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David Richards

Military officer David Richards was born on March 19, 1929 in Sedalia, Missouri to Christina Diggs Richards and David Richards. He attended Lincoln School and C.C. Hubbard High School in Sedalia. Richards then studied at the College of Mortuary Science in St. Louis, Missouri, graduating in 1951. Years later, Richards received his B.A. degree in business administration from Park College in Parkville, Missouri in 1975. Three years later, he earned his M.A. degree in human resources from Pepperdine University.

Upon graduating from high school, Richards joined the United States Army in 1946. He was stationed at Camp Stoneman in California, and deployed overseas to the Pacific Theater. Richards became a member of the U.S. Army band, and rose to head of the reed section. After completing U.S. Army service in 1948, Richards worked briefly as an apprentice mortician, and returned to the Army in 1954. He completed airborne training at Fort Benning, Georgia and attended rigger school at Fort Lee, Virginia. He served ten years in the 612th Quartermaster Aerial Supply Company, and then transferred to the Artic Test Center in Fort Greenly, Alaska, where he tested airdrop equipment. Then, Richards was sent to the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center in Massachusetts, where he helped develop expendable parachutes for the Vietnam War. In 1968, Richards became the Army’s first African American warrant officer, and remained the sole African American in that rank until his retirement in 1983. After his Army career, Richards worked at the Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department in staffing, and later as a crime prevention analyst. He continued teaching as an adjunct professor at Saint Leo University until 2000.

As the first African American warrant officer, Richards was inducted into the Parachute Rigger Warrant Officer’s Hall of Fame upon his retirement in 1983. Richards was also inducted into the Distinguished Order of Saint Martin within the Quartermaster Corps in the United States Army. He was a three time recipient of the Omega Man of the Year Award and the Superior Service Award. Georgia Legislative Black Caucus, Inc. also honored Richards with the Salute to Veterans Award.

Richards was a member of St. Philip A.M.E. Church in Savannah, Georgia. He also served as an advisor to the director of the West Board Street YMCA, as president for the Mental Health Association of the Coastal Empire, as vice chair of human services for Chatham County and as chairperson of the superintendent advisory council for the Chatham County Board of Education. Richards was a board member for the Frank Callen Boys and Girls Club, JHS of Savannah, the Meditation Center Board, the Martin Luther King Day Observance Committee and the Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum.

Richards and his wife, Swannie Moore Richards have three children: David Richards III, Yvette Richards, and Bonnye Richards Anthony.

Richards passed away on February 5, 2019.

David Richards was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 9, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.044

Sex

Male

Interview Date

02/10/2017

Last Name

Richards

Maker Category
Schools

Pepperdine University

Park University

C.C. Hubbard High School

Lincoln School

First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Sedalia

HM ID

RIC20

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Success Awaits At Labor's Gates.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

3/19/1929

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Savannah

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

2/5/2019

Short Description

Military officer David Richards, Jr. (1929 - 2019) conducted over 11,000 parachute operations on behalf of the U.S. Army, and was inducted into the Parachute Rigger Warrant Officer’s Hall of Fame.

Employment

US Army

Saint Leo University

Savannah Tribune

Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department

Favorite Color

Purple

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of David Richards' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - David Richards lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - David Richards describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - David Richards describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - David Richards talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - David Richards describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - David Richards remembers his community in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - David Richards describes his parents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - David Richards remembers the Lincoln School in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - David Richards remembers the Great Depression

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - David Richards recalls his childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - David Richards remembers the faculty of the Lincoln School in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - David Richards remembers his activities at C.C. Hubbard High School in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - David Richards recalls the Taylor Chapel Methodist Church in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - David Richards remembers his prom

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - David Richards describes his family vacations

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - David Richards remembers the businesses in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - David Richards recalls joining the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - David Richards recalls the aftermath of World War II in the western Pacific

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - David Richards remembers joining a U.S. Army band, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - David Richards remembers joining a U.S. Army band, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - David Richards talks about his military promotions

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - David Richards recalls his training as a mortician

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - David Richards remembers his decision to return to the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - David Richards remembers his paratrooper training

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - David Richards recalls attending parachute rigger school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - David Richards remembers conducting parachute field tests

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - David Richards describes his work at the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - David Richards remembers being denied a promotion

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - David Richards remembers his promotion to warrant officer

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - David Richards describes his duties as a warrant officer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - David Richards remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - David Richards talks about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - David Richards remembers his retirement from the U.S. military

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - David Richards recalls his career at the Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - David Richards describes his college education

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - David Richards remembers his career as a professor

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - David Richards describes his organizational activities, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - David Richards describes his organizational activities, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - David Richards shares a message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - David Richards reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - David Richards describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - David Richards recalls serving as parade marshal for the Veteran's Council

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - David Richards remembers his students

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - David Richards narrates his photographs

Michael Jack

Television manager Michael Jack was born on June 6, 1951 in Berlin, Germany to Johanna Magrete Kresse and Huston Jack, Jr., a military veteran. He moved to Massachusetts at age two, however, he relocated frequently with his father to several military bases in the United States and Germany. Jack attended John F. Kennedy High School in Willingboro, New Jersey and Heidelberg High School in Heidelberg, Germany. After graduation, Jack enrolled in Pennsylvania’s Haverford College where he earned his B.A. degree in political science.

After graduating from college, Jack worked for WABC-TV in New York, a subsidiary of Capital Cities ABC-TV, where he would serve for nineteen years. Jack moved to Chicago, Illinois in 1980, serving as an account executive for ABC sales spots in the city until 1981, when he became a national sales manager at KGO-TV in San Francisco, California. He was promoted to local sales manager at KGO and remained at the station until 1986.

In 1986, Jack moved to Los Angeles becoming Capital Cities’ National Sales Office Sales Manager, where he would work for a decade. In 1996, Jack joined NBC, working for Los Angeles’ KNBC as Vice President of Sales. In his role, Jack oversaw the entire department on both local and national levels. Three years later, Jack became president and general manager of Columbus, Ohio’s NBC affiliate, WCMH-TV station, succeeding executive Bill Katsafanas in managing the entire station. During Jack’s tenure, WCMH led the market in early morning news, late news and prime time markets.

An industry veteran, Jack became president and general manager of WRC-TV in Washington, D.C., jumping from the thirty-fourth largest television market in the nation to the eighth-largest. The same year, Jack was named NBC’s Vice President of Diversity by General Electric Company’s chairman and chief executive officer, Bob Wright. He became the President and General Manger of NBC New York in 2010. Jack serves on a variety of boards, including the Greater Washington Urban League, the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington and the Greater Washington Board of Trade.

Michael Jack resides in New York with his wife, Mary, and daughter, Truce.

Michael Jack was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 28, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.277

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/28/2007

Last Name

Jack

Maker Category
Schools

Haverford College

Heidelberg American High School

Bryn Mawr College

John F. Kennedy High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Michael

Birth City, State, Country

Berlin

HM ID

JAC27

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica, Mexico

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

6/6/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

Germany

Favorite Food

Barbecue (Ribs)

Short Description

Television station general manager Michael Jack (1951 - ) was the president and general manager of NBC New York.

Employment

WABC TV

ABC

WNBC TV

WCMH TV

WRC-TV

Bloomingdales

Celanese Fiber Company

KGO-TV

NBC

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Michael Jack's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Michael Jack lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Michael Jack describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Michael Jack talks about his mother's upbringing in Germany

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Michael Jack describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Michael Jack describes his father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Michael Jack describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Michael Jack describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Michael Jack describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Michael Jack recalls moving frequently between the United States and Germany

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Michael Jack recalls his early experiences of travel

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Michael Jack describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Michael Jack talks about his brother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Michael Jack recalls the radio and television programs of his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Michael Jack talks about his education in New Jersey and Germany

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Michael Jack describes his early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Michael Jack talks about his family's perception of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Michael Jack remembers the assassinations of Malcolm X and Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Michael Jack describes the demographics of Haverford College in Haverford, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Michael Jack describes his experiences at Haverford College in Haverford, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Michael Jack remembers the African American community at Haverford College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Michael Jack recalls studying at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Michael Jack describes his early work in retail marketing

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Michael Jack recalls starting in the sales training program at WABC-TV in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Michael Jack talks about the television advertising industry

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Michael Jack talks about the television programming of the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Michael Jack recalls the lack of diversity at New York City's WABC-TV

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Michael Jack describes his experiences of racial discrimination at WABC-TV

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Michael Jack describes his experiences of discrimination in the television advertising sales industry

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Michael Jack talks about his career in the sales division of ABC

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Michael Jack describes his philosophy of salesmanship

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Michael Jack talks about selling airtime to niche advertisers

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Michael Jack describes the importance of experience in the media industry

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Michael Jack remembers his decision to work for NBC

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Michael Jack talks about his marriage and family

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Michael Jack describes his role at WCMH-TV in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Michael Jack describes the programming on WRC-TV in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Michael Jack reflects upon the representation of African Americans in the television industry

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Michael Jack talks about the lack of diversity on television

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Michael Jack reflects upon his career

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Michael Jack describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Michael Jack describes his transition to WRC-TV in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Michael Jack talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Michael Jack describes his organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Michael Jack reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Michael Jack reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Michael Jack talks about his parents' response to his success

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Michael Jack describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

