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David Baker Lewis

Attorney David Baker Lewis was born on June 9, 1944 in Detroit, Michigan to Dorothy Florence Baker Lewis and Walton Adams Lewis. Lewis attended St. Peter Claver School, Courville Elementary School, Nolan Junior High School and graduated from John J. Pershing High School in 1962. As a business administration student at Oakland University, Lewis spent the summer of 1964 as an intern with Holderbank Financiere Glarus in Zurich, Switzerland. In 1965, Lewis earned his B.A. degree in business administration from Oakland University and later interned at Chicago’s Northern Trust Bank in 1966. In 1965, Lewis obtained his M.B.A. degree in finance from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, where he was president of the Business Club. In 1967, Lewis enrolled in University of Michigan Law School earning his J.D. degree from there in 1970.

Lewis worked as a law clerk for the Honorable Theodore Levin of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan while teaching for the University of Michigan’s African American Studies Department. In 1971, Lewis joined the law firm of Patmon, Young and Kirk Professional Corporation. He also served as an associate professor of law for the Detroit College of Law from 1972 to 1978. In 1972, Lewis, along with two other black lawyers, formed Lewis, White and Clay (now Lewis & Munday) – a professional corporation. Lewis served as president of the firm from 1972 to 1982 at which time he became chairman of the board. In 2001, Lewis & Munday ranked sixteenth nationally among all bond counsel and twentieth among all underwriter counsel firms in the country. Lewis served as a member of the State of Michigan Attorney Discipline Board from 1978 to 1983. He has also been a board member of the National Association of Bond Lawyers, the Institute of American Business, the National Association of Securities Professionals, Conrail, Inc., LG&E Corporation, Paradies Metro Ventures, Comerica, Inc., TRW, Inc., M.A. Hanna Company, Fife Electric Co., Lakefront Capitol Advisors, Inc., Lewis and Thompson Agency, Inc., the Detroit Edison Securitization Funding, LLC, Kroger Company, the Police Foundation and H&R Block.

Lewis has been a Fellow of the American Bar Association and a member of the board of trustees of Oakland University, and the Oakland University Foundation. Lewis was awarded honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees from both the University of Detroit Mercy in 1991 and Central Michigan University in 2001. In 1995, he received the Learned Hand Award from the American Jewish Committee.

Accession Number

A2007.081

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/9/2007 |and| 10/26/2012

Last Name

Lewis

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widowed

Middle Name

Baker

Occupation
Schools

John J. Pershing High School

St. Peter Claver Elementary School

Courville Elementary School

Nolan Junior High School

Nolan Elementary School

Pershing High School

Oakland University

University of Chicago Booth School of Business

University of Michigan

First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

LEW09

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

6/9/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Detroit

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cake (Red Velvet)

Short Description

Bond lawyer David Baker Lewis (1944 - ) co-founded the law firm that became Lewis & Munday, LLC.

Employment

Lewis & Munday, A Professional Corporation

Patmon, Young and Kirk Professional Corporation

Detroit College of Law

United States District Court, Eastern District of Michigan

Favorite Color

Orange, Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of David Baker Lewis' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - David Baker Lewis lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - David Baker Lewis describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - David Baker Lewis describes his maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - David Baker Lewis describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - David Baker Lewis recalls his maternal family's history of activism

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - David Baker Lewis describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - David Baker Lewis recalls his maternal grandfather's personal injury lawsuit

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - David Baker Lewis describes his family's vacations to Idlewild, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - David Baker Lewis describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - David Baker Lewis describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - David Baker Lewis describes his father's educational background

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - David Baker Lewis describes his parents' courtship

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - David Baker Lewis talks about his father's W. A. Lewis Insurance Agency

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - David Baker Lewis describes how he takes after his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - David Baker Lewis remembers his father's entrepreneurialism

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - David Baker Lewis talks about his half-brother, Robert Lewis

