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Curtis T. Jewell

Entrepreneur Curtis T. Jewell was born on September 8, 1943 in Richmond, Virginia to Thelma Jewell and Fletcher Jewell. Jewell attended 18th Avenue Elementary School in Newark, New Jersey and Manakin Elementary School in Manakin, Virginia. After graduating from Central High School in Goochland County, Virginia, Jewell enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1961, and served as a hospital corpsman. In 1975, Jewell earned his B.S. degree in social psychology from Park University in Parkville, Missouri.

Following his discharge from the military, he pursued a career as a physician. In 1966, Jewell began working as a technician at Harvard Teaching Hospital while taking pre-med courses at Northeastern University and Boston University. However, he returned to Richmond, Virginia in 1969 without completing his medical degree. In 1972, he was hired as the executive director of Uhuru, a substance abuse treatment center in Columbus, Ohio. Following his college graduation, Jewell became the President and CEO of Intercontinental, Inc. After four years with the company, he left in 1979 to join Nationwide Insurance as a sales agent. In 1985, he became a partner at Praxis, where he remained for four years. Then, in 1989, Jewell founded EXCEL Management Systems, Inc. and established the Jewell Group, LLC, a property holding company, in 1994. In 2004, he became the majority stockholder of J.B. Chart Development Company, LLC.

From 1990 to 2008, Jewell served on the board of the National Black Programming Consortium. He also served as a member of the Columbus State Community College Development Foundation, Inc. and the Advisory Council for the Center of Science Industry Columbus.

Jewell was awarded the Minority Small Businessman of the Year Award by the U.S. Small Business Administration in 1994, and named Businessman of the Year by the Black Presidents’ Roundtable. The following year, the Greater Columbus Chamber named him Small Business Person of the Year, and the Ohio Association of African American Business Owners named him African American Male Business Owner of the Year. In 2015, Jewell was inducted into the Central Ohio Business Hall of Fame.

Jewell and his wife, Beverly Jewell, have six children: Neonu, Nia, Sisi, Curtis, Clay, and Leah.

Curtis T. Jewell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on Novemeber 15, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.202

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/15/2017

Last Name

Jewell

Maker Category
Middle Name

T.

Occupation
Schools

Central High School

Northeastern University

Boston University

Virginia Commonwealth University

Park University

First Name

Curtis

Birth City, State, Country

Richmond

HM ID

JEW03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

You don't have to know how to do everything. You need to know how to get everything done.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

9/8/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Columbus

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Entrepreneur Curtis T. Jewell (1943 - ) was the president and CEO of EXCEL Management Systems, Inc., a company he founded in 1989. He established the Jewell Group, LLC in 1994.

Employment

Excel Management Company

Praxis

Nationwide Insurance

Intercontal

Utturu Drug Program

Rubicow Drug Program

Harvard Teaching College

Favorite Color

None

The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr.

Attorney Anthony William Hall, Jr. was born on September 16, 1944 in Houston, Texas to Quintanna Wilson Hall Alliniece and Anthony William Hall, Sr. Hall received his B.A. degree from Howard University in 1967, and served in the military from 1967 to 1971. While in the military, Hall attained the rank of captain and received the Purple Heart as well as three Bronze Stars. After his military service, Hall worked for the Harris County Commissions Office in 1971 and served as a State Representative from 1972 until 1979, when he was first elected to the Houston City Council. Upon his appointment, Hall was the third African American, after Judson W. Robinson, Jr. and Ernest McGowen, to be elected to the city council in Houston.

Hall obtained his J.D. degree from the Thurgood Marshall School of Law at Texas Southern University in 1982.
In 1990, he became the first African American chairman of the Houston Metropolitan Transit Authority, an agency which was created as a response to the public’s desire to have an efficient and reliable transportation system that would replace the existing malfunctioning busing system. During this time, Hall also became one of only three African Americans among the 50 partners in the Houston law firm, Jackson Walker, LLP. The firm, which has offices in Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, San Angelo and San Antonio, represents clients in litigation for intellectual property, health care, labor and employment, technology, bankruptcy and numerous other fields. Hall served as the City Attorney for the City of Houston from 1998 until 2004, when he became the Chief Administrative Officer for the city. Hall’s key responsibilities included implementing some of the Administration’s significant priorities, participating in the budget process, and overseeing the Houston community’s safety issues.

