decision to major in sociology at Stanford University in Stanford, California

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson recalls her mentors and black organizations at Stanford University in Stanford, California

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about her decision to attend medical school at the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson reflects upon her mother's illness and death in 1970

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes the racism and sexism she experienced while attending the University of Cincinnati Medical School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson recalls her medical work in Liberia between 1972 and 1973

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her medical residency at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about how pediatrics has changed since the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her career in public health in the 1980s and working at a refugee camp in Bangkok, Thailand

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her public health work with the American Medical Association in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about her 1980s research into the effects of HIV/AIDS on vulnerable populations

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about her work as medical director and Administrator for Children's Mental Health Services in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about problems with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in youth

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson reflects upon how society and medicine treat mental disorders

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes coauthoring the book 'Losing Control: Loving a Black Child with Bipolar Disorder'

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes teaching at Howard University in Washington, D.C. and writing about minority health issues

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson reflects upon the shifting demographics of drug use and criminality among African Americans and women

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson reflects upon her life choices and her spirituality

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Janice Hutchinson talks about how she would like to be remembered

DASession

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DATape

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DATitle
Dr. Janice Hutchinson recalls her medical work in Liberia between 1972 and 1973
Dr. Janice Hutchinson describes her career in public health in the 1980s and working at a refugee camp in Bangkok, Thailand
Transcript
Okay. All right. Well, anything happen before graduation that--was there ever a time when you thought you weren't gonna make it or wanted to stop?$$My mother's [Dorothy Howell Hutchinson's] death was a great challenge. It was a deep challenge, both in medical school and in life. It was a very profound challenge, but I, my senior year, I went to Liberia and worked at JFK Hospital [John F. Kennedy Medical Center] in Monrovia [Liberia], and I also worked what's called upcountry at a hospital called Phebe [Hospital, Bong County, Liberia]; you know, when you're in those situations where there are few medical resources you do everything. I fainted my first day on the wards, on the pediatric ward in Liberia. We were rounding on a hundred kids. About halfway through kid number fifty or so, I just hit the floor. I think I was just dehydrated. The same thing happened when I went to work in Thailand in a refugee camp. I fainted my first day in camp. I think I was just dehydrated. I don't seem to tolerate heat very well. I guess I just don't keep up with the fluids well enough, but anyway. So, I was in Liberia for a couple months or so, starting my Albert Schweitzer international healthcare work.$$What was Liberia like? Did you have any conception of what it would be like in Liberia or in Africa, period, that you--$$Not really, no, no. [President William R.] Tolbert [Jr.] was still in office. He died shortly thereafter. He was overthrown.$$Yeah, he was murdered--$$He was murdered viciously.$$Publicly and viciously, yeah.$$I made friends with a family there, the Stewarts, with whom I'm still friendly and close and going to the wedding of one of their grandchildren in a couple of weeks down in North Carolina. I met a number of doctors there who trained in the United States, guys who were surgeons, I came to appreciate the United States and all of the benefits and the wonders of our life. I was stunned by Africa, though. I've never, ever been any place that beautiful. When I was in Europe, and I was in Europe for six months as a student, I visited twelve countries including Hungary and Czechoslovakia, all of the Scandinavian countries. I never saw anything like what I saw in Africa, still haven't.$$You mean Liberia itself?$$In Liberia; well, in every African country I've been to since, but, I mean it was just stunning. I mean, it was breathtaking. I didn't, I mean, I can remember thinking to myself this must be the world as God first made it. That's how it hit me. I was going, we had a bus ride into a village that had a doctor once a month and I was going with a pharmacist on a big bus with some volunteers and we were going to provide the monthly medical services to pregnant women and sick children, and old men and I saw diseases, typhoid fever, malaria, things I've never seen in the United States, leprosy. At one point, I was little concerned I was going to come back and develop leprosy, but you're the doctor, (laughter) that's a chance you take, you know. It goes with the territory. But, it was a fabulous, fabulous experience. I learned to eat Liberian food; what they called chop, African chop, highly spiced food, saw hundreds of kids a day, had babies die in my hands and my arms, had interpreters, of course. It was a challenge; in some ways, very stressful, very stressful, but a tremendous, tremendous experience. So, that was my senior year of medical school.$All right. So, you're back in Chicago [Illinois] at Rush [University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois] as a resident, was it in psychiatry or--$$I finished pediatrics in Chicago, eventually wound up I was adjunct faculty in Rush Medical School [Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois]. I used to sit on the admissions committee there.$$So this is the early '80s [1980s] now?$$'80s [1980s] yes, yeah. I worked the AMA [American Medical Association] for a while, for about four years at their Public Health Division. I worked in the Commissioned Corps of the [United States] Public Health Service for about four years. During that time, I have accumulated a lot of leave. I went to work in a refugee camp about an hour-and-a-half outside of Bangkok [Thailand] with Cambodian and Laotian and Vietnamese refugees. I had a team of six medical students and two residents and we took care--we saw a hundred kids a day, at least. I had interpreters from all these other nationalities and I came to appreciate better why people have trouble differentiating black people, because I was unable to differentiate Cambodians from Laotians from Vietnamese and I was told that they were obviously different, so that was a good experience for me to, you know, step into another culture and to understand where some other people are coming from. Just like when I was in Africa, I, the first time in my life, had second degree burns on my face from exposure to the sun. I never could understand why white people were so upset about sunburn and used all this sunblock. I spent thirty minutes in the sun with some African kids on a basketball court and the next morning I had blisters everywhere and it was incredibly painful, and I never, ever said I didn't understand about sunburn again. So, I was able to cross cultures in some ways.