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John Silvanus Wilson, Jr.

College president and academic administrator John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. was born on August 16, 1957 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Genester Millicent Nix and John Silvanus Wilson, Sr. He received his B.A. degree in business administration and management from Morehouse College in 1979. In 1981, Wilson earned his M.T.S. degree from Harvard Divinity School. He then attended the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where he earned his Ed.M. degree in education in 1982, and his Ed.D. degree in education in 1985.

Wilson began his career in 1985 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he served as an associate in the analytical studies and planning group in the office of the president. In that role, he conducted research for a report on the experiences of African American students at MIT. He then shifted to financial management and fundraising, serving first in corporate development and, ultimately, as director of foundation relations by 1994. He was an officer in two major capital campaigns at MIT, with goals of $700 million and $2 billion. In 2001, he moved from MIT to The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. During his eight-year career there, Wilson served as senior assistant vice president from September to December 2001, executive dean of the Virginia campus from 2002 to 2006, and associate professor at the Graduate School of Education and Human Development from 2007 to 2009. He was appointed by President Barack Obama to serve as executive director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities in 2009, where he remained until 2013. From January 2013 to April 2017, Wilson served as the eleventh president of Morehouse College. He moved to Harvard University as a president in residence at the School of Education, where he began research for a book about the future of American higher education, with an emphasis on HBCUs. In April 2018, Wilson was appointed as senior advisor and strategist to the president of Harvard University.

Wilson has served on multiple boards, including Spelman College and Harvard University. He has received various awards for his work in higher education, including the 1998 Bennie Leadership Award presented by Morehouse College, Ebony magazine’s Power 100 Award in 2014, and the Atlanta Business Chronicle’s 100 Most Influential Atlantans Award in 2015.

Wilson and his wife, Carol Espy-Wilson, have three adult children: twin daughters, Ayana and Ashia, and son, John Silvanus Wilson, III.

John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 27, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.096

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/27/2019

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Silvanus

Schools

Morehouse College

Harvard Divinity School

Harvard Graduate School of Education

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

WIL93

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Perspective Is Worth A Hundred Points of IQ and Signal To Noise Ratio Is Everything

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/16/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Favorite Food

Mushroom Risotto

Short Description

College president and academic administrator John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. (1957- ) was an academic administrator for twenty eight years before becoming the eleventh president of Morehouse College.

Employment

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The George Washington University

White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Morehouse College

Harvard University School of Education

Harvard University

Kellogg National Fellowship Program

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Program

Educational Testing Service

Rockefeller Foundation

Favorite Color

Black

Tamara Harris Robinson

Financial advisor and civic leader Tamara Harris Robinson was born on August 13, 1967 in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands to Theresita Shelburn Harris and Earl Harris. Robinson graduated from the Philadelphia High School for Girls in 1984, and went on to earn her B.A. degree in economics, with a minor in Spanish, from the University of Pittsburgh in 1988. She then earned her M.B.A. degree from the University of Pittsburgh in 1989, and her M.S.W. and E.M.P.A. degrees from New York University in 2012.

From 1990 to 1994, Robinson worked as an associate at Prudential Financial in Newark, New Jersey and Scranton, Pennsylvania. Robinson then became an equity research analyst at Deutsche Bank in 1996. In 1997, she began working at Salomon, Inc. in Hong Kong. Robinson and her then-husband founded the North Jersey Advocates for Education and the Robinson Harris Foundation in 2004, working with the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) to provide scholarships for minority students. Robinson served as president of the North Jersey Advocates for Education from 2003 to 2009. In 2011, Robinson founded the Haramat Group, serving as chief executive officer. Then, in 2013, she founded Tamara Harris LLC, a divorce consultation firm. Robinson became an adjunct professor at New York University’s Silver School of Social Work in New York City in 2015.

Robinson was active in various organizations throughout her career as well. From 2008 to 2013, she served as vice chair of the United Negro College Fund board of directors, and as chair of the UNCF’s 2012 “A Mind Is…” Gala. Robinson also served as an adjunct professor of public child welfare at Montclair State University and as an adjunct instructor of management and organization practice at New York University Silver School of Social Work. She was a member of the National Association of Professional Women, the Studio Museum in Harlem’s Global Council, the Apollo Theater’s Women’s Committee, and the Davis Museum at Wellesley College’s Director’s Council. Robinson served on the board of trustees at Second Stage Theatre as well.

Robinson has two daughters, Paige Robinson and Simone Robinson.

Tamara Harris Robinson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 17, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.142

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/17/2016

Last Name

Robinson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Leona

Schools

New York University Silver School of Social Work

New York University Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

University of Pittsburgh

Philadelphia High School for Girls

Thomas K. Finletter School

Wesleyan Academy

Moravian School VI

First Name

Tamara

Birth City, State, Country

St. Croix

HM ID

ROB30

Favorite Season

Summer

Favorite Vacation Destination

Miami

Favorite Quote

Don't Be Mainstream, Find Your Own Stream.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/13/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

U.S. Virgin Islands

Favorite Food

Tuna Fish

Short Description

Financial advisor and civic leader Tamara Harris Robinson (1967 - ) worked at Prudential Financial, Deutsche Bank, and Salomon, Inc. She also founded the North Jersey Advocates for Education, the Robinson Harris Foundation, the Haramat Group, and Tamara Harris LLC.

Employment

Tamara Harris LLC

Haramat Group

New Jersey Advocates for Education

Citigroup Inc.

Prudential Financial Inc.

New York University

WTJX-TV

3M

Morgan, Grenfell and Co.

Favorite Color

Navy Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Tamara Harris Robinson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Tamara Harris Robinson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her father's upbringing in the U.S. Virgin Islands, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her father's upbringing in the U.S. Virgin Islands, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes the racial diversity in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Tamara Harris Robinson recalls the importance of landownership in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers her community on St. Thomas, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers her community on St. Thomas, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her parents' reasons for returning to the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers the cultural shifts in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her elementary schooling in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her perception of her light skin color

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her skin color privilege, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her skin color privilege, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers moving to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about moving to the United States

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her relationship with her father

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her experiences at the Philadelphia High School for Girls

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her decision to attend the University of Pittsburgh

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her mother's education and career

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her decision to study economics

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers her coursework at the University of Pittsburgh

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about the University of Pittsburgh Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers her position at 3M in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her reasons for leaving 3M

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Tamara Harris Robinson recalls how she came to work for Prudential Financial Services

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her role at Prudential Financial Services

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers moving to Hong Kong as a newlywed

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers her interest in working internationally

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her reasons for moving back to New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about working in a global environment

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her decision to move to New Jersey

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes the creation of the New Jersey Advocates for Education

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes the New Jersey Advocates for Education

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her experiences in Beijing, China, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her experiences in Beijing, China, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers joining the board of the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about the challenges faced by historically black colleges

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers organizing galas for the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about the lack of college preparatory classes in inner city public schools

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her experiences at the Silver School of Social Work at NYU

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Tamara Harris Robinson remembers founding the Haramat Group and Tamara Harris LLC

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes her role as a divorce coach, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her role as a divorce coach, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Tamara Harris Robinson describes the process and services of Tamara Harris LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Tamara Harris Robinson talks about balancing her life and career

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Tamara Harris Robinson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Tamara Harris Robinson reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Tamara Harris Robinson shares her advice for future generations

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Tamara Harris Robinson talks about her perception of her light skin color
Tamara Harris Robinson describes the creation of the New Jersey Advocates for Education
Transcript
I want to talk about skin color because that's always (laughter)--$$Let's talk about that (laughter). Okay. Let's talk about that.$$--a sensitive topic (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) All right, Harriette [HistoryMaker Harriette Cole].$$--in our communities, and, and you're--$$Okay.$$--coming from an island that you've just described all of the different peoples who have populated the island over time, and, you know, you yourself are very fair skinned. How--what are the skin color dynamics on St. Thomas [U.S. Virgin Islands], and how did you navigate that?$$Ooh, so that's, that's been--it's been a very--it's been a very interesting journey, and so I will start with the overarching mantra that I have which is race--I think growing up in the islands and my experience with skin color, I think by the time I was eleven, I, I distinctly remember this, eleven, twelve years old, internalizing that race is a social construct, and it has nothing to do with me, and the reason I said that is because--I would say twelve because it kind of solidified when I moved to the states, so I'm the lightest person in my family. My family, your complexion--my, my mother [Theresita Shelburn Harris], outside of my mother, who was always frustrated that she always passed for everything but black. I mean, she--always mistaken for Hispanic, Hawaiian, Italian, you know, everything, so she had her own issues and journey with race, but I remember growing up in my family being teased a lot for being this light skinned.$$By family members?$$By family members. My father [Earl Harris] used to call me his little white cheese, and his little--but, yeah, and so--or when I would--you know, if I was too pale, he would say, "We need to get you out in the sun and get you some color," so that was, that was what I experienced in the home with someone that was supposed to sort of accept you no matter what, but what I realized, that was his own issues with color and race and didn't--you know, is what it was. But he wasn't the only one. I would go home or if I'd be out and you'd see people. They'd say, "Oh, my god. Why you so light? You know, you don't get out in the sun." "What's wrong with you? Get your daughter out in the sun." So this was like this pervasive thing that I would hear, and I, I remember one summer actually getting sun poisoning because I was trying to get darker. I had to go to the doctor. I had to get this medicine 'cause my--I mean, I was just--I had ruined my, my gums were a mess, so as a young kid, remembering so--wanting so desperately to be black, like be dark and, and darker, you know, and, and loving it. Like not--so I grew up as a kid knowing that black is a thing of beauty, and I wanted--you know, and I, I was trying to do what I could about it, but it was what it was. So I moved to the states, and I'm now living in a town where it's very Jewish. Irish people go to the Catholic school, on the way to my school [Thomas K. Finletter Elementary School; Thomas K. Finletter School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], and I remember getting on the bus, and these two Irish boys on their way to school, got on the bus, saw me, and said, "Oh, my god, look at the little N girl." And I looked at them, and I said--I--I'm gonna--I said, I said, "Thank you." (Laughter) And I said, I said, "You think I'm black? Thank you so much." And the bus driver died laughing, died laughing, and they thought I was crazy. Those two guys looked at me, and they didn't even know what to do with me because what they thought they were doing in terms of hurling me an insult, I was like, finally, somebody recognizes I'm black. And I said that. "Finally, finally, somebody sees I'm black." And so they were, they were horrified because they didn't, they didn't know what to do with that. And then you fast forward, and so that's, you know, middle school, and then you get to high school [Philadelphia High School for Girls, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], and then I have guys hitting on me 'cause I'm, I'm--then I'm hearing terms that I never heard in the Caribbean, you know, red bone, high, high yellow, you know, all the things that they say about--$$Right.$$--light skinned girls, and--$$They didn't say that there.$$I didn't hear those terms until I moved to the states. That's just not what we--you know, that's not a--$$Right.$$--terminology that we used down there. But what--so and then getting all this attention because I'm, I'm black. I mean, so there's no question about that, or I had been accepted into this tribe, but I'm, I'm on this other side of the spectrum that somehow makes me more attractive or more, you know, desirable or whatever.$And then you founded an organization [New Jersey Advocates for Education] shortly after that--$$Yeah (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) is that right?$$Yeah.$$What--tell me about that.$$So we came to New Jersey, and we actually went to--so we, you know, we set up in the suburbs, and I'm meeting people, and, you know, have got kids. My old- my oldest now is going still into elementary school, so I'm beginning to, you know, connect with the community, and my, my ex [Robinson's ex-husband] and I went to an event, actually, a UNCF [United Negro College Fund] event, that was being hosted down in Princeton [New Jersey] by some UNCF alum that had gone to historically--some of the, some of the UNCF HBCUs [historically black colleges and universities], and so it was a group of African American professionals; lawyers, bankers, people in the Princeton area, that decided to host this event. And I met the area director at the time, and one of the things that they did at the event is they had a guest speaker, and it was a young man who had grown up in Newark [New Jersey], and had gotten a ton of scholarships. You know, his mother kept him on the strong path and got him to a major university here in New Jersey, had gotten scholarships, a full ride, and he was going to study chemistry, science, and he had done well in his school environments, but once you got to this predominantly white institution, started to get depressed, you know, wasn't as smart as his peers. Professors, to your point about teachers and how sort of supportive they are, wasn't really finding he was in a community that was nurturing of his environment, and now he was out of his element, right, away from home, away from his mother, and it reflected in his grades. And he was becoming very depressed, and he was actually at the point where he was maybe in jeopardy of losing his scholarship, so he was very much in distress, very much struggling. So he said a cousin had invited him to come down and visit him for homecoming at Morehouse [Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia], and he said when he walked on that campus, he literally called his mother and said he's going to be transferring to Morehouse, and his mother was devastated because he was giving up his full ride. He had to work three jobs to, to graduate from that school, but he did it, and then he went onto get his degree in chemistry and worked in some of the--at one of the pharmas, but then actually left to go teach in the City of Newark. And he had won teacher of the year in math and science and actually twice, which was a new, a new experience. So he talked about what Morehouse had done for him and going to an HBCU and actually had received a UNCF scholarship, so that was the journey. And I have to say, I was so moved. And, actually, when I worked at Prudential [Prudential Financial Services; Prudential Financial, Inc.] when we had United Way [United Way of America; United Way Worldwide] drives, UNCF at the time was one of the recipients, so I gave money to UNCF, and, again, I went to a--you know, I had a--I went to--I lived on an island that had a car- HBCU [College of the Virgin Islands; University of the Virgin Islands, Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands], knew people from HBCUs, so very much involved and invested in that. So I went up to the area director and said, "You know, I'd love to support" (background noise)--$$Keep going, keep going.$$"I'd love to support UNCF," and I said, "You can, you can actually, you know, tell me what I can do, but I'm, I'm willing to--you know, how can I be of help?" And he said, "Well, if you want to host an event in your area, we'd love to have you do that." I said, "No, no. I have two kids [Paige Robinson and Simone Robinson], I just want to lick some stamps, and, you know, do some--you know, seal some envelopes. I don't have time for that. I've got like, young, young kids." So he said, he looked at me and my accent, and he said, "You know, we need young people like you doing things like this." He said, "You know, we've had a lot of folks in the New Jersey area that have lifted us up and carried us a long way, but they're onto, to new and different things in their phase of life, and, you know, what we're doing here in Princeton, we don't have anybody in the space that you live in, and we would love to replicate something like this there." So my ex and I went home, and we realized, you know, if we did this, this would be a commitment. This wasn't just, you know, write a check. If we were going to do something, we needed support, so we gathered a group of our friends from the kitchen cabinet and said, "Look, you know, we're thinking of having this event. We will underwrite it. We'll pay for the party, but if we do that, would each of you be willing to either fill a table or write a check that's the equivalent of a table?" And everyone in that room, Harriette [HistoryMaker Harriette Cole], had either gone to an HBCU, received UNCF money, had been a scholarship recipient, or they were very passionate about education for minority youth, and there wasn't a single person that didn't say yes. And we had our first event. It was a fashion show at our home. We had [HistoryMaker] B Michael, we had all kinds of people. It was, it was actually quite interesting what we pulled together, and we had about 220 people, and we raised $107,000 at our first event.