1$1

DATitle
Michael Jack describes his experiences of discrimination in the television advertising sales industry
Michael Jack describes the programming on WRC-TV in Washington, D.C.
Transcript
So I was telling you a couple of self-inflicted wounds (laughter), 'cause you were asking about how I felt people at ABC treated me and I really was talking just in general about some experience in Corporate America, but back to that period of time, I was, 'cause I was making very little money, was also selling suits at night at a store called Barneys [Barneys New York], so I, I, after saving Barneys discount, I bought a silk tan jacket. I was sharp and proud. It was the first time, other than a blue blazer that I bought at Bloomingdale's that I actually bought something and I rode down the elevator with the president of the division at that time. And I had on some dress sandals. I don't know if you recall the type that where, you had kind of slits in 'em but I was looking sharp.$$Huaraches they're called, I think, or something like that.$$Not huaraches, but a little more dressy than that and I was, I thought I was looking bad, so, up in the elevator with him. Riding down the elevator, he says, looks over at me and says something about the jacket. And I said, "You like it? Well come on down to Barney's, I'll hook you up. I'll give you a little discount," et cetera. The next day, the next day, there was a memo that came out that all account managers, salespeople who worked for ABC will wear suits or at the--in casual moments, blue blazers, so, so should I have been smarter? Probably. Had I been there longer, maybe the outcome would have been different. But it clearly was, we were on different pages. Had I worked at the time for a different company maybe the outlook would have been different.$$You were actually thinking that he wanted one of 'em.$$Oh, absolutely. I, and I was gonna hook him up. And he was looking at me as, who is this crazy fool riding down the elevator, thinking he's looking sharp, et cetera, et cetera. There haven't been many situations like this, but I remember distinctly one that I know, as I was doing it, it was not the smartest thing to do, but I wonder had the same conversation happened between two white males, if the outcome had been the same, so. Not a bad outcome 'cause I didn't get fired, but we were at a dinner, I can't remember if it was a client dinner or one of just ABC personnel at the time, and one of the guys who happens to have the job that I now have, was sitting at the table with me, along with, I think it was the president of the division, another guy at the time. This is a number of years later, and the conversation came up about country clubs, and we got into this debate about why he thought it appropriate that you could exclude African Americans from country clubs. And I, I just, his rationale was, well because it's private. And I remember distinctly saying, and it stopped the conversation. "So, let me understand this, so it's okay to discriminate in public--in private, but not in public? Is that what you're saying?" So, all in all this world is comprised of people who, despite seeing color as the first thing that walks in the door, is how we deal with each other. Some people never get past that initial reaction and some people do, so, to generalize, I've been successful. Could I have been more successful earlier if I had been evaluated only for the things that hopefully I am evaluating individuals for, competency and performance and those kinds of things, maybe, probably, but this is America.$We were talking off camera about the nature of what you're doing, you were saying that in terms of my concern about public affairs programming, that only 7 percent of the programming nowadays is on the air.$$Is over the air (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Is over the air. That rest is cable, right?$$That people receive via the antenna, in this area, and there are some areas that are even less, the Bay Area [San Francisco Bay Area, California] for instance. Everybody's wired there.$$Okay, so then the presumption is that people would get, would have access to, well cable access channels who carry public affairs shows and then any other niche you kind of--programing would be carried on some other cable channel. Is that pretty much it?$$I mean, I think that's somewhat of a generalization but that's relatively fair. People, people unfortunately don't watch a lot of that programming either (laughter). We do some shows here, one called 'A Reporter's Notebook' [sic. 'Reporter's Notebook'] and another called 'Viewpoint' about a single topic with folks within the community talking about issues that are important here the Washington [D.C.] area, so we do give a voice to it. And the good news is we've locked it in between Sunday morning programming and what's happening in the world is people are waking up earlier and those now become very highly rated areas, but beyond that, you know, I think the domain of public affairs programming is no different than the domain of any other programming you know. People, there are so many different things that people are doing, so many distractions, so many multitask these days that finding audiences for programming is difficult in the broadcast business, but a lot of it's going online. We talk all the time. Our competition is not ABC and CBS and FOX, its Google [Google Inc.] and Yahoo and that's where the world is today. I spent a lot of time talking about how to grow our business on all the multiplatforms that exist. We're content providers but we've got to have the content where people want to watch it and we're, watch and use it. It's a different world than it was thirty years ago.$$We were discussing too that NBC 4 [WRC-TV, Washington, D.C.] here is not a superstation like WGN [WGN-TV, Chicago, Illinois] or WOR [WOR-TV; WWOR-TV, Secaucus, New Jersey] used to be or TBS [Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.], but what you do here, you do, you shoot programs for national distribution here like 'George Michael Sports Machine' ['The George Michael Sports Machine'] used to. Is that still being produced here?$$That was cancelled in March of this year.$$Okay.$$We took it off the air. It had been on for twenty-five years, but we do do here, of course, 'Matthews Show' ['The Chris Matthews Show'], 'Meet the Press,' a show called 'It's Academic' that has a regional place. It's a high school--kind of like 'Jeopardy' for high school competitions. We do--$$'McLaughlin' ['The McLaughlin Group'] is here.$$'McLaughlin' is done out of here, done out of our studios, yeah, downstairs.$$Okay, all right, so, yeah this was like, you know, once we drove up here I mean, I, I been to a few stations, but I've never seen as many antennas, and (laughter)--$$Yeah, right, right. We also have a few MSNBC shows and CNBC down here. It's also the network news bureau, so Tim Russert is the managing editor of NBC News in Washington, so we share the same building.

Nathaniel R. Goldston, III

Founder of Gourmet Services, Inc., Nathaniel Russell Goldston, III was born on October 20, 1938, in Omaha, Nebraska, to Nathaniel and Mary Elizabeth Goldston. Goldston’s mother worked in food service in the public school system and his father at the local hotels and restaurants. Goldston received his B.S. degree in business administration with a concentration in hotel and restaurant management from the University of Denver in 1962.

Goldston worked at a food service company for ten years after graduating from college; he held positions such as district manager, regional vice president, and senior vice president. After being denied a promotion to chief executive officer due to racial discrimination, Goldston left in 1974 to start his own business, Gourmet Services, Inc. in Charlotte, North Carolina. Gourmet Services, Inc. grew to include contracts at six black colleges and employ 300 individuals; in its first year, the company generated $2.3 million in revenues. In 1976, Goldston met former Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson, who encouraged him to move Gourmet Services, Inc. to Atlanta. The business continued to grow after relocating, and eventually Gourmet Services, Inc. became the nation’s largest African American-owned food service management companies, boasting 2,500 employees; it was ranked fourteenth among the nation’s top 50 food service companies.

In 1986, Goldston founded the Atlanta Chapter of 100 Black Men of America along with twenty-one other local businessmen and civic leaders. In 1989, Goldston became the 100 Black Men of America’s second national president. Gourmet Services, Inc. has donated millions of dollars in scholarships to students attending historically black colleges and universities; Goldston also established the Mary E. Goldston Foundation to provide scholarships to deserving African American students.

Goldston passed away on July 4, 2017.

Accession Number

A2007.112

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/26/2007 |and| 2/25/2008

Last Name

Goldston

Maker Category
Middle Name

R.

Schools

Kellom Elementary School

Omaha Central High School

University of Denver

Doane University

First Name

Nathaniel

Birth City, State, Country

Omaha

HM ID

GOL02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Nebraska

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape Town, South Africa

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

10/20/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Death Date

7/4/2017

Short Description

Food service executive and food service entrepreneur Nathaniel R. Goldston, III (1938 - 2017 ) was the founder of Gourmet Services, Inc. and the Atlanta Chapter of 100 Black Men of America.

Employment

Union Pacific Railroad

Allied Chemical Corporation

Dillon Hotel Company

Catering Management, Incorporated

Gourmet Services, Inc

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:744,7:1209,13:1581,18:3906,45:4371,51:11253,167:17682,231:18114,236:21246,274:22974,326:23406,331:30485,418:30841,423:34045,472:35202,491:38584,559:44670,618:44998,629:45982,645:46966,659:47868,675:53140,731:53679,739:53987,744:55835,771:56297,778:56605,783:57298,797:57683,803:58376,813:59608,834:61148,859:61533,865:62072,878:63150,895:63689,903:64228,911:64536,916:67847,984:68617,996:74330,1023:74750,1030:84998,1188:86174,1211:89702,1272:90374,1283:92426,1292:93162,1302:95830,1335:98314,1375:102522,1469:102862,1475:104562,1505:106262,1560:114125,1663:114869,1672:117548,1697:117940,1702:118430,1708:118822,1713:119998,1728:122252,1763:122938,1771:129602,1884:130974,1916:152070,2192:152700,2200:153240,2208:159090,2308:160350,2331:170206,2524:171422,2600:172258,2612:173778,2636:174234,2643:174994,2655:175602,2664:176362,2675:177654,2695:178262,2704:179022,2715:184620,2752:184920,2757:185745,2773:186420,2785:186795,2791:187245,2798:193157,2870:194123,2902:194951,2925:195503,2934:197558,2950:200180,2988:201076,2997:204056,3024:207125,3057:207590,3063:208520,3082:209078,3090:220140,3241:220484,3246:221430,3258:222032,3267:223870,3274$0,0:819,17:1183,22:8190,179:22372,348:26850,392:27270,399:30000,456:30630,468:31120,476:45144,671:46362,692:47406,723:50886,826:60760,939:61680,954:62232,961:66556,1048:68304,1072:70420,1140:80448,1256:81456,1269:85325,1310:86960,1339:88206,1348:96562,1455:98082,1485:99070,1507:99526,1514:100438,1531:100970,1539:101350,1549:101730,1555:102034,1560:102490,1569:102946,1576:103782,1590:105226,1625:105758,1634:111466,1662:112229,1670:121308,1807:121604,1812:122196,1823:124120,1860:127678,1905:132364,1962:136802,2058:137112,2064:139767,2098:140222,2104:142679,2149:143225,2156:143680,2193:144499,2204:153476,2295:160046,2410:171712,2556:172180,2563:172648,2570:175490,2590:178346,2657:179186,2672:179606,2678:182294,2787:182966,2799:183302,2808:183806,2815:189120,2843:189528,2848:193608,2936:194526,2946:196872,2973:197280,2978:197892,2985:199014,3004:203736,3018:204392,3028:204966,3037:206114,3062:206852,3073:207590,3086:217975,3290:218885,3314:219210,3320:219535,3326:220055,3336:223390,3349:224245,3364:225765,3383:226715,3424:230040,3461:235170,3557:242418,3598:243408,3632:248208,3703:250676,3722:252104,3745:252376,3750:257858,3879:260308,3899:260564,3904:261332,3923:263796,3939:265743,3986:266156,3994:268760,4009:269100,4036:274030,4098:278654,4206:279130,4215:279946,4231:280218,4236:281034,4254:286530,4285:289550,4331:290876,4359:292280,4431:298093,4479:302319,4541:302691,4546:307317,4577:310610,4625:311210,4633:311710,4639:312510,4648:313210,4656:313710,4662:314410,4674:315210,4686:315710,4691:316410,4699:317110,4707:317610,4713:325980,4810:326260,4815:326540,4820:327240,4833:327800,4843:332844,4888:339830,4972
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Nathaniel R. Goldston, III's interview, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his mother's parenting

