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Milton Irvin

Investment banker Milton Irvin was born on June 18, 1949 in Orange, New Jersey to Milton M. Sr., and Dorothy W. Irvin. A graduate of Essex Catholic Boys High School in 1967 in Newark, New Jersey, Irvin received his B.S. degree in marine engineering in 1971 from the United States Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York and his M.B.A. degree in finance in 1974 from the Wharton School of Business at University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia.

Irvin joined Chase Manhattan Bank as corporate lending officer and assistant treasurer from 1974 to 1977. He then went to work for Salomon Brothers, Inc. in New York City from 1977 to 1988. Irvin then served as managing director at Paine Webber Inc. from 1988 to 1990 and then re-joined Salomon Brothers, Inc. as managing director, and the firm’s first African American partner where he worked from 1990 to 1998 and handled short-term debt securities for Salomon’s clients. Irvin was appointed to the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation as chair of the Advisory Committee by President Bill Clinton and served from 1995 to 1998. He then joined Blaylock & Partners as president, chief operating officer and partner. Irvin was named managing director at UBS Investment Bank where he led the strategic and tactical execution of diversity initiatives. He also served as UBS global head of career mobility advisor office, talent executive for Leadership Development Program (ASCENT), and global head of recruiting and training for the Fixed Income, Rates and Currency Department from 2002 to 2012.

Irvin was appointed by President Barack Obama for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. He also was appointed chairman of the Board of Advisors at CastleOak Securities in 2012. He served as non-executive chairman at NexTier Companies, LLC., a multi-disciplined consulting and investment advisory in 2013. Governor Nikki Haley appointed Irvin to serve on the South Carolina State University Board of Trustees in 2015. Irvin was elected chairman of the Board of Trustees for South Carolina State University in 2018.

Irvin was named one of The 25 Hottest Blacks on Wall Street by Black Enterprise magazine.

Milton and his wife Melody have three adult children including Brandon, Viola and Kesi.

Milton Irvin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 23, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.145

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/23/2018

Last Name

Irvin

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Our Lady of the Most Blessed Sacrament School

Essex Catholic High School

United States Merchant Marine Academy

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

First Name

Milton

Birth City, State, Country

Orange

HM ID

IRV02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Antigua

Favorite Quote

Don't Sweat The Small Stuff.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

South Carolina

Birth Date

6/18/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hilton Head

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Investment banker Milton Irvin (1949- ) was managing director at UBS Investment Bank and before that, he was managing director at Paine Webber Inc. and Salomon Brother and prior to that, president and chief operating officer of Blaylock & Partners.

Favorite Color

Blue

The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr.

Attorney Anthony William Hall, Jr. was born on September 16, 1944 in Houston, Texas to Quintanna Wilson Hall Alliniece and Anthony William Hall, Sr. Hall received his B.A. degree from Howard University in 1967, and served in the military from 1967 to 1971. While in the military, Hall attained the rank of captain and received the Purple Heart as well as three Bronze Stars. After his military service, Hall worked for the Harris County Commissions Office in 1971 and served as a State Representative from 1972 until 1979, when he was first elected to the Houston City Council. Upon his appointment, Hall was the third African American, after Judson W. Robinson, Jr. and Ernest McGowen, to be elected to the city council in Houston.

Hall obtained his J.D. degree from the Thurgood Marshall School of Law at Texas Southern University in 1982.
In 1990, he became the first African American chairman of the Houston Metropolitan Transit Authority, an agency which was created as a response to the public’s desire to have an efficient and reliable transportation system that would replace the existing malfunctioning busing system. During this time, Hall also became one of only three African Americans among the 50 partners in the Houston law firm, Jackson Walker, LLP. The firm, which has offices in Austin, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, San Angelo and San Antonio, represents clients in litigation for intellectual property, health care, labor and employment, technology, bankruptcy and numerous other fields. Hall served as the City Attorney for the City of Houston from 1998 until 2004, when he became the Chief Administrative Officer for the city. Hall’s key responsibilities included implementing some of the Administration’s significant priorities, participating in the budget process, and overseeing the Houston community’s safety issues.