Carolyn Young

Civic leader Carolyn Young was born on September 14, 1944 in Atlanta, Georgia to Dorothy Wilmont Harden and George McClain, Sr. Young graduated from Price High School in 1962, and went on to receive her B.S. degree in sociology and elementary education from Atlanta's Clark College in 1966. After teaching at Wesley Elementary School for several years, Young received her M.A. degree in elementary education from Georgia State University in 1971.

Upon graduating from Georgia State University, Young became a teacher at East Lake Elementary School in Atlanta, where she helped to desegregate the faculty. She taught kindergarten through seventh grade but primarily focused her attention on fifth grade students. She went on to teach at E. Rivers Elementary School, where she also served as a Sunday school superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Young married U.S. Ambassador Andrew Young in Capetown, South Africa in 1996, and retired from teaching. She worked as the protocol contact for foreign dignitaries at GoodWorks International, a transnational business management consulting firm founded by her husband in 1996. There, she coordinated logistics, travel, and events around the world. Young served as vice chair of the Andrew J. Young Foundation and as the executive director of Andrew Young Presents, the Young Foundation’s Emmy award-winning, nationally syndicated documentary series highlighting Africa, the Civil Rights Movement and other social issues.

Young received many honors for her dedication to elementary school teaching, including the Atlanta Area II Teacher of the Year award. Young was a recipient of the Southern Bell Black History Calendar “Teacher of Excellence” Award, the Georgia Teachers Incentive Award for Intermediate Grades. Young also served on the board of directors for numerous organizations including the United Negro College Fund, the Andrew & Walter Young YMCA, Atlanta Area Technical College, WestCare, the Andrew Young School of Public Policy at Georgia State University, and Clark Atlanta University. She was honored by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Women, and was the recipient of the Mankind Assisting Students Kindle Educational Dreams Award, the Outstanding United Negro College Fund Volunteer Award, and the Lady Who Leads Award.

Carolyn Young was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 2, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.047

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/4/2016

Last Name

Young

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Slater Elementary School

Price Middle School

Clark Atlanta University

Georgia State University

First Name

Carolyn

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

YOU07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cape Town

Favorite Quote

Now, Abided Faith, Hope And Love, But The Greatest Of These Is Love.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

9/14/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hot Dog

Short Description

Civic leader Carolyn Young (1944 - ), wife of former Ambassador Andrew Young, served as the vice chairperson of the Andrew J. Young Foundation. She also taught in the Atlanta Public Schools for over thirty years.

Employment

Wesley Elementary School

East Lake Elementary School

GoodWorks International Consultant Firm

E. Rivers Elementary School

Goldsmith Elementary School

Andrew J. Young Foundation

Favorite Color

Ivory

Timing Pairs
0,0:15187,277:16186,287:16630,292:23176,344:29522,451:30521,541:42200,612:55704,705:59818,793:65021,856:65626,1135:72326,1177:78532,1307:86592,1420:87758,1479:97460,1610:97935,1616:102115,1693:102495,1698:104680,1731:116390,1954:118005,1994:118685,2007:119110,2013:120045,2033:127210,2124:127760,2130:136944,2311:144540,2400:146390,2413:153766,2509:158901,2600:159454,2633:165745,2697:176664,2854:177144,2860:178776,2904:179256,2910:180216,2922:180984,2931:207430,3268$0,0:2106,103:5508,170:6075,179:6885,191:10840,214:37257,605:41412,640:41958,650:47438,842:48212,852:48814,861:49588,876:62402,1064:63470,1085:64182,1094:65161,1112:65784,1120:66763,1186:74814,1259:78873,1324:79566,1332:81348,1365:82041,1373:82833,1382:85951,1398:93465,1519:96930,1566:100290,1574:104498,1657:105366,1665:106234,1673:113135,1822:113870,1830:116576,1857:121322,1902:122678,1921:123808,1936:124599,1948:130592,2031:131243,2039:133196,2075:141370,2175:142198,2186:148084,2278:153364,2331:154288,2339:156664,2369:162636,2473:164904,2505:165336,2510:171168,2598:178098,2655:180394,2703:180804,2713:184494,2800:190570,2863:191235,2871:195434,2950:197783,2971:200393,3015:202307,3055:210280,3150:211270,3185:212980,3215:213520,3288:219930,3355:233030,3527:236410,3573
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carolyn Young's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carolyn Young lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carolyn Young describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carolyn Young talks about never meeting her father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carolyn Young describes her brother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carolyn Young reflects upon her struggles

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carolyn Young talks about the impact of her father's absence on her family

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carolyn Young describes her home life

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carolyn Young describes her mother and grandmother's personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Carolyn Young remembers her early education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Carolyn Young describes her experiences of bullying

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Carolyn Young describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carolyn Young talks about her family's financial status

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carolyn Young recalls her childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carolyn Young describes her experiences at Luther Judson Price High School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carolyn Young describes her talent for singing

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carolyn Young talks about her deductive reasoning skills

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carolyn Young recalls developing an illness during college

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carolyn Young describes her experiences at Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carolyn Young talks about her family's experiences during the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carolyn Young remembers her early teaching experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carolyn Young talks about her attire as a teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carolyn Young remembers her first husband

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carolyn Young describes how she was treated by her white colleagues

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carolyn Young recalls how she was treated by her African American colleagues

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carolyn Young describes her teaching career in the Atlanta Public Schools

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carolyn Young recalls attending Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carolyn Young talks about her approach to black history education, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carolyn Young talks about her approach to black history education, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carolyn Young recalls meeting Andrew Young's son

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carolyn Young describes her initial relationship with the Young family

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carolyn Young remembers her friend, Elizabeth Knox Blackwell

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carolyn Young recalls the death of her friend, Elizabeth Knox Blackwell

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carolyn Young recalls comforting Andrew Young after the death of his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carolyn Young remembers dating Andrew Young

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carolyn Young remembers her engagement to Andrew Young

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carolyn Young describes her wedding

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carolyn Young recalls the initial response to her marriage to Andrew Young

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carolyn Young talks about her first impressions of South Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carolyn Young shares a story from Andrew Young's travels in South Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carolyn Young talks about the wealth gap in South Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carolyn Young describes her return from South Africa

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carolyn Young talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carolyn Young talks about her husband's transnational consulting firm

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carolyn Young talks about her husband's documentaries

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carolyn Young describes the Carolyn Young Mentor Walk

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Carolyn Young talks about her mentorship and board memberships

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Carolyn Young talks about her husband's colleagues

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Carolyn Young reflects upon her legacy and how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

8$8

DATitle
Carolyn Young talks about her approach to black history education, pt. 2
Carolyn Young describes the Carolyn Young Mentor Walk
Transcript
I said, "You find out what you can do that nobody else can do." I said, "You don't have to follow in--if your dad," I had doctors and lawyers and everything else children in there. Their pare- their maids would drive up there in Mercedes [Mercedes-Benz]. I said, "But, find something that somebody needs or this society is going to want and nobody else has done it." And, they, they started thinking. So, when they did their projects, they would always think outside of the box and stuff. So, we did a lot of that. And, and we talked about how people helped--I said, "Let me tell you something." I said, when I would get (unclear), 'Eyes on the Prize' and show them a piece of it, said, "What you have to realize, this movement was not just a black movement." I said, we were talking about the Civil Rights Movement then. It was very foremost on their mind. I said, "You hear about Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.]. You hear about [HistoryMaker] Andrew Young. You hear about Ralph David Abernathy [Ralph Abernathy], Joe Lowery [HistoryMaker Reverend Dr. Joseph Lowery]." I said, "But, there were white people." I say, a lady by the--the first tombstone that Miss Lowery [HistoryMaker Evelyn Gibson Lowery] and I put up on Highway, I think 48 [sic. U.S. Route 80] off Selma [Alabama], was Viola Alousso [sic. Viola Liuzzo]. She had four children [sic.] and her husband was in the union [International Brotherhood of Teamsters] and I think they were in Michigan--$$Right, from Detroit [Michigan].$$Detroit. And, they--she was sitting looking at TV how they were beating these people and putting firehoses. She asked her husband, she left her children, came down to Selma. And, driving one evening in the highway, she had a black man in the car. That was against the law. You couldn't have a black man in the car with a white lady. And, I said, "They killed her. She gave her life." I said, "So, don't think that you hear them. You might not hear about those, those people. But, those people the three boys, Andrew [Andrew Goodman], Matthew [sic. Michael Schwerner], and, the three boys that were killed.$$Schwerner.$$Schwerner and Chaney [James Chaney].$$And Goodman.$$And, Goodman. I said, "They gave their lives." I said, "When you saw that march, what made that march go across the Edmund Pettus Bridge [Selma, Alabama], there was as many white, pastors, and people, and stars, as anybody else." So, I said, "We can't live divided." I said, "We have to come together." So, we never taught separatism, we always taught togetherness, and so the parents really liked that. They really liked that. See, we teach, a lot of times we'd teach in isolation and you can't do that. Not one culture, not one race do anything by themselves. It was a combination. So, I used to tell 'em, I said, "This is, Black History Month's designated to us. But, our black history and American history are all in one."$$Okay. Okay, so, you, in 1982 Andrew Young is elected mayor, succeeds Maynard Jackson. And, you're teaching in Buckhead [Atlanta, Georgia]. You start that same, that (simultaneous)--?$$(Simultaneous) Yeah. I'm teaching at E. Rivers [E. Rivers Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia]. I taught there until 1997.$What else does [HistoryMaker] Andrew Young--now, there's a Carolyn Young Walk too right?$$Yeah, it's a Carolyn McClain Young Mentor Walk [sic. Carolyn Young Mentor Walk] which we started six years ago. And, I was talking to some friends who are of East Indian descent and they were saying, "We want to put a mentor walk in your name." And, I said, "Oh, I don't know about having anything in my name." I said, "My husband is the famous one." They say, "No, but you've done a lot and you don't want anything for it." I said, "Well, I don't do anything to get anything for it. I do it because it's the right thing to do." But, I shared with them when I was at Clark [Clark College; Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia], I used go down to go M. Agnes Jones [M. Agnes Jones Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia] my sophomore year and volunteer with the students on my free time. And, then at the end of the period I would take, and with some of the teacher, take one class and bring 'em to the college campus so they could see college. And, I said, "You know, a lot of these students would never see a college campus. They don't know college is a friendly place. They don't know the fun that the kids have." So, they said, "Well, that's the more reason we're gonna develop this mentor walk." And, so, we first invited schools to come and we paired up college students with them. The first two mentor walks was at M. Agnes--was Agnes Scott College [Decatur, Georgia], an all girl white college. Then, we went to, after we left Agnes Scott College, we went to Georgia Tech [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia] for one term. We went to Georgia State [Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia] for one time, and to do the mentor walk. The kids were bused in. It was on a Saturday and we do reading with the younger kids. We have a session where the, we have volunteers from the corporate community that come in and talk to the parents. We had a session for high school kids on self-concept and on talking about careers. And, it was really, really grown. And, the last two years we've had it at Atlanta Technical College [Atlanta, Georgia] because we want kids to see everybody. You don't have to go to a regular college. You can--technical college, I'm on that board as well. And, they do 98 percent graduation and 98 percent job placement. They have the Allied Health Building. They have the beauty part of it, where you do hair. Where you, where you do nails. They have the, now they have a place where you can do the aeronautics, work on airplanes and different things, and the mechanical part. They have so many components. And, then they have a program where the high school students if they're doing real well, they can come over there their senior year and take at least two to three courses which we count for college credit. And, a lot of them will leave early. So, it's just a wonderful thing that we've started. Like, we start on October the 28th visiting school, reading, giving children books, because now children are so technology savvy and they don't read anymore. They--but to hold a book in their hand and see all the beautiful illustrations. You have to start when they're very young and then it will go on. You can't start, you know, even though we include the middle school and high school. And, we have different tracks for them. The little kids we wanna put books in their hands, and tell stories, and get them interested, and do puppetry art, and do different things. But, it has gone very well.