Hall is also the Chairman of the Boulé Foundation and is involved with Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, serving as the past national president of the organization, and is currently on the board of trustees. He has devoted many years of his life to public service and has been given several awards for outstanding civic work. These awards include the Fifth Ward Enrichment Program’s Heart of Houston, the Black Achiever Award from the YMCA, the George “Mickey” Leland Community Service Award from the Barbara Jordan—Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University in 2006, and the National Forum for Black Public Administrators Marks of Excellence Award for Public Service Leadership in 2009. After years of public service, Hall returned to private practice law in the city of Houston in 2010.

Anthony Hall was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 9, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.229

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/9/2007 |and| 5/6/2014

Last Name

Hall

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

W.

Schools

Texas Southern University

Marshall Education Center

Miller Intermediate

Jack Yates High School

Howard University

First Name

Anthony

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

HAL11

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts; Barbados

Favorite Quote

Simply Achieve.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

9/16/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo (Seafood)

Short Description

City attorney and city council member The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. (1944 - ) was the third African American man to be elected to the city council in Houston, Texas. He was the first black and minority chairman of Houston's Metropolitan Transit Authority, served as city attorney from 1998 to 2004 and was the chief administrative officer for the city.

Employment

Law Office of Anthony W. Hall, Jr.

City of Houston

Jackson & Walker

Williamson, Gardner, Hall & Wiesenthal

Favorite Color

Beige

Timing Pairs
0,0:616,8:2904,27:8448,160:13024,275:15048,304:19800,377:26418,438:46950,726:49398,775:51560,794:53175,816:53685,824:54195,831:57670,852:70562,1084:100140,1500:109260,1677:122756,1915:123212,1922:123516,1927:134147,2092:163506,2626:163902,2634:164232,2640:167400,2692$0,0:9630,146:35540,482:47698,664:49441,690:68460,972:77512,1095:81266,1125:81626,1131:82850,1148:83282,1155:86450,1258:92426,1362:98906,1488:110812,1577:111468,1588:117290,1698:123700,1732:128110,1819:148666,2102:149061,2108:151194,2150:151747,2158:153248,2184:170571,2447:172133,2473:174760,2525:180126,2548:182885,2592:183145,2597:186265,2654:186590,2660:186850,2665:191120,2769:194458,2791:195720,2813
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his mother's early education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls how his parents met and their personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers his community in Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the ward boundaries in Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the segregated education system in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his grade school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his college selection process

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers his high school community

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about the Reserve Officers' Training Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls majoring in economics at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls joining the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers being wounded in the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the start of his political career

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about the end of the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls serving in the Texas Legislature

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. explains his decision to attend law school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about African Americans' role in politics

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the progressive movement in Houston's politics

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers serving on the Houston City Council

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about chairing the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls Republican politicians in Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about mayoral races in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls serving as Houston's city attorney

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his career in management

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his role as chief administrative officer of Houston, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his membership in Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr.'s interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. lists his favorites, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his stepfather

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers his relationship with his stepfather

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his stepfather's family background

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his mother's family history

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his maternal grandparents

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his maternal family in Cedar Lake, Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his mother's education in Houston, Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers the values of his maternal family

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his father's military career

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his father's law enforcement career

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the history of Houston's police organizations

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his childhood personality

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers living in Angleton, Texas with his mother

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his childhood in Brazoria County, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of Brazoria County, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his family farm

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls institutions in his Houston community

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers black professionals in Houston, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about the Sweatt v. Painter case

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers Charles Hamilton Houston

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his education in Houston, Texas

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his aspirations for a career in science

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about black professionals in Houston, Texas

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls African American politicians in the 1960s

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes Jesse H. Jones

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the contributions of Jesse H. Jones

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his high school activities

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls Greater Zion Baptist Church

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his extracurricular activities in adolescence

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about being the chief administrative officer of Houston

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his accomplishments in Houston city government