Hall is also the Chairman of the Boulé Foundation and is involved with Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, serving as the past national president of the organization, and is currently on the board of trustees. He has devoted many years of his life to public service and has been given several awards for outstanding civic work. These awards include the Fifth Ward Enrichment Program’s Heart of Houston, the Black Achiever Award from the YMCA, the George “Mickey” Leland Community Service Award from the Barbara Jordan—Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University in 2006, and the National Forum for Black Public Administrators Marks of Excellence Award for Public Service Leadership in 2009. After years of public service, Hall returned to private practice law in the city of Houston in 2010.

Anthony Hall was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 9, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.229

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/9/2007 |and| 5/6/2014

Last Name

Hall

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

W.

Schools

Texas Southern University

Marshall Education Center

Miller Intermediate

Jack Yates High School

Howard University

First Name

Anthony

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

HAL11

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts; Barbados

Favorite Quote

Simply Achieve.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

9/16/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo (Seafood)

Short Description

City attorney and city council member The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. (1944 - ) was the third African American man to be elected to the city council in Houston, Texas. He was the first black and minority chairman of Houston's Metropolitan Transit Authority, served as city attorney from 1998 to 2004 and was the chief administrative officer for the city.

Employment

Law Office of Anthony W. Hall, Jr.

City of Houston

Jackson & Walker

Williamson, Gardner, Hall & Wiesenthal

Favorite Color

Beige

Timing Pairs
0,0:616,8:2904,27:8448,160:13024,275:15048,304:19800,377:26418,438:46950,726:49398,775:51560,794:53175,816:53685,824:54195,831:57670,852:70562,1084:100140,1500:109260,1677:122756,1915:123212,1922:123516,1927:134147,2092:163506,2626:163902,2634:164232,2640:167400,2692$0,0:9630,146:35540,482:47698,664:49441,690:68460,972:77512,1095:81266,1125:81626,1131:82850,1148:83282,1155:86450,1258:92426,1362:98906,1488:110812,1577:111468,1588:117290,1698:123700,1732:128110,1819:148666,2102:149061,2108:151194,2150:151747,2158:153248,2184:170571,2447:172133,2473:174760,2525:180126,2548:182885,2592:183145,2597:186265,2654:186590,2660:186850,2665:191120,2769:194458,2791:195720,2813
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his mother's early education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls how his parents met and their personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers his community in Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the ward boundaries in Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the segregated education system in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his grade school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his college selection process

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers his high school community

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about the Reserve Officers' Training Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls majoring in economics at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls joining the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers being wounded in the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the start of his political career

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about the end of the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls serving in the Texas Legislature

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. explains his decision to attend law school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about African Americans' role in politics

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the progressive movement in Houston's politics

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers serving on the Houston City Council

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about chairing the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls Republican politicians in Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about mayoral races in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls serving as Houston's city attorney

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his career in management

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his role as chief administrative officer of Houston, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his membership in Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr.'s interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. lists his favorites, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his stepfather

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers his relationship with his stepfather

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his stepfather's family background

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his mother's family history

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his maternal grandparents

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his maternal family in Cedar Lake, Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his mother's education in Houston, Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers the values of his maternal family

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his father's military career

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his father's law enforcement career

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the history of Houston's police organizations

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his childhood personality

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers living in Angleton, Texas with his mother

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his childhood in Brazoria County, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of Brazoria County, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his family farm

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls institutions in his Houston community

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers black professionals in Houston, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about the Sweatt v. Painter case

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers Charles Hamilton Houston

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his education in Houston, Texas

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his aspirations for a career in science

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about black professionals in Houston, Texas

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls African American politicians in the 1960s

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes Jesse H. Jones

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls the contributions of Jesse H. Jones

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. describes his high school activities

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls Greater Zion Baptist Church

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his extracurricular activities in adolescence

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. remembers Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about being the chief administrative officer of Houston

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his accomplishments in Houston city government