Billye Aaron

Nonprofit executive and television personality Billye Aaron was born on October 16, 1936 in Anderson County, Texas to Nathan Suber and Annie Mae Smith Suber. She attended Clemons School in Neches, Texas and later graduated from Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas in 1954. In 1958, she graduated from Texas College in Tyler, Texas with her B.A. degree in English. She received a fellowship to attend Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia and graduated with her M.A. degree in 1960. Aaron continued her post-graduate studies at the University of California at Berkeley.

Aaron taught English in the Atlanta public school system, at Spelman College, Morehouse College, South Carolina State College and Morris Brown College. In 1968, she was hired as a co-host for WSB-TV’s ‘Today in Georgia,’ becoming the first African American woman in the southeast to co-host a daily, hour-long talk show. In 1973, she married baseball legend Hank Aaron and began hosting her weekly talk show, ‘Billye,’ for WTMJ-TV. In 1980, she served as the development director for the Atlanta branch of the United Negro College Fund. Throughout her fourteen-year tenure with the organization, she co-hosted the annual telethon, ‘Lou Rawls Parade of Stars,’ co-founded the Mayor’s MASKED Ball and became the second woman in the organization to serve as vice president of the southern region. After retiring in 1994, she and her husband started the Hank Aaron Chasing the Dream Foundation to award scholarships to assist the education of low-income children.

A longtime member of the NAACP, Aaron chaired its premiere fundraiser, the annual Freedom Fund Dinner, for five years. She was named director emeritus of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and has been honored with numerous awards for her service, including the 2003 Martin Luther King, Jr. “Salute to Greatness” and the YWCA Woman of Achievement award.

Aaron and her husband, Hank Aaron's children include Ceci Haydel, Aaron’s daughter from her first marriage, and Gaile, Hank, Jr., Lary and Dorinda, from Hank Aaron’s first marriage. They also have two grandchildren, Emily Jewel and Victor Aaron Haydel.

Billye Aaron was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 1, 2016.

Accession Number

A2016.065

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/1/2016

Last Name

Aaron

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Suber

Schools

Lincoln High School

Texas College

Clark Atlanta University

University of California, Berkeley

Clemons High School

Mound Prairie Institute

First Name

Billye

Birth City, State, Country

Anderson County

HM ID

AAR02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bahamas, Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Help Me To Do Unto Others As I Would Have Them Do Unto Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

10/16/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Nonprofit executive and television personality Billye Aaron (1936 - ) hosted 'Today in Georgia' and 'Billye,' and served as a regional vice president of the United Negro College Fund.

Employment

Atlanta Public Schools

Spelman College

Morehouse College

South Carolina State College

Morris Brown College

WSB-TV Atlanta

WTMJ-TV Milwaukee

United Negro College Fund

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:2874,44:21344,241:33256,380:42226,430:51766,524:55497,621:58045,657:77770,1026:81968,1063:104580,1328:105030,1378:110726,1398:118896,1535:127730,1604:146102,1881:174940,2191:183573,2290:183857,2295:196700,2440:202430,2514:208500,2596:208844,2601:209188,2606:213930,2663$0,0:1552,21:2176,33:2566,39:4438,78:4750,83:7284,127:11378,212:11734,217:12624,228:33570,405:33895,411:34155,416:37161,444:43460,525:46470,582:47760,601:56194,698:65394,794:73260,846:73824,854:77246,885:77820,893:78148,898:83806,959:85886,987:94931,1061:95405,1068:96669,1126:105047,1199:108122,1236:116666,1323:117010,1328:117526,1336:117870,1343:119074,1362:121138,1403:122256,1440:135879,1579:137214,1601:141575,1675:158260,1853:163434,1900:167570,1962:176664,2054:178232,2075:185465,2125:187505,2149:187930,2155:188780,2166:189290,2213:190225,2229:190650,2235:192460,2240:193426,2260:198470,2297:205821,2408:218074,2577:229042,2703:229450,2708:230266,2718:237495,2831:237830,2837:239304,2862:239572,2867:242580,2898:243756,2926:244092,2931:250056,3053:250560,3061:258528,3155:259608,3173:260904,3196:261192,3201:261552,3207:261984,3214:262488,3222:264072,3253:264864,3265:274586,3370:275071,3376:286004,3476:286444,3482:288908,3525:290580,3550:291108,3557:291636,3564:295244,3647:295596,3654:296564,3670:305095,3758:305395,3769:307602,3781:314709,3868:315135,3876:315561,3883:320878,3957:321142,3964:327142,4161:327830,4170:333678,4258:334108,4264:334796,4273:336258,4292:336602,4297:336946,4302:346854,4426:347736,4436:348912,4449:354160,4487:354620,4492:355080,4497:355540,4502:356575,4513:363140,4585
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Billye Aaron's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Billye Aaron lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Billye Aaron describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Billye Aaron describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Billye Aaron talks about how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Billye Aaron lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Billye Aaron describes her parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Billye Aaron describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Billye Aaron remembers her paternal grandmother's farm

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Billye Aaron describes her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Billye Aaron recalls her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Billye Aaron describes her early interest in television

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Billye Aaron remembers her classmates at Lincoln High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Billye Aaron recalls attending Texas College in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Billye Aaron remembers enrolling at Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Billye Aaron talks about her first husband

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Billye Aaron recalls her teaching experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Billye Aaron remembers the Civil Rights Movement in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Billye Aaron recalls commuting to Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Billye Aaron describes the civil rights activities of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Billye Aaron recalls her first husband's relationship with Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Billye Aaron remembers the night of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Billye Aaron remembers the night of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Billye Aaron talks about the aftermath of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Billye Aaron remembers Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Billye Aaron talks about the contention between the black church leaders in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Billye Aaron remembers the challenges of desegregating Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Billye Aaron talks about her first husband's religious affiliations

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Billye Aaron remembers joining WSB-TV in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Billye Aaron describes her experiences as co-host of 'Today in Georgia'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Billye Aaron remembers the death of her first husband

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Billye Aaron recalls her early relationship with Hank Aaron

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Billye Aaron talks about her life after marrying Hank Aaron

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Billye Aaron talks about her involvement with the NAACP

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Billye Aaron describes her experiences in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Billye Aaron remembers working for the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Billye Aaron describes her work with the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Billye Aaron talks about Hank Aaron's philanthropy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Billye Aaron describes the Hank Aaron Chasing the Dream Foundation

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Billye Aaron talks about her scholarship endowments

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Billye Aaron describes her and husband's business ventures

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Billye Aaron describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Billye Aaron talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Billye Aaron describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

5$3

DATitle
Billye Aaron remembers the night of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, pt. 2
Billye Aaron describes the Hank Aaron Chasing the Dream Foundation
Transcript
So anyway, Coretta [Coretta Scott King] was preparing to get the, get a flight to Memphis [Tennessee] and she invited us back, as I said. We talked. She said that Mayor Allen [Ivan Allen, Jr.] was on his way to pick her up and that he had called to get the--see if he could get the plane delayed because otherwise she would never make the flight. It was a rainy, nasty kind of night, drizzly night and she--well we stayed back there with her while she packed. Maybe, maybe ten minutes. It may not have been that long. When we were told that the mayor was there. So we went out. Mayor Allen came to me to ask if I would mind--if I knew the city. Of course I know the city. Said, "Would you mind riding with Louise [Louise Allen] to the airport [Atlanta Municipal Airport; Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Atlanta, Georgia] because she doesn't know the city," and the police cars they would be going as fast as they could go so of course I agreed. So I left my car there. I got in the car with Mrs. Allen who drove and we followed to a degree the police car. Of course they lost us and we about fifteen or so minutes maybe twenty minutes later, we got to the airport and when we got to the airport we found I mean we were told at the desk what am I saying? You know what I'm trying to say where the people were to put, to check in on the flight, we were told that they were in a bathroom. I can't remember whether it was a male bathroom or a female bathroom but when we got, when we opened the door to go into the bathroom and they were standing there in a huddle obviously crying because it was Coretta, Dora McDonald [Dora E. McDonald] who had gotten, who had arrived, Christine [HistoryMaker Christine King Farris], the mayor and, and I believe a policeman was in there but I'm not 100 percent sure. I might have that wrong. But anyway they were standing there in a huddle and Mayor Allen looked up at us and did kind of you know message, he didn't make it was the message that we got and surely enough he [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] had passed. So he asked Coretta after a while what she wanted to do. Because they had held the plane and she said, "Well I'll go back home and see about my children." So that was that. And we went back. I went back again and with Ms.--she went in the police car, I followed with Mrs. Allen in her car and I stayed for a while and I went on home too. But people had begun to arrive at her house so I don't, I don't know who they were. And I can't even tell you how many there were, but--there weren't many but they were there to, you know, to do whatever I guess they could do.$Now Chasing the--the Chasing the Dream Foundation that was founded by you and your husband, [HistoryMaker] Hank Aaron, tell us about it? In fact I asked him about it and he said ask you (laughter). He said you know everything about it and can explain it a lot better so we're depending on you.$$Well, I, I just had a conversation with him and, and asked him if he would consider doing a foundation that would help youngsters. I had seen the documentary that Mike Tollin [Michael Tollin] did on him and it was called or is called 'Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream' and that was what really gave me the idea. After seeing him in his early days running across the, whatever some kind of patch across from his home with bottle tops and a stick trying to hit a baseball and it just sort of brought home to me how many of us and particularly our kids come up with little or nothing but who somehow make something out of little of nothing. And I realized as I did when I was growing up, well having the desire to participate in various activities at school but they almost always require that you have some money. You even had to have money at least to buy clothes or to go to an event to showcase what little talent you might have. So we came up with the idea why not use the same name that Mike used for the documentary and just turn it into a foundation. So we call it the Hank Aaron Chasing the Dream Foundation [Atlanta, Georgia] and we started raising money so we could help kids who just needed a hand really who needed in some instances they needed somebody to pay for the piano lessons. Their parents couldn't pay for piano lessons or they needed somebody to pay for tennis lessons or whatever their interest might be. So we agreed that we would start this little foundation and try to serve as that middleman to help get the kid to the person that can do the most for them to develop, help them to develop their talent. So that's it just kind of grew from that and we proudly recognized the talents of a few of our kids who are really, really outstanding now. We have a young man now who is, well I'll start with Mason. Mason went from Brown elementary school [Brown Middle School, Atlanta, Georgia] down here a few miles away from us and started taking harp lessons. There's a lady here who Roselyn Lewis who just has done marvelous things with a lot of our kids because you don't expect kids from the inner city to be playing the harp or the cello or whatever, whatever but she, she gets them involved, specifically the harp is her area of interest and she has started a foundation, but Mason Morton was one of her students and he of course started taking harp. Then when he got out of high school he went on to he got a scholarship to Michigan [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan]. He followed his, his music teacher from Michigan to Rice University in Houston [Texas], graduated in Houston and we were helping him all along the way. Not--helping him is the key word here. We weren't--I don't wanna think want you to think that we were footing the bill because we couldn't possibly, we were not that large an organization or foundation but we were there to help him with those things that he really desperately needed that scholarship money and other funds did not take care of. Mason--today Mason, he's a member. I don't know if I--of a group called Serendip [Sons of Serendip] and they were on 'America's Got Talent' and they have cut two or three records now, he and a little group, but he also teaches harp in the public school system in Boston [Boston Public Schools]. So we are so, so proud of him. Then we have a young man who's working toward his Ph.D. at Juilliard [The Juilliard School] in New York [New York] and he's been, been in our program since he was ten or twelve or something like that so these are just two of the really, really outstanding ones and others some of we just made good, good citizens. We have a young lady who went to Fisk [Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee] who was a Phi Beta Kappa [Phi Beta Kappa Society] who is--who went to Yale [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut] and got her master's degree. We stay in close touch with her and she is now in some field of healthcare. I can't remember what precisely but they come home generally at Christmas and we have them over for our big New Year's Eve and they perform for us and we, we just have a wonderful relationship with several of the kids who have had very good high school and college careers and who are now in the broader community and doing well.