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his charitable work

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about chairing the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County
The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his role as chief administrative officer of Houston, Texas
Transcript
Tell us about becoming the chairman of the Metropolitan Transit Authority [Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County]. This is 1990, right?$$Yes. I was leaving city council [Houston City Council], and, and Kathy Whitmire [Kathryn J. Whitmire] asked me if I would--we were in the middle of--as we continue 'til this day to be debating--the middle of very intense debate about development of the rail system in Houston [Texas]. We have a very unique challenge, in that Houston is almost seven hundred square miles geographically, and has a lower population density than traditional East Coast cities and some West Coast cities, and has made public transportation a continuing challenge for us, but we recognize in 2007 that we, based on the growth projections for the next twenty years, which we will double, that we cannot build highways large enough to accommodate that kind of growth. There would be nothing but highways that we've got to find alternative means to move people around, to move goods around in this community. We have long had a monumental community battle about the institution of rail, and there is a whole debating story in history behind that. I am a big advocate for rail. We ought to have it, we've got to have it if we are to prosper, and if we are to, to help our citizens not spend two, three hours a day in their cars, on the freeways trying to get [to] work, home, and that kind of thing. And that debate sort of crescendoed in 1990. She asked me if I would share the authority because we had a big battle between local developers primarily, and their supporters in [U.S.] Congress. Unfortunately, Tom DeLay was on the transportation committee. He was a senior person, and he prohibited us from getting federal assistance for rail in Houston, as a member of the local delegation, while at the same time approving it for other communities. Seems sort of weird today, but that's what happened. Fortunately, we have had the voters, for now the third time, approved rail and we, I hope, are on our way to beginning to have the first expansion of the first seven mile system that Lee Brown [HistoryMaker Lee P. Brown] built, and I might say was built entirely with local money, and Lee Brown, while mayor, had the first seven miles, so the rail system that you see in the center of downtown that runs out to the Astrodome [NRG Astrodome, Houston, Texas]--a little bit better than seven miles, we have now approved a significant expansion of that now out and through the communities that is supposed to be accomplished over the next fifteen years or so, so--$$Okay.$$But those were the issues; those issues really continue to be debated until this day.$Let me ask you, what haven't I asked you about this job that you can tell me and how do you see this as a fit for you? I guess that's--$$Well, I think this job has been kind of natural. I served as city attorney for six years and I have had--I served in the legislature [Texas Legislature], served on city council [Houston City Council], so I think I come more uniquely qualified than anybody that's ever had it before. I happen to be the first black there that has this job but administration of a city government is something that almost everything I have done in the past has prepared me to do, so I find it exciting. We're doing a lot of new and different things. I have grown and learned in the job because I have been forced to deal with issues that I hadn't spent much time in before, particularly related to finance, and financial-related issues like pension and healthcare benefits and the intricacies of that, that I had never been particularly involved in before, I have had to become, quote, expert in. So, it's been exciting. It's been a good thing.$$Is there any particular project that, that you really would like to complete before your (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes. One of the principal initiatives of the White [Bill White] administration is the reclamation of inner--some inner city neighborhoods that have been for--now forty years, fifty years--more or less written off. They were written off because the average tax delinquency of the houses in the community is about nine, ten years tax delinquent, many of them unoccupied, many of them need to be torn down; no, no economic activity in the neighborhoods, obviously, nobody moving in. We have an initiative that we call Houston HOPE that it started out with six neighborhoods--inner city neighborhoods disbursed around the city that meet this criterion I just described. It is our plan and hope, by the end of this administration, to have built five thousand assisted affordable housing units in those neighborhoods, to have completely rebuilt the infrastructure in those neighborhoods. And by affordable, we don't mean poverty housing; we're talking about housing that in the main would be marketed for $130-140,000, but we are offering as much as $30,000 in down payment assistance, we're offering land assemblage concessions to the community development corporations to build those houses. I believe when we finish, and I think we will succeed, that that will be the impetus, because we can see it happening already, to private housing development in those neighborhoods, so that we will be the best example in America of how you reclaim inner cities in an inner city community with inner city communities like Houston [Texas]. That is called Houston HOPE, and I believe that we will show the nation how to do that.

John B. Clemmons, Sr.

College professor and scholar J.B. Clemmons was born John Benjamin Clemmons on April 11, 1912 to Lewis and Bessie Clemmons in Rome, Georgia. Clemmons graduated from high school in 1927 after completing only the tenth grade; African Americans were not allowed to go to eleventh or twelfth grade in Rome. In 1930, he entered Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia.

Clemmons then enrolled in graduate studies at Atlanta University, obtaining his M.A. degree in 1937. He then moved to Harlan, Kentucky, where he began teaching for $100 a week and met and married Mozelle Daily. By 1942, Clemmons was the principal of the school in Harlan. In 1947, Clemmons and his wife moved to Savannah, Georgia. While his wife began her lifelong involvement in the NAACP, Clemmons taught at Savannah State College (now Savannah State University) alongside his colleague, Dr. Henry M. Collier, Jr. Together, they formed the Delta ETA Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. In the summer of 1949, he worked as a visiting professor at the University of Pittsburgh.