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about his charitable work

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. talks about chairing the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County
The Honorable Anthony W. Hall, Jr. recalls his role as chief administrative officer of Houston, Texas
Transcript
Tell us about becoming the chairman of the Metropolitan Transit Authority [Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County]. This is 1990, right?$$Yes. I was leaving city council [Houston City Council], and, and Kathy Whitmire [Kathryn J. Whitmire] asked me if I would--we were in the middle of--as we continue 'til this day to be debating--the middle of very intense debate about development of the rail system in Houston [Texas]. We have a very unique challenge, in that Houston is almost seven hundred square miles geographically, and has a lower population density than traditional East Coast cities and some West Coast cities, and has made public transportation a continuing challenge for us, but we recognize in 2007 that we, based on the growth projections for the next twenty years, which we will double, that we cannot build highways large enough to accommodate that kind of growth. There would be nothing but highways that we've got to find alternative means to move people around, to move goods around in this community. We have long had a monumental community battle about the institution of rail, and there is a whole debating story in history behind that. I am a big advocate for rail. We ought to have it, we've got to have it if we are to prosper, and if we are to, to help our citizens not spend two, three hours a day in their cars, on the freeways trying to get [to] work, home, and that kind of thing. And that debate sort of crescendoed in 1990. She asked me if I would share the authority because we had a big battle between local developers primarily, and their supporters in [U.S.] Congress. Unfortunately, Tom DeLay was on the transportation committee. He was a senior person, and he prohibited us from getting federal assistance for rail in Houston, as a member of the local delegation, while at the same time approving it for other communities. Seems sort of weird today, but that's what happened. Fortunately, we have had the voters, for now the third time, approved rail and we, I hope, are on our way to beginning to have the first expansion of the first seven mile system that Lee Brown [HistoryMaker Lee P. Brown] built, and I might say was built entirely with local money, and Lee Brown, while mayor, had the first seven miles, so the rail system that you see in the center of downtown that runs out to the Astrodome [NRG Astrodome, Houston, Texas]--a little bit better than seven miles, we have now approved a significant expansion of that now out and through the communities that is supposed to be accomplished over the next fifteen years or so, so--$$Okay.$$But those were the issues; those issues really continue to be debated until this day.$Let me ask you, what haven't I asked you about this job that you can tell me and how do you see this as a fit for you? I guess that's--$$Well, I think this job has been kind of natural. I served as city attorney for six years and I have had--I served in the legislature [Texas Legislature], served on city council [Houston City Council], so I think I come more uniquely qualified than anybody that's ever had it before. I happen to be the first black there that has this job but administration of a city government is something that almost everything I have done in the past has prepared me to do, so I find it exciting. We're doing a lot of new and different things. I have grown and learned in the job because I have been forced to deal with issues that I hadn't spent much time in before, particularly related to finance, and financial-related issues like pension and healthcare benefits and the intricacies of that, that I had never been particularly involved in before, I have had to become, quote, expert in. So, it's been exciting. It's been a good thing.$$Is there any particular project that, that you really would like to complete before your (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes. One of the principal initiatives of the White [Bill White] administration is the reclamation of inner--some inner city neighborhoods that have been for--now forty years, fifty years--more or less written off. They were written off because the average tax delinquency of the houses in the community is about nine, ten years tax delinquent, many of them unoccupied, many of them need to be torn down; no, no economic activity in the neighborhoods, obviously, nobody moving in. We have an initiative that we call Houston HOPE that it started out with six neighborhoods--inner city neighborhoods disbursed around the city that meet this criterion I just described. It is our plan and hope, by the end of this administration, to have built five thousand assisted affordable housing units in those neighborhoods, to have completely rebuilt the infrastructure in those neighborhoods. And by affordable, we don't mean poverty housing; we're talking about housing that in the main would be marketed for $130-140,000, but we are offering as much as $30,000 in down payment assistance, we're offering land assemblage concessions to the community development corporations to build those houses. I believe when we finish, and I think we will succeed, that that will be the impetus, because we can see it happening already, to private housing development in those neighborhoods, so that we will be the best example in America of how you reclaim inner cities in an inner city community with inner city communities like Houston [Texas]. That is called Houston HOPE, and I believe that we will show the nation how to do that.