Art Norman

Broadcast journalist Art Norman was born in New York City, New York. Norman graduated with his B.S. degree in math and physics from Johnson C. Smith University, where he was a member of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. He has also received a first class F.C.C. engineer’s license.

Norman began his broadcasting career in 1969 when he was hired as a television engineer at WCCB-TV in Charlotte, North Carolina. Throughout the 1970s, he worked as a reporter at WPCQ-TV and WSOC-TV, both located in Charlotte; and, in 1976, he served as a writer and photographer on the George Foster Peabody Award winning edition of NBC's "Weekend Magazine." Norman was then hired as a reporter and weekend anchor for Baltimore, Maryland’s WMAR-TV in 1979. In July of 1982, he joined WMAQ-TV NBC5 in Chicago, Illinois as a general assignment reporter. At WMAQ, Norman went on to cover breaking news, anchor broadcasts and cultivate community-oriented feature segments, including the popular “Art Norman’s Chicago.” He retired from WMAQ in 2009, but returned on a part-time basis as a special contributor in 2012.

Norman has received many awards throughout his career. He won North Carolina's RTNDA Award for his coverage of a fatal air balloon crash in 1975, and his documentary on the plight of poor children won a 1978 School Bell Award from the National Association of Educators. He received a 1984 International Radio and Television News Directors Award and a 1987 Wilbur Award; his hosted series, "Cops and Robbers," was honored with two prestigious awards: a national Investigative Reporters and Editors Award and an Associated Press Award for "Best Investigative Reporting." Norman was an integral part of NBC5's coverage of the Beirut hostage crisis, which earned him a 1986 Emmy Award. He also received Emmys for his contributions to NBC5's coverage of the Laurie Dann spot news story; his spot news coverage of the Fox River Grove Bus Crash; and his contribution to NBC5's coverage of the Chicago Auto Show. In all, Norman has earned six Emmy Awards.

Norman's involvement with the Chicago community has also been extensive. In addition to hosting numerous community events each year, he is a spokesman for the United Negro College Fund and serves as an on-air host of their telethon. He is also a frequent NBC 5 News ambassador.

Norman is married and lives in Evanston, Illinois.

Art Norman was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 21, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.258

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/21/2014

Last Name

Norman

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Johnson C. Smith University

P.S. 186 Harlem

Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. School,

J.H.S. 43

Brooklyn Technical High School

Samuel Gompers Career and Technical Education High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Art

Birth City, State, Country

Harlem

HM ID

NOR07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

Precious Lord Take My Hand

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

9/6/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Green Bean Casserole, Sweet Potatoes, Collard Greens

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Art Norman (1947 - ) worked as a reporter, anchor and special contributor for Chicago’s WMAQ-TV station for over thirty years. He received six Emmy Awards for his news coverage.

Employment

WCCB-TV

WPCQ-TV

WSOC-TV

NBC

WMAR-TV

WMAQ-TV

Favorite Color

Blue, Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Art Norman's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Art Norman lists his favorites, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Art Norman lists his favorites, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Art Norman describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Art Norman talks about his parents' move to New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Art Norman describes his mother's life in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Art Norman remembers growing up in the Harlem community in New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Art Norman describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Art Norman remembers his father's combat injuries from World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Art Norman remembers visiting relatives after his parents' separation

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Art Norman describes his half-brother

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Art Norman remembers his twin brother, Lionel Norman

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Art Norman talks about his likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Art Norman describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Art Norman remembers his father's mindset about his war injuries

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Art Norman remembers his interests during grade school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Art Norman talks about the influence of his mentors at Camp Minisink

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Art Norman describes his experiences at Samuel Gompers Vocational and Technical High School in Bronx, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Art Norman talks about his time as a television repairman

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Art Norman remembers building the WJCS Radio station at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Art Norman remembers the criticism of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Art Norman recalls the aftermath of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Art Norman remembers his first professional broadcasting experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Art Norman talks about changing his accent

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Art Norman talks about Steve Jobs' approach to interface design

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Art Norman describes how he became a reporter at WSOC-TV in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Art Norman remembers declining Ted Turner's offer to work at CNN

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Art Norman recalls covering a fatal air balloon crash in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Art Norman remembers his investigative coverage of a nuclear power plant in North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Art Norman remembers his experiences at WMAR-TV in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Art Norman talks about the founding of the National Association of Black Journalists

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Art Norman remembers joining WMAQ-TV in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Art Norman describes how Oprah Winfrey came to WLS-TV in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Art Norman remembers the election of Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Art Norman talks about Mayor Harold Washington's relationship with the press

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Art Norman remembers the aftermath of Mayor Harold Washington's death

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Art Norman reflects upon the connections between Harold Washington and President Barack Obama

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Art Norman recalls the National Association of Black Journalists' research on the media representation of African Americans

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Art Norman remembers covering a shooting at a family court in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Art Norman remembers his journalistic mentors

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Art Norman talks about his coverage of Andrew Wilson's trial

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Art Norman recalls covering the Laurie Dann shooting

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Art Norman remembers his interactions with Mr. T

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Art Norman talks about covering unlawful searches by Cook County sheriff's deputies

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Art Norman remembers an investigation of racial profiling in the Highland Park Police Department

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Art Norman reflects upon his journalistic philosophy

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Art Norman remembers Barack Obama's first campaign for the U.S. Senate

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Art Norman remembers the proposal to hire Jerry Springer at WMAQ-TV

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Art Norman talks about his news segment, 'Art Norman's Chicago'

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Art Norman remembers John H. Johnson

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Art Norman remembers the death of his first wife

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Art Norman talks about his friendship with President Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Art Norman talks about his relationships with his mentees

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Art Norman remembers covering a Ku Klux Klan rally in Concord, North Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Art Norman reflects upon his experiences as a black reporter in the South

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Art Norman reflects upon his experiences of racism in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Art Norman talks about his favorite news stories

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Art Norman reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Art Norman talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Art Norman remembers meeting Terri Diggs Norman

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Art Norman reflects upon his mentorship of young journalists

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Art Norman describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$7

DAStory

2$1

DATitle
Art Norman talks about covering unlawful searches by Cook County sheriff's deputies
Art Norman remembers covering a Ku Klux Klan rally in Concord, North Carolina
Transcript
Let's, let's talk about the Cook County [Illinois] sheriff's deputy story--$$Yeah--$$--department story, rather.$$Yeah that's in Dixmoor, Illinois and one of the things that, every year I used to emcee the NOBLE [National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives] banquets, which is a black police officers organization, and I got a call from a group of police officers, sheriff's police officers, and they said, "Something is going on, is rotten in Denmark." "What do you mean?" And he says, "We're having raids in communities and they are strip searching women inside clubs for no apparent reason." I said, "What?" So what we did we got our camera crews out there and we started following the Cook County Sheriff's Office and I was no big fan of Sheriff O'Grady [James O'Grady] for doing this, but they went into a club in Dixmoor with a warrant for--marijuana warrant for someone who was in there, and they strip searched everybody in there including the sister of the mayor [David Johnson] of Harvey [Illinois] who was in there watching the Bulls [Chicago Bulls] game. And the point we were trying to make in our story is the fact that if you had marijuana cigarette in Schaumburg [Illinois], should everybody in that nightclub get strip searched? That only happened in the black community and here's another thing that was very upsetting according to the black police officer that approached me about it he said all the white officers were inside this club, the black police officers were on the perimeter, why? And these police officers were mad and they started leaking documents, I'm not going to use names but they started leaking documents to me showing everything. I got a copy of the warrant, I got everything. They're looking for an outstanding warrant for a guy named John Doe for marijuana, why are you strip searching in plain view of everybody in the nightclub in Dixmoor? Ah, that crossed the line. It was at the time when--$$So they did this in public? People were strip searched--$$Right in public. And at the time O'Grady was running for office and I was on the radio talking about it on WGCI [WGCI Radio, Chicago, Illinois] and V103 [WVAZ Radio, Chicago, Illinois] talking about my story, "Be sure and watch it that night," and who should I get a call--calls in Sheriff Michael Sheahan calls in and he says, "O'Grady ought to be ashamed." I said, "Mr. Sheriff Candidate I can't have this conversation with you. You have to be a listener like everybody else because you're running for office, and let the community talk this out." That's what I said on the air to him. I said, "Listen Michael Sheahan I appreciate you calling in, that means a lot but I need you to back off," (laughter) and he did. He did because it was--he was trying to politicize it. I think it was a fact of life that you can't strip search everybody in a nightclub. And they--they had everybody up against the wall then they started taking mug shots of everybody there in this black club watching the Bulls game that night. You couldn't do that in Schaumburg, no. So I did the investigative report on that with a lot of documents and won the investigative reporter of the year award for that series of reports. It was not just one report, it was over five straight days of these reports. And so it won a lot of accolades from IRE [Investigative Reporters and Editors], the investigative reporters organization (simultaneous).$When you look back on everything you've done to this point in your career is there anything major you would do differently?$$No because even your mistakes you learn from your mistakes. I remember going to a Klan rally--yeah I can't believe that either, but it was one of those things that--I'm in North Carolina and I'm going to a Klan rally and the speaker is David Duke the grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan [KKK]. So I'm a wise bud and I said, "I'm going to call the Klan and say, can I do an interview, I'm not going to tell them I'm black." So I say, "Hello David Duke." "Yeah how you doing," he's coming in from Louisiana. I say, "Okay I'm in Charlotte, North Carolina. We are going to come over and meet you Concord [North Carolina] and we'll do a sit down interview where you're going to have the rally." He said, "Oh great, great, what time are you going to get there?" I said, "Two o'clock." "Beautiful." I said, "Oh man," I hang up the phone and said, "Whew what have I done?" See these are the kind of stories I put on my video tape resume that in the next bigger market--love. "What the hell did this Negro--?" Anyway I get, I'm getting to go to their rally and so my camera lady is a camera lady and she's white female. So I said, "Listen Marsha [ph.] when we get up there let me carry the bag." "No, no, that's not your job," and I said, "It's going to look kind of weird." "I don't care, my job is to be a camerawoman." She was trying to make a statement that she didn't want anybody to take--I said, "All right, okay, okay." So I'm getting ready to leave the station then I get a call from the FBI [Federal Bureau of Investigation]. They said, "Mr. Norman [HistoryMaker Art Norman]," I say, "Yes," he says, "You're going to be out there at the Klan rally today, we got a--this is the FBI and we got a feeling that your civil rights are going to violated." I said, "For real?" He said, "Yeah I just want to let you know if you hear any gun shots immediately fall to the ground, immediately, and tell your camera lady the same thing. We have agents and they've infiltrated the Klan and the Klan rally." So I said, "Okay." "So you just go out there and do the interview like you're going to do it but if you hear shots immediately go to the ground." I said, "Okay." He said, "We'll be out there but you won't see us." I said, "Okay," I hung up the phone I said, "Marsha that was the damn FBI." "Get out." So I called the station manager over there and he said, "Well should we do anything?" And I said, "No, they're going to be out there." So I get out there and as soon as I walk out there, get to the car everybody is like--it's a Klan rally. Everybody's got their sheets on and stuff like that and they're like, "Hey nigger." So I said, "Water on a duck's back, I'm not going to let it bother me," said, "I'm going to walk through this." I walked through all those name calling things and I felt like Jackie Robinson, I know what he felt like all right. So I went through it, got to David Duke he said, "I didn't know you was colored." I said, "Yeah you got me; I'm the same guy you talked to on the phone. You didn't ask me what color I was." He said, "You know what you're absolutely right, and you've got balls to come in here," I said, "Absolutely." So we sat down and did the interview. We did an interview for about a twenty minute interview. They gave me all kinds of awards for that interview but the point is I walked right into the lion's den and wasn't afraid and he had a lot of respect for me. We did a good job--good interview and no easy questions, no powder puff questions. I think I felt a little brave 'cause the FBI--I knew the FBI was somewhere nearby (laughter). But these guys they were drinking, they were drinking liquor, they were getting liquored up and it was getting late. I wanted to get out of there before it got night but the point is it was a hostile environment and I got out of there and I said, "Whew." There are other times--I've seen some (unclear) (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Did Duke provide any escort for you to leave or (unclear)?$$No just, "Thanks for coming by to see me, can we walk you to the car?" And I said, "No I'm fine I know where, I know where it is." He took a picture with Marsha the lady, he wanted to take a picture of all three of us together, we took a picture of them together, they took a picture and I said, "Fine." I'm still alive (laughter) just one of those things you have to go through you know, it's North Carolina. Wow, it's--things are different in North Carolina, so--but you bring that to the table to your next city or your next town, to your next assignment that you can do that--that you can do that, you can talk to anybody.

Nina M. Wells

Lawyer and state government appointee Nina Mitchell Wells was born in 1950 in Washington, D.C. She attended Immaculate Conception Academy, an all-girl catholic high school, and graduated from there in 1968. Wells then enrolled in Mount St. Joseph College, now Mount St. Joseph University, in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1970, she transferred to a women’s college, Newton College of the Sacred Heart, where she received her B.A. degree in 1972. Wells went on to receive her J.D. degree from Suffolk University Law School in 1976.