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - David Baker Lewis describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - David Baker Lewis describes the Conant Gardens neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - David Baker Lewis recalls segregation in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - David Baker Lewis describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - David Baker Lewis describes his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - David Baker Lewis recalls his experiences at integrated schools

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - David Baker Lewis remembers John J. Pershing High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - David Baker Lewis recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - David Baker Lewis describes his father's activism in the community

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - David Baker Lewis describes his early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - David Baker Lewis talks about the Detroit Red Wings

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - David Baker Lewis recalls the role of religion in his upbringing

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - David Baker Lewis describes his extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - David Baker Lewis recalls his influential teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - David Baker Lewis remembers his high school prom

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - David Baker Lewis recalls aspiring to play football at the University of Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Slating of David Baker Lewis' interview, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - David Baker Lewis describes his decision to attend Michigan State University-Oakland

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - David Baker Lewis remembers his mentors at Michigan State University-Oakland

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - David Baker Lewis recalls his trip to Zurich, Switzerland

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - David Baker Lewis recalls his experiences at Michigan State University-Oakland

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - David Baker Lewis describes his decision to attend the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - David Baker Lewis remembers receiving the Alfred G. Wilson Award

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - David Baker Lewis describes his internship at the Northern Trust Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - David Baker Lewis talks about his mentors at the University of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - David Baker Lewis recalls his experiences in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - David Baker Lewis recalls his influences at University of Michigan Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - David Baker Lewis recalls playing football with Reverend Jesse L. Jackson and Reverend Dr. Jim Holley, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - David Baker Lewis remembers the riots in Detroit, Michigan in 1967

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - David Baker Lewis describes his experience at University of Michigan Law School

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - David Baker Lewis remembers working at W.A. Lewis Insurance Agency

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - David Baker Lewis recalls the assassination of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - David Baker Lewis talks about Harold Cruse

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - David Baker Lewis recalls Carl Stokes' mayoral election in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - David Baker Lewis recalls his involvement in the Black Action Movement, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - David Baker Lewis recalls his involvement in the Black Action Movement, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - David Baker Lewis recalls his decision to join Patmon, Young and Kirk, PC

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - David Baker Lewis recalls his clerkship for Judge Theodore Levin

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - David Baker Lewis remembers founding the law firm of Lewis, White, and Clay, PC

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - David Baker Lewis talks about Judge Damon J. Keith

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - David Baker Lewis describes his partners at Lewis, White, and Clay, PC

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - David Baker Lewis recalls his role in Coleman Young's mayoral campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - David Baker Lewis recalls his early career at Lewis, White, and Clay, PC, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - David Baker Lewis recalls his early career at Lewis, White, and Clay, PC, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - David Baker Lewis remembers trying employment discrimination cases

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - David Baker Lewis describes his litigation on behalf of the City of Detroit

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - David Baker Lewis describes his involvement in the expansion of Cobo Hall in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - David Baker Lewis recalls his public finance practice in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - David Baker Lewis describes the growth of his law firm

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - David Baker Lewis describes the role of his M.B.A. degree in his law career

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - David Baker Lewis describes his role on the board of Consolidated Rail Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - David Baker Lewis talks about his corporate board membership

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - David Baker Lewis talks about joint M.B.A. degree programs

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - David Baker Lewis remembers Coleman Young, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - David Baker Lewis remembers Coleman Young, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - David Baker Lewis describes the African American leaders of Detroit, Michigan, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - David Baker Lewis describes the African American leaders of Detroit, Michigan, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - David Baker Lewis describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - David Baker Lewis describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - David Baker Lewis reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - David Baker Lewis reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - David Baker Lewis explains why he did not seek political office

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - David Baker Lewis recalls the influence of his family and coworkers

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - David Baker Lewis describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

