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Barbara Ann Lumpkin

Banker and former public official Barbara Ann Lumpkin was born Barbara Ann Madlock on July 27, 1950 in Oxford, Mississippi to Estella and John Lewis Madlock. She attended Green Hill Elementary School and graduated from North Panola High School in 1968, where she excelled in theater. Lumpkin earned her A.A. degree from Coahoma Community College in 1970, and after moving to Chicago, she took additional business administration courses at DePaul University.

Lumpkin began her career in banking as an assistant recruiter in the human relations department of Chicago’s Continental Bank. Gaining a front line banking job in 1980, she served in the bank’s Personal Financial Services Group. In 1985, Lumpkin moved to the Corporate Trust Department, where she rose to the position of senior vice president and corporate trust manager. After joining Amalgamated Bank in 1994, Lumpkin was certified as a corporate trust specialist by the Canon Financial Institute. In 1995, Lumpkin became Chicago’s City Comptroller and, in 1998, the City’s Budget Director. In 1999, an investigation forced the City Treasurer out of office, and Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley appointed Lumpkin to the position of City Treasurer. She was later appointed a special assistant to Mayor Daley. In 2000, Lumpkin left this position to become senior vice president in the Corporate and Institutional Services business unit of Northern Trust Bank.

In 2005, Lumpkin was called to serve the City of Chicago as the City of Chicago’s Chief Procurement Officer when it was revealed in early 2005 that Chicago was underperforming in its employment of minority contractors. Lumpkin was responsible for implementing promised improvements. In addition, she leads the City’s Minority, Women and Disadvantaged Enterprise Initiative. She is also an advisory board member of the United Negro College Fund and has publicly endorsed career opportunities in the financial and banking worlds for rising students. Lumpkin is a member of the Chicago Finance Exchange and the Urban Bankers Forum.

Lumpkin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 18, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.099

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/18/2006

Last Name

Lumpkin

Maker Category
Middle Name

Ann

Schools

DePaul University

Coahoma Community College

Greenhill Elementary School

North Panola High School

First Name

Barbara

Birth City, State, Country

Oxford

HM ID

LUM02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Mississippi

Favorite Vacation Destination

Puerta Vallarta, Mexico

Favorite Quote

Always Respect Self And Others.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/27/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Thanksgiving Dinner

Short Description

Bank executive and city treasurer Barbara Ann Lumpkin (1950 - ) was the former chief procurement officer for the City of Chicago, and served as city comptroller and budget director. In the private sector, Lumpkin worked as senior vice president and corporate trust manager for Continental Bank in Chicago.

Employment

Continental Bank

City of Chicago

Northern Trust Company

Favorite Color

Black, Shades of Gray

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Barbara Ann Lumpkin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her mother's upbringing in Sardis, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her community in Sardis, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her experiences at Greenhill Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her teachers at Greenhill Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes the school system in Sardis, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes segregation in Mississippi during the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her high school experiences, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes the role of music in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her high school experiences, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls barriers to her aspirations for a business career

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her experiences at Coahoma Community College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls visiting Chicago, Illinois in her youth

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls joining Continental Bank in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls working in human resources for Continental Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes working in financial services for Continental Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls the 1983 mayoral campaign of Harold Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes the Urban Bankers Forum of Chicago, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes the Urban Bankers Forum of Chicago, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls continuing her education in Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin remembers working for Amalgamated Bank of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes working as comptroller for the City of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls becoming budget director for the City of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin remembers her work with Mayor Richard M. Daley

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls how she became treasurer of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin recalls managing the Y2K panic as treasurer of Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin reflects upon her term as Chicago city treasurer

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her career after serving as city treasurer

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her Northern Trust Corporation vice presidency

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin talks about becoming chief procurement officer of Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her role as chief procurement officer of Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin talks about advocating for minority contractors

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her hobbies and family life

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Barbara Ann Lumpkin narrates her photographs, pt. 3