Solomon Brown Watson, IV

Senior vice president and corporate general counsel to The New York Times, Solomon B. Watson IV was born on April 14, 1944, in Salem, New Jersey. In 1966, Watson graduated from Howard University with his B.A. degree in English. During the Vietnam War, Watson joined the U.S. Army. He served as a lieutenant in the military police corps from 1966 to 1968 and was awarded the Bronze Star and Army Commendation Medals. In 1968, while still in Vietnam, Watson took the LSAT and was accepted into Harvard Law School. Upon being discharged from the army in 1968, he entered Harvard Law School and graduated in 1971 with his J.D. degree.

After graduation, Watson worked as an associate in the Boston law firm of Bingham, Dana & Gould where he was one of their first minority lawyers. In 1974, he joined the legal department of The Times Company and became the assistant secretary of the company in December 1976, and secretary in July 1979. He was named assistant general counsel in 1984, general counsel in 1989, and senior vice president in 1996. With a twelve-lawyer staff, he supervises the paper’s litigation, copyright, and intellectual property issues and oversees acquisitions.

Watson has championed the cause of Vietnam War veterans exposed to Agent Orange. He was a member of the advisory board of the Agent Orange Settlement Fund, which was established to distribute funds to about ten million affected people. It was the largest class action settlement at its time. Watson was a participant in President Clinton’s Call to Action to the Legal Profession for Racial Equality and Pro Bono Services.

Watson served as chair of the Dinner Committee of the American Jewish Committee’s 1998 Judge Learned Hand Award Dinner and that same year he received the Pioneer of the Profession Award from the Minority Corporate Counsel Association. In 1999, he received the Distinguished Service Award from the Greater New York Chapter of ACCA. He is a member of One Hundred Black Men, Inc. and the Anglers’ Club of New York. In 2002, Watson was awarded the National Equal Justice Award by the NAACP League Defense and Educational Fund in honor of his professional accomplishments, commitment to public service and legal excellence. Watson is an avid saltwater fly fisherman.

Accession Number

A2005.245

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/27/2005

Last Name

Watson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Brown

Schools

Woodstown High

Harvard Law School

Howard University

First Name

Solomon

Birth City, State, Country

Salem

HM ID

WAT07

Favorite Season

Fishing Season

Sponsor

Brenda Gaines

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts
Key West, Florida

Favorite Quote

Always The Same, Never Changing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/14/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Corporate general counsel Solomon Brown Watson, IV (1944 - ) led the legal department of the New York Times. Watson is a Vietnam War veteran who has championed the cause of veterans exposed to Agent Orange.

Employment

Bingham, Dana, and Gould

New York Times Company

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
192,0:832,13:1088,18:4810,80:7200,90:15348,175:17191,208:22031,242:26032,318:33570,401:39102,456:39948,466:45174,522:51919,651:59900,769:60376,797:62008,813:62416,820:62756,826:63164,833:63436,838:63844,846:64932,866:72431,972:76957,1061:77395,1068:81862,1097:82246,1104:82758,1114:86854,1216:88006,1243:88710,1257:89670,1279:94598,1412:99971,1452:100555,1462:101066,1484:102015,1513:105957,1590:106395,1597:107709,1621:108001,1626:108439,1634:111060,1639$0,0:400,4:8880,283:10640,312:11200,320:13040,352:13760,363:14720,383:16960,423:18320,441:18800,449:25120,466:25989,481:28994,510:29384,517:30398,550:35624,632:36404,643:38276,687:43346,807:49171,849:50249,869:51404,886:52020,895:52790,906:53252,913:64276,1109:65032,1121:66124,1135:67216,1152:69400,1192:71080,1230:72256,1245:77690,1274:79894,1303:81414,1332:83846,1394:85898,1416:86658,1427:94440,1512:94800,1518:96816,1565:97176,1571:100181,1621:100811,1633:101441,1647:102134,1672:102386,1680:113330,1848:114380,1873:116930,1955:121055,2060:122330,2088:123830,2127:124130,2132:126005,2165:126905,2182:131960,2196:132464,2204:132968,2213:135540,2238:136206,2251:136946,2262:138426,2293:138944,2301:140720,2328:141386,2338:141682,2343:142274,2352:144864,2370:145566,2380:148188,2421:152400,2506:153696,2524:158700,2572:159342,2580:159770,2585:160198,2590:162124,2614:165983,2641:166830,2656:167446,2666:168524,2681:169063,2690:170141,2705:171065,2724:180721,2802:184123,2855:190703,2918:191493,2933:192520,2946:193863,2964:194337,2971:195048,2981:195601,2989:197440,2998
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Solomon Brown Watson, IV's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his childhood home