2$2

DATape

6$7

DAStory

4$9

DATitle
David Baker Lewis talks about Judge Damon J. Keith
David Baker Lewis remembers Coleman Young, pt. 2
Transcript
So I just wanted to go back a minute to Judge Keith [HistoryMaker Damon J. Keith] to see if you have any reflections on the services of Judge Keith since he's such an--he's an important figure in Detroit [Michigan].$$Right, right. I can remember while I was clerking for Judge Levin [Theodore Levin], Judge Keith issued one of his famous decisions in the Sinclair [United States v. Sinclair, 1971] case which is a civil rights case that involved a prosecution of radical community organizer. I can remember walking down to Judge Keith's chambers after I heard about or seen the opinion and I said that's a way to ring that liberty bell Judge Keith and he got a big kick out of that. But obviously Judge Keith has been a exemplar of the you know the finest of contributions that a jurist can make to the community. I certainly respect his effort to identify and develop some great talent among the law clerks who work for him, Eric Clay [Eric Lee Clay] was one of them, Jimmy Greiner [D. James Greiner] is a professor at Harvard Law School [Cambridge, Massachusetts]. There's another, there're, there're numerous lawyers here in the community who clerk for Judge Keith and have gone on to you know make their contributions to our community or others over the years and of course the judge himself has been at the, at the forefront and then the vanguard of civil rights practitioners a--from the you know from the, from the bench and bringing the [U.S.] Constitution to a level where it can be said that there is equal justice under law and he's taken some very courageous steps along the way. I can think of the Hamtramck housing decision [Garrett v. City of Hamtramck, 1971], I think it was Hamtramck [Michigan] where he found that there'd been a concerted effort to move African Americans out a particular community for desegregated--desegregating housing in the area to just a numerous decisions including the one involving President Nixon [President Richard Milhous Nixon] and so he has been sort of the beacon in our community for aspirations of civil rights enforcement and civil right vindication under the Constitution.$And he [Coleman Young] was a member of the constitutional convention that redrafted the Michigan Constitution [Constitution of the State of Michigan] in 1963 or '62 [1962] and he knew the Constitution upside down. I mean he had been elected to, to public office by then but he, he was not a casual politician, he was purposeful in everything he did and he was focused on empowerment of his people who had been denied so many ways a place at the table. So he's a great man in my book and working with him you know at a distance initially and closer over the years, it's been a great influence on my life and so its influenced me in a very, very positive way. He had a style about him in terms of empowerment that is almost lost in, in today's world. Of course the world has changed and many of the battles that he fought are no longer the primary battles that have to be fought, but he was very collaborative. He knew how to move on key issues. He wasn't afraid to hear the voice, voices of a number of different people and other leaders and take that cacophonous noise and weave a symphony of of action, positive action to improve the destiny of the city and I think he's certainly to be regarded as a great mayor of the City of Detroit [Michigan] who moved Detroit in the right direction for African Americans although at the same time it created controversy with the greater white community who see him in a very different light. But my, my book he's a great man, a great American.

Amyre Ann Makupson

Detroit television news anchor, Amyre Ann Porter Makupson was born on September 30, 1947 in River Rouge, Michigan to Dr. Rudolph Hannibal and Amyre Ann Porche Porter. She attended Visitation Catholic Elementary School in Detroit, Michigan and graduated from St. Mary’s Academy High School in Monroe, Michigan in 1965. She earned her B.A. degree in dramatics and speech from Fisk University in 1970 and her M.A. degree in speech arts/communications theory from American University in 1972.

Makupson held positions at WSM-TV in Nashville and WRC-TV in Washington, D.C. before returning to Detroit, Michigan in 1975 to work as director of public relations for Head Start, the Michigan Health Maintenance Organization. That same year, Makupson was hired by WGPR-TV, the nation’s first African American-owned television station, as a news anchor for “Big City News” and the Detroit focused talk show “Porterhouse.” In 1977, Makupson joined WKBD-TV as a news anchor and public affairs director. At WKBD-TV, she hosted “Morning Break,” the station’s daily talk show, and produced and anchored a five-minute newsbreak. In 1985, Makupson co-anchored WKBD’s “Ten O’clock News” and anchored “Eyewitness News at 11” on WKBD’s sister station, WWJ-TV.

