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C. Bernard Fulp

Bank executive C. Bernard Fulp was born on October 9, 1935 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina to Amanda Murray Fulp and Cyrus Fulp. Fulp graduated from Atkins High School in Winston-Salem in 1953, and received his B.S. degree in elementary education from Winston-Salem State University in 1957. Fulp then served in the U.S. Air Force until 1962, and went on to earn his M.A. degree in education from the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut in 1963. He also completed a program in management development at the Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration in 1978.

Fulp began his career in banking as a loan manager at the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company branch in Winston-Salem in 1964. He also worked at State Street Bank and Trust Company and Unity Bank and Trust Company before joining the New England Merchants National Bank in 1970, where he eventually worked his way up to the position of senior vice president. In this role, he was responsible for the bank’s emerging middle market group. When New England Merchants National Bank merged with The CBT Corporation in 1983, creating the Bank of New England – then the second largest bank in New England – Fulp was promoted to executive vice president in charge of the bank’s private banking division, making him the first African American to assume the role. Fulp left the Bank of New England after it was acquired by FleetBoston Financial in 1991. He then worked for the accounting and advisory firm of Grant Thornton LLP until 1994 when he co-founded Middlesex Bank and Trust in Newton, Massachusetts. Fulp led Middlesex Bank until 2002, when it was acquired by Connecticut’s Westport National Bank. In 2004, Fulp became the president of GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Fulp received numerous awards, including the 2005 Mary Hudson Onley Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Hall of Black Achievement. He served on the Small Business Administration Boston Advisory Council from 1972 to 1982. Fulp was named by Governor Deval L. Patrick to the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education, and chaired its Fiscal and Administrative Affairs Committee. He served as a member of the Lesley University Board of Trustees, and on the board of directors for the American Red Cross of Massachusetts Bay, the Massachusetts Technology Leadership Council, and The Ron Burton Foundation.

Fulp is married to Carol Fulp, and has three children: Deanna, Rachael, and Cyrus.

C. Bernard Fulp was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 21, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.076

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/21/2016

Last Name

Fulp

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Bernard

Occupation
Schools

Harvard Business School

University of Connecticut

Winston-Salem State University

Atkins Academic and Technology High School

14th Street School

First Name

Cyrus

Birth City, State, Country

Winston-Salem

HM ID

FUL01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

10/9/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Bank executive C. Bernard Fulp (1935 - ) was the executive vice president of private banking for the Bank of New England, as well as the founding president of Middlesex Bank and Trust and GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Employment

GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Middlesex Bank & Trust Co.

Grant Thornton

New England Mercantile/Bank of New England

Unity Bank and Trust Company

State Street Bank & Trust

Wachovia Bank & Trust

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of C. Bernard Fulp's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his mother's career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his relatives' service in the U.S. military

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his likeness to his father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the black community in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the black business district in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his teachers at the 14th Street School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers the 14th Street Community Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his family's emphasis on work ethic

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers playing sports

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his experiences of academic tracking

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers his mentors at Atkins High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the State of North Carolina's influence on the Winston-Salem Teachers College

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers the student unrest at the Winston-Salem Teachers College

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his graduation from Atkins High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the alumni of the Winston-Salem Teachers College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the alumni of the Winston-Salem Teachers College, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his aspiration to become an educator

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers his mentors at the Winston-Salem Teachers College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his social life at Winston-Salem Teachers College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers Coach Clarence E. Gaines

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls the influence of Simon Green Atkins and Francis Atkins

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the student sit-ins in North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his service in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his master's degree from the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers applying for the management training program at Wachovia Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the history of black banking in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his loan management training

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers providing loans to African Americans in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the impact of redlining on the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his promotion to assistant treasurer of State Street Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls the founding of the Unity Bank and Trust Company in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the history African American banking

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his experiences at New England Merchants National Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his mentors at New England Merchants National Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls his decision to attend Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his start at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his education at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about Donald Trump's business strategy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers returning to the New England Merchants National Bank

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the consolidation of the banking industry around 1990

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp recalls the founding of the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp remembers the acquisition of the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his accomplishments at the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the mission of the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his involvement with GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the competitors of GoBiz Solutions, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his civic activities

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his service on the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - C. Bernard Fulp describes the impact of massive open online courses

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - C. Bernard Fulp shares his concerns about for-profit universities

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his position on charter schools

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about the future of banking in the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - C. Bernard Fulp describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - C. Bernard Fulp talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - C. Bernard Fulp reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - C. Bernard Fulp reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - C. Bernard Fulp narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - C. Bernard Fulp narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$1