After a brief stay in Los Angeles, California, Wells began her legal career as assistant corporation counsel for the City of Newark legal department. In 1990, Wells served as head of the Division of Rate Counsel in the Department of the Public Advocate while Governor Jim Florio was in office. She then served as vice president and senior attorney at the CIT Group from 1994 until 1996. In 1996, Wells was hired at Rutgers University School of Law and served as the assistant dean for the Minority Student Program. In 1998, she was named vice president of public affairs at Schering-Plough Corporation and president of their philanthropic arm, Schering-Plough Foundation. Wells was then appointed to New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine’s cabinet as the Secretary of State of New Jersey in 2006, and served in that position until 2010.

Wells has served on numerous boards including Seton Hall Preparatory School, Newark Day Center and Teach for America. In 2013, she served on the board of trustees of both the Victoria Foundation and the New Jersey Performing Arts Center Women’s Association. She received a nomination by President Barack Obama to serve on the board of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority. Wells has also been the recipient of several awards and honors such as the New Jersey Women Lawyers Association Women’s Initiative & Leaders in Law (WILL) Platinum Award and the Montclair Art Museum Honoree for Arts Education. Wells has received honorary degrees from Drew University and the College of St. Elizabeth.

Wells and her husband, criminal defense lawyer Theodore Wells, reside in Livingston, New Jersey.

Nina Wells was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 11, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.216

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/11/2014

Last Name

Wells

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Mitchell

Schools

Immaculate Conception Academy

Mount St Joseph University

Newton College of the Sacred Heart

Suffolk University Law School

First Name

Nina

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

WEL04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Grand Cayman

Favorite Quote

You Only Live Once.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/9/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

State government appointee and lawyer Nina M. Wells (1950 - ) served as the Secretary of State for New Jersey from 2006 to 2010.

Employment

City of Newark Legal Department

Department of the Public Advocate

CIT Group

Rutgers Law School-Newark

Schering-Plough Corporation

Schering-Plough Foundation

Governor Jon Corzine's Cabinet (New Jersey)

Garfinkel's

U.S. Social Security Administration

New Jersey Bell Telephone Company

Bell Communications Research

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:3276,94:10756,311:16916,419:26548,482:27136,511:39776,711:43820,748:44474,755:58862,963:72140,1120:78740,1554:92898,1728:121538,2010:127810,2152:136600,2280:140685,2367:145205,2446:170900,2941:182606,3103:183380,3114:190080,3178:193852,3272:197542,3376:202298,3478:207874,3668:210990,3851:212794,3913:213450,3923:213778,3928:214270,3937:215008,3949:215746,3961:225270,4037:226732,4066:229398,4112:229742,4117:230516,4259:247105,4489:247865,4499:256420,4633$0,0:964,62:2308,89:5668,149:10288,219:12136,247:26029,428:30511,538:35574,664:35989,683:37151,705:37898,718:40222,761:40637,767:41467,778:41882,784:43957,840:57508,1041:61636,1113:65076,1180:72300,1340:77995,1366:79848,1387:92415,1640:93360,1662:120158,2316:129551,2503:133976,2535:134468,2542:135124,2553:148170,2806:154154,2943:159100,2969:161300,3006:179211,3266:180279,3285:182300,3294:198300,3492:200988,3585:205608,3682:206364,3692:213854,3779:214322,3786:227504,4070:227816,4075:243330,4330:246290,4386:248690,4474:252610,4585:252930,4590:253570,4600:253890,4605:260964,4635:266396,4719:266784,4724:276295,4884:277045,4928:281995,4989:286495,5090:287395,5105:295040,5247:295810,5260:300498,5347:304632,5437:311886,5623:312432,5631:313134,5643:318840,5657:321504,5691:323328,5728:324012,5738:325076,5769:325608,5778:326140,5787:326444,5792:327812,5830:335260,6060:336020,6071:336704,6081:356574,6376:363050,6488
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Nina M. Wells' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells talks about her paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells remembers her relationship with her father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Nina M. Wells describes her extracurricular activities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Nina M. Wells remembers her summer jobs in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Nina M. Wells remembers modeling for Garfinkel's in Washington, D.C., pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells remembers modeling for Garfinkel's in Washington, D.C., pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells remembers visiting her parental grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells talks about her aspiration to attend college

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells describes her social life during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells talks about her social activities

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells remembers dating her husband

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Nina M. Wells remembers transferring to Newton College of the Sacred Heart in Newton Centre, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences at Newton College of the Sacred Heart

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells describes her decision to attend the Suffolk University Law School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells talks about the early years of her marriage

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells talks about the differences between law schools

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells remembers studying at Langdell Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences at Suffolk University Law School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells remembers the first case as counsel to the City of Newark

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells describes her reasons for moving to Newark, New Jersey, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells describes her reasons for moving to Newark, New Jersey, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells describes her role as counsel to the City of Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells talks about the Garden State Bar Association

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells recalls the notable African American lawyers in New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells remembers the events of the 1970s in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells describes her role at the New Jersey Bell Telephone Company

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells talks about the breakup of the Bell system

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences at Bell Communications Research, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells describes her work with the New Jersey Department of the Public Advocate

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells talks about New Jersey Governor James Florio

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells describes her involvement on charitable boards, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells describes her involvement on charitable boards, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells talks about her two-year sabbatical

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells describes how she came to work for CIT Financial Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells recalls her assistant deanship of Rutgers Law School in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells talks about balancing her career and her family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells describes her position at the Schering Plough Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells remembers meeting New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells talks about her relationship with New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells describes how she became the New Jersey secretary of state

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells remembers honoring Judge Robert L. Carter

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells remembers the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells talks about the political role of the New Jersey Department of State

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells talks about New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences as New Jersey secretary of state, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells describes her experiences as New Jersey secretary of state, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Nina M. Wells talks about the defunding of the New Jersey Network

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Nina M. Wells talks about diversity and segregation in New Jersey

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Nina M. Wells talks about New Jersey politics

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Nina M. Wells recalls her appointment to the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Nina M. Wells reflects upon her marriage to Theodore V. Wells, Jr.

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Nina M. Wells describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Nina M. Wells describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Nina M. Wells reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Nina M. Wells narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Nina M. Wells narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

8$5

DATitle
Nina M. Wells remembers dating her husband
Nina M. Wells remembers honoring Judge Robert L. Carter
Transcript
So tell, talk about meeting Ted [Wells' husband, HistoryMaker Theodore V. Wells, Jr.].$$Yeah. Well, I, like I said, I knew a lot of the kids from Coolidge [Calvin Coolidge High School; Calvin Coolidge Senior High School, Washington, D.C.], and a young man had asked me to go on a bus trip, and the bus trip was sponsored by the coach of Calvin Coolidge, the football coach. So if the team did well every year, he would take them on a bus ride to--we were going to see the Baltimore Bullets [Washington Wizards] play in Baltimore [Maryland], basketball game. So it was like a big deal. So this young man asked me to go, and I said, sure. So I'm on the bus, and sitting in front of me was Ted--excuse me, and his girlfriend. Then afterwards, he--Ted turned around and saw me, and then he said to my date, "Let's trade numbers, phone numbers," so they traded phone numbers, so Ted called me. But at the time, he was known as Tokey. He was a jock. And I kind of knew about him, and he was like in a nice crowd, but not exactly my crowd. Like if he'd come to the parties, he wouldn't get in the front door. They would end up coming in later when somebody would open the door for them.$$(Laughter).$$So I was like, I know this guy. I seen him come in the back door. I'm like, he's not one of the invitees, invited guests, so I told him I didn't--wasn't interested. I said, "No, I know you, and I know your friends, and that's--no, no thank you." So he kept calling me, and then he had a friend call and say, "Oh, I can, I can tell you, he's really a good guy. He's really smart. He does well in school. He's really nice." I was like, "No, I don't--I'm not interested." So he kept on, kept on, kept on calling. He goes, "Why don't you even give me a chance? Like one date." I was like, I don't know. So I said, okay. So I went out on one date with him, and I was like totally impressed 'cause I thought he was more of a--I used to say, "You're, you're just a hoodlum, and your friends are hoodlums." But I just meant that they were like, you know, kind of really out there, but he was so nice, and he was so well dressed, and I thought he was going come with some hip hop clothes on, and he had on Bass weejuns [G.H. Bass and Company], and I was like, oh, my god. You look nice. So from that point on, I thought maybe he was worthy of my attention, so--and then I found out that he was really like--really interested in going to college, too, which was really important 'cause at first my father [Ignatius Mitchell, Jr.] did not like him.$$Oh, he didn't.$$No.$$What did he say?$$No. He was I don't really--I don't know. He's--Ted was pretty much raised by his mom [Phyllis Wells]. He goes, "Oh, a single parent." I'm like, "I'm [sic.] a single parent." And my father said, "No, I don't think I really like him. I don't think he's a good date." And I said, "Well, you don't know him. You have to get to meet him, meet his family and everything." So once Ted--once my father met Ted's mother, he said, "Oh, she's really lovely." And then, believe it or not, Ted's family, once we started dating, his family, his mother and sister [Toni Wells] would join us for Christmas dinner for like years, and then when we decided to get married, we just got married at, at a Christmas dinner informally, so it was so interesting how the mothers really became friends.$$Oh, the two mothers became friends (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yes, yes.$$Okay. Not the fath--$$Yeah.$$The two mothers.$$The mothers 'cause Ted's father [Theodore V. Wells, Sr.] wasn't in the picture.$$Right.$$And then--$$Right.$$--my father thought Ted's mother was quite lovely, too.$$Okay.$$But my father didn't join us for dinner. My mother [Pearline Jackson Smith], remember, was (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I see.$$--remarried, yeah.$$So you know--$$So it was interesting how we kind of merged the two families, yeah (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Because I read that you went to see movies your first date, 'Fahrenheit'--maybe 45- (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) '451.' That was--well, that was the first date, but don't forget, when I met Ted, that wasn't a date.$$Right. That--$$They switched (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) that was on the bus.$$Yes. How did you read that?$$Go on, all right.$$Where did that come from? That's true, 'Fahrenheit 451,' yeah, absolutely. Thank you for refreshing my recollection, yeah. I--we used to--I used to keep track. I'd write down every date and give it a grade (laughter). For years and years I had a record of every place we went, and then I would evaluate it. I mean, how was it? And what was he like? (Unclear), right?$So (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah.$$--talk about what, what happened.$$Yeah.$$You became the--$$Yeah. I became the secretary of state for New Jersey, and previous governors had moved certain functions out of the department for a variety of reasons, and Governor Corzine wanted to put it back in. But one of the fun things I did was, I was part of the senior staff, which really meant that you met with the governor every single day at eight o'clock in the morning, and, basically, what you would do is you sat around with like ten people, and you talked about all the priorities for the administration, what we were going to do that day, what public events there were, how we were going to execute things, and, basically, you, you were like the pulse of state government every single day, you know. Were there key issues you'd heard about that the governor needed to be aware of? If he was, you know, considering certain actions, what was your reaction? How did you feel about things, and, you know, so you were sort of eyes and ears outside of your own cabinet position, so you got a chance to really see everything that was going on in the state government, and to--and, politically, and you were--you know, had the political, you know, you have to be attuned to what was happening politically, comment accordingly, and if you saw opportunities. One of the really fun, fun, fun things I did, and I have a picture to capture it, is Ted [Wells' husband, HistoryMaker Theodore V. Wells, Jr.] said to me, "While you're there, ask the governor--we got to give Judge Robert L. Carter [HistoryMaker Robert L. Carter], we got to get him a building, a school, a school, a building, something. Nina [HistoryMaker Nina M. Wells], you're on a mission. Let's go do it." So I talked to Jon Corzine, and he says, "I'm fascinated with Judge Carter's career." I said--twenty-four [U.S.] Supreme Court arguments, won twenty-three. You know, argued Brown versus Board of Education decisions [Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 1954], you know, before Thurgood [Thurgood Marshall] did, and Thurgood is getting feedback, and then they go and they come, the whole nine yards. 'Simple Justice' ['Simple Justice: The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equality,' Richard Kluger], you know, right, taking the pages out of 'Simple Justice.' And Corzine said, "What a phenomenal idea. Let's see what we can do." And I talked to Cory [Cory Booker], and it's like, "Cory, give me a school." "Everything is just so school board, and it's so difficult." So I said, "We got to find a building. We got to find a building, got a find a building." The department of education [New Jersey Department of Education], we said, "That's the perfect building," in Trenton [New Jersey], right. So I have this wonderful--we had a reception for Judge Carter here. Of course, we had a wonderful--at the department of education, we had the entire department, all of these great, you know, key people in state government, and governors come out and dedicate the department of education building [Robert L. Carter Building] to Judge Robert L. Carter. I'll show you the signage that is in front of it. And that morning, we were all set for the media and everything. That morning Judge Carter's wonderful son called and said Judge Carter was too sick to even get in the car. You know, he had coronary heart disease. I mean, this was maybe five years before he passed. He was very sick. And he said, "But we're coming," he and his brother [John Carter and David Carter]. He said, "We're coming and we'll speak and everything." And we're like, "No problem." So we have this wonderful, wonderful ceremony. Everybody in the department of education was going like really crazy. What's really nice, though, is that it's been memorialized in the lobby. First of all, there's a beautiful, huge sign which I'll show you. Then this--his, his bust, a plaque, the whole history of everything he did. They said busloads come to that building, it's like on the, you know, tour. If you come down to the statehouse in Trenton, that's one of the things that's a must see. Busloads of kids get out and read about Judge Robert L. Carter, which I think--who was a New Jerseyan, right?$$Now, so (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah.$$--talk about his relationship with New Jersey and his, you know--$$Yeah. Started school in Newark [New Jersey], and his father [Robert L. Carter, Sr.] died. His mother [Annie Martin Carter] was a nurse, and she moved the family to East Orange [New Jersey], and he went to high school in East Orange. And, I mean, a lot of people from Newark and from--of course, he was a top, top, top student at Barringer High School [Barringer Academy of the Arts and Humanities] in Newark. A lot of people do not know, and in East Orange and graduated with honors, but he had a lot of challenges, though, because East Orange, at that time, was primarily Caucasian, and they didn't want him even to use the swimming pool, and he talks about how, you know, he dealt with all of the racism and everything and still graduated the tippy top of his class, and, you know, and then went Lincoln University [Lincoln University, Pennsylvania] and then on to Columbia Law School [New York, New York]. But a lot of people in Newark do not know him, so it's so nice now to have the department of education building in Trenton dedicated to him, and so it's exposed people in a way that they never would have been exposed, and then Raymond M. Brown, the son of the famous lawyer [Raymond A. Brown], although, he is also very famous, has a program called 'Due Process,' and they did a whole segment on Judge Carter right as he passed, so it's a wonderful piece, and they've replayed it over and over and over again, and I wish it could be part of something in your library.$$I, I actually saw, saw the piece (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Did you see the program?$$I saw the program.$$Yeah.$$So--$$Letting people in Newark know--$$Right.$$--in New Jersey.$$So let me--I mean, that was a wonderful thing to do. Did he, did he get to see the wall, though?$$He, he never got to see it. Although, we had pictures.$$Oh.$$Because in his later years, he couldn't travel. Don't forget Trenton for him would have been two hours in the car, but his sons--you should see the pictures, amazing. We did a whole portfolio. But then we had a reception here at the apartment, and I, I brought it out so you could see it.