Makupson has won six local Emmy awards including Best News Anchor, Best Interview/Discussion Program, and three for Best Commentary. In 1992 and 1995, Makupson won the Oakland County Bar Association Media Award for the show “Straight Talk” and named SCLC’s Media Person of the Year in 1995. She was also named the March of Dimes’ Humanitarian of the Year in 1996 and Makupson was inducted into the Silver Circle of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in 2003. An author, Makupson published “So...What’s Next?” in 2004. Makupson serves on the boards of The Alzheimer’s Foundation, the Sickle Cell Association, the Skillman Foundation, Covenant House, the Providence Hospital Fund, and the March of Dimes. Makupson lives outside of Detroit, Michigan with her husband, Walter, with whom she has two children.

Amyre Ann Makupson was interviewed by The HistoryMakerson April 5, 2005.

Accession Number

A2005.097

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/5/2005

Last Name

Makupson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Ann

Occupation
Schools

Visitation Catholic Elementary School

St. Mary’s Academy

Fisk University

American University

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Amyre

Birth City, State, Country

River Rouge

HM ID

MAK01

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Aw, Man.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

9/30/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Detroit

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pizza

Short Description

Television anchor Amyre Ann Makupson (1947 - ) was hired as an anchor by WGPR-TV, the nation’s first African American-owned television station. She has also hosted "Morning Break," was co-anchor of WKBD’s "Ten O’Clock News," and is the winner of five local Emmy awards.

Employment

WSM TV

WRC TV

WGPR TV

Head Start Program

WKBD TV

Favorite Color

Navy Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:971,21:4763,141:5790,153:6264,160:8081,211:8792,222:9187,228:10925,255:15284,271:15576,276:17036,298:23241,387:26891,485:27256,491:27840,500:28424,510:28789,516:31709,569:33461,597:33972,609:34337,615:35724,638:42112,706:42656,716:46464,804:50136,926:51496,956:51904,963:52380,974:52720,980:53128,987:57118,1011:57594,1019:58818,1043:59158,1049:59770,1059:60518,1073:61470,1090:62490,1118:63714,1151:64190,1159:65210,1178:66230,1204:67250,1235:69290,1275:70446,1296:72758,1364:82419,1453:83129,1606:95483,1801:95909,1808:96193,1815:96548,1821:98181,1856:100311,1966:106230,2024:107055,2040:109305,2098:114130,2164$0,0:288,114:3026,155:3618,164:4728,184:6134,216:7170,263:7614,274:7984,280:8354,286:8650,291:8946,297:9242,302:9538,307:10056,316:12350,343:13460,361:13830,367:15310,399:21772,421:22300,428:22652,433:24412,464:24940,490:30220,596:31452,615:38492,691:40252,723:45891,790:46621,801:47278,815:47862,827:48300,835:48811,844:49103,849:50052,868:52461,918:53045,928:55162,962:55673,970:56184,978:56695,986:57206,995:58812,1051:59980,1069:62243,1113:62535,1118:62827,1123:63411,1133:68826,1164:69121,1171:69888,1188:70124,1193:70419,1201:71894,1230:72189,1236:72425,1241:73074,1255:74195,1284:74962,1302:75375,1314:78266,1381:78620,1388:79033,1396:79328,1407:79564,1412:80744,1445:82632,1497:82927,1502:84048,1532:84284,1537:91901,1603:95664,1698:96090,1705:97084,1723:100705,1827:101699,1844:102693,1861:109962,1882:110982,1900:111458,1908:111866,1916:112342,1924:112818,1932:113090,1937:113498,1944:113974,1953:114450,1962:115130,1976:116286,2006:116694,2013:118258,2047:118598,2053:119006,2061:124290,2113:124710,2120:125760,2137:126810,2162:128350,2190:129890,2219:130310,2226:131080,2238:131920,2252:133670,2283:134090,2290:135910,2364:136750,2386:137310,2401:137590,2406:139620,2455:139900,2460:140250,2466:141580,2493:150660,2628:152140,2671:152584,2678:152880,2683:153546,2695:155766,2735:156432,2746:156728,2755:158430,2802:159170,2816:159466,2821:159762,2826:160354,2836:161316,2848:166721,2877:168664,2916:169066,2923:169468,2930:169736,2935:170272,2940:170674,2947:171143,2955:171880,2970:172148,2975:172550,2982:173019,2990:176771,3080:179049,3131:179451,3138:179719,3143:180456,3151:180724,3156:182064,3191:182332,3196:182935,3214:187156,3235:187648,3242:200112,3431:201392,3471:202032,3487:203696,3529:204016,3535:204464,3544:205488,3573:207792,3626:208176,3633:208688,3643:209904,3662:210224,3668:210544,3674:210992,3682:216070,3744
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Amyre Ann Makupson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Amyre Ann Makupson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Amyre Ann Makupson recalls her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Amyre Ann Makupson remembers her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about her father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Amyre Ann Makupson describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about her father's medical school years and medical career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Amyre Ann Makupson recalls her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about her household and remembers the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Amyre Ann Makupson describes her childhood personality and love for Motown

