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Emmett D. Carson

Nonprofit chief executive Emmett D. Carson was born on October 6, 1959, in Chicago, Illinois to city business inspector Emmett Carson and Chicago Public School's head cook Mary Carson. He graduated from Emil G. Hirsch High School in 1977 and received his B.A. degree in economics from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia in 1980. In 1983, he obtained his M.P.A. degree in international affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, followed by his Ph.D. degree in 1985.

In 1985, Carson became a social legislation analyst at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., before taking a position as a project director at the Joint Center for Political & Economic Studies in 1986. There, he designed and directed the first national comparative study of black and white charitable giving and volunteerism in America. He was an adjunct professor of Afro-American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park from 1987 until 1989, when he became a program officer at the Ford Foundation in New York City. He managed the foundation’s Rights & Social Justice Program and its Governance & Public Policy Program. In 1994, Carson was named president and CEO of the Minneapolis Foundation in Minnesota, one of the nation’s oldest and largest community foundations, whose total assets more than tripled under his management. After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused over $120 billion in damage to Louisiana and surrounding states, Carson headed the Louisiana Disaster Recovery Foundation. He left the Minneapolis Foundation for the San Francisco Bay Area, where he merged the Community Foundation Silicon Valley and the Peninsula Community Foundation into the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, becoming its president and CEO.

In addition, Carson served on the board of directors of the National Economics Association, a professional association for minorities in the field, from 1993 to 1995; as chair of the board of the Association of Black Foundation Executives from 1994 to 1995; and on the board of Joint Venture Silicon Valley, which coordinates efforts between charitable foundations and Silicon Valley corporations. His research has received awards from the Joint Center for Political & Economic Studies and the National Economics Association.

Carson is married to professor and nonprofit executive Jacqueline Copeland-Carson, and they have one daughter, Yetunde Olagbaju, a graduate of Beloit College in Wisconsin.

Emmett D. Carson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 16, 2015.

Accession Number

A2015.013

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/16/2015

Last Name

Carson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

D.

Schools

Hirsch Metropolitan High School

Morehouse College

Princeton University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Emmett

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

CAR32

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Quote

It's not the things you don't know that get you in trouble, but the things you think you know, but don't.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

10/6/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Palo Alto

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive Emmett D. Carson (1959 - ) was the president and CEO of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation and the president and CEO of the Minneapolis Foundation.

Employment

Library of Congress

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

University of Maryland at College Park

Ford Foundation

Minneapolis Foundation

Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Foundation for Louisiana

Favorite Color

Black

Marcia Cantarella

Corporate executive and school administrator Marcia Elaine Young Cantarella was born on October 31, 1946, in Minneapolis, Minnesota to Margaret Buckner Young and late civil rights leader Whitney M. Young, Jr. Cantarella attended Bryn Mawr College and graduated with honors in 1968 after earning her B.A. degree in political science. For two years, she audited American Studies and law courses at the University of Iowa before moving to New York City in 1972.

Cantarella began working for Avon Products, Inc. in public affairs as a manager, focusing on minority and women’s affairs and issues of affirmative action. In 1973, she joined the board of directors for the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies and became chair of the Committee for Board and Service Volunteers. A year later, Cantarella joined the Women and Foundations Group, became a member of the Association of Black Foundation Executives and joined the nomination and health maintenance organization committee for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Greater New York. She would remain active in all four organizations until 1980.

In 1976, Cantarella was promoted by Avon Products, Inc. to Director of Public Affairs, where she would remain for four more years. During her tenure, Cantarella revamped the Avon Products Foundation in order to focus on women’s issues and moved the organization past monetary donations to focus on volunteerism. In 1980, she was again promoted by Avon, becoming Director of Special Markets, where she spent two years working with minority markets.

In 1985, Cantarella left Avon Products, Inc. and became a work and family issues consultant. Her major clients included New York University and Catalyst, Inc., an organization that works to further the roles of women in the workplace. In 1988, Cantarella was named Executive Director of the National Coalition for Women’s Enterprise, a women's self-employment and advocacy organization. In 1989, Cantarella returned to school and in 1996 earned her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in American Studies with a concentration in American Business from New York University.

Cantarella became Director of Academic Enhancement Programs at New York University at the College of Arts and Sciences. In 1999, Cantarella was named Assistant Dean of Princeton University, where she was responsible for the Mellon Minority Undergraduate Fellowship Program. In 2002, Cantarella was named Vice President for Student Affairs at the Metropolitan College of New York and in 2005, became Acting Associate Dean for Student Opportunities at Hunter College. Cantarella continues to serve in leadership roles on not-for-profit boards and committees.