Robert Bogle

Newspaper chief executive Robert Bogle was born to John Bogle, a vice president and advertising director at The Philadelphia Tribune, and Roslyn Woods Bogle, an advocate and activist throughout the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area. In 1973, he graduated from Cheyney State College with his B.A. degree in urban studies and attended the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business and Finance to study marketing and economics.

Bogle was first hired at The Philadelphia Tribune in 1970, and was named advertising director in 1973. He served in that position until 1977, when he became director of marketing. From 1981 to 1989, Bogle worked as executive vice president and treasurer for the Tribune and was then promoted to president and chief executive officer. In 1991, Bogle was appointed president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA), where he served two terms. Among his achievements as president of the NNPA were the dedication of the new national headquarters in Washington, D.C., the introduction of the NNPA’s national wire service, and the establishment of new and enhanced relationships with major national advertisers, including Toys R Us, Procter & Gamble, U.S. Air, K-Mart, and Walt Disney World Company.

Bogle has served on the boards of U.S. Airways Group, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association, United Way of America, the Zoological Society of Philadelphia, the Workforce Investment Board, and the African American Chamber of Commerce. In addition, in 2009, Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter appointed Bogle to the Independence Blue Cross board of directors.

Bogle is chairman of the Hospitals and Higher Education Facilities Authority of Philadelphia and serves as a commissioner of the Delaware River Port Authority. He has served as chairman of the council of trustees of Cheyney University and is an advisor to the United Negro College Fund, a member of the executive committee of the Boy Scouts of America, and a life member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. He is also a founding member and president of the African American News and Information Consortium, a group of premier Black newspapers in some of the largest markets in the United States of America.

In 1993, Bogle was named one of Ebony magazine’s 100 most influential black Americans. In 1995, 1997 and 1999, the NNPA honored Bogle with the Russwurm Award, the highest honor to the “Best Newspaper in America.” Bogle received an honorary doctorate of humane letters degree from Drexel University in 2000.

Robert Bogle was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 11, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.151

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/13/2014

Last Name

Bogle

Maker Category
Middle Name

W.

Schools

Cheyney University of Pennsylvania

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

BOG02

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Maarten

Favorite Quote

Never To Your Friends Your Secrets Tell, For One Day Your Friend May Be Your Foe And Out Into The World Your Secrets Will Go.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Oxtail Stew, Pig's Feet. Chitlins, Roast and Turkey

Short Description

Newspaper publishing chief executive Robert Bogle ( - ) is the president and chief executive officer of The Philadelphia Tribune. He also served as president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association from 1991 to 1995.

Employment

The Philadelphia Tribune

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert Bogle's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Robert Bogle lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert Bogle talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert Bogle talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert Bogle talks about his maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert Bogle talks about his mother's academic abilities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert Bogle talks about his father and his parents' views of race and character

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert Bogle talks about how his parents met, his likeness to them and lessons from his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert Bogle describes his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert Bogle talks about his brother, HistoryMaker Donald Bogle, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert Bogle talks about his brother, HistoryMaker Donald Bogle, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert Bogle talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert Bogle talks about his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert Bogle talks about growing up in Darby, Pennsylvania where he attended integrated schools

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert Bogle talks about the lessons he learned from his father

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Robert Bogle talks about his religious upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Robert Bogle states his elementary school and recalls his elementary school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Robert Bogle talks about meeting influential African Americans as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Robert Bogle talks about growing up knowing that he would have to choose between education, work, and the military after high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert Bogle talks about South Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and black-owned theaters across the country

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert Bogle claims Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as the birthplace of the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert Bogle talks about working as a newsboy, his educational experience, and moving to Yeadon, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert Bogle talks about attending Yeadon High School in Yeadon, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert Bogle talks about attending Cheyney State College in Cheyney, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert Bogle lists his instructors at Cheyney State College in Cheyney, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Robert Bogle talks about how he came to work at the Philadelphia Tribune

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Robert Bogle talks about his studies at Cheyney State College in Cheyney, Pennsylvania and working at the Philadelphia Tribune

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Robert Bogle talks about participating in the student union at Cheyney University of Pennsylvania in Cheyney, Pennsylvania

Dorothy Cowser Yancy

Johnson C. Smith University President Dorothy Cowser Yancy was born on April 18, 1944 in Cherokee County, Alabama to Linnie Bell Covington Cowser and Howard Cowser, a farmer. She was raised on the family farm once owned by her great-great grandfather. Upon graduation from Hatcher High School in 1960, Yancy entered Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina where she was a student activist in the Civil Rights Movement, holding memberships in the SGA, SCLC, and SNCC. She graduated from Johnson C. Smith University in 1964 with her B.A. degree in history. In 1964, Yancy entered the University of Massachusetts where she earned her M.A. degree in history. Simultaneously, she received a certificate in management development from Harvard University. In 1968, Yancy married Robert James Yancy, and in 1974, she entered the doctoral program in political science at Atlanta University where she became an accomplished scholar.

After receiving her Ph.D. degree from Atlanta University, Yancy sought post-graduate work at a variety of institutions including the University of Singapore, Hampton University, Northeastern Illinois University, Northwestern University, Georgia Tech University and the University of Illinois, Chicago. Yancy became a tenure-track professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1972 and served as professor of history, technology, and society and management. She became the first African American professor to be promoted and tenured as a full professor. She also served as Associate Director of the School of Social Sciences, and she remained at Georgia Tech until 1994, when she became the first female president of Johnson C. Smith University.

As president, Yancy doubled the University endowment to approximately $57 million and increased applications 300%. She also upgraded the technical capabilities of the school by ensuring that each undergraduate student receives an IBM Thinkpad upon entry through a lease program. During her presidency, Yancy became the first female board president of the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association.

Yancy was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 20, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.180

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/20/2007

Last Name

Yancy

Maker Category
Middle Name

Cowser

Schools

Hatcher High School

Savage Wood Elementary School

Johnson C. Smith University

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Clark Atlanta University

Northwestern University

Northeastern University

First Name

Dorothy

Birth City, State, Country

Cherokee County

HM ID

COW01

Favorite Season

Christmas, Thanksgiving

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Spas

Favorite Quote

No Good Deed Will Go Unpunished.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

4/18/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

String Beans, Barbeque Ribs

Short Description

Political science professor and university president Dorothy Cowser Yancy (1944 - ) was the first female president of Johnson C. Smith University.

Employment

Johnson C. Smith University

Georgia Institute of Technology

Albany State College

Barat College

Hampton Institute

Favorite Color

Bright, Dark Colors

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dorothy Cowser Yancy's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her parents' roots in Cherokee County, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about her white relatives

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her family's land in Cherokee County, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about her early education

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her early interest in literature

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy remembers Hatcher High School in Centre, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy recalls segregation in Cherokee County, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about her parents' professions and siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy remembers her sister's role at Hatcher High School in Centre, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes the racial tensions in Cherokee County, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her experiences at Hatcher High School in Centre, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about the segregation of schools in Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy recalls her paternal relatives who passed as white

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy remembers her arrival at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes the civil rights activities at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her experiences at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy recall her aspiration to attend graduate school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about her experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy recalls her arrival at the University of Massachusetts Amherst

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her summer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy remembers her decision to become a teacher

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her teaching position at Albany State College in Albany, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about her husband and daughter

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy recalls her doctoral studies at Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her courses at Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her work with the labor unions in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy recalls the impact of desegregation and the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy recalls integrating the tenured faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her social life in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her role as an associate director at the Georgia Institute of Technology

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about The Links chapter in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her holiday celebrations

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy recalls how she became the president of Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy remembers her mentors at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her capital campaign at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes the laptop program at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes the use of technology at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about the security system at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes the international studies programs at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy remembers working with her former professors at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy reflects upon the traditions at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about her fundraising strategies

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes the social activities at Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about Johnson C. Smith University's donors

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about the Smith family's contribution to Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her decision to retire from Johnson C. Smith University

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about her involvement with the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her role at the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy talks about returning home to Cherokee County, Alabama

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dorothy Cowser Yancy reflects upon her legacy