DAStory

8$12

DATitle
C. Bernard Fulp describes his accomplishments at the Middlesex Bank and Trust Company
C. Bernard Fulp describes the black community in Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Transcript
I don't want to minimize the accomplishment of it. But founding a bank is a big accomplishment and just want to ask you like what were, what were you able to do as a founder of this bank [Middlesex Bank and Trust Company; Eastern Bank], you know, that, you know, you're proud of and that's part of your legacy today?$$Well, as you've said, I mean, one of the local newspapers, the Herald [Boston Herald] said, "You know, there are a lot of things easier to do than start a bank." And Newton Graphic [The Newton Graphic] called it adventures in banking which I wasn't too happy about thinking (laughter) about, investing my life savings and they're calling it adventure. But we were able to provide services, we had talked earlier about small businesses, small companies and families. Here I was actually able to do that full time. So there were companies, both owned by people of color and of Caucasians that we financed that we helped grow. We had some impact, you know, in a smaller neighborhood within a wealthy suburban community of Newton [Massachusetts]. I mean, it was a big deal. It received a lot of newspaper coverage. We actually were covered on a couple TV stations, Channel 5 [WCVB-TV, Boston, Massachusetts] and Channel 68 [WBPX-TV, Boston, Massachusetts]. We were able to finance some real estate companies. We financed an automobile operation. We financed a summer camp. We did, you know, a number of buildings for small businesses and a number of homeless families around Newton. So, you know, it accomplished its mission and it's--it is still there. It, you know, did not do any bad or crazy things. It was owned by people who wanted to sell it.$The community in east Winston-Salem [East Winston, Winston-Salem, North Carolina] was a very tight black community in terms of business and of the, I mean, the relationships of the people there. From what I understand from--we interviewed Togo West [HistoryMaker Togo D. West, Jr.] years ago, and I forgot what town he grew up in, but he spoke really, he spoke a lot about growing up and the kind of bonds that people had in Winston-Salem.$$Well, you know, again, the professional community there cooperated and worked together in a very unique way at that time. I mean, there was a community of teachers. There were several physicians and dentists who--most of us knew who the players were. Togo's mother [Evelyn Carter West] was the music director in my elementary school, at 14th Street elementary school [14th Street School, Winston-Salem, North Carolina]. Togo's father [Togo D. West, Sr.] was a math teacher and assistant principal at Atkins High School [Atkins Academic and Technology High School, Winston-Salem, North Carolina]. He, in fact, was my geometry teacher. In addition to Safe Bus Company [Winston-Salem, North Carolina] that we talked about earlier, there was Winston Mutual Life Insurance Company [Winston-Salem, North Carolina] run by the Hills brothers. The--there were several funeral homes that--where the owners did pretty well and got involved in real estate matters. Also of significance around Winston-Salem was the fact that in 1947, Winston-Salem elected its first black alderman, Kenneth R. Williams. Williams went on to become, in addition to an alderman, to become president of Winston-Salem State University [Winston-Salem, North Carolina] at a longer time. But as far back as 1947, Winston-Salem elected black people to the board of aldermen. A few years ago, I, as I recall, four out of eight aldermen were African Americans.$$Okay. So, and Winston-Salem--now, you know, when you, when I hear stories about the South, you know, we--I grew up, you know, watching te- television and hearing about the voting right struggles in the South. But they seem to be mo- mostly in the smaller communities, not in the larger ci- cities, like black people could vote in Memphis [Tennessee], they could vote in Atlanta [Georgia] and they could vote in Winston-Salem. Right?$$That's true. And as I said earlier, they actually voted in a black person. The stories around the South or life around the South--in the larger cities, at the time I grew up, Winston-Salem was a city of around 120, 125,000 people. And I believe the percentage of people, of African Americans was around 38 percent, so it was a fairly high representation there. As we understood it, life in the rural areas, life in the mountains could be quite different. But within the cities, R.J. Reynolds didn't want disturbances. He wanted his tobacco factories to run smooth. The (unclear) wanted their tobacco factories to run on time. Piedmont Airlines [Piedmont Airlines, Inc.] didn't look for disruptions. And Western Electric [Western Electric Company] was mak- wanted people that make telephones and spend money. So the city was segregated, but the kinds of stories you hear about some parts of the rural South, Mississippi and other places, you know, were not part of the daily life around Winston-Salem. It was a manufacturing driven town with the, some of the companies I named earlier, several very large banks, so the corporate community wanted things to remains stable.

Phyllis Hicks

Newspaper marketing director and nonprofit administrator Phyllis Jean Mosley Hicks was born on March 7, 1943 in Omaha, Nebraska to Juanita Agee Mosley and James P. Mosley, Jr. Hicks’ civic-minded grandmother, Emma Lee Agee, was a 1919 member of the church pastored by Reverend Earl Little (Malcolm X’s father) and was a childhood friend of the National Baptist Convention’s controversial Reverend Joseph H. Jackson, as well as Whitney M. Young, Jr. Her paternal grandfather Rev. J. P. Mosley Sr. led a demonstration to integrate the swimming pools in 1954 in Chillicothe, Missouri. Whitney M. Young was president of the Omaha Urban League, where Hick's mother worked as his personal secretary. Her mother played trumpet in an all girl band and her father was a saxophone player. Hicks studied piano and voice for several years and she was a member of the Elks Drill Team. She attended Long and Howard Kennedy elementary schools. Hicks was a member of NAACP Youth Chapter, worked on the school paper and was a member of the journalism club and the yearbook staff at Omaha Technical High School. Graduating in 1961, she attended Peru State Teachers College.

Married in 1963, Hicks took a job with the Power Electric Company and volunteered for Omaha Opportunities Industrialization Centers, Inc. (OIC). Hired by OIC in 1967, she produced eight pageants for the organization in addition to serving in as instructor and in an administrative role for thirty years. Hicks joined Sitel Corporation in 1998 as a quality assurance representative and trainer. Employed at CSG Systems, Inc., she served as product support analyst through 2005 when she retired.

Marketing director for the "Omaha Star," the oldest and only African American newspaper in Omaha, Hicks also writes a column called “It’s Just My Opinion” for the publication. She is the founder and mentor to “The Stepping Saints,” a local drill team. Hicks is the recipient of the Woman of the Year, the Black Heritage Award, OIC’s Thirty Year Service Award and the City of Omaha’s Living the Dream Award at the 2002 Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration.