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his father's parenting

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III remembers working for his father

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his family's food service professions

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls his neighbors in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III remembers Kellom Grade School in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III remembers the winters in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III remembers moving to a residential neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his family's catering business

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III remembers playing golf

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes Omaha Central High School in Nebraska

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes Doane College in Crete, Nebraska

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls working as a chair car porter

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls paying tuition at the University of Denver

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes the University of Denver in Colorado

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls the civil rights activity at the University of Denver

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes the Pi Lambda Phi Fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes food service education

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls his early employment

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III remembers the Vietnam War draft

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls studying at the University of Denver College of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his early contracts at Gourmet Services, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his family

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes Gourmet Services, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his work with the Aramark Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Slating of Nathaniel R. Goldston, III's interview, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his college education

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III talks about the food service industry

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls joining Catering Management, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls his position at Catering Management, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III talks about food service in universities

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III remembers leaving Catering Management, Incorporated

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls partnering with his previous clients

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls moving to Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls starting Gourmet Services, Inc. in Atlanta

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes the employees of Gourmet Services, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls changes in his business strategy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III talks about his business innovations

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes the board of Gourmet Services, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III talks about Gourmet Services Inc.'s catering

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his hotel business

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his business challenges

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III lists the top food service industry companies

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his plans for the future of Gourmet Services, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his collaboration with Aramark Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls working with Eastern Air Lines

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III talks about the young leadership of Gourmet Services, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls founding 100 Black Men of Atlanta, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls the members of 100 Black Men of Atlanta, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls fundraising for Project Success

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls the contribution of Dillard Munford

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls the fundraising events for Project Success

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes the changes in Project Success

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes creation of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls his presidency of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes his initiatives as president of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III describes the successes of 100 Black Men of Atlanta, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III reflects upon his legacy and how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III shares his advice to aspiring businesspeople

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Nathaniel R. Goldston, III narrates his photographs

DASession

2$2

DATape

4$6

DAStory

7$1

DATitle
Nathaniel R. Goldston, III remembers leaving Catering Management, Incorporated
Nathaniel R. Goldston, III recalls founding 100 Black Men of Atlanta, Inc.
Transcript
So you build this business up for six years, until about 1970. Is that right?$$Nineteen--nine- I, I built the Catering Management [Catering Management, Incorporated] business. I, I, I stuck with it 'til 1974, right.$$So tell me, what happens in 1974 that makes you decide that it's time to go (laughter)?$$(Laughter) It was very interesting. I was, I was still with Catering Management, but Catering Management had been sold, and it'd been sold to a major conglomerate company in, in New York. And if you remember the, the early '60s [1960s] and, and the early '70s [1970s], they didn't have a lot of faith in the fact that, that an African American can, could run that, that business. So when Catering Management sold, I was brought into Columbia, Missouri, as the senior vice president and chief operating officer. But it was always understood that I would never be the president of the company because they were in a search mode for, for president of the company. I ran the company for almost, I guess it was two years, from 1972 to 1974, with interim managers coming in--come--presidents coming. They'd come in, and they, they couldn't figure it out, and they couldn't do the business. And yet and still, I'd turn--once I turn the reins over to the them, I'd have to go back and start all over again, to the point that it became rather frustrating. And, and my wife [Darlene Goldston] said to me, "You know, you run these people's--this biz- business for these people. You don't need these people for you, for, to run the business. You can see that you run the business. You know how to run--you ought to run your own business." I said, "You're probably right." So they had one more sale, when they sold--the company that, that, that bought my company sold to Aramark [Aramark Corporation]. Then it was ARA Services. And I knew I didn't want to get into that big company and getting into all of that. It just wasn't my style. I wasn't gonna move to Philadelphia [Pennsylvania], and I wasn't gonna--and you know, what was my job gonna be? And I basically just decided I'll just start on my--I mean I just woke up one morning and flew to Atlanta [Georgia], and had a, a meeting with an attorney in Atlanta, and told him I wanted to--what, what, what is my, my legal obligations to this company, and how can I start my own business? That lawyer was Prentiss Yancey [Prentiss Q. Yancey, Jr.], who had graduated from Villanova [Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania] and graduated from Emory law school [Emory University School of Law, Atlanta, Georgia]. And, and he was responsible ultimately for, for the merger between the American Basketball Association and the National Basketball Association. And Prentiss is, was a very bright guy. He knew how to bring things together. And he told me, he said, he said, "Well, let me look at your contract." And I looked at the contract. "You have a contract with, with food service management. You don't have a contract with ARA. So, if you were still an employee of, of, of the other company, you would have an obligation. But since you quit, you have no obligations to anybody." He said, "Now you gotta figure out how to go get your business." And it's a, a very interesting story in itself.$Let's talk about your involvement with the 100 Black Men [100 Black Men of America, Inc.]. So let's start from the beginning.$$Well, it was a (laughter), it's a very interesting story. Back in the, in the mid-'80s [1980s], we operated a food service for the Harlem State Office Building [Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building] in, in New York [New York]. And one of my, one of the people that, or one of the, the organizations that we regularly served on a monthly basis was the 100 Black Men of New York [100 Black Men, Inc. of New York]. And they met in our building, and we would, and we would serve them dinner in the evenings. And I just happened to be around and asked the president, who was Roscoe, Dr. Roscoe Brown [HistoryMaker Roscoe C. Brown], if I could just kind of listen into the meeting. "Y'all, this is a secret meeting or something?" "No, no, no, no, sit down." And they were--I listen to them. They were planning their annual fundraiser for scholarships that they gave to, to kids in Harlem [New York, New York], basically, going to any college that they wanted to. And, and it was a nice, it was great, great kind of a program. And on my way back to Atlanta [Georgia], I thought about it. I said you know, there's no organization like that in Atlanta that basically, you know. And it was during the time, in those '80s [1980s], black males had a, they had a, a horrible rap. I mean it was, I mean we were known as people that, that ran off and left our families and people that went to the grocery store and never came back for twenty years and all that kind of stuff. And we didn't have the greatest reputation. And I thought about it, and I said you know, there ought to be, we ought to be able to put one of those groups together in the City of Atlanta. And I came back to my secretary, who was Monica Douglas at that time, and I told her. She said, "Yeah, maybe, I don't know." She said, "I, I don't know." She said, "But you're right: there is nothing, you know, there is nothing here in Atlanta that even comes close to that." We didn't have a black chamber. We didn't have a--we had the Black United Front [National Black United Front], which came close to doing something like that. So at any rate, I decided I would, I would call a few guys and invite them to dinner at the Mansion Restaurant [Atlanta, Georgia]. It ended up there was twenty-five or thirty of us showed up. And I talked to them about, you know, the group in, that I'd encountered in New York. And they were actually founded to combat police brutality in Harlem back in the, in the '50s [1950s] and the '60s [1960s]. That's how they got their group together. You know, they called it 100 Black Men [100 Black Men, Inc.; 100 Black Men of America, Inc.], and they worked with the police department and the mayor to stop some of the police brutality that was going on. And, and I said we need that kind of a community organization here, and the guys agreed with it. So we sat down and as a result of that, we decided we had to try to figure out what we were going to do. What can we do to impact the, the community in the City of Atlanta? And of course, one of those guys was in the superintendent of schools. He said, "I'll tell you what you can do. You can help some, keep some of these young people in school." He said, "You can help us, you know, basically give them some kind of a hope, some mind of a reason for staying in school and going on with life instead of dropping out. Our dropout rate is somewhere around 45 percent, 50 percent." And we said well, that makes sense. So what, what, what could we do? He said, "Well, I'll tell you what: he says I got a school. The worst school I got is Archer High School [S.H. Archer High School, Atlanta, Georgia] up at Perry Homes [Atlanta, Georgia] in the projects up there. And if we can figure out a way to help those kids through school and make certain that they went on to college and had a college education," he said, "We could do it like that guy did up in New York, that Eugene Lang." He said, "We challenge them. If they come through our program, and they do everything we say, that at the end of there, when you graduate, we'll make certain that your college tuition is paid for." Everybody, the room went silent. And then of course the, the accountants came up there. "How much would that cost?" "We don't know how much it would cost." "Well, don't you think we need to find out first?" So we went back. And the next meeting they came back, and when the accountants came up and gave their report, said, "You would have to raise anywhere between three hundred and fifty and a half million dollars every year." You've got to be kidding me. That's what it's gonna cost. Now if you get out there and make that promise, you better be able to deliver. And so we thought long and hard about it. And I was kind of the leader of the group, since I was the convener.