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about her Catholic faith

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Amyre Ann Makupson recalls her grade school years and going to lunch with a nun who taught her in the second grade

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about attending St. Mary Academy in Monroe, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about the Civil Rights Movement and attending high school at St. Mary Academy in Monroe, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Amyre Ann Makupson recalls her career interests as a youth and lists where she attended college

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Amyre Ann Makupson recalls her brother's death and her time at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about her mentor at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about earning her M.A. degree from American University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Amyre Ann Makupson describes her career trajectory in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Amyre Ann Makupson describes how she behaved as an anchor

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about working for WKBD under five separate ownerships, earning six Emmys and her public speaking

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Amyre Ann Makupson remembers interviewing families during telethons

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about how her racial ambiguity has impacted her life and career

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Amyre Ann Makupson recalls memorable news stories she has covered over the years

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about advancements in women's roles in the media

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Amyre Ann Makupson narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about her civic engagement in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Amyre Ann Makupson describes the most exciting days of her career

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Amyre Ann Makupson describes her endeavors after ending twenty-five years of news at WKBD in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Amyre Ann Makupson describes her book 'So What's Next' and explains what motivated her to write it

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Amyre Ann Makupson reflects on the decline of Detroit, Michigan and her hopes for the city

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Amyre Ann Makupson reflects upon her life

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about working with Detroit Repertory Theatre

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Amyre Ann Makupson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Amyre Ann Makupson talks about her family

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Amyre Ann Makupson describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Amyre Ann Makupson recalls working on a PSA with Isiah Thomas

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Amyre Ann Makupson narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