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

5$4

DATitle
Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes working as comptroller for the City of Chicago
Barbara Ann Lumpkin describes her career after serving as city treasurer
Transcript
So you're approached by the Daley [Richard M. Daley] administration in '95 [1995] (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Um-hm. In '95 [1995].$$How did that happen?$$It was a surprise to me, too (laughter). Mayor Daley had just won re-election in 1995 and he also had just received the authority to take over the public school system [Chicago Public Schools] and as a result, he was re-tooling his cabinet. The budget chief at the time and his chief of staff and a few of the people who were going over to head the Chicago [Illinois] public school system and so they were moving some people around, the person who was comptroller at the time was being promoted to be CFO [chief financial officer] and they said they were looking to recruit the new comptroller. I received a call one day and I'm thinking, "Oh my God, have we blown their account?" I told the staff, "Look, if we're not balanced or we've blown this account, we're all fired so, oh, my God, oh, my God." But that wasn't what it was about at all. They invited me to come over for coffee and I thought, "Well, I suppose so, you know, I'll walk over, you're a client." They didn't say why, they just said, "Have you ever considered government, city government before?" And I said, "Well, I guess not, I've always worked in a bank."$$And those were the days of Paul Vallas and Gery Chico being the two (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, that was the group that had gone over.$$Yeah, had moved over, right.$$Mm-hm. And as a result, Diane Aigotti was named budget director and then, you know, then there was the comptroller role they were looking for. So I went over and we were just chatting and I was totally convinced in my walk over that I really loved what I was doing, that I was having a really great time, this was a rather unique opportunity for someone like me, you know, the staff and my bosses and all of us. We had this great working relationship and we were really making some significant inroads and, you know, I was just wanting to do what I could to pull that all off. And, and besides, they never said, when they invited me over what the assignment was, they just said, "Would you want to come over and talk to us?" So I went over and spent actually about an hour with them before--being myself, I said, "Okay, what exactly were you talking about. What job are we exactly talking about?" And they said, "Well, we're looking to fill the position of comptroller." I said, "Oh. Then that's different, let's, you know, let's talk more." So that's how we started the conversation. There were I'm sure, a lineup of very talented people. All of them I don't know who they were or whatever, but I just can imagine that a City of Chicago with the talent that it has that there was any shortage in names.$$I might sound dumb here but, is that, you know, you got a big position in a mid-size bank [Amalgamated Bank of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois]] and, you know, I mean, being the comptroller in the City of Chicago, is that more attractive than what you, I mean--$$Well, this is what I always try to do in my career is layer experiences. I thought that, as I still do, that adding the additional experience and the opportunity to see and learn the operation of doing a bond issue from the side of an issuer, which the City of Chicago is and which the comptroller is all responsible for, seeing it from the issuing side, because remember in the past when I was working with the transactions and the clients, it was from the bank's perspective but not from the client's perspective, and I thought I would have been even a better banker because you understand it all. I was--that was always my goal, to try and get to understand, top to bottom, soup to nuts, so, any conversation I would have with someone or if I was trying to resolve an issue, I'm talking about what I know, not what I'm thinking, or whatever I'm making up, this is a real live experience. This is something that I, you know, can talk about with confidence and I thought, you know, for these, and this is my reasoning, I thought, you know these assignments are very high intensity, you know, very demanding, long hours, lots and lots of work or whatever. I'll be back in a couple of years. That was what I thought, but it became a life of its own and I ended up in city government almost six years and doing several different things from that assignment.$Did you go to Northern Trust [Northern Trust Corporation, Chicago, Illinois] immediately after you--$$Not immediately thereafter. I, you know, just needed some time to kind of stop working the ninety hours a day and sort of settle. I worked--I went to the mayor's office as a special assistant to the mayor [Richard M. Daley]. I was working on a number of projects. One of the things that I worked on was the mayor had appointed me during my tenure as treasurer to a mayoral task force and that task force was charged with coming up with ways to identify opportunities to utilize minority women-owned firms at the city [Chicago, Illinois]. And I was fortune to have business leaders, public and private sector, higher ed [higher education], medical services, across the board, work with me on that and we served up some really interesting kind of cutting edge, I think, ideas about what the opportunities could be and how we could reshape, how we could restore. And one of the things that was in that report was some of the things that's in place now in city government and it was kind of like how to restructure and instead of calling it purchasing maybe we call it procurement services. So here it is. I just did that assignment and together with everybody else and when that project was over, it was quite an involved one because we met with the various groups and met with the various individuals, met with community, met with, you know, faith-based, met with all the state collators and everybody else and when the new procurement chief was appointed in 2000, I said, "Here's the bulk of the work that I've worked on and here are some of the things that the group thought might work." And I worked on a few of the other projects there in the mayor's office concentrating on maybe finance, or community outreach kind of stuff and while deciding what I would do next. And that's when I went to Northern Trust.$$Okay.$$It was at the end of the year.$$Okay. So it was at the end of 2000, end of 2000. Okay.$$December 2000, I joined Northern Trust.$$Okay. Now how--what position did you hold at Northern Trust?$$I went to Northern Trust in--my official role was senior vice president. I was first placed in the public funds group. My role was, it was like an undefined role, it pretty much one that I supported the leadership of that group and over time, the role sort of morphed into senior vice president and head of its public affairs and government relations kind of group. Kind of a new role that had not yet existed before at the company, and it took on various shapes depending on the nature of what we were doing. But the central core of it was to help position the company in the--and its core products in the communities it served. And if that meant sitting there with some of the investment guys, talking to a client about an investment transaction, that was helping protect the turf. So basically my role was to join the others, to partner with them to help protect and grow the business. Also, interact with all of the key decision makers external to the bank, be it organizations or political figures who would have an impact on the corporation's well-being. Part of my role was a lot of problem-solving, lending a hand in developing strategy to resolve certain things. You might say I got involved in some of the more complicated, more complex situations, which was kind of fun for me because I kind of like the activity. So that was the job. It was--talk about a trailblazer--much of it had to do with a lot of the external business, you know. Anything that might impact the bank's impression, its image or its client base--