Clemmons then decided to continue his education by attending the University of Southern California to earn his Ph.D. He received Ford Foundation and National Science Foundation grants in 1951 and 1952, respectively. After working towards earning his Ph.D. at UCLA, Clemmons decided to return to Georgia, continued his teaching career and became involved in banking. He went on to charter the Alpha Lambda Boulé of the Sigma Pi Phi in Savannah in 1963.

Clemmons served as the Chairman of the Department of Mathematics and Physics at Savannah State University for thirty-seven years. He received many honors over the years for his outstanding work and philanthropic efforts in the community. Clemmons served as Chairman of the Board for Carver State Bank in Savannah.

Clemmons passed away on June 13, 2012 at the age of 100.

Accession Number

A2007.025

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/22/2007

Last Name

Clemmons

Maker Category
Middle Name

B.

Schools

Morehouse College

Main Elementary School

Clark Atlanta University

University of Southern California

University of Pittsburgh

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Rome

HM ID

CLE04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Las Vegas, Nevada

Favorite Quote

Ask The Man That Won't Own One.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

4/11/1912

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Savannah

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster

Death Date

6/13/2012

Short Description

Math professor and physics professor John B. Clemmons, Sr. (1912 - 2012 ) served as acting chair Department of Mathematics and Physics at Georgia State College, and chartered the Alpha Lambda Boule’ of Sigma Pi Phi fraternity. He also served as Chairman of the Board for Carver State Bank in Savannah, Georgia, and received many honors over the years for his outstanding work and philanthropic efforts in the community.

Employment

Fairbanks Company

Tobacco Farm

Duffy's Tavern

Rosenwald High School

Savannah State University

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:582,9:7275,134:22029,263:34220,378:63210,704:124748,1423:126790,1428:142950,1624:149995,1720:173820,2031:196572,2227:257950,2766$0,0:584,21:1430,35:12522,272:26572,553:47980,740:54535,835:57290,1021:60045,1046:119384,1530:126248,1591:126664,1596:138470,1665:157702,1825:165954,1899:166731,1908:213330,2417
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of John B. Clemmons, Sr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his family's land in Rome, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. talks about his brothers

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his parents' professions

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers working at the Fairbanks Company in Rome, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his grade school education

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers his elementary school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his experiences as a Boy Scout

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. recalls the entrance examination at Morehouse College

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers working on a tobacco farm in Hartford, Connecticut

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his summer work experiences during college

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his college education in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his thesis at Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his position at Rosenwald High School in Harlan, Kentucky

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his move to Cumberland, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. recalls being excused from U.S. military service

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his Ph.D. program at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. recalls joining the faculty off Savannah State College in Savannah, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers his academic grants

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers Louis B. Toomer

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his real estate investments

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers the first computers at Georgia State College in Savannah, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his position on the board of Carver State Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Savannah, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers founding the Alpha Lambda Boule

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes the Alpha Lambda Boule's scholarship program

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. describes his loan program at Savannah State College in Savannah, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. talks about his organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers his induction to the Savannah Business Hall of Fame

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers teaching drama at Savannah State College

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. talks about his wife and children

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - John B. Clemmons, Sr. narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