Phyllis Hicks was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 5, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.279

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/5/2007

Last Name

Hicks

Maker Category
Schools

Howard Kennedy Elementary School

Omaha Technical High School

Peru State College

Creighton University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Phyllis

Birth City, State, Country

Omaha

HM ID

HIC03

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Nebraska

Favorite Vacation Destination

Las Vegas, Nevada

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Nebraska

Birth Date

3/7/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Omaha

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

Nonprofit administrator and newspaper marketing director Phyllis Hicks (1943 - ) was the marketing director and columnist for the Omaha Star newspaper. She volunteered for thirty years for the Omaha Opportunities Industrialization Centers, Inc.

Employment

Power Solutions Electric Company

Omaha Opportunities Industrialization Center, Inc.

Sitel Corporation

CSG Systems, Inc.

Omaha Star

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Phyllis Hicks' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Phyllis Hicks lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Phyllis Hicks describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Phyllis Hicks talks about Malcolm X's family in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Phyllis Hicks describes her maternal grandmother's civic involvement

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Phyllis Hicks describes her mother's community in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Phyllis Hicks describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Phyllis Hicks describes her family's civil rights activism

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Phyllis Hicks describes her mother's work for Whitney Young

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Phyllis Hicks describes her father's upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Phyllis Hicks describes her parents' interests in music

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Phyllis Hicks describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Phyllis Hicks describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Phyllis Hicks talks about the role of music in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Phyllis Hicks talks about her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Phyllis Hicks describes her early activities

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Phyllis Hicks remembers her stepfather

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Phyllis Hicks remembers the St. Martin de Porres Club

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Phyllis Hicks recalls the basketball team at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Phyllis Hicks remembers Technical High School in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Phyllis Hicks recalls her decision to attend Peru State Teachers College in Peru, Nebraska

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Phyllis Hicks remembers Peru State Teachers College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Phyllis Hicks recalls singing at Peru State Teachers College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Phyllis Hicks describes the Civil Rights Movement in Nebraska

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Phyllis Hicks talks about Nebraska's Native American community

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Phyllis Hicks remembers reading African American publications

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Phyllis Hicks recalls her maternal ancestors' experiences after moving to Omaha

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Phyllis Hicks describes the start of her career

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Phyllis Hicks recalls working for the Opportunities Industrialization Centers

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Phyllis Hicks describes her projects at the Opportunities Industrialization Centers

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Phyllis Hicks describes her later career

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Phyllis Hicks talks about writing for the Omaha Star, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Phyllis Hicks talks about writing for the Omaha Star, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Phyllis Hicks describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Phyllis Hicks talks about the police shooting of Vivian Strong

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Phyllis Hicks recalls the black business district in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Phyllis Hicks talks about the African American community in Omaha, Nebraska

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Phyllis Hicks reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Phyllis Hicks reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Phyllis Hicks talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Phyllis Hicks describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