Sheryl Riley Gripper

Sheryl Riley Gripper is the founder of the Black Women Film Preservation Project and is Vice President of Community Relations at WXIA-TV, Channel 11, an NBC affiliate in Atlanta, Georgia. Originally from Waco, Texas, Gripper was born on December 16, 1951, the first of two children born to Samuel L. and Dolores Posey Harris, Jr., Spelman and Morehouse College graduates. Gripper attended J.H. Hines Elementary School in Waco where her maternal grandmother was one of her teachers and later became her principal. Gripper graduated from A.J. Moore High School two years ahead of her class and entered her mother’s alma mater, Spelman College, where she obtained her B.A. degree in english. She took enough courses for a minor in journalism.

A successful internship at a major Houston, Texas newspaper, while still a student at Spelman College, played a major part in Gripper’s decision to choose journalism over a career in music. As a contralto singer, she aspired to grace the stage of the Metropolitan Opera. This internship set the stage for her to become the Manager of Promotions at WETV, Channel 30 and WABE-FM, a position that she held from 1975 to 1981. In 1977, she earned her M.A. degree in education from Georgia State University, and in 2000, she was awarded her M.A. degree in film. Gripper founded the Black Women Film Preservation Project in 1997. This organization hosts an annual awards/scholarship luncheon, which highlights the career of women who have made significant contributions to the industry and the annual “Black Women in Film Festival” in Atlanta.

Gripper is the recipient of four Emmy Awards, one for the 11 Alive Community Service Awards, an awards show that has honored volunteers for thirty-one years. She also created The Bronze Jubilee Awards, a program that honored Black culture while at WETV and WABE. As Vice President of Community Relations at WXIA-TV, she serves as the executive producer for the 11 Alive Community Service Awards. Gripper has been with Channel 11 since 1981.

Gripper is married to Jeffery Gripper, Atlanta’s first world karate champion, and is the mother of three sons, Edward Riley, Jr., Jeffery Gripper, Jr., and Ellis Gripper. She is also a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and is the corporate campaign cabinet of the United Negro College Fund.

Accession Number

A2005.266

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/19/2005

Last Name

Gripper

Maker Category
Middle Name

Riley

Occupation
Schools

A.J. Moore Academy

J.H. Hines Elementary School

Spelman College

Georgia State University

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Sheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Waco

HM ID

GRI05

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Adults, Students interested in Media

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

Holiday Season

Speaker Bureau Notes

Availability Specifics: Quarterly as lunch time
Preferred Audience: Adults, Students interested in Media

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

We Have To Pray.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

12/16/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Shrimp

Short Description

Broadcast executive Sheryl Riley Gripper (1951 - ) founded the Black Women Film Preservation and is Vice President of Community Relations at WXIA-Channel 11 (CBS affiliate in Atlanta, Georgia).