4$6

DATitle
Amyre Ann Makupson talks about her mentor at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee
Amyre Ann Makupson describes her career trajectory in Detroit, Michigan
Transcript
Okay, were there any teachers that were like mentors or, or role models at Fisk [University, Nashville, Tennessee]?$$I had a teacher and her name is Dr. Gladys Ford, from Houston, Texas, she was the head of the speech and drama department which I--was my major. I am to this very day, thirty-five years later, I'm still very friendly with Dr. Ford, she still lives in Houston, Texas, I visit her often, well not often but I do visit her and she has come up to visit us and she was my drama teacher, she's the first person I sent a copy of my book to for her to review because I, I knew she would tell me the truth about what she thought about it. And, and the way we got friendly was kind of interesting because I used to debate a lot and of course she was involved in that but I just, it, it--shortly after I got there, one day I just was horribly depressed and just thinking about my brother [Rudolph Porter, III] who had died maybe, I don't know, two months earlier or three months earlier and I was kinda walking down the hall of one of these buildings where she was teaching and she says wh--what's, what's the matter? Come on in here. And I started talking to her and just, you know, you never know what kind of reaction and action she's going to have and the fact that she saw me, the fact that she asked me to come in her office, the fact that she sat there and listened as I cried and talked, just, I mean it was like somebody had given me fifteen winning lottery tickets, it just meant so much to me and that's when I definitely, 'cause I hadn't even declared a major. That's when I decided right then I was gonna be in her department 'cause I so admired her and wanted to be around her and, we've been friends for life and I just think she's a terrific person, it's one of those human things that I don't think could happen at one of these huge [University of] Michigan [Ann Arbor, Michigan], Michigan State [University, East Lansing, Michigan] type schools and I think it's one of the advantages of a, of a place like Fisk University. And she, she made it for me, she just, and I just, there's nothing I wouldn't do for her today, nothing.$$Okay.$So what did you do afterwards [after earning her M.A. degree from American University, Washington, D.C.], I mean, what--?$$You know what? I am one of the luckiest people alive on the face of the earth. I came back home [Detroit, Michigan] after grad [graduate] school and right about that time, they were about to launch WGPR TV in Detroit, that was, was the first black television station in the country. I knew some people over there, my father knew a couple people over there, I went over there and told them what I wanted to do and they hired me to be the anchor for Big City News, it was called, it debuted September 29, 1975, 'Big City News' with Amyre Porter and Pal D'Que. I had never anchored a newscast in my life, I had pretty much, other than an internship, never been in a television station in my life, to be able to start on that level in a top ten market in the city I grew up in, you, you can get struck by lightning first, I'm sure and win fifteen lottery tickets first as well. But that's the way it happened and that's how it started, I stayed there and I, I did 'Big City News,' I did a talk show every day called 'Porterhouse,' I didn't have a clue how to do a talk show, I would, c--in a hour a day, I would find people on the street and say, you know one thing I can do is talk, I can talk to anybody for an hour about anything, including a tree and I really believe that. I'd pull people off the streets, I'd call restaurants and ask for the owner, I called Detroit City Council and had them come in, just anybody I could think of who I knew who had something to say, I'd call 'em and invite 'em on 'Porterhouse' and we would sit there and talk and talk and talk and that's really how it all began. Now I had been there, it's a really interesting story and I used to tell this to kids in, in my speeches all the time, I had been there, oh geez, they canceled the news shortly after I started because they didn't have the money to keep it on, I decided that I was gonna stay anyway because I wanted the experience. After about a year, here I've got my big bad master's degree, I'm making zero, absolutely zero. First of all, I'd left a job, I was making 22 thousand dollars at Michigan Health Maintenance Organization, left that job to go to GPR for twelve five [twelve thousand five hundred], 30 days later they stopped paying me because they couldn't afford to keep that news on, but I stayed to do the Porter House and some other things. I'd gotten pretty discouraged and was able to get my old job back at Michigan Health Maintenance Organization at my old pay, well, just then, channel 50 called and asked me if I was interested in coming over there and I really was not, I was kinda discouraged because of what had happened and I decided, well, I'll give it one more shot. I went over there and that was in September of '77 [1977], and what I did was produce and host a live thirty minute talk show Monday through Friday and was also public affairs manager of the station, we started news in '86 [1986], and I've anchored that and, and in some form had a talk show ever since. But I, I, I walked away from a, from another job, it wound up being the best decision that I'd ever made and then I stayed there for, I stayed at 50 or WKBD for twenty-five years.$$Okay. Wow, that is--this story is, is really remarkable, you know?$$It is.$$It just seems like it just--$$It absolutely is, I was never a reporter, I never had to do the street thing, I never had to go to the cities that you've never heard of before to get experience. I never led the gypsy lifestyle, I never left there, I stayed there and never left and I'm still doing special projects for the station (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Now--