Marcia Cantarella was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 20, 2007 and July 20, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.152

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/20/2007

7/20/2007

Last Name

Cantarella

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widowed

Middle Name

Young

Schools

Oglethorpe Elementary School

New Rochelle High School

University of Iowa

New York University

Simmons College

Bryn Mawr College

Lothrop Magnet Center

First Name

Marcia

Birth City, State, Country

Minneapolis

HM ID

CAN04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Minnesota

Favorite Vacation Destination

France, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

10/31/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Foundation chief executive Marcia Cantarella (1946 - ) started her career with Avon Products, Inc. and then became executive director of the National Coalition for Women’s Enterprise. She served as the acting Associate Dean for Student Opportunities at Hunter College.

Employment

Hunter College

Metropolitan College of New York

Princeton University

New York University

National Coalition for Women's Enterprise

Avon Products, inc.

Rabat American School

Robert F. Kennedy's Office

National Urban League

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521701">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marcia Cantarella's interview, session 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521702">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521703">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella describes her mother's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521704">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella describes her mother's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521705">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521706">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her paternal grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521707">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's upbringing in Lincoln Ridge, Kentucky</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521708">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella describes how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521709">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's decision to pursue social work</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521710">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521711">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her experiences in Omaha, Nebraska</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521712">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella talks about the integrated community of Omaha, Nebraska</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521713">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the Oglethorpe School in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521714">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the Oglethorpe School in Atlanta, Georgia, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521715">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's civil rights activities in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521716">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella describes segregation in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521717">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's involvement with the Unitarian church</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521718">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella talks about her family's move to Cambridge, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521719">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella recalls her time in Atlanta, Georgia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521720">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella describes her early aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521721">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella describes her family's move to New Rochelle, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521722">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella describes her early involvement with the National Urban League</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521723">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes her decision to attend Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521724">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella recalls her opposition to the Vietnam War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521725">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes her family's opposition to the Vietnam War</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521726">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the National Urban League's Council of Board Members</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521727">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella recalls her internship with Robert F. Kennedy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521728">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's work with President Lyndon Baines Johnson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521729">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella recalls her involvement in the presidential election of 1964</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521730">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the assassinations of 1968</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521731">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella recalls the civil rights organizations at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521732">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's stance on equality and opportunity</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521733">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the portrayal of working women in films</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521734">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her mentors at Bryn Mawr College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521735">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes her father's work in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521736">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the male mentors in her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521737">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella describes her social life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521738">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella describes her experiences at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521739">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her father's death and her divorce</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521740">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella remembers lessons from her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521741">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes how she came to work for Avon Products Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521742">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella recalls joining Corporate America in the 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521743">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Marcia Cantarella describes the challenges she faced at Avon Products Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521744">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Marcia Cantarella's interview, session 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521745">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella describes the leadership of Avon Products Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521746">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella describes her role at Avon Products Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521747">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the changing corporate culture of the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521748">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella describes her work as a business consultant</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521749">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the role of women in business</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521750">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella describes her decision to attend New York University in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521751">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella remembers Leslie Grossman and Mary Murphree</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521752">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Marcia Cantarella describes her experiences at New York University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521753">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Marcia Cantarella remembers her mentors at New York University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521754">Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Marcia Cantarella describes the Academic Achievement Program at New York University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521755">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes the influence of the Unitarian Universalist church</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521756">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella describes her career at New York University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521757">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella describes her role at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521758">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella remembers the Audrey Cohen College in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521759">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella describes her position at the Audrey Cohen College in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521760">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella describe her role at New York City's Hunter College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521761">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon her family's work</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521762">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Marcia Cantarella describes the Trickle Up program, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521763">Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Marcia Cantarella describes the Trickle Up program, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521764">Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the status of women in business</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521765">Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon the obstacles facing entrepreneurs of color</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521766">Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Marcia Cantarella talks about the increasing diversity in the United States</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521767">Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Marcia Cantarella reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/521768">Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Marcia Cantarella narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
Marcia Cantarella describes her father's civil rights activities in Atlanta, Georgia
Marcia Cantarella recalls her opposition to the Vietnam War
Transcript
During those early years do you remember what was happening at home? Who were the people that were visiting the home?$$Um-hm.$$Was your father [Whitney Young] becoming extremely active within the southern civil rights community (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Um-hm, um-hm. We lived in a, in a sort of complex of other faculty, you know, separate homes but we were, it was a little kind of like a gated community. And one of our neighbors who was a good friend was Horace Mann, Horace Bond [Horace Mann Bond], and his son Julian, Mr. Julian Bond [HistoryMaker Julian Bond], who I thought was just adorable, (laughter) that was when I was a little girl, he was much older, and, and his brother, James [James Bond], and sister, Jane [HistoryMaker Jane Bond Moore]. Jane I adored because she gave me all her books as she, you know, out grew her books she just passed them on to me, which was wonderful. James was a pain, yeah, yeah, yeah, he was just a bother. But, you know, so, you know, my father was certainly, you know, working with that family and, and others. You know, I became aware of the fact that as, as the sit-ins started, you know, daddy wouldn't be home for dinner 'cause he was bailing students out of jail, you know. There--$$Do you remember your first sit-ins, do you remember what the conversations were at home and what your father's specific role was (unclear)?$$Not really. I mean, it's not, you know, again, I'm, I was, you know, ten or eleven (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Eight, yeah, and okay.$$Yeah, so, so this was kind of all going over my head. It really wasn't until, you know, I was getting into my teens that, that he and I began to really engage and I, I began to form my own activism. So, but, you know, I was aware of the fact that there were meetings that took place.$$And that the sit-ins were happening and that your father was late--$$Right, right.$$--coming home because he was dealing with it?$$Right, exactly, exactly. But I, and, and, and the piece that I did because it, it absolutely hit home, that I remember was the boycotts because the, we weren't allowed to go to stores that we used to go to. The department (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Now when did the boycotts take place?$$The, the, the boycotts took place in, I'd say probably '55 [1955], '56 [1956] thereabouts, around lunch, lunch counters and the fact that the major department stores had segregated lunch counters. So you could shop at Rich's Department Store [Atlanta, Georgia] but you couldn't eat at Rich's Department Store. And so everyone, you know, the entire black community began to boycott the major stores. And so as a kid, you know, it was like why can't we go to that store anymore? And, and being, you know, told the reason and, and supporting the reason. So, you know, that was, that was certainly, you know, a crystallizing experience.$So the issues were civil rights and, and the war [Vietnam War]. Those were the big issues. And, so (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) And how did your father [Whitney Young] feel about the war?$$Well, it was interesting. He had to ride the fence because there were so many young black men fighting in the war that he couldn't really take a position. He didn't feel he could take a position overtly in opposition. So he let me be the firebrand on the war. And there was one night we were at a dinner together and he was sitting on the dais with McGeorge Bundy, and he proceeds to tell McGeorge Bundy all about what his daughter thought about the war. And after the dinner there is a reception and daddy brings McGeorge Bundy to me and introduces me as this is the person who's, you know, I was telling you well, what, what she thinks. And then daddy walks off and leaves me with McGeorge Bundy and me being all of like nineteen, continued to mouth off on my views of the war to the undersecretary of state. And many years later, my husband [Francesco Cantarella] and I met McGeorge Bundy at a dinner and reminded him of this story and McGeorge Bundy said, "And history proved you right." Very gracious of him, I must say, (laughter) it was really remarkable. But, you know, my, by this time my father trusted my judgment enough that he could throw me out there and assume that I would probably equip myself reasonably well.

Harriet Michelle Michel

Harriet Michel was born Harriet Richardson in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on July 5, 1942, to John Robert and Vida Harmony Richardson. Attending A. Leo Weil School and McKinley Elementary School, Michel also studied in Norway as an American Field Service exchange student before graduating from Coraopolis High School in 1960. In 1965, Michel earned her B.A. degree in sociology and criminology from Juniata College in Huntington, Pennsylvania.

From 1965 to 1970, Michel was a program officer for the National Scholarship Service (NSSFNS). Joining the New York Foundation as its executive director in 1970, Michel became the first African American woman to head a major foundation. During President Jimmy Carter’s administration, Michel served as director of the Department of Labor’s Office of Community Youth Empowerment Programs/CETA. She established the Women Against Crime Foundation at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in 1982 and served as president of the New York Urban League from 1983 to 1988. A resident fellow at Harvard University’s Institute of Politics in 1988, Michel later joined the National Minority Suppliers Development Council (NMSDC), eventually becoming its president and chief executive officer. At NMSDC, Michel encouraged African American businesses to compete with larger white businesses.