DASession

1$1$1

DATape

3$5$1

DAStory

1$2$10

DATitle
Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes the civil rights activities at Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina
Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her capital campaign at Johnson C. Smith University
Dorothy Cowser Yancy describes her early interest in literature
Transcript
You had mentioned the Civil Rights Movement, so when you got to Johnson C. Smith [Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, North Carolina] how did that manifest on campus?$$Well, you know, you have to remember now I came out of Alabama where the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] was illegal. We had had the Montgomery Bus Boycott, but in north Alabama, nothing had happened, not in the north Alabama where I lived. After I left home, there was a movement in Gadsden, Alabama and my cousins were involved in it and then my cousins integrated the Cherokee County High School [Centre, Alabama] after I left home. And eventually my sister [Evelyn Cowser] taught at the white high school. But when I left home, everything was still segregated. And so when I came here, and, and, and I knew about the sit-ins, I immediately began to participate 'cause it made a lot of sense to me.$$What were the organizations?$$Well, we just had a student government here on campus. And I remember Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.], you know, SNCCs [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee], S--SCLC [Southern Christian Leadership Conference], SNCC and stuff like that. But we had a student organization. But see, I, I don't remember too much the stu- the, the SNCC and all that. I remember Dr. Hawkins [Reginald Hawkins]. There was a man here in town who was a dentist, who also had graduated from Johnson C. Smith Seminary [Johnson C. Smith Theological Seminary, Atlanta, Georgia] and graduated from undergraduate school here. He led the movement in this town of students. And then we had student leaders, and I remember we had to go through this nonviolent training in the auditorium downstairs because you weren't supposed to spit back or hit back or anything like that. So I remember going through all of that before you went downtown to protest. But we used to go on Tuesdays and Thursdays, those were light teaching days. And the boys from Davidson [Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina] would come over sometimes. But the Queens girls [Queens College; Queens University of Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina], I don't ever remember seeing them, although now they say they were in the movement. But I don't know anything about them. But I do remember the Davidson boys coming over. And we were--we were very active. We had Charlie Jones [Charles Jones] who was involved in SCL- was involved in SNCC, and Charlie ha- went on down to the protest in Mississippi and went on down to Albany, Georgia and places like that. And there were a few fellas out of the seminary, 'cause Charlie was in the seminary. It was--his mother was my English teacher. And Charlie used to write back letters telling us what was going on in the various southern towns that he was going, going through. And she would--we would go over them in class, in English class. And she would teach that along with 'The Iliad' [Homer] and 'The Odyssey' [Homer]. How she did it I will never know. Well, Ms. Jones was a wonder woman. She was considered to be a little fickle, you know, and quite avant garde, but she was one of the more exciting teachers I ever had. And she was fun and I kept her for two years of English, and I've always had the upmost respect for her.$$But she would teach the classics and then she would teach?$$And, and, and she would read Charlie's letters and somehow it would bring it into human rights and social justice. And we had--we had a teacher in religion whose name was Dr. Steele who believed that the Civil Rights Movement was sort of like God ordained. You know, if God was here, if Jesus was here he'd be in the movement too. And we had some very interesting religious--religion classes on social justice and the social gospel. Johnson C. Smith had an interesting social gospel that they taught at the seminary. And there's been a dissertation written on it about the social gospel that was taught in the seminary at Johnson C. Smith led by Algernon O. Steele. And it was--it was quite interesting because we knew that we were doing what God would've wanted us to do when we were protesting. And it was supported by the president and the faculty and everybody.$So, what was your plan of action when you got here, what did you wanna do?$$Well, the pla- when I got here, I walked into a capital campaign and the goal was $50 million. And so I had to raise the money. So I walked in and went to the capital campaign meeting and Ed Crutchfield who was the biggest banker in town head of First Union Bank [First Union Corporation; Wells Fargo and Company], and John Stedman [John B. Stedman, Jr.] who was the guru of fundraising here in town and the head of Duke Energy [Duke Energy Corporation] and Duke Power [Duke Power Company, Charlotte, North Carolina] at the time, and the head of the newspaper and the head of Lance [Lance, Inc.; Snyder's-Lance, Inc.]. That was my operating committee. I mean here are all these big dogs, you know, and here I am this kid who just walked out of the classroom. And so I'll never forget my first meeting. The--Ed Crutchfield was late. You know, Presbyterians are always on time. And then he looked at me and he says, "Well I don't know how we gonna tell the Johnson C. Smith story since Bob Albright [Robert Albright] has gone." And I remember looking at him, by now I'm really seething. I said, "Well I don't know what you are talking about, I am the damn story. And if I can't tell it, it can't be told. Bob Albright didn't go to Johnson C. Smith [Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, North Carolina]." And he and I hit it off just like that. And we've been friends ever since. And he helped--we work together. We met every three months and we raised that money.$$How long did it take you (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) We had sixty-three--in--in '98 [1998] we ended the campaign at $63.8 million. That's right.$$And you had more than doubled the endowment or?$$The endowment has gone from when I came here it was 13 something, and a few weeks ago it was 53 million, 'cause we just finished an--another campaign. It was 75 million and we've hit 80.6 million. So it's, it's, it's been interesting. So what you see around the campus, the new library, the new technology center, the renovation of this building, the track and academic complex, the renovation of the buildings, the air conditioning of all the dormitories. You know, the, the gr- I mean all the things you see around here are the things that we've done and the infrastructure. We've tried to, to improve upon what we found and just create a very good learning community, a place where students can come and learn and go out and be, be successful and main--major contributors to, to, to the universe. I mean, we, we wanna raise global students and I think we do that with our technology. I don't think our students would know what to do without having a laptop. They've all had one individually since 2000. And I think that's probably the, the connections that they made with the world is probably the best contribution or the major contributions of, of something I've given to them.$What was your favorite subject in school?$$Well, I liked math and I liked--I, I loved to read, that was, that was my favorite thing.$$What did you like to read, what books?$$Well, I loved to read anything. And I remember my favorite set of books, and you're probably gonna think I'm really nerdy now, was this set of Childcraft that the school [Savage Wood Elemenatary School, Cherokee County, Alabama] had. The little school had a set of Childcraft, I don't know who bought them. But when the school closed and my father [Howard Cowser] bought the school, we ended up with the whole set of Childcraft. And we used--I used to read all of the fairy tales and all of the stories. And then we would have, you know, they had that big long one, what volume thirteen and fourteen were the big long skinny ones, remember. And they had the--had all the wild animals and all this kind of stuff in it. And it was a really exciting book. And of course the story--the stories you don't tell those kind of stories to children anymore because the people got eaten up, you know. They had to--had to sort of make them socially acceptable in recent years. But I still--we still have that set in my parents' ho- house. But I used to just love to read anything. And then my mother [Linnie Covington Cowser] used to get Progressive Farmer, I know that's not gonna float your boat, but we used to--I used to read The Progressive Farmer, I used to read Reader's Digest, and then Reader's Digest had the books, novels that you could get. And then we use to get all the magazines and stuff. I, I, I would just read anything. But my favorite person that I loved to read about that my mother had difficulty with was Billie Holiday. I loved Billie Holiday. I thought she had the most beautiful voice in the world, but it was about the time that she was on drugs and my mother was just incensed that I wanted to read about this woman. So I would hide and read everything I could about Billie Holiday.

Nancy Bowlin

Educator and public health nurse Nancy Bowlin was born on August 8, 1927 in Harlem, New York to Harriet Seraphina Worghs and Phillip Worrell Douglas. Her parents met in Harlem in 1924. Bowlin attended P.S. #10, St. Thomas the Apostle Elementary School, Asbury Park High School and graduated from George Washington High School in 1945. She received her associate’s degree from Brooklyn College in 1947 and graduated from Bellevue School of Nursing in 1952 as a registered nurse. Bowlin went on to earn her B.S. degree in home economics and M.S. degree in health education from Lehman College in the 1970s.

Bowlin worked as a nurse at Bellevue Hospital from 1952 to 1954. As a state public health nurse for the State of New York in Harlem from 1954 to 1958, Bowlin assessed family health and taught neo-natal care. Later, she was appointed Supervisor of Nursing Education for the federally funded Central School for Practical Nursing. In 1969, Bowlin joined the New York City Board of Education, where she taught home economics at P.S. #142 and later taught bio medical sciences, nursing and biology at the high school level until 1984.

Bowlin is a member of the United Negro College Fund, the NAACP and the Schomburg Center for Black Research. She lives in Bronx, New York.

Bowlin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 17, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.144

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/17/2007

Last Name

Bowlin

Schools

Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing

Brooklyn College

George Washington High School

St. Thomas the Apostle School

Asbury Park High School

Lehman College

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Nancy

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

BOW06

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

If You Don't Use It, You Lose It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/8/1927

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Educator and public health nurse Nancy Bowlin (1927 - ) worked as a nurse at Bellevue Hospital, and as a public health nurse for the State of New York. Bowlin was also appointed Supervisor of Nursing Education for the Central School for Practical Nursing.

Employment

Bellevue Hospital

Harlem Hospital

New York City Board of Education

Central School for Practical Nurses

New York City Department of Health

Knickerbocker Hospital

Favorite Color

Earth Tones

Timing Pairs
0,0:8667,178:9234,195:30108,509:38204,742:56216,885:70660,1034:74485,1090:101484,1476:102963,1513:103398,1519:109604,1542:110592,1557:130782,1841:133257,1874:149945,2104:150593,2118:151241,2131:152294,2181:159270,2239$0,0:929,15:1496,23:12913,252:15697,305:17872,343:28926,602:29465,610:30543,626:35087,678:35403,683:36114,700:39538,740:46505,859:48351,911:51546,978:52185,991:52469,996:52753,1001:53250,1009:54457,1044:61272,1180:66746,1228:67740,1296:69160,1324:69444,1329:87260,1547:88151,1559:90743,1648:91634,1660:97884,1699:98665,1711:111325,1895:111895,2031:128258,2397:130346,2442:137546,2601:138470,2630:150054,2858:151266,2883:159474,2968:159870,2974
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Nancy Bowlin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Nancy Bowlin lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Nancy Bowlin describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Nancy Bowlin talks about her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Nancy Bowlin describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Nancy Bowlin describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Nancy Bowlin describes her father's ancestry and career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Nancy Bowlin talks about how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Nancy Bowlin remembers her maternal aunt

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Nancy Bowlin describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Nancy Bowlin remembers the Harlem community in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Nancy Bowlin describes her chores and pastimes

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Nancy Bowlin remembers her music lessons

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Nancy Bowlin describes her religious upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Nancy Bowlin remembers the Harlem Library in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Nancy Bowlin remembers her grade school experiences in New York City, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Nancy Bowlin remembers her grade school experiences in New York City, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Nancy Bowlin remembers moving to her father's home in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Nancy Bowlin remembers George Washington High School in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Nancy Bowlin recalls living with her father in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Nancy Bowlin describes the drug culture in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Nancy Bowlin remembers her teenage pastimes

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Nancy Bowlin recalls the public speakers in New York City's Harlem neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Nancy Bowlin remembers Brooklyn College in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Nancy Bowlin recalls her admission to the Bellevue Schools of Nursing in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Nancy Bowlin remembers her first patient at the Bellevue Schools of Nursing

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Nancy Bowlin talks about her understanding of death

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Nancy Bowlin remembers working at New York City's Bellevue Hospital

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Nancy Bowlin remembers how she met her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Nancy Bowlin describes her early nursing career in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Nancy Bowlin remembers becoming a public health nurse

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Nancy Bowlin talks about the prevalence of tuberculosis

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Nancy Bowlin describes her duties at the New York City Department of Health

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Nancy Bowlin remembers her career at the New York City Department of Health

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Nancy Bowlin describes her public health casework

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Nancy Bowlin talks about the changes in psychiatric care

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Nancy Bowlin talks about the black community's public health concerns

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Nancy Bowlin talks about the changes in hygiene and diet in the United States

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Nancy Bowlin recalls teaching at the Central School for Practical Nurses in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Nancy Bowlin recalls teaching in New York City's public schools

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Nancy Bowlin remembers her experiences in Senegal

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Nancy Bowlin describes the public health conditions in Senegal

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Nancy Bowlin talks about her interest in travelling

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Nancy Bowlin describes her graduate studies in health education

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Nancy Bowlin talks about her organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Nancy Bowlin describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Nancy Bowlin reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Nancy Bowlin reflects upon her philosophy of life

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Nancy Bowlin talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Nancy Bowlin talks about her health

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Nancy Bowlin describes her family's legacy in healthcare

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Nancy Bowlin describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Nancy Bowlin narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

4$3

DATitle
Nancy Bowlin remembers her first patient at the Bellevue Schools of Nursing
Nancy Bowlin talks about the changes in psychiatric care
Transcript
So you were admitted to the school in '49 [1949], and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, I was--right and I graduated in 1952.$$Now, now what was the hardest part of nursing school for you?$$Nothing was hard.$$Okay.$$You know what my average was which I'm gonna show you when I took my exam? Ninety-two point something. That's when you take all your tests and average them all out. Nothing was hard.$$So they didn't, they didn't grade you on the C system, I guess.$$No.$$Okay.$$No.$$Were, were you the first African American student at Bellevue [Bellevue Schools of Nursing; Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing, New York, New York]?$$No, no, there was eleven, eleven of us.$$Okay.$$Eleven of us in my class.$$Okay. How long had it been since they, I mean, started letting black people go there?$$The ones that they had before were light, you know. But we were obvious, and then after we made such a whatever, we set the road. We--the--for--if you saw the class of '69 [1969], you say, woo, things have changed. And it closed down in 1969, the three year program.$$But there was no tough time for you in--that you--where you can say, well maybe I don't wanna be a nurse or is this--$$Oh, yes. Oh, yes. The first time, the first time. There was this woman. She was mugged and I had to t- and her face--I've never seen anyone with face so mutilated and puffed up and blood and whatever and dirt. And she was my patient to take, my first patient, first. And we put four hours on the ward. This was my first patient, first. And I looked at this lady, I felt so bad for her, oh, and I had to touch her, oh, no way. I did not want--. I went in the utility room and I started to cry. I says, "I can't do this. I cannot do this." And my classmate says, "Oh, yes you can, yes you can, yes you can." So, I got the basin, took my time. I spent four hours on her face alone. That's how messed up she was. Delicately I washed her face until she got all the blood out of her nose and whatever and so forth. And she finally said, "Thank you very much." I will never forget that. That was my first patien- that was the time when I did not--I--that was the one and only time.$$Okay.$$Was my first patient.$$That's quite a story.$Were there any disease problems that were particular to well-to-do people?$$Oh, I have to tell you about the well-to-do. We were--with Bellevue [Bellevue Hospital; Bellevue Hospital Center, New York, New York] being, being the psychiatric, and that's public, so therefore they wanted to expose us to the private quote unquote high- higher up psychiatric pavilion. I think it's New York Hospital [NewYork-Presbyterian / Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, New York], I can't remember. But, anyway, we went to the private, I went to the private where the nurse, you don't read the patient's chart because these are quote CEOs and--. They go to work, they--many of them at that time would go to work during the day but they come--came back to the hospital for psychiatric care, and they were well-to-do. The dishes were out of s- oh, the, the beautiful china and whatever. And as I said, we couldn't, we couldn't know the person's name, nor could we read the charts, but this was how they were getting psychiatric care as opposed to the public Bellevue psychiatric care.$$So you're saying that many CEOs that people--$$Yeah.$$--thought were crazy, actually--$$Yeah.$$--had some kind of mental problem.$$Right, had mental conditions and would--being medicated, but they would go back--they would still go to work, but they would come back and stay in the institution, but it was like staying in a hotel.$$Now what access did poor people have to psychiatric care?$$You go to Bellevue.$$And how were the poor treated?$$And don't forget we had psychiatric institutions. We just recently got rid of all our psychiatric institutions. We have no psychiatric institutions. We used to have several psychiatric institutions up here in the Bronx [New York], not only for the children, but for the adults. We have none. That's why you see them out on the street.$$Yeah, that's, that's something that occurred fairly recently in the major cities--$$Exactly.$$--in the--$$We have no psych-$$--early '90s [1990s]. That's--$$Yeah, we have no pyschia- they got rid of all of that.$$Now, now there's I know David Satcher [HistoryMaker Dr. David Satcher] when he was secretary of health for the Clinton [President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton] administration one of the, the themes of his speeches was always health, mental health.$$Yeah.$$And how important it was--$$It was--$$--for people to--for everyone--$$Yes.$$You know, and we say, some people act crazy, or whatever, but, but he said it was important for everyone to--$$It was--it's a--$$--monitor their mental health.$$Yes. Yes. But we don't have it anymore. So you see people out here on the street and whatever, in the shelters, and, and it- it's sad. It is sad. It is very sad. We don't have it.$$And there's nothing--$$And you--why do you, why do you have such problems in school? You have children who have mental problems. Where they gonna go? The parents, what can they do? They don't have the money.

