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Rudolph Brewington

Broadcast journalist Rudolph W. Brewington was born on November 2, 1946 in New York City. He graduated from Cardinal Hayes high school in 1964 and then enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps. Brewington served two years in the Presidential Honor Guard at Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C. before deploying to the Republic of South Vietnam from 1967 to 1968. Honorably discharged in 1968, Brewington worked in a number of jobs. After studying communications at the University of Maryland at College Park, Brewington transferred to Federal City College (University of the District of Columbia) and graduated with his M.A. degree in adult education. Brewington later studied business administration at Bowie State University and the College of Southern Nevada.

During the 1970s, Brewington held a number of broadcast positions in Washington, D.C. including news anchor at WUST Radio; news director at WOOK Radio; reporter and sportscaster at WWDC Radio; and, news anchor and correspondent at WRC/NBC Radio and WRC-TV. Brewington later co-founded “Black Agenda Reports,” a nationally-syndicated radio production company. He then accepted a position as talk show host at WOL Radio followed by a position as announcer with the nationally-syndicated television news program “America’s Black Forum.” Brewington joined the Sheridan Broadcasting Network in 1981 as a news anchor and correspondent where he covered politics and ten NASA space shuttle missions. Brewington was recalled to active duty in 1990 during the Persian Gulf War, where he served at the Pentagon as a spokesman for the U.S. Navy. He also served as assistant to the Navy’s Chief of Information (CHINFO).

In 1994, Brewington accepted a position as a public affairs expert with the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service; and, in 1995, he co-founded B&B Productions, which produced the award-winning “Marvin Gaye: Pride and Joy” and “King: Celebration of the Man and his Dream.” In 1998, Brewington was appointed communications administrator with the United States chapter of Amnesty International in Washington, D.C. He also served in the U.S. Army Reserve and retired with the rank of Commander in the U.S. Navy Reserve.

Brewington has been actively involved with community groups and organizations including the American Federation of TV & Radio Artists, the National Naval Officers Association, the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Tuskegee Airmen, Inc. and the Vietnam Veterans of America. He has garnered numerous awards and honors including an EMMY Award, the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, the Chesapeake and Virginia AP Spot News Awards and other industry accolades. In 1990, Brewington was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for an investigative series entitled “Domestic Surveillance: America’s Dirty Little Secret.” His military awards include the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal, the Navy Achievement Medal, the Combat Action Ribbon, Vietnam Campaign and Service Medals, and the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal.

Rudolph W. Brewington was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 22, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.318

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/22/2013

Last Name

Brewington

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

William

Schools

Cardinal Hayes High School

University of Maryland

Federal City College

Bowie State University

College of Southern Nevada

P.S. 5

St. Charles Borromeo School

St. Thomas the Apostle School

St. Joseph's Elementary School

First Name

Rudolph

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

BRE03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

You Never Lived Until You Almost Died.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Nevada

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/2/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Las Vegas

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Okra, Tomatoes, Rice, Chicken Feet

Short Description

Broadcast journalist Rudolph Brewington (1946 - ) was the co-founder of 'Black Agenda Reports.' He received a Pulitzer Prize nomination in 1990 for his investigative series, 'Domestic Surveillance: America's Dirty Little Secret.'

Employment

Navy LIFELines Services Network

Amnesty International USA

National Naval Medical Center

Armed Forces Inaugural Committee

United States Immigration and Naturalization Service

United Press International

United States Marine Corps

WUST Radio

WOOK Radio

WWDC Radio (NBC affiliate)

WRC Radio

WOL Radio

WHUT-TV at Howard University

Radio-TV Monitoring Service

Association Personnel, Inc.