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers segregation in Woodstown, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about his Aunt Mildred

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his hometown of Woodstown, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes the churches in Woodstown, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls the economic divide between churches in Woodstown, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers discrimination at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls attending a newly integrated elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers his childhood teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers the impact of Emmett Till's murder

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls the de facto segregation of Woodstown High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls writing for his high school newspaper

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his decision to attend Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his freshman year at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls the Civil Rights Movement at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers studying English at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his prospects upon graduating from Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers Military Police Officer Basic School at Fort Gordon, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his response to Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s objection to the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls receiving his orders to Vietnam

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes race relations in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers jailing a friend while serving in Vietnam

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes deciding to attend law school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, recalls his decision to attend Harvard Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls adjusting to life at Harvard Law School

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls African American students at Harvard Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls hearing of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers the news of his brother's death

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his first position upon graduation from Harvard Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls joining The New York Times Company legal staff

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls discrimination suits brought against The New York Times Company

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his first promotion at The New York Times Company

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls Myron Farber case

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about the Judith Miller case

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about the dismissal of Jayson Blair

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about The New York Times Company legal department

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls New York Times Co. v. Tasini

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV comments on journalism

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls how he afforded Harvard Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls attending the executive graduate program at Tuck School of Business

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his promotion to general counsel of The New York Times Company

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes The New York Times' acquisition of The Boston Globe

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his diverse legal work as general counsel

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV comments on the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the U.S. Supreme Court

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls working on strategy for The New York Times Company

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about diversity at The New York Times

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon his position at The New York Times

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about intellectual diversity

Tape: 5 Story: 14 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about the Agent Orange Class Assistance Project

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his mentors at The New York Times

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about other minority general counsels

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about affirmative action at The New York Times Company

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon his mentorship of others

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon the importance of history

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon his legacy and how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about his first wife, Bernadette Aldridge

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV reflects upon his success

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his organization memberships

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV describes his awards

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV talks about fly fishing

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Solomon Brown Watson, IV narrates his photographs