For her work, Michel has received many awards including the 2004 Enterprising Woman of the Year Award; the Executive Leadership Council’s Achievement Award; and the Legacy Award from the Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency. A member of three United States Agency for International Development missions to South Africa, Michel also served on the United States-Haiti Business Development Committee. She is a founding member of the Association of Black Foundation Executives.

Accession Number

A2005.059

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/7/2005

3/9/2005

Last Name

Michel

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Michelle

Schools

Coraopolis High School

A. Leo Weil School

McKinley Elementary School

Juniata College

Harvard Kennedy School

First Name

Harriet

Birth City, State, Country

Pittsburgh

HM ID

MIC01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Haiti

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/5/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Short Description

Foundation executive Harriet Michelle Michel (1942 - ) became the first African American woman to head a major foundation when she joined the New York Foundation. Michel was also appointed director of the Office of Community Youth Empowerment Programs/CETA for the United States Department of Labor, and served as president and CEO of the National Minority Suppliers Development Council.

Employment

National Scholarship Service for Negro Students (NSSFNS)

New York Foundation

U.S. Department of Labor

New York Urban League

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283123">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Harriet Michelle Michel's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283124">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283125">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about her mother's side of the family, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283126">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her maternal grandfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283127">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about her mother's side of the family, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283128">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about her father's side of the family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283129">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes Richardson family reunions and Rural Retreat, Virginia</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283130">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her father's background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283131">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers relocating from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Coraopolis, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283132">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283133">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her earliest childhood memory and shares a story about her birth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283134">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her father's pranks</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283135">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283136">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her father's involvement with the Candy Kids on Pittsburgh's KDKA Radio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283137">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283138">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel considers the impact of her relatives' choice to pass as white</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283139">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes moving from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Coraopolis, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283140">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers the advent of television</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283141">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her educational experiences in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283142">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel recalls her memorable teachers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283143">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers her American Field Service experience in high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283144">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers traveling to Norway as part of the American Field Service's student exchange program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283145">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her experience living abroad in Norway</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283146">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon Europe's progressiveness in the 1950s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283147">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers having formative discussions about race in Norway</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283148">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon Norwegians' understandings of American racism in the 1950s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283149">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her return to Coraopolis High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283150">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers being recruited to attend Juniata College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283151">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes challenges of attending Juniata College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283152">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes joining a jazz group at Pennsylvania State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283153">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her friendship with Galway Kinnell at Juniata College</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283154">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes protesting in Montgomery, Alabama in 1965</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283155">Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Harriet Michelle Michel recalls being photographed by Charles Moore when attacked by state troopers in Montgomery, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283156">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the aftermath of the civil rights demonstration in Montgomery, Alabama</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283157">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her graduation from Juniata College in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283158">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her employment with the National Scholarship Service and Fund for Negro Students and the New York Foundation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283159">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers assassinations of political leaders during the Civil Rights Movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283160">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the New York Foundation and her responsibilities for the John Lindsay mayoral administration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283161">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the heroin epidemic of the 1970s and founding the Association of Black Foundation Executives</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283162">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers the formation of black organizations in the late 1960s and early 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283163">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her appointment to President Carter's U.S. Department of Labor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283164">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her transition from the U.S. Department of Labor to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283165">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes changes in government funding under the Reagan administration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283166">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes being selected as first female president for New York Urban League</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283167">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers leaving the New York Urban League</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283168">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel recalls her fellowship experiences at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283169">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her appointment as president of the National Minority Supplier Development Council</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283170">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the National Minority Supplier Development Council</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283171">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel explains the National Minority Supplier Development Council impact on minority businesses</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283172">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the impact of supplier diversity programs for minority businesses and corporate America</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283173">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes National Minority Supplier Development Council's senior board management</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283174">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel shares a success story of a minority supplier</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283175">Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes challenges businesses face to retain their minority status</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283176">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel narrates her photographs</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283177">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel explains HistoryMaker Earl G. Graves Sr.'s disagreement with the National Minority Suppliers Development Council</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283178">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her leadership for the National Minority Suppliers Development Council</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283179">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel explains how her foresight affects her leadership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283180">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes Robert L. Johnson's sale of BET to Viacom, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283181">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel explains the economic challenges of keeping black owned businesses strictly independent</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283182">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes economic and social effects of the offshore industry, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283183">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes economic and social effects of the offshore industry, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283184">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her evolving worldview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283185">Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her role as a liaison between corporations and minority businesses</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283186">Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her identity as an African American female executive</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283187">Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers the impact of 9/11, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283188">Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers the impact of 9/11, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283189">Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283190">Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283191">Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 3</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283192">Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about the opportunities for minority suppliers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283193">Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about the need for African Americans to regain a stronger sense of community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283194">Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283195">Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel considers her future plans and goals</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283196">Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her hope to assist in Haiti's economic development</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283197">Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283198">Tape: 8 Story: 12 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about her family's response to her accomplishments and success</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/283199">Tape: 8 Story: 13 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$7