2$6

DATitle
Phyllis Hicks describes the start of her career
Phyllis Hicks talks about writing for the Omaha Star, pt. 1
Transcript
After you got married [to Alonzo Hicks], you kind of dropped out of Peru [Peru State Teachers College; Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska] for a while and--$$Um-hm.$$Well, what did you do?$$I worked at the Power District [Omaha Public Power District], got involved in the politics down there because all of the black, except for two women who had been there for years, worked in the mail room, so I started my campaign. I got that job because my roommate in college, her stepfather was an engineer there, and he had gotten--they got me the job 'cause I had college--in the mail room, you know? And so I, I rebelled. When we used to have to go, there was a plant that was about six blocks; we'd take the mail up there twice a day, then we'd have to go out and wait on a bus to take the bus to go to another plant--it was on 43rd Street. And they said before I came, they used to have to even go down by the river to take that mail, and they'd be on the bus and you're standing out here, and one day it was raining cats and dogs, and they'd give you galoshes and a raincoat and umbrella to go carry this satchel of mail. I told her, "I am not going." This is what--I say, "I have been driving since I'm ten years old, and you have all those cars down there in the garage that belong to OPPD [Omaha Public Power District]. I am not going out in this rain to carry mail or anything else. Now, you can do what you got to do." So (laughter), they took me in to the vice president's office. I said, "I'm not going." I said, "Now, if you want the job, you got it." And he (laughter), he said, "Well, we'll get somebody to carry it; it is raining kind of hard." And from that day on, the women didn't have to take the bus no more. They--he'd started using the couriers. They didn't let us drive, but they started using a courier service. So I guess I've always been a rebel. I just--you know, for wrong and injustice I just had to stand up and let it be known. And so I worked there until I decided to have a child. And in those days there was no such thing as pregnancy insurance, so I had to quit, and then you had to re-apply, but then I didn't wanna go back 'cause it's just--a lot of things had happened there that they discriminated against people, and it's so funny because one guy that started in the print shop there the same day I started, his name is Fred Petersen, ended up being the president of the power company. And we always kind of maintained a friendship through the years, and when he got his first check as president, he called and asked me to lunch and he said, "I just couldn't show this to nobody but you." He showed me his check, and you know, I had a lot of choice words for him. So anytime I needed anything, he owed me--I'd call, "Fred," (laughter), I'd say, "'cause you didn't know anything when you started. I helped you get your promotions." And so it was always a joke, but I said, "It's not a joke." But he ended up being president of the company. And so then I didn't go back to work there. I worked six months at an insurance company, and then they were starting what they called the OIC, Opportunities Industrialization Centers, Reverend Sullivan--Leon Sullivan's program (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Right, right, in Philadelphia [Pennsylvania], right.$$Okay, all right. I started--I quit my job with a six month-old baby [Wayne Hicks], and went to work for free.$Your column, It's My Opinion [ph.]? Is that--$$Um-hm.$$Okay. When did you start writing that?$$When I came--started working at the Star [Omaha Star]. I came--I retired (laughter) April 2000--April 15th, 2005, and I started working down here at the Star in June, so I retired a whole month and a half? (Laughter) And so then I'd been here for a little while, and I decided I would write this one particular story about the substandard and the government money going to the subsidized private business, and then after that, I started it. And I figure--I write it because it's what I think, I can say what I think, if you don't agree you can write back and say what you think, but that's my opinion whether you like it or not. So it gives me freedom to say what I really want, within reason (laughter).$$Okay. Now, what have been some of the issues that you've (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, there's a filling station, it's right at the base of where they're gonna start this new North Omaha [Omaha, Nebraska] plan, and it's a Sinclair [Sinclair Oil Corporation] station, and I just happened to--I needed gas, I was coming from city hall, and I went up Dodge [Street], and I said, "Well, I won't go to that one, I'll go to one in the neighborhood," but I happened to look at it and I remember I say, "Well, you know, I'm really on empty," so I stopped and got gas, and then I came on down and I came down 24th [Street], and I got to the one on 24th and Cuming [Street], in a same Sinclair station, but the, the price was forty cents more a gallon. I say, "Wait a minute, something is wrong." So I drove all the way back to Dodge Street to look at it, so the--I was so mad, so I went into the--I stopped to come in there and speak to the manager. They say the manager wasn't there. I say, "Well, who decides who--what you sell the gas for?" Well, I guess they said the manager. I said, "Well, I wanna talk to the manager." So I just couldn't sleep. I got up that next morning bright and early; took my camera, went and took pictures of the one that I got gas from, came down to the one that was in North Omaha, and took pictures of that one being forty cents more a gallon and, and I asked the girl (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Forty cents less, I mean the one--$$More.$$Oh, the one--$$The one that I got gas (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Oh, the first one, yeah. It was--that's--yeah, right, okay.$$On Dodge Street, it was off downtown. And so then I asked to speak to the manager, I left my name and number, they never called. So I wrote--I took pictures and showed it (laughter), and I put it--I wrote that in Just My Opinion. The manage- didn't--the manager or one of the employees wrote me an email, just real nasty, about that he's the nicest person, that I had no business doing that, and all, and he gave them jobs, and blah, blah, blah. Come to find out, under disguise, the manager was Hispanic--the owner is Hispanic, and had--and nobody knew he was Hispanic, and he called me and he said, "Can I meet with you?" I said, "Sure." He said, "I want you to change that story because I come and they told me not to meet and not to open up 'cause I would have all the--all this, and I don't make the money that the other station--I don't have a quick shop and I don't have--." I said, "Sir." He said, "What they're selling gas for--and they're still doing it, still. You go down there now and it's still forty cents more." And I said, "When you bought your gas and it was the same price as everybody else's gas, granted it may have gone up the next time you bought it, but are you gonna tell me that in two weeks that you bought your gas, your tanks were empty? That you had to raise your price?" "Yes, I had to--I don't make any money off the gas and, and, and you--I just made my money--," and he has a Subway. I say, "Well, you make it off the sandwiches. You're right at the bottom of the hill of Creighton [Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska]." And so he went on, and he just went on and said, "I want you to change that story." I said, "I'm not changing my story." And so he kept on and kept on, and I said, "I am not changing it." I say, "Now, if you wanna write something, your opinion, I'll put it in there, but I am not 'cause it's the fact. Is this not your store? Is this not your sign? This is not the one on Dodge--this is not their sign." So I made a call, and I called all--about seven more in Omaha [Nebraska]. Some of 'em would tell me their prices--most of 'em wouldn't over the phone. So I started going around looking at 'em, and so he changed it a little bit, but then he went right back. If you go there now, he's forty cents more. So--$$Okay.$$And I--you know, I just wrote it and I didn't go back and revisit it, which I probably should, because he's still doing it. And people pull up without even noticing, fill up their tanks, and they can go right down the street, or four blocks over, and get it for forty cents less a gallon.$$Okay.$$So that's what, that's what inspired me to write those two stories, and that's when I started writing my articles.

Jefferson Eugene Grigsby

Art professor, fine artist, and high school art teacher Jefferson Eugene Grigsby, Jr. was born on October 17, 1918, in Greensboro, North Carolina, to Jefferson Eugene Grigsby, Sr. and Perry Lyon Dixon. Grigsby first discovered his love for art after his family moved to Winston-Salem, North Carolina, when he was nine years old. In 1933, Grigsby attended Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina. Within a year, Grigsby transferred to Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, where he first met his long time mentor, Hale Woodruff. Grigsby graduated from Morehouse College in 1938, with B.A. degree and because of Woodruff, he was equipped with extensive artistic experience that he would retain throughout his life. Grigsby went on to obtain his M.A. degree in art (1940) from Ohio State University and his Ph.D. degree from New York University (1963).

In 1942, Grigsby volunteered to serve in World War II and became a master sergeant of the 573rd Ordinance Ammunition Company under U.S. Army General George Patton during the Battle of the Bulge. In 1943, Grigsby married Rosalyn Thomasena Marshall, a high school biology teacher and social activist. Three years later, at the invitation of the school’s principal, W.A. Robinson, Grigsby began working at Carver High School as an art teacher. After the closing of the school in 1954, Grigsby began working at Phoenix Union High School where he remained until 1966.