Employment

WXIA-TV

WETV (PBS)

The Houston Post

Atlanta Daily World

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sheryl Riley Gripper's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sheryl Riley Gripper lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sheryl Riley Gripper talks about her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Shirley Riley Gripper describes her maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Shirley Riley Gripper describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her father's side of the family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her father's time at Morehouse College

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes Morehouse College's Miss Maroon and White tradition

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her mother's side of the family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her mother's side of the family, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her father's side of the family, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her father's side of the family, pt. 3

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sheryl Riley Gripper remembers growing up in Waco, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes Waco's South Tenth Street Community Club

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her neighborhood in Waco, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her church and education

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sheryl Riley Gripper remembers her early interest in writing

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sheryl Riley Gripper remembers her choir director, Vivienne Malone-Mayes

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sheryl Riley Gripper talks about her father's half-brother

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her early musical interests, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her early musical interests, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her activities at Waco's A.J. Moore High School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her interests at Waco's A.J. Moore High School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her time at Spelman College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her early journalism experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sheryl Riley Gripper recalls the first sororities at Spelman College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her time at Spelman College, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sheryl Riley Gripper recalls the Pentagon Papers and applying for jobs in Atlanta

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her work at WETV in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes the Bronze Jubilee Awards

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her work at Atlanta's Channel 11, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her work at Atlanta's Channel 11, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes the Black Women Film Preservation Project

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sheryl Riley Gripper talks about African American women in film, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Sheryl Riley Gripper talks about African American women in film, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sheryl Riley Gripper recalls TV and film producer HistoryMaker Jennifer Lawson

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her family and how she met her second husband, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her family and how she met her second husband, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her film about the Negro League and her wedding

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sheryl Riley Gripper talks about her spirituality

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sheryl Riley Gripper reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sheryl Riley Gripper shares her advice for aspiring journalists

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sheryl Riley Gripper describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sheryl Riley Gripper reflects upon her legacy and how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sheryl Riley Gripper narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sheryl Riley Gripper narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

4$7

DATitle
Sheryl Riley Gripper describes the Bronze Jubilee Awards
Sheryl Riley Gripper describes the Black Women Film Preservation Project
Transcript
With a group of people at the TV station I came up with an idea for a--an awards program called the Bronze Jubilee Awards, which was like a Oscars [Academy Awards] for black culture. And we honored persons in music, dance, drama, theater, communicative arts and long-term contribution to the arts and arts educators. And we did this show on public TV at the Morehouse Chapel [Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia]. And that program started in 1978. And as a result of doing that program, he [Richard Holcomb] made me promotion manager of the TV stations and the radio station there. So I was promotion manager for WETV [WPBA-TV, Atlanta, Georgia] and WABE Radio [Atlanta, Georgia]. The program was televised live on--on public broadcasting, WETV, and we were able to bring in hosts through the years like [HistoryMaker] Freda Payne, Peabo Bryson then performed on it. We went and got artists from other areas where public television was that I could get 'em. I got Richmond Barthe who was a sculptor in--living in--in--in California. We brought him in to get an award. We brought in people from New Orleans [Louisiana] who were artists and--and--to--to get awards. So we--we didn't just focus on the Atlanta [Georgia] area.$$So you had a budget--$$Yes.$$--that you worked with, too?$$I had to raise the money. Sears [Sears, Roebuck and Co.] was one of my first sponsors and the Atlanta Coca-Cola Bottling Company. And we had a budget with the TV station and with the sponsors that enabled us to--to do this.$$Okay, and do--do you have, I mean, the television station have clips of those that you actually did the--the shows of.$$Um-hm.$$Okay.$$And that was--that program ran from 1978 to 1990. And I left the TV station in 1981, 1981, yeah, 1981 to go to Channel 11 [WXIA-TV, Atlanta, Georgia], which is the NBC affiliate.$So what is a typical day like for you as VP of community relations [at Channel 11; WXIA-TV, Atlanta, Georgia]?$$The good thing is there is no typical day. That when I get to work today--when I go in this afternoon, I don't know what is gonna be awaiting me, which means that you kind of have to be, at this point, a jack of all trades. It could be that the news department needs something from me. It could be that my boss needs me to do something. But I plan to be working on Black History Month because I'm gonna get sponsors to do vignettes for that. That's my plan. But when I get there I may have to divert from that plan. As a result of being in TV for so many years I realize that what I really enjoy doing is being creative. So I went back to school after I got the--I got a--the degree at Spelman [Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia] in English in '72 [1972], and then I got a master's [degree] in education in '77 [1977] because my mother [Dolores Posey Harris] and [maternal] grandmother [Ollie Nickerson Posey] were in education, so you always have to have that to fall back on. Well in 2000, I got a master's in film and video at Georgia State [Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia]--$$Okay.$$--so that I would have the opportunity to be creative. While there, I realized there were no black women in any of my classes. And I started an organization, the Black Women Film Preservation Project [Black Women Film Preservation Project, Inc.; Black Women Film Network] to increase the numbers of women that are in film or related areas. And also to honor, because my background was award shows, to salute women who have blazed a trail in film. And my first honoree was the woman [HistoryMaker Jennifer Lawson], who is now the head of the communications department [sic. WHUT-TV] at Howard University [Washington D.C.], who is a filmmaker.$$And her name is?$$I'm gonna have to come up with that (laughter).$$Okay, all right, that's fine.$$And the second honoree was Sheryl Lee Ralph, the actress and filmmaker 'cause she has done a film called 'Secrets' and does a film festival [Jamerican Film Festival] in Jamaica. And last year we honored Xernona Clayton Brady [HistoryMaker Xernona Clayton] who does the Trumpet Awards because she has focused on so many African American women. And I do this just so women can get their props, but at the same time so that somebody else can see these women and feel like I can do the same thing. And then we give out these scholarships to the girls and we've given--last year we gave 'em to girls at North Carolina A&T [North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, North Carolina], at Spelman, Clark [Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia], and one of the girls is one of the--$$Joyce--Jocelyn--$$Yeah Jocelyn Delk.$$--Jocelyn Delk one of The HistoryMaker employees was a recipient and she was at Clark Atlanta.$$Right, so she was one of our recipients. And it's just exciting to me to see what the recipients are doing because Jocelyn would send me letters about working--doing movies with Jennifer Lopez and working with Judge Mathis [HistoryMaker Gregory Mathis] in Chicago [Illinois]. So it's just--and last year for the first time we did a film festival in conjunction with the awards and scholarships, and this year will be our fifth luncheon where we present scholarships, and we will be doing our second annual film festival at the Regal Cinema at Atlantic Station [Regal Atlantic Station, Atlanta, Georgia].