2$3

DATitle
John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers working at the Fairbanks Company in Rome, Georgia
John B. Clemmons, Sr. remembers the first computers at Georgia State College in Savannah, Georgia
Transcript
How much education did your father [Lewis Clemmons] have?$$He went to the third grade, he said. I don't know, but I know he could, he kept a, on his job, he kept a ruled notebook where he--real neat--where he would say, oh, you know, I, bill fifteen, uh, meaning assemble, fifteen 5213 trucks. That's the number of it. And those were cotton trucks, 5213. I will always remember that 'cause I remember most of them. And at the assembly, the price might have been--let us say, twelve cents. And then, if he built ten of them, then he put a dollar and twenty cents out there, and then on down the line, whatever trucks he was assembling. And then, one time, they were--the bosses sent three white boys down there one summer to work with him. And, and daddy said, "No, I'm not going to teach these boys how to take my job" (laughter). So, so he told his boss no. Well, one of the boys that came down there was one of the bosses' son. One--another one of the officials of the company [Fairbanks Company, Rome, Georgia]--son. And, and it was three boys. And, and the, and the, I don't know whether if that's what they planned to do or not. But daddy said, he wasn't going to teach them how to take his job--not him.$$So, did you and your brothers [Eddie Clemmons and Willie Clemmons] have--I'm sure you had chores, but did you work?$$Yeah, we would work sometimes after school. We, when we got a certain age, we'd go down to the same company. See, my daddy's work was piecework. And, and then, we had tapped, we knew the numbers of different things and, and, that were in certain bins. And it was a big factory too, covered about three or four blocks. And what we would do is, if he had to build fifty 230s--2- 2- trucks that were called 230s--then, we knew what brackets to get, what axels to get, all of the parts. And we'd bring it out of the bins, out to a desk. And my daddy and another man, Mr. Williams [ph.], for part of the time, and then, finally, there was just, there's a lot of different folks with him. But we'd pile those other, stack them up neatly by the desk, where the bench, where the, where each man was working. And then, and as the truck is assembled--first, you, you put the two hands down, then you do what, what they call nose guards and things, put them down. And then, finally, you end up, you putting the wheels on the axel. And then, you push it off. And every day about four o'clock, some man comes through, and see how many of them you assembled.$$Okay.$$And then, our job was to roll them to the warehouse. And in the warehouse, well, they shipped everything from the warehouse. That was what daddy did.$$Okay. Now (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) He was doing that when he died--up to, and lived to that point, he got--up 'til he retired.$At this time, you're still, you're teaching at Savannah State [Georgia State College; Savannah State University, Savannah, Georgia]. How long--$$I'm not teaching. I didn't--$$Not--no, at this time, this is in 1947, 1948.$$Oh, yeah, I was teaching.$$Yeah. How long did you teach at Savannah State?$$I, I taught, let me see, I taught thirty-five years there.$$What did you teach? Was it mathematics and physics (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Mathematics, physics, and computer science.$$Okay. And you were the chairman of the department of mathematics?$$Chairman, chairman of the department. One of the things, special things I did, I wrote IBM [International Business Machines Corporation] at Poughkeepsie, New York. They gave me a trip up there, and tell--I went to a meeting in University of Georgia [Athens, Georgia] for all of the units in Georgia. And they took us out to Georgia Tech in, in Georgia [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia]. And, and those places, they had rooms where each student would have a computer way back then, and I didn't know that. I didn't know that was happening. And so, I wrote IBM. They gave me a trip up there. And I took one of the leader, leader students with me up there, and see, he's, he's deceased now. But (unclear), I was able to talk to the vice president of IBM. And I told them, that's--you all should--we trying to get the computers. And when--you all should give, give us some, a resource person. Said, "Well, we'll let you know." And I stayed two days up there. But when I got back, I got a letter saying they had decided that they would give us a resource person at their expense for one year. Well, that person came, and we were living at The Landings [Savannah, Georgia]. That's where rich people--they paid for all of that. And, and we had, and he taught a class in it. And I, I and they didn't--lady named Ms. Wilson [ph.] knew a good bit about programming and stuff. But that, that fellow kind of directed us and taught us more. And we got what you call the 1620 computer [IBM 1620]. And, and they put that in, in here at the college. And then, later, we got a, one called a 360 [IBM System/360], but the college bought it. And then, but you see, but that's something, a lot of the kids didn't know how the computer got here. But, and a lot of teachers probably didn't know, but that's how we got it, see (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) All right.

Ronald Daly

Business executive Ron Daly was born on February 23, 1947, in Chicago, Illinois, the eldest of two children. Daly’s mother was a homemaker and his father a laborer. After graduating from Farragut High School in 1964, Daly went to work for R.R. Donnelley.

As one of the first African Americans to work at Donnelley, Daly continued his education, and, in 1975, earned his associate’s degree from Prairie State University. Two years later, he earned a B.A. degree from Governor’s State College, becoming the first person in his family to graduate from college. Daly continued his education, earning an M.B.A. from Loyola University of Chicago in 1980. He continued to work at R.R. Donnelley, and by the time he left in 2002, he had risen to the position of president of Donnelley Print Solutions, the largest division of the organization. Daly was then named president and CEO of Océ-USA Holding, Incorporated. At Océ, Daly is the first American to run the company’s North American operations, and the first American to sit on the board of directors of the Netherlands-based company.