Dr. Lloyd C. Elam

Founder of Meharry Medical College’s Psychiatry Department and retired college president Dr. Lloyd C. Elam was born on October 27, 1928 in Little Rock, Arkansas. His parents, Ruth Davis Elam and Harry Penoy Elam met in church in Little Rock. Elam attended Stephens School and graduated from Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in 1944 at age fifteen. He went to junior college in Little Rock before moving to Harvey, Illinois. There, Elam worked for the Maremont Automobile Plant and commuted to Chicago to attend classes at Roosevelt University where he graduated with his B.S. degree in zoology in 1950. After a stint in the United States Army, Elam earned his M.D. degree from the University of Washington School of Medicine in 1957. From 1957 to 1958, Elam completed an internship at the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago, and from 1958 to 1961, he served as a resident in psychiatry at the University of Chicago Hospital.

Elam joined Chicago’s Billings Hospital as staff psychiatrist and instructor of psychiatry in 1961. From 1961 to 1963, he served as assistant professor and chairman of the Psychiatry Department of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. Becoming a full professor in 1963, Elam was appointed interim dean of the college in 1966. In 1968, he was selected president of Meharry Medical College and supervised the school’s growth in that capacity until 1981. From 1981 to 1982, Elam was college chancellor. He served as Distinguished Service Professor of Psychiatry from 1982 to 1995 when he retired to serve as a volunteer faculty member. Elam served as a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, California in 1982. He was made Professor Emeritus of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in 1996 and Chairman Emeritus in 1997. Elam is a member of the Tennessee Psychiatric Association, Tennessee Medical Association, American Medical Association, National Medical Association, American Psychiatric Association, American College of Psychiatrists, Black Psychiatrists of America, R.F. Boyd Medical Society and the American College of Forensic Examiners.

In 1973, Elam was presented an honorary Doctor of Laws from Harvard University. His other awards include honorary degrees from Meharry Medical College and St. Lawrence University; the 1988 National Board of Medical Examiners Distinguished Service Award; induction into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society; the 1972 Nashville Club Man of the Year Award; the 1976 Human Relations Award from the National Conference of Christians and Jews and the 1988 Eleanor Roosevelt Key, Roosevelt University’s highest alumni award. Meharry Medical College established the Lloyd C. Elam Mental Health Center in his honor and that building now bares his name.

Elam and his wife, Clara Elam, R.N., have two daughters: Dr. Gloria Elam-Norris of Chicago and Dr. Laurie Elam-Evans of Atlanta. Elam passed away on October 4, 2008.

Elam was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 14, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.089

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/14/2007

Last Name

Elam

Middle Name

Charles

Schools

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

University of Washington

Stephens Elementary School

Roosevelt University

University of Chicago

First Name

Lloyd

Birth City, State, Country

Little Rock

HM ID

ELA02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

10/27/1928

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Nashville

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Peas (Black-Eyed)

Death Date

10/4/2008

Short Description

College president, psychiatrist, and psychiatry professor Dr. Lloyd C. Elam (1928 - 2008 ) founded Meharry Medical College’s Psychiatry Department, and served as the college's president until 1981.

Employment

Meharry Medical College

Dupont Corporation

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:791,12:5650,140:6102,145:30696,395:31860,409:34382,445:50022,646:61102,735:62510,753:74602,924:77122,960:78550,985:108414,1291:110898,1326:111634,1338:173850,2051$0,0:418,5:786,10:1522,20:2166,25:6950,98:8330,115:9250,129:12194,165:12654,171:13298,179:18562,205:25321,275:26926,295:36312,362:38063,367:38973,378:40429,394:41248,406:42249,418:46981,475:51258,511:65404,685:68060,726:69637,750:78069,816:78818,824:86000,847:86658,855:90418,908:91546,921:92016,927:96460,1013:102080,1052:103250,1066:103700,1072:104060,1077:104780,1086:121683,1244:128958,1339:129734,1348:130122,1353:130510,1358:131577,1372:143411,1472:156529,1610:214180,2006:251253,2276:254050,2284
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Lloyd C. Elam's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his mother's community in Arkadelphia, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his father's education and occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his likeness to his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his father's lumber business

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about race relations in Little Rock, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his paternal grandfather's career as a stagecoach racer

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his household

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his refusal to eat meat

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his childhood diet

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his transportation to school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers his family's road trips to Arkadelphia, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his experiences as a migrant farmworker

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls attending Stephens Elementary School in Little Rock, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his family's daily prayers

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls selling newspapers

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers his teacher, Leroy Christopher

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers an influential teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his community's emphasis on education

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his early interest in medicine and psychology

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers his early understanding of mental health

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls the popular ideas about mental illness during his youth

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls the beliefs about mental illness in rural Arkansas

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his decision to attend Roosevelt College in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers his high school graduation

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his experiences at Roosevelt College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers serving in the U.S. Army's Medical Service Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls race relations at the University of Washington School of Medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes the findings of his medical study of stress

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls the psychiatry program at the University of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his influential professors

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about the treatments for mental illness

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes the perceptions of psychiatry in the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls founding the Department of Psychiatry at Meharry Medical College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes the changes in the cost of psychiatric care

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls establishing a day hospital in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his presidency of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his challenges as the president of Meharry Medical College

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes Meharry Medical College's contributions to Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about his community health concerns

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes the increase in African Americans seeking psychiatric care

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about his retirement

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about the underrepresentation of African Americans in the medical field

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam reflects upon the psychological effects of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam talks about his involvement at the First Baptist Church in Nashville, Tenneesee

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes his civic activities

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Lloyd C. Elam narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

11$7

DATitle
Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his early interest in medicine and psychology
Dr. Lloyd C. Elam recalls his presidency of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee
Transcript
Now how was high school [Paul Laurence Dunbar High School; Dunbar Magnet Middle School, Little Rock, Arkansas]? Were you active in clubs in high school or student government or sports or anything like that?$$I went to all the football games but most of the people in my--most of the guys in my class were active and I was not. I enjoyed studying (laughter). As a matter of fact, the way I got interested in medicine I was thirteen and kind of browsing in the library one day and saw a little book and the title of it was 'Physique and Personality' [ph.] and I said, oh, that sounds interesting. I read it, it was fascinating and it went on to show how whatever kind of physique you has, you have determines what kinds of adjustment possibilities are open to you. If you're a little athletic boy and somebody does something on the playground, you might hit him or push him or something and he stops doing it. And so you figure that works and so you become that kind of an outgoing person. If you are a little thin, scrawny guy and you try that, the guy will hit you back and say that, that won't work. So you decide to go to the library, (laughter) read books and so that determines your--another little boy on the playground tries pushing, gets hit, tries studying, reading, he's not smart so that doesn't work. So he becomes the jokester and so the little fat boy becomes a jokester. And so it was fascinating the way he wrote the book but it has some motivational kind of lesson. And his students really tried to, to do a scientific study of all of this but they went too far. But as you know, your physical does affect your personality. But that's how I got interested in psychology and then found out, if you're gonna do research in psychology, you should go on and be a psychiatrist so you can do all kinds of research. And that's how I got interested in that.$$Okay, so at age thirteen you were aware of what a psychologist was and--$$Yeah (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) in terms of that--$$Yeah.$$--because of that study?$$Yeah.$Now, just about the time that I got all of that going the--there was progress in civil rights and desegregation of schools. And people had the idea that all of the black schools were gonna merge into the others and you wouldn't need them so we had that kind of crisis. And that's when I moved into administration and bunch of us met every Saturday night for a year struggling with what, what would be an appropriate approach to this problem. It was a problem for us.$$The funding began to dry up or--for the black institutions?$$No, probably, I don't know but you know, black institutions have always had funding problems so I don't know if it was drying up or not. I was--this is before I was in administration. But the question is, why do you need two whatever kinds of institutions, you know, and so what we decided after that year of, of talking about the problem is that, sure enough, you did need historically black institutions [HBCUs]. If, if Meharry [Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee] stopped it's existence, then number of black persons going into medicine would drastically decrease and so that we did, indeed, need to continue this institution. And that's when I went into administration and decided that, if we were going to, we needed to be a niche institution. And we should address those illnesses and problems that were unique to the population that we served. And, in order to do this, we had to do a number of things. One, was to build a campus and that's what a good number of years of my administration was involved. But the other was to establish a Ph.D. program, research programs, and so on. And we did that. And it's--and they are going very well in addition to medicine and dentistry.$$How long did it take to establish those?$$I, let's see, I became president in '68 [1968] so we started building campus in '69 [1969] and we started the research in, in graduate studies in about '75 [1975] somewhere in there, middle '70s [1970s]. And then it became a school of graduate studies and research in about '76 [1976]. So--excuse me, let me see, '76 [1976], yep, that's right in '76 [1976]. And now we will graduate a significant percentage of black Ph.D.'s. in the biomedical sciences and of course we still have the medical program.

Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr.

Internal medicine physician Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. was born on March 22, 1925 in Tuskegee, Alabama to Dr. George Clayton Branche, Sr. and Lillian Vester Davidson. Branche attended Boston Latin High School in Boston, Massachusetts and graduated in June of 1942. He then attended and graduated from Bowdon College in Brunswick, Maine, earning his B.A. degree in 1946. Branche graduated from Boston University’s Medical School in 1948 earning his M.D. degree.