Gloria Scott

Gloria Dean Randle Scott was the eleventh president of Bennett College located in Greensboro, North Carolina. She was the second female chief administrator at Bennett College. Scott was born on April 14, 1938 in Houston, Texas to Juanita and Freeman Randle. She attended Blackshear Elementary School and Jack Yates Secondary School where she graduated from in 1955. A scholarship fund afforded Scott the opportunity to attend Indiana University. She received her B.A. degree and M.A. degree in zoology in 1959 and 1960, respectively, and her Ph.D. in higher education in 1965.

In 1961, Scott’s career began as a research associate in genetics and embryology at Indiana University Institution for Psychiatric Research. During this time, she worked as a biology instructor at Marion College until 1965, making her the first African American instructor at a predominately white college in Indianapolis, Indiana at the time. Scott held the positions as Dean of Students and Deputy Director of Upward Bound at Knoxville College in 1965 and as the Special Assistant to the President and Educational Research Planning Director at North Carolina A&T University in 1967. During her ten year tenure, Scott continued to make history by becoming the first African American National President of the Girl Scouts in 1975. She then served as the Institutional Research Planning Director at Texas Southern University for a year before becoming Vice President at Clark College in Atlanta in 1977.

After ten years at Clark College, Scott became the President of Bennett College in 1987, thus fulfilling her life’s mission to educate African American women.

Scott is the recipient of three honorary doctorate degrees. She has been featured in several publications such as Who’s Who Among American Women, Famous Texas Women and Essence magazine.

Scott is married to Dr. Will B. Scott, a professor of sociology.

Scott was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 8, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.055

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/8/2007

Last Name

Scott

Maker Category
Middle Name

Dean Randle

Occupation
Schools

Blackshear Elementary School

Jack Yates High School

Indiana University

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Gloria

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

SCO05

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Any. Especially teens.

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - 0 - $500

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Any. Especially teens.
Special Interest: Women's groups, education, girl scouts, defense groups, religious groups, and social action groups,.

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water

Favorite Quote

We Must Do And Not Just Be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

4/14/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Corpus Christi

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish, Peach Cobbler

Short Description

College president Gloria Scott (1938 - ) was the president of Benedict College and was the first African American national president of the Girl Scouts of America.

Employment

Indiana University Institute for Psychiatric Research

Marian College

Knoxville College

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Texas Southern University

Clark College

Bennett College

Girl Scouts USA

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:8170,189:13480,249:17330,301:23882,465:25520,492:25975,498:29888,566:30889,579:35680,590:37305,643:38605,751:40490,808:47336,923:48467,943:50033,966:50555,979:55688,1072:56906,1089:59255,1128:65519,1303:75382,1404:76062,1422:76946,1450:77422,1459:78034,1469:85310,1631:86058,1645:86466,1652:91972,1720:94988,1772:96572,1808:96968,1828:104888,2055:110552,2101:110978,2108:111404,2115:116090,2204:119439,2239:120069,2252:120384,2258:124113,2303:124596,2312:125148,2325:128667,2413:129357,2430:130116,2444:140447,2579:148888,2664:149785,2700:159426,2824:159894,2831:160986,2852:177415,3142:177699,3148:180823,3219:189064,3373:189533,3382:191208,3431:193017,3475:200620,3557:200960,3563:204580,3615:209339,3651:209960,3662:211823,3710:218620,3802:228820,4074:235306,4105:243424,4235:245854,4327:271252,4732:273050,4749$0,0:288,8:1632,28:20370,322:20745,328:22395,366:27195,547:27945,560:28245,565:28545,570:37395,778:37845,785:38145,790:45384,851:45986,860:50286,956:53382,1013:60620,1068:63630,1138:66270,1144:68241,1184:69628,1210:77147,1355:77585,1362:79045,1398:83372,1421:83930,1431:84612,1445:85046,1453:86038,1474:91855,1594:96280,1707:97255,1721:99130,1758:99730,1771:101680,1813:101980,1829:106130,1874:106550,1880:107222,1890:116782,2152:121264,2227:128822,2338:130901,2374:132826,2411:134982,2457:137720,2479
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gloria Scott's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes her maternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott talks about her older siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott talks about her brother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes her younger sister

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Gloria Scott describes her youngest sister, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott describes her youngest sister, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls attending kindergarten at the Fourth Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers enrolling at Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott talks about her father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her father's interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her neighborhood in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott remembers the Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott remembers her baptism

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her experiences of color discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott remembers Blackshear Elementary School in Houston, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott remembers her paper route

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott remembers her experiences as a Girl Scout

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott describes her aspiration to become a doctor

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes Jack Yates Senior High School in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Gloria Scott remembers attending the prom at Jack Yates Senior High School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott remembers Bernie Harper

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her decision to attend Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott remembers William S. Holland

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott recalls her arrival at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her studies at Indiana University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott recalls meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott remembers the delay of her marriage license

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her early career in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls being hired as a dean at Knoxville College in Knoxville, Tennessee

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott recalls her civil rights activism with Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes Stokely Carmichael's visit to Knoxville College

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott talks about school desegregation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott recalls the accreditation of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott recalls working at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her vice presidency of Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott recalls her presidency of Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott talks about Johnnetta B. Cole and Niara Sudarkasa

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott talks about the accreditation of historically black colleges

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott describes her work with the Girl Scouts

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott remembers promoting diversity in Girl Scouting

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her presidency of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Gloria Scott recalls leading the National Urban League's education committee

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Gloria Scott describes her work with the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott recalls her conflict with the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott talks about the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes her community involvement, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott describes her community involvement, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott talks about her presidency of Bennett College in Greensboro, North Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Gloria Scott describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 3

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Gloria Scott reflects upon her life

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Gloria Scott describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Gloria Scott recalls the St. John Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Gloria Scott narrates her photographs

DASession

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DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Gloria Scott remembers the Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church in Houston, Texas
Gloria Scott describes her work with the Girl Scouts
Transcript
So now we're in elementary school [Blackshear Elementary School, Houston, Texas].$$Okay. Um-hm.$$What type of student were you?$$Um-hm.$$Well I should say what type of child were you? We know you were a good student.$$Um-hm. Well, I really was a child, I guess that you would probably call square, because, and then again, the early adults to whom I was exposed, starting I guess with kindergarten and my parents [Juanita Bell Randle and Freeman Randle] and the people around us, all were about having you do right and I attributed a lot of my development as the person to my church. I said, I was for a while, I was the only person in my house who went to church. This is before my sister [Greta Randle] and brother [Billy Randle] came back and before the other children were born, I was staying alone with my parents. And Rose Hill [Greater Rose Hill Missionary Baptist Church, Houston, Texas] was right across the street and as later life, I would describe that I was a high energy child, I used up a lot of peoples energies, I mean I was like a sponge and I was attracted to the church and I, I said it many days, the church probably helped keep me out of a lot of trouble, because I would, I would go over--this is the truth and this sounds weird to people when they say, when I say this. I think on Monday night may- maybe they had prayer meeting, I would go over and sit in the back of the church for prayer meeting. On Tuesday night, they had something else, I would go over. On Wednesday night they had Christian benevolence meeting. Now, I learned probably as a very young girl what a benevolence fund was, how people in the church would put their money together so that when people needed loans and things, benevolence and I, 'cause I asked, what the word was, I, I was inquisitive like that. If there was something I didn't really know, I'd ask. And Mr. Milligan [ph.], the husband of the ma- of the woman I was telling who'd take--I would go home with them on Sundays he worked for the post office, he was the person in charge of that, then I'd go to choir rehearsal and then Sunday school teacher, teachers' meeting on Friday night, I would go over and sit and listen. So, the church, a lot of that and then the people there would take us on field trips and we always had six weeks of summer bible school, you know, it isn't like now days, it's two days or whatever? We would have six weeks and it was great for the children, because we had nothing else really to do. And so that kind of helped to shape me to be the kind of person that I was and to really learn. And when I was seven, we were practicing for the Easter play. We had Easter, churches, you know, used to have Easter programs on Easter Sunday, and we were doing the, going to reenact the crucifixion and so we were practicing on Friday evening, Good Friday before Sunday and this, the girls were playing Mary Magdalene and all the others and the boy had the cross on his shoulder and, you know, the--the various things and so we were going down the aisle and so the girls were crying and we were, and so our, our director said, "Okay, you all can stop, that was good, we're all ready for Sunday." And so I remember sitting down and I was crying, I sat in the chair and I was crying, and so she came over she said, "Gloria [HistoryMaker Gloria Scott], you can stop crying now. It's all over, it's good. You all are doing good," and I said to her, "Did they really kill him just because he was doing good?" And she said, in later years, again as an adult, she said, that you can't imagine, "I said, 'What, what--if, I said, yes?'" And I said, "Well, if that's the truth, I want to be like him and I want to be a Christian, so I want to be baptized Sunday." They always baptize on Easter Sunday, and she told us later, she said, "I said, 'Oh girl, unh-uh, your mama, no you can't just decide you wanna be baptized. No you--I have to go and ask.'" I said, "Well, will you go and ask my mother?" She said, "I have to go and ask your mother." Well, we lived right across the street. So we went over to my house and again at this time my mother was not in church, nobody in my family was in church so she told my mother that I had said that I wanted to be baptized. So my mother said, "Girl, you don't know what you're talking about," and I said, "I do, I wanna be like Jesus." And she said, "Oh, you don't know what you're talking about," and I said, "I do, yes I do, I do want to be like Jesus, I want to do good; I want to do the right things." So eventually she relinquished and so she had to get a dress, get a white dress for me for Sunday to be baptized. So I was baptized on Sund- Easter Sunday morning, and nobody in my family was there.$Now, s- stepping out of the academic arena--$$Um-hm.$$--we need to talk a little bit about your involvement with the Girl Scouts [Girl Scouts of the United States of America].$$All right, sure. I was a girl, Girl Scout here in Houston [Texas] in San Jacinto Girl Scout Council and I think a little bit earlier I told you about that, about going to Oklahoma and all that. So, when I went away to college [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana] I was not involved and at my job at Knoxville [Knoxville College, Knoxville, Tennessee] as dean of students, at that time that was in 1965, a Dr. Jeanne L. Noble who was on the board of Girl Scouts, national board, who was one of my mentors, she had been president of Delta Sigma Theta [Delta Sigma Theta Sorority] when I was the second vice president and they had gotten Girl Scouting to try out a new program, called Campus Gold, to try to look at young women who had gone, who'd graduated and had gone to college who were Girl Scouts and to see could we not get them as volunteers to learn to be troop leaders and so forth. And so, she called up and ha- had the Girl Scouts ask me if I would have a Campus Gold group on Knoxville's campus and we did. So we created that Girl Scout group and we sponsored three troops for girls, Brownies, Juniors and ca- two, two Brownies and a Junior troop in the low income neighborhood right around Knoxville College. And it was a fantastic thing for the college girls as well as the students so. And in Girl Scouting once you start doing something as a volunteer, they keep, you know they keep rolling over and so, the next thing I knew I was asked to serve on a regional committee and that to help select kids for international opportunities, and I said I would do that because also, I wanted to always try to make sure that things are equal and the girls, black girls had a acqu- equal access to those. So I served on that group and then we moved to North Carolina to Greensboro at A&T [Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina; North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University], and while I, when I went there, Girl Scouting was just undergoing kind of a realignment like it's doing right now nationally, and council coverage and a new council had been created and I was asked to serve on a committee to help set up the personnel policies and all for that council and to help them recruit the first executive director. So I did and I did another volunteer job.