In addition to a lifetime of dedication to his work, Daly is active in the community as a member of the board of directors of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, president of the Leadership Group of Chicago and a member of the executive council of Metropolis 2020. Daly and his wife, Delores, have three children.

Accession Number

A2003.286

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/3/2003

Last Name

Daly

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

E.

Schools

Mason Elementary School

Farragut Career Academy Hs

Prarie State College

Governors State University

Loyola University Chicago

First Name

Ronald

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

DAL02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

If You Always Do What You Always Did, You Will Always Get What You Always Got.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

2/23/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Olympia Fields

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Corporate chief executive Ronald Daly (1947 - ) is the CEO of Océ-USA.

Employment

R.R. Donnelley

Donnelley Print Solutions

Oce-USA Holdings

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ronald Daly's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ronald Daly lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ronald Daly describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ronald Daly describes his family's experiences with racial prejudice in Mobile, Alabama and Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ronald Daly describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ronald Daly talks about his interest in African American history

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ronald Daly describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ronald Daly describes his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ronald Daly describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ronald Daly describes his time at Farragut High School on the West Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ronald Daly describes the tensions of rising in corporate management as an African American

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ronald Daly describes his beliefs on the controversy over reparations for slavery

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ronald Daly describes his elementary school education in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ronald Daly describes his studies at Farragut High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ronald Daly describes neighborhood violence during his high school years in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ronald Daly remembers his childhood ambitions

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ronald Daly reflects on the ability for self-improvement in the African American community

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ronald Daly talks about entering the workforce after graduating from high school in 1964

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ronald Daly recounts beginning his first job at R.R. Donnelley and Sons

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ronald Daly remembers the Chicago Blizzard of 1967

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ronald Daly remembers historical moments in Chicago, Illinois during the late 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ronald Daly talks about his decision to go to college while working at R.R. Donnelley

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ronald Daly talks about his experiences at Prairie State College in Chicago Heights, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ronald Daly talks about colleges who cut arts in favor of pre-professional programs

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ronald Daly describes his initial executive roles at R.R. Donnelley and Sons

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ronald Daly describes becoming the president of Donnelley Telecommunications

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ronald Daly remembers working with the Oregon Symphony to honor the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ronald Daly describes leaving R.R. Donnelley to become the C.E.O. of Oce North America

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ronald Daly relates his experiences at Oce North America

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ronald Daly shares advice for aspiring business leaders

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ronald Daly describes his work toward the advancement of young African Americans

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ronald Daly reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ronald Daly talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