After earning his medical degree, Branche worked as a medical intern at Boston City Hospital between 1948 and 1949. In July of 1949, Branche started his residency in internal medicine at Cushing Veterans’ Hospital. After his residency ended in 1951, he earned a cancer fellowship at Tufts Medical School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. After his cancer fellowship, Branche entered the U.S. Army. Between October and December of 1952, Branche attended medical field service school at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas in preparation for service overseas during the Korean Conflict. Between December of 1952 and May 15, 1954, Branche served in the U.S. Army as a medical officer. He was honorably discharged in November of 1954, achieving the rank of captain.

Branche started to practice internal medicine in Richmond, Virginia near the end of 1954 after leaving the U.S. Army. The following year, he got married and started a family. After seven years in Richmond, Branche and his family moved to New York City, where he practiced medicine with his brother, Dr. Matthew Branche. Branche worked in the Admissions Department at Columbia University Medical School. Branche also helped found the organization, 100 Black Men. He was involved with the organization for forty-three years and was an active member for many years.

Branche passed away on April 23, 2009 at age 84.

Accession Number

A2006.152

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/6/2006 |and| 12/12/2006

Last Name

Branche

Maker Category
Middle Name

Clayton

Schools

Boston Latin School

James P. Timilty Middle School

Chambliss Children's House at Tuskegee Institute

Boston University School of Medicine

Bowdoin College

First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

BRA06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/22/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken, Fish, Vegetables

Death Date

4/23/2009

Short Description

Internal medicine physician Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. (1925 - 2009 ) was a medical officer during the Korean Conflict, was a founder of 100 Black Men and had his own internal medicine practice in New York City.

Employment

U.S. Army

Boston City Hospital

Cushing General Hospital

Harlem Hospital Center

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:1520,28:1824,33:6004,127:6992,153:15656,319:33691,605:38945,736:59330,913:62634,953:71821,1116:81654,1224:85994,1264:87456,1292:89262,1323:89950,1336:97908,1538:98260,1543:99404,1560:100020,1568:113794,1689:115039,1707:115537,1715:118193,1752:118774,1761:124994,1854:139484,2123:140128,2131:141769,2144:146729,2212:147450,2220:153322,2293:155672,2322:156048,2327:156612,2334:165590,2498:166790,2519:180201,2762:184326,2808:185614,2846:186718,2861:213370,3179$0,0:4470,33:4830,41:5190,46:6270,68:22040,283:25942,329:27202,352:27790,360:33416,442:35772,500:37292,534:38128,552:38812,564:51290,760:59877,838:60498,853:60843,859:61257,867:66480,942:66790,948:78334,1043:78774,1049:79302,1057:81686,1107:89970,1252:91490,1325:92250,1337:93846,1359:94226,1365:94530,1370:102096,1425:102704,1434:103464,1445:105136,1470:105668,1478:105972,1483:110000,1571:110456,1582:116960,1662:119435,1765:145717,2026:146270,2034:155710,2154:156964,2184:157426,2192:157690,2197:179690,2512:180959,2522:183088,2535:183698,2541:189960,2651:191020,2666:200062,2765:200774,2775:224215,2959:230140,3078:232841,3106:233520,3130:258700,3335
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his mother's upbringing in North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his paternal great-uncle, George Clayton Shaw

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's university education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about his father's medical research

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's social involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his family life in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls travelling with his family as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls Camp Emlen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls moving to Boston, Massachusetts for high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls differences between Boston and Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls the Roxbury community in Boston

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his mother and siblings' move to Boston

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his decision to study medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his internship at Boston City Hospital

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his mentors

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his medical internship and residency

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls joining the U.S. Army as a medical officer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his service in the Korean War

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. remembers segregation in the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls returning from the Korean War

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls moving to Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his medical career in New York City, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls the difficulties of practicing medicine in Richmond

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his medical career in New York

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his social involvement in New York

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the Youth Shelter Program of Westchester, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his wife and his friends at Harlem Hospital Center

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about George Clayton Shaw's writings

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the history of Mary Potter Academy, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the history of Mary Potter Academy, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls serving with black physicians in the Korean War

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his medical duties in the Korean War

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about why he settled in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls Richmond's African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls moving to New York City in 1962

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his early medical career in New York City

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls practicing medicine with his brother

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his community involvement in Harlem, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his involvement in 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his medical career in New York City, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes Westchester County, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the community of Scarsdale, New York

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes African Americans' presence in the medical profession

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the medical issues facing the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his concerns about healthcare for African Americans

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the operations of the Youth Shelter Program of Westchester, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his work with the Westchester Clubmen

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about his Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity membership

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about his three children

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$6

DAStory

5$5

DATitle
Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his decision to study medicine
Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his medical duties in the Korean War
Transcript
I'll ask you now, but we'll keep going in chronological order. Well, why was that not an option for you? Why did you not see that as a path for you to take?$$I wasn't interested. I was afraid to fly. I was afraid to ride a horse. I was afraid to ride, I fell off a pony at camp and never rode a horse, and I had no interest in it, and I was active, and I wanted to go to medical school, and I was fortunate, they needed doctors.$$Had you always been interested in medicine?$$I never thought of anything else.$$For how long? How far back can you remember?$$Well, as far as I can remember. That's the only think I knew. I lived in a community of doctors, my father [George Clayton Branche, Sr.] was a doctor, his close friends were physicians. I didn't know what kind I would be, but I never thought, as I said, and I'll get to the, once I got into Bowdoin College [Brunswick, Maine], I had spent almost two years there, 1944, I had finished my, I finished Boston Latin [Boston Latin School, Boston, Massachusetts] in '42 [1942]. I spent two years at Bowdoin and was told that unless I got into medical school that I would be subject to the draft. I only, didn't have enough, yeah, I only had two years, but I took a summer and at that time all, many of my classmates were in the same situation I was. We were only nineteen and twenty and so the colleges, Williams [Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts], Bowdoin, many of us, my friend Garrett [John Garrett, Jr.] at Amherst [Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts], we were allowed to go to medical school and we, and then we accelerated very rapidly, but then in 1945, the war [World War II, WWII] sort of ended and we decelerated so we spent a couple, one six-month period without going to school, and we had to write a little thesis and do something else, and then went on back and finished. And, but the reason, as I said, I was always interested in medicine. And at Boston University [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts], it was a very tiny school. When my father went there, there were only twenty-three students at the medical school. And three of 'em was black, including my father. And when I went to BU medical school, it was still small. There were only fifty-nine and now there're over 160 in each class.$$How many blacks were there when you were there of the fifty-nine?$$Very, I was the only one in my class, just like I was the only one at Bowdoin, except for a young fellow who was there for a year and left to go in the [U.S.] Army.$$Where did you live when you went out to Bowdoin?$$When I went back, when I came back from Bowdoin? My mother [Lillian Davidson Branche] had moved to 71 Highland Street. A family moved out and she moved in the same building, apartment, little apartment in Boston [Massachusetts], and I used to ride a bicycle from my apartment to the medical school. I'd get on my, had my books on the back and I'd get on my little bike and kids would say look, there's a man on a bike. So I rode that and they would let me hook it up inside the building and then I would bicycle back up to, it was a couple, maybe mile and a half, two miles.$But I only spent a, no more than four or five weeks, and then I was allowed, I traded places with this fellow, as I told you I don't like flying, but I was willing to get into a little tiny two-seater with my duffel bag and fly south. And while I was there I was--you had to have a dispensary. You had to have a dispensary for soldiers when they had various problems, whether they're STS [significant threshold shift], sexually transmitted disorders, or various other things, or whether the common cold or whether they were this or that. They would come to the dispensary. Now--$$A dispensary is a pharmacy basically.$$The dispensary is a little tent where I had, had a little desk and things, and I had pills and so forth to treat--injections for certain disorders. But I saw very few sick people in this little--now there weren't, there wasn't a great deal of fighting going on. You remember there were little lulls in fighting. Now we're talking now, we're talking, I got to this hospital and about February of 1993 [sic. 1953], and there were no major battles or anything going on. Occasionally there was a push so to speak when the Chinese became involved and there were skirmishes and so they came, they did bring in, as I said, this was Evacuation Hospital [11th Evacuation Hospital, Korea]. They would bring troops down from the lines and so there were times when there were troops who had to have emergency surgical procedures which is what some of my friends were involved with. But I couldn't help out because I knew nothing about surgical tech. In fact, they would ask all of the officers, medical officers, to come and give a hand, and I recall, I never will forget it, when I got in the operating room, and my friend Wharton [ph.] would be operating, really working hard, and I would try to, he said, "Gee you're all thumbs," he said, "please leave." And I was, I had to leave. But anyhow, as things passed on, what happened was I allowed the Korean civilians to come into the clinic, those who had medical problems that I could handle, and so each morning you would see a line up outside, see it was a gate, not a gate, but a guard would be there opening, letting them into our little ground, camp, whatever you want to call them, you'd find maybe fifteen, twenty or so lined up coming in, and so it was okay. In fact, the U.S., my superiors said, sure, you can see as many as you, so they would line up and take their time and I would see them for various forms of anemia, a lot of parasitic diseases and minor problems that I could handle and they were grateful, and I enjoyed it, because otherwise I wouldn't have been practicing any medicine.$$You wouldn't have had anything to do.$$Very little.$$Very little.$$And so anyhow, I was there for about ten, let's see, from oh about eight to ten months and then I was transferred to the area near Seoul [South Korea], to the 121st Evacuation Hospital. That was in the town across from the Han River from Yeongam-eup [South Korea], I got promoted to captaincy, I was captain, and did primarily--much bigger facility and we, the general medical, we had medical wards and treated more medical problems, I left there. The war ended as you will recall only a few months after I got to Korea actually. And I left Korea in 1954, and came to, back to the states.