DASession

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DAStory

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DATitle
Solomon Brown Watson, IV remembers jailing a friend while serving in Vietnam
Solomon Brown Watson, IV recalls his first promotion at The New York Times Company
Transcript
What was the most difficult thing about you being there in Vietnam?$$I, I had a couple of interesting incidents. Once my, my driver--guy name Owens [ph.]. I think Owens was from Newark [New Jersey] or East Orange [New Jersey]. Owens was a good MP [military police]. He was big, he was black, he looked just like a black Mr. Clean, good guy. Used to love riding around with Owens, but Owens had a weakness for marijuana, and he was found to have--or a marijuana pipe was found in his, in his--near his bunk, so he was convicted of having marijuana that violated Article--it wasn't Article 15 but violated a rule, and he was sentenced to Long Binh Jail [Long Binh, Vietnam]. Long Binh [Long Binh Post] was a base camp, I think, west of, of barrack at--maybe ten or fifteen miles, or maybe ten miles away, and that's where people were sent to jail who'd violated rules. And I'm not sure about this, but I was asked to drive Owens to jail. Now, I'm not sure if it was because I was duty officer that day the duty officer takes care of that stuff or whether people wanted to test whether I was strong enough to drive my own driver to jail. That was kind of interesting. I thought that was kind of a test of, of some type. Whether it was intended as a test or not, it was a test. Now, the reality is I'm the kind of guy, if someone says, "Rosie has violated the rules," then Rosie goes to jail, and I'd be happy to drive her there. I'm the best person to drive her there. So, while somebody may have been testing me on that, not a problem, gotta top--you got what's a tough job for anyone else, give it to me and I'll make it easy.$So, what caused you to be promoted in '76 [1976]. From '74 [1974] to '76 [1976]? You'd only been here [The New York Times Company, New York, New York] for two years. What were you doing that stood out for them to recognize you (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) There are, there are, there, there are a number of factors which come into play in, in the success or failure of anyone's career, and by-and-large, most of these factors have been ones of success for me. Early on in my career, I had an occasion to make a presentation before the board of directors on a law which had recently come into effect, and the presentation went relatively well. I--$$But tell me the story because I know you were a junior lawyer, it wasn't common that juniors present, yeah (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) It--I was a very junior lawyer, the newest guy on the block, it was a new complex law, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, signed into law by President Ford [President Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr.] on September 2nd, 1974. All the lawyers in the department were smart; I was the new guy, I'm the guy that had to read the law, explain it to my bosses, one of whom used to sit in this office, and we had to come up with an administrative process for handling pension plan issues and welfare plan issues, medical, dental plan issues, and my bosses and I came up what we thought was--with what we thought was a reasonable structure, or scheme, as the English would say, and someone had to present it to the board because it involved the establishment of a new board committee. I, of course, thought that one of the senior guys would do it. They, of course, thought that it would be, be good for me to do it, and I remember one of my bosses--mentor--I just love this guy, said, "Sol [HistoryMaker Solomon Brown Watson, IV], okay, we're gonna practice, we're gonna do this; don't worry, it'll be okay, don't worry." I said, "Mike [Michael E. Ryan], just relax, there's no one shooting at me in there, you know? I'm a Vietnam [Vietnam War] vet, I can do this." But Mike, who was a great mentor and supporter was--he was more nervous about it than I was. So that was--it was helpful to me because later on when there was the need, because of a structural change in the organization, to promote someone up the ladder, the directors were familiar with me; I became corporate secretary, which led to my sitting in on board meetings, so they became very comfortable with me, and as there were corporate organizations and reorganizations, I was--I had the reputation of being a very hard worker, a very reliable worker, and when vacancies came up in the legal and administrative chain of command, I was able to, either by virtue of luck, or some--how can I say--admixture or mixture of luck and, and managing the process, influencing the process, I was able to, to be promoted--$$To assistant secretary--$$I went up from assistant secretary to secretary, I then became assistant general counsel--

Dr. Clinton Warner

Dr. Clinton E. Warner, Jr. saw action on the front lines of two of the twentieth century's most transformative struggles. Born in Atlanta on July 11, 1924, Warner fought in World War II and became an active civil rights participant.

Warner's post-secondary education was interrupted by the onset of World War II. From 1942 to 1946, he served in the U.S. Army and participated in the D-Day invasion of France that turned the tide of the war in Europe. Warner then returned home to study at Morehouse College, where he received his M.A. in 1948. He earned his medical degree from Meharry Medical School in Nashville, graduating summa cum laude in 1951. Following an internship in Chicago and surgical training in St. Louis, Warner entered private practice in Atlanta as a surgeon specializing in breast diseases.

Warner also became heavily involved in the civil rights movement of the 1960s. He purchased his first home on Fielding Lane in Southwest Atlanta, defying the Berlin Wall-like Peyton Road Barricades erected in 1962 by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr. to segregate the community. Warner's act of resistance initiated a campaign for fair housing that opened housing in Southwest Atlanta to African Americans. Warner was also a plaintiff in a 1963 lawsuit that desegregated Emory University and the Fulton County Medical and Dental Society. As the civil rights movement gained momentum, Warner contributed medical and financial services to student activists and was jailed twice in hotel protests in Atlanta. In 1967, he founded the first minority medical surgical group, the Atlanta Surgical Professional Association.

An active member of several medical and civic organizations, Warner has been recognized several times for his contributions to medicine and the community. He served as honorary co-chairman of the Medical Support Group for the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, and serves on the board of trustees of Morehouse College. Warner retired from medicine in 1996. He and his wife, Sally Johnson, have one son, Clinton E. Warner, III, and live in Atlanta.

Dr. Clinton Warner passed away on June 30, 2012.