Marquita Pool-Eckert

Journalist and Senior Producer at CBS News, Marquita Jones Pool-Eckert was born on February 19, 1945, in Aurora, Illinois, to Jeanne Boger Jones and Mark E. Jones. She received her B.S. degree from Boston University in 1966 and her M.A. degree in journalism from Columbia University in 1969. Pool-Eckert began her career at WABC-TV in New York as producer from 1970 to 1974. From 1974 to 1975, she worked as a producer for WNET/l3 Public TV and moved to CBS News as an associate producer in 1975. Pool-Eckert functioned as a producer there from 1984 to 1990, and became senior producer of Sunday Morning in 1990. She sat on the board of directors of Nzingha Society Incorporated from 1976 to 1989, and served as its president from 1976 to 1985. She has been a member of the New York Association of Black Journalists since 1985; the Women’s Media Group since 1986; and has been on the board of directors of New York Women in Film since 1994. From 1994 until 1998, Pool-Eckert sat on the board of directors of the Frederick Douglas Creative Arts Center. She has been member Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the Friends of New York’s Museum of Modem Art since 1995. She is the Metro-Manhattan chairperson of The Links Incorporated.

Pool-Eckert’s honors and awards include Emmys for producing the segments “The Bombing of Beirut” and “The Vanishing Family - Crisis in Black America” in 1983. Dollars and Sense magazine named her one of the 100 Top Professional Black Women in 1986. She received a National Monitor Award in 1988 and an International Monitor Award for “80s Remembered” in 1990. Norfolk State University presented her with a Career Achievement Award in 1996, and she received a Black Career Women Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997. Pool-Eckert received additional production Emmys for “Racism” in 1986; “Pan Am 103 Crash” in 1988; and “Diana, Princess of Wales,” a CBS Sunday Morning piece, in 1998. She received the Muse Award from New York Women In Film and Television in 1999. Pool-Eckert married Knut Eckert on May 21, 1988.

Pool-Eckert was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 29, 2005.