DAStory

3$9

DATitle
Harriet Michelle Michel remembers having formative discussions about race in Norway
Harriet Michelle Michel describes her role as a liaison between corporations and minority businesses
Transcript
Yeah, I know in this country, especially in those days, we were told that America is the freest country in the world, and all that--even with the racism and stuff (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well--the transformational, and I, and I call this--I do a speech where I talk about transformational things happening in my life; it wasn't just going to Norway and living in a different culture. I--at that time, Orval Faubus was preventing the Little Rock Nine from going to school [Central High School, Little Rock, Arkansas], and the Russians [Citizens of the USSR] were broadcasting these very negative programs. The, the men of the village would come to the house where I lived--my father's house, my Norwegian father's house, every night to smoke and drink and discuss the day's--the world's events, and they would listen to both the 'Voice of America' [VOA], and whatever this Russian broadcast was, and the Russians, of course, were making a big deal out of this discrimination thing, right?--that was going on, and the men started asking me about race and how I felt about being black, and it was the first time in my life, at age sixteen, that I really began to talk to white people about what it meant to be black, and it changed my life 'cause I've done that since then in almost every job I've ever had. But that's where it started. I, I began thinking about things that had never even crossed my little mind before, and thinking about them in a very different way. And we used to have long discussions and I would listen to the broadcast--I would listen to the one from Russia. It was broadcast in English, by the way, and I'd listen to the 'Voice of America,' and to the extent that I knew anything, I would try to explain to them 'cause they were very curious wanting to know about America and the race situation and that sort of thing, so I began becoming a race woman, I think, with that experience.$What you've kinda revealed in this discussion is a level of understanding about the business world that I think few people really (laughter) entertain, but yet at the same time, you recognize a need for opposition to some of those two distinct (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And I, and I understand also--I understand the, the pain and I, I talk about corporations mostly because the corporations are our members and they fund this organization [National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC)], so it's certainly a big part of my job to try to keep them happy and give them what they come to this organization seeking. On the other hand, though, I have to be mindful of the issues that face these minority suppliers and the unreasonableness with which some of the, the corporate--corporations demand of them. For example, part of the new procurement paradigm now is doing what they call reverse auctions, where they get people on computer terminals and they have a commodity paper--it's probably not paper, but a commodity--something that people make, and you as a supplier hoping to get the business, you sit there and you bid by Internet--via Internet against other people, and the reverse auction means that it starts with a price and you just keep goin' down, down, down, down, down. Well, the big boys can do that because they're doing volume, and so if they make a few--fewer pennies per item, they can tolerate it because they're making it up in volume. A smaller business, and often a minority business, just doesn't have that latitude, and while some minority entrepreneurs have won these reverse auctions, it's a brutal, brutal playing field, and people are left bloody, you know. Some corporations do it just to bring down the price of their existing supplier; they're not really serious about giving the, the business to somebody else. They want to force their existing supplier, i.e., very often a large white company, to bring their prices down, but everybody's out here so price conscious now--corporations are, consumers are, that it's a rough and tumble world, and I have to keep reminding corporations, "Listen, you know, some of this stuff that you say is a level playing field ain't really level," you know? So I, I have to be sensitive about the suppliers' issues as well; I can't just look at, you know, through the lens of corporations. I have to really be able to see both sides. And when I do speeches, as a matter of fact, I spend time lashing at the corporations, and I spend other time talking to the MBEs [minority business enterprises] saying, "Listen, if you want to stay in this game, these are the things you better do." And everybody walks away feeling good because I basically (laughter)--not chastised, it's probably too strong a word, but I've given direction and I've criticized and--but I've encouraged both sides of the equation. This is a partnership between minority businesses and corporations, and we are the glue that brings the stuff initially together, and I wanna make sure that everybody's doing things in the right way so the relationship can be successful.