Accession Number

A2003.181

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/12/2003

Last Name

Warner

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

East Depot High School

Morehouse College

Meharry Medical College

First Name

Clinton

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

WAR05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Accept, But Verify.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

7/11/1924

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beans (Baked)

Death Date

6/30/2012

Short Description

Civil rights activist and surgeon Dr. Clinton Warner (1924 - 2012 ) served in the U.S. Military, facing action in World War II's D-Day invasion, and was active in the Civil Rights Movement.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:1284,41:26420,313:44100,560:109625,1267:109965,1290:110730,1302:114895,1378:138820,1716:139180,1973:167460,2242:198740,2581$0,0:1570,23:2380,33:16895,254:25480,404:27803,444:50116,822:80278,1185:80902,1194:82852,1424:94498,1545:103056,1699:156601,2218:160790,2330:179598,2502:197220,2756:208884,2913:236810,3270:246742,3411:255646,3644:265332,3737:285350,3922
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Clinton Warner's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Clinton Warner lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Clinton Warner identifies his maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Clinton Warner recounts the success of his maternal ancestors

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Clinton Warner describes his family's public service efforts and family farm

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Clinton Warner details his maternal aunts' and uncles' educational and professional accomplishments

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Clinton Warner explains how his maternal grandfather learned to read

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Clinton Warner describes his mother's life and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Clinton Warner relates his parents' childhoods, education, and marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Clinton Warner talks his father's position at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Clinton Warner recalls his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Clinton Warner shares more memories from his early childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Clinton Warner describes the development of his race consciousness

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Clinton Warner recalls his experiences in school as the principal's son

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Clinton Warner talks about his affinity for the piano

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Clinton Warner reflects upon his religious views

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Clinton Warner talks about his path towards becoming a doctor

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Clinton Warner details his experience during and views on World War II, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Clinton Warner details his experience during and views on World War II, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Clinton Warner recalls his time at Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Clinton Warner recounts his time at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Clinton Warner describes segregation in Chicago, Illinois inside and outside of the hospital

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Clinton Warner details the final steps of his entry into the medical profession

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Clinton Warner describes the challenges he faced entering the surgical field

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Clinton Warner talks about black colleagues in his medical field

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Clinton Warner reflects upon how the medical profession has changed over time, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Clinton Warner reflects upon how the medical profession has changed over time, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Clinton Warner talks about fighting for civil rights through the medical profession, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Clinton Warner talks about fighting for civil rights through the medical profession, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Clinton Warner describes his involvement in a legal suit against segregation in the medical profession and integrating the neighborhood of Southwest Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Clinton Warner talks about integrating Southwest Atlanta, Georgia despite resistance from the mayor and racist neighbors

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Clinton Warner talks about moving to Georgia from St. Louis, Missouri and being met with racism

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Clinton Warner talks about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Clinton Warner recalls forming the Atlanta Surgical Professional Association

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Clinton Warner talks about Sigma Pi Phi, otherwise known as the Boule, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Clinton Warner talks about Sigma Pi Phi, otherwise known as the Boule, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Clinton Warner comments on the Boule's secrecy and changes in the group

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Clinton Warner talks about his involvement with a black bank in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Clinton Warner talks about how he became chairman of the board of trustees at Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Clinton Warner talks about HistoryMaker Louis Sullivan