6$4

DATitle
Ronald Daly remembers his childhood ambitions
Ronald Daly describes leaving R.R. Donnelley to become the C.E.O. of Oce North America
Transcript
When you were a senior in high school [Farragut High School, Chicago, Illinois], did you have any idea what you were going to do after high school? Did you have a career in mind? Or what did you think? Were you thinking that you had really made a mess at high school?$$Yeah. I thought I made a mess at high school. I realized that. I know I wasn't going straight to college. I didn't even try. But the truth is, no guidance counselor ever tried to counsel me to go to college either, which, when people ask me later in life if I'd ever been discriminated against, you know, I say, "Well, I can't think of anything," and then later it hit me. Nobody ever counseled you. You started at twelve, graduated at sixteen. No matter what troubles you got in, nobody ever came to you and approached you to go to college. And the counselors were white and black. But see, the expectation was back then from that school, you were black, you didn't necessarily go to college. It wasn't an expectation. So that in itself is a form of discrimination. In my college--in my high school yearbook it says I wanted to be a reporter, 'cause I liked the news and I liked, you know, the guys on TV, and I read a lot of newspapers. So I thought, yeah, I would write one now, write columns. So that's what I had in there. When I ended up in the printing business, I used to laugh; well, that's close. You know, I'm not in the business of creating a newspaper. I'm printing it, you know.$$(Laughs.)$$We got magazines here, all that kind of stuff coming out of this place. So I kind of rationalized it a little bit. But that's what I had thought I wanted to be.$$Now you said you paid attention to the news. You read a lot from about age ten or eleven.$$Or even before then. I was never without a book while I was in elementary school. Okay.$$Okay. Who did you discuss, you know, your learning with? I mean, who did you talk to? Was it a teacher or somebody in the family or friends?$$Well, with teachers. Sure.$$Okay.$$Yeah. You know, I loved to debate. So I'd debate anybody. I'd debate my friends and they'd tell me, "You know so much. Shut up, Mr. Know-it-All." You know, I used to drive kids crazy because I had this basic knowledge that I would use, and they didn't want to hear it from me, you know. And then I got good grades in elementary school, you know, so I was every teacher's pet. They didn't like that. I used to get in fights about good grades all the time, which is a problem for me. It was a problem for me back then. I think it's a problem for young blacks today, is that to get great grades in school is considered a bad thing. That's a huge mistake, you know. But that goes back to that discussion we were having on reparations and stuff. As long as that exists, reparations, they're not going to help--because we don't want people to achieve, you know. So, you know, kids used to beat me up 'cause I was smart.$$Mmhm.$$Yes. It's a fact of life for me. I mean I had--used to fight kids because I got good grades, you know. And it's no different than in my life today. There are people who view me as a sell-out because I'm a corporate executive. Well, oh, you know, I have to fight. But I don't even pay any attention to that crap anymore. Okay. So you had to--what do you do? So I decided once I got into high school, okay, they called--they treated me badly because I was smart. Okay. I'm going to be dumb like everybody else. Guess what? They treated me badly anyway. So I might as well had gone on and been smart, you know (laughter). Maybe it would have been better off. So that was a lesson I learned. Quit trying to be what you're not for other people. Okay. That served me well later in life.$Okay. Now, tell me about being the second man at R.R. Donnelley [and Sons].$$It was cool. I mean, it was heady stuff, you know. It was--I worked at this company for thirty-seven years, you know. I had been somebody that they said was "marginally capable of being a supervisor." Okay. But since that time, I had educated myself. I had gotten a master's degree. I had done the work. I--you know, my grandmother used to say from the Bible, "The race neither goes to the swift or to the strong, but to the one that endures to the end." [Ecclesiastes 9:11] I have done the endurance. I'm there. It was great. I felt fulfilled. Okay. And then I realized I didn't want to do it anymore.$$Well, what happened?$$I got tired of doing the same--I'd been in the printing business all this time. I'm the top guy. I reasoned that I wasn't going to get to be the number one guy. Okay. There was only three years difference between me and the number one guy. Okay. I said, "Well, if he stays 'til 62, when he leaves, I'm 59. That's too old to make a CEO." Especially, I had committed myself to retire at 62. So they're not going to put somebody in for three years. They want continuity. I said, "He ain't going right now." Which was wrong. It turns out he left the year after I left. He announced his resignation. But I still don't think I would have gotten the job, because I had only been in that job--would have only been in that job for a year and a half when he announced his retirement. They wouldn't have given to me. I hadn't been groomed or prepared. So, you know, either way it goes, I don't think I would have gotten the top job. Along comes Oce and says, "We need a C.E.O. for North America." And they were encouraging me to do some of the things that I had been restricted from doing at Donnelley. Okay. And I don't need to go into what all those are. But this was a technology company. I like technology. It was a company focused on growth. Yes. And the competition was interesting to me. It was competing head to head with Xerox and Hewlett-Packard, and people like that, you know. You know, nobody knows the folks in the printing business, you know, because we don't put our names on anything. We do everything for everybody else. And so I just wanted the challenge to do something else. And then, you know, a lot of people, like me, you know, throughout their careers always think, "I wonder how I can do in some other arena. You know, I know I can do it here, but can I go do it somewhere else? Are my skills transferrable?" And I'm one who's always asking myself those questions. Here I am now fifty-five years old. If I'm ever going to make this jump, it's got to be now. So I did. So--and an interesting learning from that. All the years that I was in the printing business, people would ask me about other jobs. I had looked at other jobs before, but something kept me in the print business, and I believe it was because I was a craftsman with a journeyman's card. I believed in our business. We educated the world. We entertained the world with the stuff that we did. I can see the tie in what we did in printing throughout the fabric of everything that happened in our culture. You know, so it was important. I had this passion for it. And I said, so my passion is for printing. I can't leave. And then as soon as I got into Oce and started competing with Xerox and Hewlett-Packard, I was passionate about that, too. Then I realized the recognition was that the passion that I had wasn't about printing. It was just passion for me. And it was transferrable to almost anything that I did. So it's my way of attacking the world. I do it with passion. I'm a passion person. So I'm attacking Oce just like I ever did anything at Donnelley, you know, with the same vigor. And I'm having fun.