In 1958, Grigsby was selected by the Museum of Modern Art in New York City to represent the United States as an art teacher at the Children’s Creative Center at the Brussels World Fair in Belgium. This experience inspired Grigsby to initiate a number of art programs in community centers, housing projects and day care centers in the Phoenix area.

Grigsby began teaching at the university level in 1966, working at the School of Art at Arizona State University until 1988. During this time, Grigsby published "Art and Ethics: Background for Teaching Youth in a Pluralistic Society," the first book ever written for art teachers by an African American artist and author.

In 2001, "The Art of Eugene Grigsby Jr.: A 65 Year Retrospective" was featured at the Phoenix Art Museum. The exhibition featured insightful commentary of Grigsby’s life and influence on the art and education world by his many colleagues, friends and family.

Grigsby served on the boards of numerous organizations, including the National Art Education Association, the Committee on Minority Concerns and Artists of the Black Community/Arizona. Grigsby has also been awarded numerous times for his outstanding work, including the Arizona Governor’s “Tostenrud” Art Award and the NAACP’s Man of the Year Award.

Grigsby lives with his wife in their Phoenix home. They have two sons, Jefferson Eugene Grigsby, III and Marshall Grigsby, who both have been recognized as educators.

Jefferson Eugene Grigsby, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 11, 2007.

Jefferson Eugene Grigsby passed away on June 9, 2013.

Accession Number

A2007.204

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/11/2007 |and| 7/13/2007

Last Name

Grigsby

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Eugene

Schools

Second Ward High School

Morehouse College

The Ohio State University

New York University

American Artists School

École des Beaux-Arts

Search Occupation Category
First Name

J.

Birth City, State, Country

Greensboro

HM ID

GRI06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Phoenix, Arizona

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Arizona

Birth Date

10/17/1918

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Phoenix

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp, Salmon

Death Date

6/9/2013

Short Description

Fine artist, art professor, and high school art teacher Jefferson Eugene Grigsby (1918 - 2013 ) was selected in 1958 by the Museum of Modern Art in New York City to represent the United States as an art teacher at the Children's Creative Center at the Brussels World Fair. Grigsby published Art and Ethics: Background for Teaching Youth in a Pluralistic Society, the first book ever written for art teachers by an African American artist and author.

Employment

Carver High School

Phoenix Union High School District

Arizona State University

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jefferson Eugene Grigsby's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his mother's personality and upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his father's upbringing and career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his home life

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby talks about his grade school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes the community of Prairie View, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls moving to Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his introduction to painting

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers the Second Ward High School in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls moving to Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his art classes at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers moving to New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby talks about the Works Progress Administration

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his introduction to New York City's arts community

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers Langston Hughes

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers New York City's Harlem community

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his studies at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his studies at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his art residency at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers Mary McLeod Bethune

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls joining the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his promotions in the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers organizing a U.S. Army band

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his deployment to Europe during World War II

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls mounting theater productions while serving in the U.S. Army

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby talks about his marriage and the start of his teaching career

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers George Washington Carver High School in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his art students at George Washington Carver High School

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls the closure of George Washington Carver High School

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls teaching at Phoenix Union High School in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers travelling internationally as an artist

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes L'Ecole Superieure des Beaux Arts in France

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers his transition to teaching

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his colleagues at George Washington Carver High School in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby talks about his adjustment to Phoenix Union High School

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his wife's career

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his decision to pursue a Ph.D. degree

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers Expo 58 in Belgium

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls the African American expatriates at Expo 58

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers traveling in Europe with his family

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls returning home from Belgium

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby talks about his honorary doctorate in fine art

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls joining the faculty of Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his accomplishments as an art professor

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers interviewing African American artists

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his work with the National Art Education Association

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his research on African art traditions

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls curating an African art exhibit at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls curating an African art exhibit at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes the black community's support of the Heard Museum

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his final years at Arizona State University

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby reflects upon the role of art competitions

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes the Consortium of Black Organizations and Others for the Arts

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby talks about his retirement from Arizona State University

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his artistic style and influences

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby talks about aspiring African American artists

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby talks about commercialism in art

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby reflects upon his role in the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby shares a message to future generations

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby narrates his photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers artist Grace Hampton