Dr. Walter Young

Dentist and civil rights activist Dr. Walter Fuller Young was born on August 18, 1934, in New Orleans, Louisiana, to Daisy Valentine Fuller Young and Andrew Jackson Young, a dentist. Young attended Valeda C. Jones School with his brother Andrew Young. He later attended Gilbert Academy and then went on to attend and graduate from Princeton High School in Princeton, New Jersey, in 1951. Young earned his B.A. degree from Baldwin Wallace College in Ohio in 1955. Following in his father’s footsteps, Young studied dentistry at Howard University Dental School.

After a stint as a dentist in the United States Navy, Young returned to New Orleans, where his father had practiced, established his dental practice and taught at Dillard University. At the same time, Young became an active supporter of the All African Students Association’s lunch counter sit-ins at New Orleans’ downtown Woolworth’s and at other New Orleans businesses from 1961 to 1964. During that same period, Young was introduced to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., by his brother, SCLC’s Rev. Andrew Young. Moving to Atlanta in 1978, Young joined his brother and worked to address the issues of dental health maintenance and the establishment of dental programs in schools, churches and organizations in the Atlanta area. Young’s dental practice has been active in the same location for twenty-eight years. He is a member of the North Georgia Dental Society and the American Dental Association. Young is owner and president of Young International Development Corporation and serves as a director of Jamaica Communications, Datacom International, Inc., and Health Management Decisions.

As a member of the City of Atlanta Blue Ribbon Committee on Equal Business Opportunity, Young is involved in a number of civic and community programs. He is a consultant to the Osaka American Club of Japan, American Computer Technology in Atlanta, Gulfstream Aerospace in Savannah, and Grady Healthcare in Atlanta. Possessing a keen interest in African American history, Young is honorary consul general for Liberia and has traveled extensively on the African continent. In 2004, Atlanta’s Southwest YMCA was named for Young and his brother, Andrew.

Young is married to event planner, Sonjia Young, and is father to five children.

Accession Number

A2006.115

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/12/2006 |and| 12/13/2006

Last Name

Young

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Princeton High School

Valena C. Jones Elementary School

Baldwin Wallace University

Howard University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Walter

Birth City, State, Country

New Orleans

HM ID

YOU05

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

All

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

Summer

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: All

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

8/18/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo, Crab (Softshell)

Short Description

Civil rights activist and dentist Dr. Walter Young (1934 - ) worked in the Civil Rights Movement in New Orleans with the All African Students Association, and later in Atlanta on issues of dental health. Young founded his Atlanta dental practice in 1978, and was owner and president of the Young International Development Corporation.

Employment

Young International Development Corporation

Walter F. Young, DDS

Southern Christian Leadership Conference

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:708,22:1003,28:1534,39:2065,50:5100,105:6090,116:7080,130:10169,153:46334,486:47677,510:50521,570:51074,579:54945,670:55261,675:59448,768:64425,854:76200,947:76625,953:88890,1149:91072,1167:97580,1248:98732,1266:99380,1276:100172,1289:100604,1296:101828,1323:102188,1329:102476,1334:103124,1344:104852,1379:106510,1385$0,0:2070,25:2610,32:2970,37:3330,42:5400,74:15186,205:15989,226:40131,490:40852,498:44457,545:47444,594:56587,670:57697,679:72050,897:73040,916:76960,943:79170,960:89604,1093:92802,1148:93192,1154:96776,1172:97186,1178:100384,1217:101942,1243:103910,1275:104730,1286:115472,1462:116292,1474:119408,1530:120064,1542:126170,1564:126550,1570:127006,1577:128602,1602:129286,1607:136664,1708:137504,1719:138260,1729:138848,1737:153512,1903:153917,1909:155500,1916:156088,1925:156928,1938:157348,1944:159448,1979:167428,2120:168184,2131:168688,2139:176890,2194:177520,2204:178510,2216:179140,2225:190558,2347:198930,2450:202534,2501:203670,2511
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Walter Young's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Walter Young lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Walter Young describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Walter Young recalls his maternal uncle who passed for white

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Walter Young describes his maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Walter Young describes his family life as a child in New Orleans

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Walter Young describes his mother's education in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Walter Young describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Walter Young describes his parents and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Walter Young describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Walter Young describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Walter Young recalls fights from his childhood in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Walter Young recalls the role of music in his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Walter Young describes his father's dental practice in New Orleans

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Walter Young describes his grade school experiences in New Orleans

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Walter Young recalls traveling with his family during childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Walter Young describes his experiences at Princeton High School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Walter Young describes his experiences at Baldwin-Wallace College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Walter Young describes his experiences at Baldwin-Wallace College, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Walter Young recalls attending Howard University College of Dentistry

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Walter Young talks about African American leaders at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Walter Young recalls Africans' involvement in New Orleans' Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Walter Young talks about New Orleans' Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Walter Young describes his friendships with the King family

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Walter Young describes the Civil Rights Movement after Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Walter Young describes his humanitarian involvement in Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Walter Young talks about how his childhood prepared him for success

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Walter Young describes his involvement with the Young Men's Christian Association

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Walter Young recalls serving as an officer in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Walter Young describes his work in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Walter Young recalls the Atlanta Missing and Murdered Children cases

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Walter Young describes his diplomatic and business pursuits in Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Walter Young describes his collaborations with Liberia's presidents

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Walter Young describes his support for Liberians in the United States

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Walter Young talks about how U.S. immigration laws affect Liberians

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Walter Young describes his involvement in Atlanta's politics

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Walter Young talks about his dental career in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Walter Young talks about immigrant owned businesses in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Walter Young describes his hopes and concerns for the United States

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Walter Young narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. Walter Young narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$2

DATape

1$4

DAStory

11$7

DATitle
Dr. Walter Young describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood
Dr. Walter Young describes his collaborations with Liberia's presidents
Transcript
What were some of the other sights and sounds and smells of growing up [in New Orleans, Louisiana]?$$The sights and sounds--$$And smells of growing up. What did they call your neighborhood?$$We grew up in a mixed neighborhood. We had an Irish grocery store on one corner, an Italian bar on another corner, and the third corner right on Galvez [Street] and Cleveland [Avenue], that was a German beer garden, and before the Second World War [World War II, WWII], his kids are, we would just play around in the bushes and peek through the windows, trying to see what was going on because they were singing songs in German, and we would peek through the window. And they were actually flags in there with a swastika, and we can remember them saying, "Heil Hitler, Heil Hitler." That was before the Second World War. Of course, when the Second World War broke out, the place was closed down.$$That's interesting.$$And we only had about oh, two or three black families in the neighborhood, and then we had a lot of Cajun people in the neighborhood. It was mostly white.$$Okay.$$So I think that's where my brother [HistoryMaker Andrew Young] got his diplomatic skills growing up in the neighborhood, when he had to communicate and meet with diverse people, people of different cultural and ethnic backgrounds, trying to get along with different people. We both learned that very young.$You talked about so many things that have happened in Liberia as you were working there. Some of the things you spoke about, let's elaborate on some of them. When Charles Taylor was there, you wanted to speak to some of the things that were going on that might have affected the business that you were doing.$$Yes. Charles Taylor really spent a lot of time here in Georgia, in Macon, Georgia; so, I knew him as a young man. However, I served under his presidency, but I had very little contact with him. I didn't go to Liberia during those years, so, but I, my interest was supporting the Liberians living in Georgia, who needed their passport renewed--that needed support, immigration support, that needed someone to support their efforts to live in the Atlanta [Georgia] area. Most were here under the amnesty program [Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986] and they had some who had come here to go to college and stay. We have roughly over ten thousand Liberians here in the Atlanta area, so I was responsible for all of the Liberians during those days, and it was a very warm relationship. I got to make many good friends, whom I still have today. It's going back to, since 1985, so I do have some long-term friends who are still here. Now that we have a democratic government and we are trying to rebuild Liberia, my role is to try to assist and encourage American companies in investing in Liberia and trying to get Liberians who have been educated in America to somehow think in terms of going back home to rebuild the country.$$Yeah, and I think that's important. I understand that when the new president [Ellen Johnson Sirleaf] took office there, she had to get rid of a lot of her government officials because they were uneducated, so--$$I know she's tried to retain as many as she could. She's, it's just a great challenge for her because Liberia was at war for so long, so young people were not schooled; in other words, all they knew how to do and still do, was to carry a gun and so many of them were not educated, so, now what do you do with ex-combatants, as we call them? Those young people who grew up fighting. What do we do with them now? We can try to create an educational system. Mostly, I would encourage vocational education, and I'm trying to encourage as much support, vocational support as I can, from America and that's my challenge now; doing whatever I can do to support Liberia and to help it to grow, and I'm following, of course, the lead of my president.

Albert Dotson, Jr.

Attorney Albert E. Dotson, Jr. was born on June 9, 1960 in Detroit, Michigan. Dotson is the oldest of four siblings. Values of self pride and community development were instilled in Dotson and his siblings at very early ages. Dotson’s father, Albert E. Dotson, Sr., became the first African American store manager for Sears Roebuck & Company. His position required relocation to several Sears’ stores across the country. Thus, the Dotson family lived in Detroit, Chicago, and Atlanta. The family settled in Miami, Florida where Dotson, Sr. and his family formed personal relationships with various African American community leaders.