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Clinton Warner talks about his path towards becoming a doctor
Clinton Warner describes the challenges he faced entering the surgical field
Transcript
Sir, when did you get, I guess, the idea that you might want to be a doctor?$$That's a good question. Can I preface it? Can I tell you what--under that control that I have with my family up to age fifteen when I left to go to college. And I guess sixteen came on at that, shortly after that. I realized I was under control because I saw what other children my age were doing. Things I would, got to say I'd like to be doing, but, "I can't do that, I know the difference." And, and when I got to college [at Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia] I decided that I was going to do all those things. I did poorly in college the first two years. The first thing I did was get drunk. I started smoking. In spite of my shyness I would chase women a little bit, sometimes I didn't know what to say to them and all that stuff, but....$$This was at Morehouse, right?$$Um-hum. Morehouse in 1940, I came out the same year that Benjamin Mays came as the president. And I did that two years just like that. And I wanted--after the second year, I told my parents I wasn't going back to school. I wasn't doing well. I was going to drop out. It helped that I discovered I could get a job at the war department, so might have -- yeah, '42 [1942]. Pearl Harbor was what they were going...They were hiring people for "fourteen-forty-four," fourteen hundred and forty-four dollars a year, a job in the war department. It was a clerical job, (unclear). But I applied for that and got. That was more money than I'd ever heard of, probably more--almost as much as my father was making, $1,444. They didn't like it, but I told them that's what I was going to do, particularly when I got accepted. And I went on, spent a year there, and got drafted. I told them the reason I was dropping out of college because I'm going to get drafted anyway. So let me go and do some things. But, but that was my wild years, wild. And I got drafted, but--now I'm back to the question. At that time I thought I wanted to be a dentist. I wanted--there was only a few things you could strive for as far as a black person, preaching, I didn't want to do that; teaching, I didn't want to do that; physician; I don't think law was available to me in my venue at that time and I never thought of it. I decided I wanted to be a physician. And I got there and I found out how hard it was to do, and said, "Ok, I'll just switch over to dentistry, I'll take the easy road," that, that was my attitude then, a complete reversal. But when I came out of the [U.S.] Army, I knew I had to go back to college.$I was referring to the situation where I found that blacks in this town [Chicago, Illinois], I guess everywhere, I don't know, they're not--they weren't used to hearing about a black surgeon who did only surgery. And thought that--and it was true, that most of the black surgery was done by whites. There was a surgeon here that preceded me. He was not certified, but he was a good surgeon. And as I made my in-roads here, he invited me to join him in practice. However, I was certified and I just wouldn't do that, because he said, "What I want you to do is take night calls for me. And I was scuffling, and maybe help out in surgery sometime, and deliver babies. I said, "Doc, I can't do that." And then he understood why, but he tried to pressure me, and I didn't do it. We remained friends. I'd help him out from time to time, and--but I wouldn't join him in his practice, because he told me, "You can't make it unless you join me", because, I wasn't, you know, I wasn't getting many referrals and all, but gradually I got the trust, I guess, or something and got.... Shortly after I got here it was time for me to apply for the American College of Surgeons, which is a national organization and membership, and that is just the--grouped in the highest thing you could get. One of the requirements was to have three members of the College observe you operate and talk to you and so forth. And I, and I went that route and asked three of my white colleagues to come over. They, they would come to black hospitals and operate on their black patients. And I got to know them, but none had the time. I was refused; they said they don't have the time to do that. So the next year, I went to a meeting and I'd go--I started going to those meetings as a resident, like a student going to these meetings, in Chicago [Illinois]--was the first one I went to. They met in Atlantic City [New Jersey], and I was in this quandary, where nobody would give me the first step, because I knew I could make it into that organization once I got over the step. I ran into Loyal Davis, Loyal Davis, who, who is the father of Nancy Reagan, who used a different name then. He was big shot in surgery. In fact, he was president of the American College of Surgeons at that time. He also published the official journal of surgery, which is (unclear). I still take it. Anyway, I cornered him on the boardwalk in Atlantic City on a lunch break, and he listened to me. He said, "I'm surprised, I didn't know that was happening." He said, "Let me see what I can do about it." I said, "Thank you." I didn't ask him anything, I was just telling him the problems I was having "any suggestions" or something to that--it was a brief conversation. But, within weeks of getting back I got invited to come down, they were going to pass up that--since the surgeons wouldn't agree to come in the room with me, and I'd go before three-member, white panel to interview. And I went, and they were (unclear). I knew them. They were obvious--they hardly even accepted black patients. Lawrence Butler McDowell's [ph.] father was one of them. I, I'm not going to give you the names--he was a local politician. He got killed. But anyway, they grilled me, not about medicine, but about ethics and, and things like that. At the time there was a big thing about fee spreading for surgeons. In other words, if you sent me your patients, I'd pay you some money. I never did that. And, and they just grilled me and said, "We hear the black doctors over there do it all the time." I said, "Well, you heard wrong." You know, I just--and I went on through that, but those were the type of questions--not my capability as a surgeon because they knew that. I had been there long enough. And the next thing I knew, I got, got the approval to join and come up to Chicago again and be inducted, back in '64 [1964] or something, whatever.