Accession Number

A2005.211

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/29/2005 |and| 9/12/2005

Last Name

Pool-Eckert

Maker Category
Schools

George Howland Elementary School

St. Edmund's Episcopal School

William Penn Elementary School

Kenwood Academy

Hyde Park Academy High School

Boston University

Columbia University

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Marquita

Birth City, State, Country

Aurora

HM ID

POO01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

College Students, Especially journalism students

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $500 - $1,000

Favorite Season

Summer

Speaker Bureau Notes

Honorarium Specifics: Travel Expenses
Preferred Audience: College Students, Especially journalism students

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Idlewild, Michigan, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

It Is All Too Much.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

2/19/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Greens, Ribs

Short Description

Television news producer Marquita Pool-Eckert (1945 - ) produced the CBS Evening News and CBS Sunday Morning. Pool-Eckert's production work has been honored with several Emmy Awards.

Employment

CBS News Corporation

Chicago City Hall

Chicago Tribune

Time Life Magazine

ABC

WABC-TV

Public Broadcasting Service (U.S.)

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marquita Pool-Eckert's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her maternal grandfather's medical practice

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her maternal grandparents' family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her mother's personality and education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her father's service in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls her father's involvement in Chicago politics

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls her father's appointment to circuit court judge

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes racial tensions during her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her father's side of the family

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her family in Washington, D.C. in the 1920s

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her notable ancestors

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her family trips to Idlewild, Michigan, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her family trips to Idlewild, Michigan, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her early education

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her time at William Penn Elementary School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert reflects upon her sense of racial identity growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls her time at St. Edmund School

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her high school activities

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers the Links Cotillion, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers the Links Cotillion, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her father's love of tennis

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marquita Pool-Eckert talks about African American tennis clubs

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes the importance of the Links and Jack and Jill

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes the discrimination her grandfather faced

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert reflects upon continued discrimination against the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers her experiences at Boston University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her social life at Boston University

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls working at Chicago City Hall and the Chicago Tribune

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her early civil rights activities

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls her decision to move to New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers searching for a job in New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers attending Columbia University while working at Time Life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her growing interest in broadcasting

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her work at ABC

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls her work at WABC-TV

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers covering Angela Davis' arrest on the TV show 'Like It Is,' pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers covering Angela Davis' arrest on the TV show 'Like It Is,' pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers being questioned by the FBI at New York City's WABC-TV

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her time at PBS

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her career at PBS and CBS

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls her work on 'CBS This Morning' and 'CBS Evening News'

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls challenges at CBS

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her Emmy-award winning segments on CBS

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Marquita Pool-Eckert's interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes New Orleans' African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert reflects upon the U.S. presidential election in 2000 and the Rodney King incident

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Marquita Pool-Eckert talks about Clarence Thomas and Anita Hill

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's 1984 presidential campaign, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's 1984 presidential campaign, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls the controversy surrounding HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's 1984 presidential campaign

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert details correspondents' roles during presidential elections

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers covering the African Famine in Sudan in 1984

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls trying to interview John Garang in Kenya

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes the relief camps in Sudan

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Marquita Pool-Eckert recalls her work on the 'CBS Evening News'

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes how she was treated as a woman in Africa

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers the market in Suakin, Sudan

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers her breast cancer diagnosis

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert talks about African Americans in television, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Marquita Pool-Eckert talks about African Americans in television, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Marquita Pool-Eckert talks about the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes the importance of internships

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Marquita Pool-Eckert reflects upon her life