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$7

DAStory

3$1

DATitle
Jefferson Eugene Grigsby recalls his introduction to painting
Jefferson Eugene Grigsby remembers Expo 58 in Belgium
Transcript
When we came to Charlotte [North Carolina], I think I came in the eighth grade.$$In reading some of your history, I came across a name, Walker Foster. Does that--$$Yeah.$$Could you tell us about Walker Foster?$$Well, when we moved to Charlotte, I immediately got me a paper route and I was--it was during the Depression [Great Depression]. At that time, I was buying all my clothes and pretty much taking care of myself financially other than food and what we had at home. So, in the paper route, the people I could count on and the people who I had problems in collecting from, seemed like the teachers and the preachers were the ones I had the hardest time collecting from. Well, at that time, teachers weren't being paid and such, but prostitutes and pimps then were the ones I could--had no problems collecting from bootleggers. So, so--but Walker Foster was a, a class of his own. He was a stone mason, and he hadn't paid me in a month or more, but I knew he would pay if I could catch him. So, one morning about four o'clock as I was delivering his papers, I saw lights on at the house and I knocked on the door. When he opened the door, there was a lot of lights and paintings were all around the room. And I said, "Where did you get these paintings?" He said he painted them. I laughed. I laughed in his face because he didn't fit my preconception of what an artist should look like. Here, this guy was quite black and kind of dumpy. He, he had really dull hands from laying bricks and all. When I--my impression of a--of an artist was blonde and blue eyes and such. So he saw I didn't believe him. He said, "If you don't believe me, would you like to come and watch?" Of course. I went down and watched, and after watching him a few weeks, he asked me if I wanted to try, put a brush in my hand and that was it.$$What facilitated the move to Charlotte? Why did you all go there?$$My dad [Jefferson Eugene Grigsby, Sr.] got a job as principal of the high school [Second Ward High School, Charlotte, North Carolina]. He--it was a challenge for him because he, he had worked in a high school in Lynchburg [Virginia], but not since then. So he packed up the family and moved in several different times. He bought a--bought an old car. We didn't have a car before that, name was Essex. And one--and driving, I went with him once from Winston-Salem [North Carolina] to Charlotte and he asked me if I wanted to drive, so I did. So I was twelve years old then. So I was driving and a policeman stopped. And when he, he came up and said--he asked me, "How old are you boy?" I said, "I'm fourteen." Well, you had to be sixteen. And after, he said--told dad, "You drive this car." And when he started driving, dad said, "Why didn't you tell him you were sixteen?" I said, "I didn't wanna tell that big a lie," (laughter).$$Now, you're, you're in Charlotte. Let's--and you found this--you found mister--Mr. Foster Walker.$$Yeah.$$Now, what was your feeling aside from the fact that you saw the paintings and didn't believe that he had done them? What was your feeling about art and paintings when you saw those paintings?$$I thought they were real nice. I didn't have any, anything beyond that I don't think at that time. I didn't have a desire to paint. It was only after Walker Foster had me trying or doing some paintings, some of which I still have that I got interested in art.$$What was the feeling when you first took that first brush and started to paint and touch it to that canvas?$$(Laughter) It's weird. It's unexpected, really, as to what might happen.$$And what was his reaction when he saw you doing this?$$I think he was pleased. I think he was pleased that he had--in fact, I know, after a while he used to take pride in introducing me.$$So, at this stage, you're--approximately how old are you now, would you say you are now?$$Between twelve and thirteen, yeah.$We're gonna go back through the '50s [1950s], the end of the '50s [1950s], and were there any, any particular events in the '50s [1950s], late '50s [1950s], that are important that, that we talk about today? For instance, we do know that you did some World's Fair [Expo 58, Brussels, Belgium] things.$$That was in '58 [1958] and I think we--didn't we talk about the (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Let's go over it again just for a moment. You, you went to--where did you go?$$I went to Brussels [Belgium], and we went there and it was cold. The fair had just opened. And Victor D'Amico who was the educational director of the Museum of Modern Art and who had invited me came along in the beginning. There were three of us. I was the only one who was not on the regular staff of the Museum of Modern Art in New York [New York]. The--D'Amico had designed two rooms, one in which we brought children in and they had toys that stimulated creativity. In the next room, they had easels for painting and a big table with all kind of objects on it for construction. Well, when we got there, there were very few kids around. So I saw a teacher with about twelve kids walking through, with the boys about ten, twelve years old. So, I ran out and grabbed them and said, "Come on over here. Here's something you might be interested in." So, they came in and it was cold. They took off their coats and hung them up. And these were Flemish kids, and they ran around and they were very aggressive. I thought at once they might tear up some of the toys they had there. We had one toy that was like a piano but it--as you press the key, you got a color on a screen and you could mix colors with--and they were rambunctious with these. Finally, went into the second room and sit down to paint. And they sat down and when they sat down, they pulled the cigarettes out and started--and I said, "Well, no smoking." At that time, we were smoking and I felt like a hypocrite.$$How old were these children?$$Ten, eleven, twelve years old (laughter).$$(Laughter).$$They were Flemish kids. And when they left, one of them said to me and I--as he was putting his coat on, he said, (speaking French), "Embrassez-moi." And I said, what did you say? And he turned around and demonstrated kiss my ass (laughter).$$(Laughter).$$We had--there were three of us from the United States. There was a maid to help clean up afterwards, there was a person who went to the various schools to bring in the students, and there was a couple of other people. There was about five of us in there. And we had a number of languages covered. The--so when the kids would enter, we learned to speak to them in their language and we'd determine that by the way they dressed and the conversations they were having. So, it's, sprichst du Deutsch, it's, parlez-vous francais? Or somebody in Spanish would speak. One kid came in and sat down, I said, "You speak English?" He said, "No." "Parlez-vous francais?" "No." Sprichst du Deutsch?" "No." And I called somebody else over to ask him and I was frustrated. I said, "What in the hell do you speak?" He said, "I speak American."$$(Laughter).$$And we went to England after that and listened to some of these cockneys, and you couldn't understand what they were saying. They were speaking English. So, all those little things really helped me understand.

Dorothy Terrell

Corporate executive Dorothy Ann Terrell was born June 12, 1945 in Hallandale, Florida. Her parents, Pearlie Weeks Terrell and Charles Walter Terrell, sent her to Lanier Elementary School, Lanier Junior High School, and Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale. Aspiring to be a journalist, Terrell graduated from high school in 1963 and enrolled at Florida A&M University. Terrell graduated cum laude from Florida A&M University in 1966 with her B.A. degree in English.