In 1978, Dotson, Jr. became the first family member to attend a four-year university. He enrolled in Dartmouth University majoring in economics and history. After his third quarter, Dotson took advantage of the foreign exchange programs at Dartmouth traveling to Morocco and Spain. Dotson graduated from Dartmouth in 1984. He then received a full scholarship to attend Vanderbilt University’s Law School in Nashville, Tennessee. During his academic tenure, Dotson was awarded the Bennett Douglas Bell Memorial Prize for academic achievement and high ethical standards. In 1987, Dotson completed his J.D. degree. He works in private practice as an equity partner with the Miami law firm of Bilzin, Sumberg, Baena, Price & Axelrod, LLP specializing in land use and zoning, and federal and local government procurement contracts and compliance.

In 1993, Dotson was the second African American to be voted on the Orange Bowl. Dotson’s father was the first African American to serve in this capacity. Dotson served as Vice President of 100 Black Men of America in 1996, later becoming Chairman in 2004. In March 2006, Dotson was sworn in to serve as President of The Orange Bowl Committee for the 2006-2007 Orange Bowl Festival and FedEx Orange Bowl Game.

Accession Number

A2006.020

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/16/2006

Last Name

Dotson

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Schools

Woodward Academy

Winston Churchill School

James Hart School

Mason Elementary School

Dartmouth College

Vanderbilt University

First Name

Albert

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

DOT01

Favorite Season

January in Miami

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere With Family

Favorite Quote

You Make The Difference.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

6/9/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potato Pie

Short Description

Association executive and administrative lawyer Albert Dotson, Jr. (1960 - ) is an equity partner at the Miami law firm of Bilzin, Sumberg, Baena, Price & Axelrod, LLP. Dotson is Chairman of 100 Black Men of America, and was president of the Orange Bowl Committee for the 2006-2007 season.

Employment

Bilzin, Sumberg, Baena, Price & Axelrod, LLP

State of Florida

Fine Jacobson Schwartz Nash Block and England

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Albert Dotson, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his father's career at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls moving to Chicago, Illinois as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his grade school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Albert Dotson, Jr. reflects upon his family life during his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls befriending the King and the Abernathy families in Atlanta

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers working as a ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his activities as a teenager in Atlanta and Miami

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes the political atmosphere of Atlanta in the 1970s, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes the political atmosphere of Atlanta in the 1970s, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers moving to Miami, Florida in 1976

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his aspirations during his high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his decision to attend Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his experiences at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his studies at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers studying abroad in Granada, Spain

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes how his legal career began

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his decision to attend law school at Vanderbilt University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his experiences at Nashville's Vanderbilt University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his first summer job as a law student

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers beginning his legal career in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his leadership of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes the mission of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his legal career in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his specialty in land use and zoning law

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his presidency of the Orange Bowl Committee

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. talks about managing multiple priorities in his career

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. reflects upon his life

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

2$5

DATitle
Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers working as a ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks
Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his leadership of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.
Transcript
We also got to meet Walt Bellamy, who at that time was the center for the Atlanta Hawks. And we met Walt Bellamy because he knew people who lived in Homewood, Illinois. And when he got traded to Atlanta, I forget what team he got traded from, he didn't know a lot of people. He talked to his friend in Homewood, Illinois, said, why don't you call my father [Albert Dotson, Sr.], he lives there. So he got to know me and my parents and just so happened it was his turn on the Atlanta Hawks to select or recommend someone to ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks. And not knowing anybody else, he recommended me. My parents, and again, there are certain things that happen in your life that you remember like it was yesterday. I come home from school and I was playing basketball at that time in Atlanta for Woodward Academy [College Park, Georgia]. I can't tell you I was all that good, but--$$Were you about as tall now? I mean then as you are now?$$I was tall for my age, but I was a little shorter than I am today. The--I came home. My parents said, "Albert [HistoryMaker Albert Dotson, Jr.], we have some good news for you." And I said, "Well what is it?" They said that Walt Bellamy called and they made all this drama, and said that he's recommended you to be ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks. At that moment I think, least I remember it, as a pregnant pause 'cause all I'm thinking is he's recommended me, what a great honor. Didn't think I was gonna be selected. And then they said, "And you've been selected." Now I've lost it. I've lost it as a child. I just completely lost it. And then my mother [Earlene Puryear Dotson] tells me, and they're gonna pay you. I said, "Wait a minute. They're gonna pay me to go downtown to be ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks, okay this is clearly a joke." Well a long story short, I did do that for three years, three seasons, ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks. It taught me that I did not wanna be a professional basketball player the rest of my life.$$Now, what did you see when you were there?$$Well as a child, what you see on television is just when they play the game. As a person who is behind the scenes, you learn and see the business of basketball. And you learn how difficult it is. As a ball boy, I remember Lou Hudson for example, getting a shot in his knee because of an injury. And you see them going through that. You see people get traded. And how that disrupts their lives and some of them are angry about it and some of them are not. You see the interaction between the inner--the private interaction between coach and player. And sort of how that works. I mean it was great. I met a lot of people. I remember my very first game, interestingly enough, was a exhibition game between the Atlanta Hawks and the Detroit Pistons. Excuse me, Atlanta Hawks and the, the New York Knicks. And the reason I say Detroit was because it was the very first and maybe the only rain--only game that was not played because of rain. And the reason it wasn't played because of rain, Atlanta had just built the Omni [Omni Coliseum, Atlanta, Georgia]. And the Omni had a leak in the roof. And the water was coming down on the court, and the game could not be played. And what happened, because no one--it had not been experienced before, they were determining how they were going to handle this. Were they gone try to fix it, were they gonna play with it, play around it. The players sat in the locker room. So I got to spend time--'cause when you're a ball boy for a team, you're a ball boy for both the visiting team and the home team. And I got a chance to just sit and talk to Dave DeBusschere who was from Detroit. And that's how we made the connection. Bill Bradley, Walt Frazier--$$Senator.$$Senator Bill Bradley. That's right, presidential candidate Bill Bradley. Willis Reed. These are the people I'm just talking to, and they were just the most gracious people. And I really, I mean Walt Frazier, he--every time they came in town, I started collecting shoes, and had them all sign it 'cause if a shoe didn't fit right or--and this was back before the major shoe contracts. But I started--they would throw them away and I'd get them to sign it. My mother was like, "Would you stop bringing these stinky shoes home?" And you know there was--it was before people were really into memorabilia. But--$$Tell me she didn't throw them all out.$$No, I still have them. I still have them to this day. Most of them, anyway. But Walt Frazier used to always bring me stuff signed. And he was just a great human being. And I started developing those same types of relationships with teams that would come in because if you're the ball boy, you're on the bench. For the most part, you get to meet those who don't play much 'cause they're on the bench too. And you're just talking and they wanna talk to you and it's a lot easier for them to converse with people they know and you know, have a relationship with. But that made an indelible mark in me, as well, having that experience.$I wanna jump in here. Can you give a little background on the history of 100 Black Men [100 Black Men of America, Inc.]?$$Okay. 100 Black Men was actually started as a entity in 1963 in New York [New York]. It grew out of naturally the civil rights struggle and movement. But the real focus of the group at that time, which were one hundred men in New York, was the criminal system and the injustice that African Americans were experiencing in the criminal justice system. And there was a desire to focus too on economic equality amongst persons of African descent and the general population. The concept of the one hundred grew as a member moved to a different locale. The second chapter was in New Jersey. And primarily out of the Newark [New Jersey] area. And that person who helped start that chapter then moved to California, to Los Angeles [California] and started a chapter there. A chapter sprung up in Atlanta [Georgia] and Indianapolis [Indiana] and Alton, Illinois, in Suffolk County, New York, and another chapter started in California in the Oakland [California] area. But we ended up with nine organizations, all 100 Black Men of the geographic region. And eventually decided that they should come together, approximately twenty years ago in October of 1996 [sic.], to form 100 Black Men of America. And those chapters then were the beginning of what we know now as 100 Black Men of America that is now as of today 105 chapters and a global organization, having chapters in the African continent, the Caribbean basin, and Europe and in the continental United States.$$Now let's see, you were born just three years before the first organization began.$$That's correct.$$So, but today you are the chairman.$$That's correct.$$Of this nation, or worldwide organization. Now how did that come to be?$$I wasn't in the room when they voted. When we started 100 Black Men of South Florida, I was the founding president. And we did not initially decide whether--that we were going to join the 100 Black Men of America because at that time the New York chapter, the New York organization was not a part of 100 Black Men of America. The--all the organizations except New York joined. New York eventually joined. But the reason I became aware of it, I have a--have a college friend who was a member of the New York organization. I spoke to Roscoe Brown [HistoryMaker Roscoe C. Brown], a--at that time he was the president of the New York chapter, he's a Tuskegee Airman. And we were talking about us starting and he said, "Look, you don't have to follow our model. You know we were around before there was a 100 Black Men of America." And we had people like David Dinkins [HistoryMaker David N. Dinkins], Charlie Rangel [HistoryMaker Charles B. Rangel], you know these were all founders of the 100 Black Men, the New York group. And they said, "You gotta make the decision for yourself whether you wanna join or not." So after we formed, I then traveled to the first annual conference that I attended, I believe it was in New Jersey at that time. And got to meet what I thought were an--they were an amazing group of men. They came, they were about doing business. It wasn't about egos. They were talking about how they were helping kids in their community. And really focused on the business of the 100. And these were men who were very accomplished in their communities. And you know, I was sort of in awe as a, as the young buck in the room, as to what they were doing. And so as the president of our chapter, I then went to the next conference. And I started volunteering to help do things. And eventually there was an election and I was elected secretary of 100 Black Men of America. This was in 1994, in Nashville, Tennessee of all places. In Opryland [Opryland Hotel; Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, Nashville, Tennessee], that's where we had the--Opryland Hotel.$$There at Opryland.$$At that time Opryland hadn't moved to its larger current location. And we were--a group of us were elected to office in 1994. And I stayed in that position for two years. And then in--where were we--in 1996, here in Miami [Florida]. Had the convention here in Miami. I convinced them to have the convention here, it was our tenth anniversary of 100 Black Men of America. And I think I said earlier that we started in 1996, if the tape may prove me wrong, but it was 1986.$$Okay.$$That we were formed, in October 1986. In 1996, we had the convention here and I was elected vice president of 100 Black Men. It just hard work in the organization. And I stayed vice president for eight years, or vice chairman, we changed the title to chairman. And then was elected without opposition to chairman of the board of the 100 two years ago.$$And how long does your tenure last?$$It lasts for two years. Well we have two year terms, but no term limits.$$Okay, so you could, you could be reelected.$$No--I guess theoretically that's possible.