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Marquita Pool-Eckert describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Marquita Pool-Eckert narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
Marquita Pool-Eckert describes her work at ABC
Marquita Pool-Eckert remembers being questioned by the FBI at New York City's WABC-TV
Transcript
As a result of the riots, the TV stations needed people to cover them and like that. So, they started, you know, hiring people. So, when I got out of college, I guess that was '68 [1968] with King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.], so, it--and, so, when I got of college, BU [Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts], no, sorry, when I got of Columbia [Columbia University, New York, New York] in '69 [1969], I graduated in '69 [1969], and then I started looking around. It was like word of mouth, you know. It was like, okay, they're looking for--they have a black show over here. PBS [Public Broadcasting Service] is starting a black show. CBS--ABC is starting a black show. They're looking for people. And, the publicity department is looking for somebody, you know. I don't know, I don't know how I knew but, I went there and I worked. But, it was word of mouth, you know, it was just like a networking thing. You'd call up people, hello, I'm working, I don't know, but, you know, so and so told me to call you 'cause, you know. And, so, I, I got a job in their network publicity department [at ABC]. So, I was the press rep for the soaps. One of the press reps for the soaps. Had to put out these press releases, today, you know, on 'One Life to Live,' blah, blah, blah (laughter).$$(Laughter).$$Well, you know, and, and I was joining the union, and that was a good thing 'cause it was a union job. But, all the people around me were tired and burnt out, you know, they were, they didn't like their jobs. And, they lived for the year when they could go to the big press junket thing and all that. But, I couldn't go 'cause I was too low on the totem pole, and I wasn't sure I wanted to go anyway. I mean, I wanted to go but, you know. I was very sensitive to, you know, I was at the point where people would be making passes at me and stuff like that. And, you had to be like very discreet about saying no, and all this so. And, so, one day I get a call that they were looking for an associate producer, an assistant producer or something like that for this show called 'Like It Is.'$$'Like It Is'?$$Yeah. And, and ABC was kind of the WABC news division [WABC-TV, New York, New York] and, so. But, the only thing was, it was local and not network, you know, ABC. And, it was a per diem job not a staff job, and not union. So, and it was less money. So, I had to think what I wanted to do about that. But, I just decided that I would take the job because that's what I wanted to do. And, so, I went over there and interviewed and everything, a small little staff, black staff. We were in a room about this big, four desks. And, I got that job. And, I stayed there for a long time. I was per diem for four years. And, ultimately, I ended up producing the show in the end, you know, just at the very end for a few months. But, in between there I also, I worked, I worked there for a while and then I--I don't know why I left there. I think I left there because they hired a guy--they brought somebody in over me, who was a guy, who hadn't--didn't have the experience I did and, he was idiot, I thought. And, you know, and he was over me. And, I wasn't making mon- you know, like this is ridiculous. So, I left.$$But, before you talk about leaving, did the content on the show have any impact on your life outside of the show?$$Well--$$Because, 'Like It Is' was it like, I mean, 'Like It Is' is still around today.$$Yeah.$$Was it the same sort of--?$$Yeah--$$--program?$$--only more so.$$Only more so. Okay.$$Yeah. Because we, I think we had more money in those days (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So, it was still Gil Noble?$$Yeah, it was still Gil Noble. We had more money in those days, you know, and we could do anything we wanted to. They just didn't wanna hear from us, you know. We were always getting--doing things, agitating.$I mean, things happened to us [at WABC-TV, New York, New York], you know. And, I remember learning about standing up and telling our stories. I said, well, this is what we, you know, we're here to do. And, you know, I remember one time the Internal Revenue Service [IRS] came. We had Stokely Carmichael [Kwame Ture] on the show ['Like It Is']. And, one day, a few--like a week later or something, these guys showed up in the office and flashed their badges, FBI [Federal Bureau of Investigation]. And, they wanted to see--I was in charge of paying, I'd pay the bills among other things. I did everything on that show. I did, I learned to do everything. And, one of the things I did was I paid guest. So, I realize now they were trying to get him--after Stokely on--he was living in Africa, anyway. But, they wanted to see the forms that we used to pay him. I don't know if they wanted to see where he was--I don't know what they were--look, they just wanted to see the forms. You know, which had everything, social security number, the address that the checks went to, where he went, you know, like that. They wanted to see all that. And, I wouldn't let them see it. And, you know, I mean, they went past the guards, they went past the news director's office, they went straight through the newsroom. They're in the back (laughter), you know, these guy came in and they were basically kinds of menacing and threatening, you know. And, they wanted to see, and I wouldn't let 'em see it. And, I was said, why, what did they do? "Well, we just wanna see." Well, what is it you wanna see, well, you know? They couldn't, they weren't--I don't know what they wanted to see. And, they were on a fishing expedition basically. You know, they knew where he was. He was in the country. He knew, they knew where every--he knew they knew that. So, what were they--what did they wanna see? And, then they, they said, "Well, and what's your name, and what's your--." I mean, then they were getting like personally intimidating, you know. And, they said, well, I forget what they said, but it was sort of implying that they were gonna look into my--and, I said, well, fine. Go ahead. And, they, they left their cards in case there was anything we thought of that we wanted to tell them. Only, you know, I don't know, I never heard any more, I never heard or saw them again.