After accepting a counseling position with Job Corps, Terrell moved to Poland Springs, Maine. In 1967, Terrell moved to Boston, Massachusetts, where she worked as a counselor for Reverend Leon Sullivan’s Opportunities Industrial Corporation (OIC), and eventually rose to the position of assistant director. In 1973, Terrell joined the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Office for Children, where she became the associate director in 1975. Serving on the advisory board of OIC brought Terrell into contact with representatives of the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), who offered her a job as a training manager in 1976. From 1978 to 1980, Terrell was plant human relations manager in Westminster, Massachusetts. She later became group human relations manager of systems manufacturing from 1980 to 1983 and, from 1983 to 1984, served as group manager for engineering and manufacturing. In 1984, Terrell was promoted to plant manager of the DEC plant in Roxbury, Massachusetts. She was the first African American woman to hold this position. Primarily manufacturing keyboards, Terrell reduced the new product cycle from ninety days to seventy-five days and reduced manufacturing costs by more than 30%. Terrell also served as DEC’s group manager of interconnect/packaging from 1987 to 1991. Terrell joined Sun Microsystems, Inc. in 1991 as president of Sun-Express, and as a corporate officer through 1997. At Sun Microsystems, she led the company in asset management performance and grew revenues to over $300 million per year. After 1997, Terrell was served simultaneously as senior vice president of worldwide sales for NMS Communications and president of Platform Services Group. Terrell temporarily left First Light Capital as a partner and became president and CEO of Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC), a national nonprofit organization that promotes economic prosperity in America’s inner cities through private sector engagement with local residents. Terrell later returned to work for First Light Capital.

Terrell has been the recipient of many awards, including being named one of the Top 50 line managers in America by Executive Female magazine, a Top Ten Business Marketer by Business Marketing magazine, and one of 20 Women of Power and Influence by Black Enterprise magazine. She also received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Florida A&M University. Terrell was a subject in The Wizards and Their Wonders: Portraits in Computing, an exhibit and book by Christopher Morgan, as well as The Enterprising Woman by Mari Florence.

Terrell lives in Miami Beach, Florida.

Dorothy Terrell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 11, 2007 and March 9, 2017.

Accession Number

A2007.133

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/11/2007 |and| 3/9/2017

Last Name

Terrell

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Dillard High School

Lanier Elementary School

Lanier Junior High School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

First Name

Dorothy

Birth City, State, Country

Fort Lauderdale

HM ID

TER03

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Genelle Trader

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

While We Can.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

6/12/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pasta

Short Description

Corporate executive Dorothy Terrell (1945 - ) was the former president of Sun Microsystem’s Sun-Express.

Employment

SunExpress

Initiative for a Competitive Inner City

Digital Equipment Corporation

Job Corps

Office for Children

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dorothy Terrell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell describes her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes her father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell describes her siblings and adopted siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell describes her parents' marriage and economic status

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her family's involvement in the A.M.E. Church

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes Lanier Elementary School in Hallandale, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell describes Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes her teachers and aspirations at Dillard High School

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her childhood pastimes

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell describes her older brother's life

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell describes her decision to attend Florida A&M University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes her experiences at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her civil rights activity in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her teachers at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell talks about the Marching 100 and Bob Hayes

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her graduation from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell recalls working at a Job Corps center in Poland, Maine

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell describes her early career in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell remembers being hired at Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her career at the Digital Equipment Corporation, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes her career at the Digital Equipment Corporation, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell recalls becoming a plant manager at the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell recalls running Digital Equipment Corporation's Roxbury plant

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell describes her team based production strategy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes her family's move to Cupertino, California

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon her career at Digital Equipment Corporation in Cupertino, California

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell recalls making major layoffs at Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell describes how she came to work for Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes the mission of SunExpress

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Dorothy Terrell's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her childhood games

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes her relationship with her father

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell remembers Greater Ward Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Hallandale Beach, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her early religious inquires

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes her early household and extended family

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her reasons for attending Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell remembers the social environment at Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell describes her high school personality

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her decision to attend Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her social life at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her decision to join the Job Corps in Poland Spring, Maine in 1963

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes her experiences at the Poland Spring Job Corps Center for Women in Poland Springs, Maine

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her move to Boston, Massachusetts in 1967

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes her work with the Opportunities Industrialization Centers

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her time with the Office for Children

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell remembers Paul Newman's invitation to join Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Dorothy Terrell describes the work environment at Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell describes affirmative action practices at the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell remembers challenges and support groups in her start at the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell compares work environments at the Digital Equipment Corporation and Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell remembers becoming plant manager at the Digital Equipment Corporation's Boston plant

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell talks about the impact of core groups at the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell talks about racial diversity within the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell remembers improving production times at the Digital Equipment Corporation's Boston plant

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell recalls lessons and challenges from managing the Digital Equipment Corporation's Boston plant

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell remembers colleague Barbara Walker's advice at a difficult time

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Dorothy Terrell describes the support she received from colleagues Richard Farrahar and Kevin Melia

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell remembers implementing just-in-time manufacturing at the Digital Equipment Corporation's Boston plant

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell talks about competition in the computing industry in the 1980s

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her promotion to lead the Digital Equipment Corporation's plant in Cupertino, California

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her family's move to Saratoga, California

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes the development of the VAX 9000 supercomputer

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell remembers laying off workers at the Digital Equipment Corporation's plant in Cupertino, California