Ulysses Ford

Ulysses Grant Ford, III was born September 28, 1943 in Charlotte, North Carolina to Roberta and Ulysses Ford, II. Ford graduated from West Charlotte High School in 1961. Moving to Talladega, Alabama to attend Talladega College, Ford pursued his interest in mathematics and received a B.A. in 1965. That year, he married Beverly Odom Ford, who now owns the consulting firm ASM & Associates. They have three sons.

From 1965 until 1968, Ford worked as a math teacher and basketball coach at Charlotte Catholic High School. In 1968, Ford became an accountant and worked for Allstate Insurance and Equitable Life Insurance. In 1972, he began his career in civil service as an administrative assistant for the public works department of the City of Charlotte. In 1978, Ford left Charlotte to become the Director of Solid Waste Management for the City of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Ford went on to hold the title of Director of City Services for seven years in Fort Worth, Texas. Then he moved to Houston and served as Director of Public Works until 1992.

At this point in his career, Ford moved from government service to business and became responsible for marketing as the Vice President of Waste Management, Inc., a post he held for six years. In 1998, Ford founded SDC Consulting, Inc. in Macon, Georgia. SDC represents private companies, helping them increase their access to local governments across the country and thus combines the two main areas of his life's work.

Ulysses Ford, III has been a member of 100 Black Men of America since 1998 and served as president of the Municipal Waste Management Association of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Ulysses Ford passed away on March 20, 2012.

Accession Number

A2002.020

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/18/2002

Last Name

Ford

Maker Category
Schools

West Charlotte High School

Fairview Elementary

Northwest School Of The Arts

Talladega College

First Name

Ulysses

Birth City, State, Country

Charlotte

HM ID

FOR03

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Sponsor

Knight Foundation

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Alaska, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Do The Things That You Fear And The Death Of Fear Is Certain.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

9/28/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Macon

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Collard Greens

Death Date

3/20/2012

Short Description

Business consulting chief executive Ulysses Ford (1943 - 2012 ) was the president of SDS Consulting.

Employment

Charlotte Catholic High School

Allstate Insurance Company

Equitable Life Insurance

Charlotte Department of Public Works

City of Ann Arbor, Michigan

City of Forth Worth, Texas

City of Houston, Texas

Waste Management

SDC Consulting

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:14636,204:30030,378:30435,384:31731,418:48524,667:58806,838:80090,1142$0,0:7781,115:47218,585:57265,781:71594,1020:79312,1484:138217,2211:161685,2695:178030,2872
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ulysses Ford's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford describes his maternal grandfather's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford describes his maternal grandfather's first job

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford talks about his maternal great-grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford describes his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford describes his relationship with his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ulysses Ford describes the difficulties his family faced after his father left

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ulysses Ford talks about his household chores

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's personality, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's personality, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Ulysses Ford describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Ulysses Ford describes his segregated childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Ulysses Ford describes his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience at the Little Rock A.M.E. Zion Church

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience as a Boy Scout, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience at West Charlotte High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience as a Boy Scout, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford describes his pride at receiving his Eagle Scout badge

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's and grandfather's reactions to his receiving his Eagle Scout badge

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford talks about his childhood athletics

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ulysses Ford describes receiving a scholarship to Talladega College

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ulysses Ford describes being a good student

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Ulysses Ford talks about deciding to attend Talladega College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's interest in his athletics

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford talks about growing up without a father

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford talks about his mentor and teacher at West Charlotte High School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford discusses the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford remembers his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford remembers meeting Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford describes his Civil Rights activism, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford describes his Civil Rights activism, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford describes his mother's reaction to his Civil Rights activities

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford discusses his grandfather's reaction to the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford talks about overcoming his fears about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford describes meeting his wife at Talladega College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford describes his wife Beverly Ann Odom's personality

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford talks about looking for jobs after college

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford describes becoming a high school teacher

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford describes his experience teaching at Charlotte Catholic High School in North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford talks about being hired as an underwriter for Allstate Insurance Company

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford discusses his experience as an underwriter for Allstate

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford discusses the racism he encountered at Allstate

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford discusses becoming an insurance salesman

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford discusses his alcoholism

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford discusses starting work for the Public Works Department in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford discusses someone he inspired

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford discusses his experience in the Public Works Department, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ulysses Ford discusses his experience in the Public Works Department, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford discusses recovering from his alcoholism, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford discusses recovering from his alcoholism, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford discusses leaving the Public Works Department of Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford discusses his experiences in the Public Works Department in Fort Worth, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford talks about the difference between a strong mayor and council manager forms of government

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford discusses privatizing garbage pickup in Fort Worth, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford discusses his growing reputation in Public Works Departments

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ulysses Ford reflects upon his grandfather's passing

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ulysses Ford discusses his move into the private sector

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Ulysses Ford talks about his experience at Waste Management

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Ulysses Ford talks about launching SDC Consulting

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Ulysses Ford reflects upon his motivations and mentors

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Ulysses Ford discusses books that have inspired him

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Ulysses Ford reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Ulysses Ford narrates his photos

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$7

DAStory

6$3

DATitle
Ulysses Ford remembers meeting Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Ulysses Ford talks about launching SDC Consulting
Transcript
But the momentous occasion in my life was when Dr. [Martin Luther] King [Jr.] came to campus. And again, as luck would have it, or fate, or whatever you want to call it... The three rooms that we would have for male guests on campus were in my dorm. And the one Dr. King was in was on my floor, right across the hall from... our doors faced each other across the hall. [HM] Jesse Jackson came with him, it was the first time I met Jesse. And I know if Dr. King were alive, I don't see a reason why he would remember me, as I don't see a reason why Jesse would. But I did get to meet them. And I can remember--because Dr. King came back a couple times--that we would sit in his room on his bed and talk till daylight. He was talking about all kind of things. He was very knowledgeable about what other things were going on in the world, whether it was sports or politics or whatever. And I can remember--not just me, I mean there were three or four of us. It was Tracy, my roommate at that time, and we sat there and talked with Dr. King. And sure enough, the day finally came, in the spring of '62' [1962], still my freshman year.$And then in October... Well, I formed my company in August of '98' [1998]. In October of '98' [1998], I began to work it. And those relationships that I had developed over the thirty years just did it for me. What I do is represent private companies desiring to do business with local governments. So, if you've got a good or a service that you want to market to anybody--to any city or county in the country--then I'd like to be on your team, to help you get that business. I mentioned getting to know the staffs of these professional organizations. I remember a client saying that they wanted to go to Salt Lake City [Utah], because the Olympics was coming. And they financed airport work, and they knew from Atlanta [Georgia] that Salt Lake City would be doing a lot of work at their airport, and they wanted to be the bond financier of it. And I said to myself, "I don't know anybody in Salt Lake City. I never... to my knowledge, I've never met a Mormon." (Laughter). So I said, "Um." So, I called the Executive Director of the U.S. Conference of Mayors [Tom Cochran]. I said, "Tom, who do I know in Salt Lake City?" He says, "You know Deedee." Deedee Corradini was the mayor. I said "Well, I know Deedee to speak, and she may know me to speak, but we don't know each other. You know, we're not buddy-buddy." "Oh yeah, you do." He said, "Hang around." About thirty minutes later, Tom calls back. He says, "See, I told you Deedee knows you, she's waiting on your phone call." Sure enough, I call up Deedee, take my client out, and we got the business. (Laughter). So, those kind of relationships worked, as well as me being able to pick up the phone and call a Solid Waste director, or a Public Works director. I remember when I was with Waste, and we were going after the city of St. Louis, and another company had the business. And supposedly the city, the Solid Waste director, really liked the other company, and wasn't interested in changing. The other company had had the business for 15 years or something. We put our bid on the table, and we were high bid. Not high, we were the second high bid. But we came in and did our presentation. And I'll never forget when we walked in to do our presentation, there was Steve sitting there. And he said, "Oh, hell, Waste Management has got to be serious now. They done brought that damn Euly Ford here." Well, I had forgotten Steve was a Solid Waste director in St. Louis. I'd flat-out forgotten. Steve and I had been on the Education Foundation for eight years; we had some real war stories to tell. (Laughter). You know, we got the business. And people say when we left that night, Steve was the one that converted everybody to vote for Waste Management. So, those relationships have come in very, very handy for me. And now, I'm able to help my clients that in turn help me.