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell recalls Scott McNealy's offer to become president of SunExpress

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell describes Scott McNealy's initial plans for SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her family's reluctance to leave California

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell recalls hiring Genelle Trader to join SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes sales innovations at SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell talks about building SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes her approach to hiring SunExpress' personnel

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her hiring process

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell remembers key executives at SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell describes infighting within Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell remembers other women and people of color from her time in the technology industry

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell talks about the importance of support to care for a family while sustaining a corporate career

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon her success as a business leader

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her decision to leave SunExpress

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her first board memberships

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell names corporate boards and committees where she has served

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her colleagues from corporate boards

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon the significance of diversity on corporate boards

Tape: 11 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her experiences on corporate boards

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell talks about Corporate America's global position

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell remembers joining the NMS Communications Corporation in Framingham, Massachusetts

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her experiences at the NMS Communications Corporation

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes the NMS Communications Corporation's operations

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell talks about joining the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell remembers projects of the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell recalls buying an apartment in Miami, Florida

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon her attraction to Miami, Florida

Tape: 12 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell describes the Perez Art Museum Miami in Miami, Florida

Tape: 12 Story: 10 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her home in Newport, Rhode Island

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her political involvements

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her philanthropic interests in Miami, Florida

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Dorothy Terrell recalls becoming a plant manager at the Digital Equipment Corporation
Dorothy Terrell describes her team based production strategy
Transcript
And then I got a call one day from Ralph [Ralph Gillespie] and he says, "I'm leaving this plant. I've been promoted to another job." He says, "Are you interested in running a plant," and I laughed. I said, "Ralph, you called me out of a meeting to ask me about running a plant. You know that doesn't happen here," because plant managers came from engineering or they came from these materials. You had to be technical in order to be a plant manager in Digital [Digital Equipment Corporation]. He says, "Why don't you just wait and see what the job description is and you decide from there," so I said fine. I went back to my meeting. But, it was at a time when I had moved from Boston [Massachusetts], I lived in Marlborough [Massachusetts] for a while, then in Chelmsford [Massachusetts], and I was getting to the point where I wanted to, if I didn't move back into Boston, I wanted to be closer to Boston. I felt like I had been blessed, I had learned a lot of things and I wanted to, wasn't so much go back home, I wanted to give back and be closer to be able to do that, and so I was in the process of trying to think about where could I work to make that happen and so Ralph's call caused me to do some thinking, although I thought it was the longest shot in the world, but when the job description came out, it played to my strengths as opposed to my weaknesses. I didn't have the technical piece but I knew Digital. That plant was a low-end manufacturing plant and that was the group that I supported, so I knew the people there. They knew me. I knew manufacturing, after all I had been in Westminster [Massachusetts] for quite some time. I grew up in manufacturing. So, I went after that job with a vengeance and I competed with a person who was an engineer, I interviewed with the group managers, I interviewed, you know, with the plant staff and I was selected to run the Boston plant in Roxbury [Boston, Massachusetts]. It was such an honor. And--$$Now what year is this?$$Eighty-four [1984].$$Okay.$$So, the Boston plant manufactured keyboards, but it was the highest volume manufacturing operation Digital had, and we had to go to three shifts because of the volume at that point. When Ralph was there, Ralph hired a really good staff and then, that's when he got a promotion, so I had great material to work with. These were really competent people and helped me to understand that I didn't have to know everything. What my job was, was to provide leadership and to bring people together to help to form a team to make that place really hum. It was at the time when just-in-time was coming in and I, when I, to tell you a story, when I went after that plant, I talked with the plant manager that I supported in Westminster and he told me, he says, "You know, you're probably gonna have to make some changes when you go to Boston." He said, "We know you in Westminster; we know you in Maynard [Massachusetts]. When you say something, that's what you mean. You might not smile a lot or you need to show emo-, you need to show more emotion." And I said, "What are talking about?" Because for me, being black, being a woman, emotion is the last thing I want. He says, "Because people are not going to understand what you're really trying to say."$How did the team, how did it help them to do it as a team, I mean, I know there's one, are they making like several keyboards at once, or are they, what do they (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, they could because what was going on is you do one thing--it wasn't like one person making an entire keyboard, one person who was doing one function and then pushing it to someone else to do something else. When you form a team, then the team would be responsible for that one person, then got to know how to put together an entire keyboard themselves, and then there would be decisions as to who would make decisions today, in a sense, around, if they had to do a hundred keyboards, then how would that get done? You know, would X number of people do it and Y number of people go get the material, or allotted, so it was the team's decision as to how the production happened, not waiting for something to come to them to do one little thing to pass it on, and they felt that was much more exciting, and I also found out that being me didn't mean that folks didn't understand me at all. It meant that, because I got a poem from one of the folks on the floor out of the group, and it pretty much said that and I think I still have it somewhere. I don't know. But it was like understanding that I care about people. I may not take care of people, but I do care about people and that came across in that I was interested in getting the best out of people. I want the best out of me, so why wouldn't folks want to have the best. You come to work, you've gotta be there, you might as well use all of you to make these kinds of things happen. So, it was an exciting time and then after Boston [Massachusetts], I got promoted to Maynard [Massachusetts] to work for Bill Hanson, who was in charge of manufacturing and I was responsible for helping with the strategy of manufacturing [for Digital Equipment Corporation]. That didn't last too long. Oh, the other thing that happened while I was in Boston is I got married for the second time just when I started working in Boston, and I got pregnant when I was in the, in the plant.