Sheridan Broadcasting Corporation

U.S. Navy Public Affairs Office

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637091">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Rudolph Brewington's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637092">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Rudolph Brewington lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637093">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Rudolph Brewington describes his father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637094">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Rudolph Brewington describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637095">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Rudolph Brewington talks about his relationship with his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637096">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Rudolph Brewington describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637097">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Rudolph Brewington remembers the St. Nicholas Houses in New York City</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637098">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Rudolph Brewington describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637099">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Rudolph Brewington describes early experiences of religion</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637100">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Rudolph Brewington remembers his Catholic schooling</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637101">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Rudolph Brewington describes his experiences in foster care</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637102">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Rudolph Brewington talks about his relationship with his twin brother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637103">Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Rudolph Brewington remembers his home life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637104">Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Rudolph Brewington remembers the community in New York City's Harlem neighborhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637105">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Rudolph Brewington remembers his early political consciousness</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637106">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Rudolph Brewington talks about his similarity to his twin brother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637107">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Rudolph Brewington recalls his decision to join the U.S. Marine Corps</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637108">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Rudolph Brewington remembers serving in the U.S. Marine Corps Honor Guard</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637109">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Rudolph Brewington remembers the conflicts between black and white troops in Vietnam</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637110">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Rudolph Brewington talks about his deployment to Vietnam</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637111">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Rudolph Brewington remembers soliciting prostitution in Vietnam</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637112">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Rudolph Brewington recalls the start of his journalistic career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637113">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Rudolph Brewington remembers his transition to civilian life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637114">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Rudolph Brewington talks about working as a reporter for NBC</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637115">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Rudolph Brewington describes the journalistic community in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637116">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Rudolph Brewington talks about the development of black radio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637117">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Rudolph Brewington remembers the black news community in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637118">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Rudolph Brewington recalls working for the Radio-TV Monitoring Service</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637119">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Rudolph Brewington recalls serving as the public affairs director for Association Personnel, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637120">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Rudolph Brewington describes his time at the Sheridan Broadcasting Network</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637121">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Rudolph Brewington describes the structure of the Sheridan Broadcasting Network</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637122">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Rudolph Brewington remembers being recalled to active duty with the U.S. Navy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637123">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Rudolph Brewington describes his role as a public affairs officer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637124">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Rudolph Brewington reflects upon his career in the U.S. Navy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637125">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Rudolph Brewington remembers his public affairs work in the U.S. Navy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637126">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Rudolph Brewington talks about 'Domestic Surveillance: America's Dirty Little Secret'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637127">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Rudolph Brewington talks about the impact of his investigative report on surveillance devices</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637128">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Rudolph Brewington talks about his transition to Amnesty International</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637129">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Rudolph Brewington remembers his most challenging public relations cases</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637130">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Rudolph Brewington talks about his retirement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637131">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Rudolph Brewington describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637132">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Rudolph Brewington talks about his generation's legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637133">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Rudolph Brewington reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637134">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Rudolph Brewington reflects upon the legacy of the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/637135">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Rudolph Brewington narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

3$5

DATitle
Rudolph Brewington recalls his decision to join the U.S. Marine Corps
Rudolph Brewington remembers the conflicts between black and white troops in Vietnam
Transcript
So how did you choose the [U.S.] Marine Corps?$$Well, to be honest I was walking, I was down in Times Square [New York, New York], 'cause Ron [Brewington's brother, HistoryMaker Ronald H. Brewington] and I used to have, I used to work for a UPS [United Parcel Service] subsidiary called, when I was a teenager, called Red Arrow Messenger Service. It's beautiful. I mean we used to wear riding spats and, and with, I'm sorry, the puffed out pants, are we okay? The puffed out pants and we'd ride bicycles and this was the thing that made it--it was, was good. This is all part of my upbringing. Because I didn't have a father, we'll get to that in a minute, but I had a chance to leave Harlem [New York, New York] and go into areas like Park Avenue, Madison Avenue, Sutton Place [New York, New York]. I saw wealthy white people that--and I was like, "Wow look at all this," you know, and, and some of them accepted me and some didn't. I met Irving Berlin. I met this one. I met that one, you know, and, and they were nice to me. Sarah Vaughan, I met, I met all these people on Park Avenue and Madison Avenue and that was a world of, that, that opened up to me. I, I, it broaden my horizons in terms of, there's Harlem but there's a bigger world like that; like mama [Mosetta Smalls] had told us. And so, but she said the key to getting into that bigger world, you know, was education. Ron, for example, worked for a woman who is--no let begin with me. I worked for a woman named Dea Carroll. She used to put on fashion shows in--which is why to this day when I hear people say, "I'm a model," I say "Well, do you, where do you model at?" Unless you're modelling in New York [New York] or Paris [France] you're playing at it. She put on fashion shows in The Pierre [New York, New York], in the Plaza [Plaza Hotel, New York, New York], in, in the St. Moritz [Hotel St. Moritz, New York, New York]. I mean I saw the best of the best, clothes wise, because girls admired me 'cause I was a teenager. They didn't look upon me as a man. So they didn't have a problem dressing in front of me and putting their, putting their clothes on. But it was an eye-opening experience for me. It was all part of my education and it broadened my horizons about the world and the reality of the world.$$So, but things are sort of brewing at the time that you're going (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes.$$--into--$$Yes.$$--into the Marines and they're brewing enough that they sort of crescendo a few years later with the, you know, the anti-war movement.$$Yes ma'am.$$So, but there are those who actually did, you know, and, and, you know, you--were you drafted?$$No. I, I volunteered.$$You volunteered.$$In fact, and now you talk about the reality of the world, a month before I went into the Marine Corps, in fact, in June, this is a part of the history, June of 1964 a young man [James Powell] was shot by a cop [Thomas Gilligan] in New York City six times. Little young man pulled out a knife like that, that big and he was shot and killed and the cop reloaded his guns after shooting him six times and shot him more times. Folks went off. This was the first urban riot in American history. You may recall it, in 1964, June of 1964, there was a major riot in Harlem. Harlem was closed off from the rest of New York City. Food wasn't brought in. Trains, subways didn't stop and that, I was also kind of like, "hm," to me. But no, but I joined the Marine Corps because I wanted to go to college. And so I went down to Times Square one day and I saw this guy and he had this fabulous uniform on, dressed blue tops and he was looking sharp, he was looking kind of sharp. And I said, "I want to be that." And so I joined the Marine Corps. I didn't have any idea that, what all was entailed in joining the Marines, the Marines being the nine one one, the first force to go in. I was fortunate. The first year I spent down in Beaufort, South Carolina [Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort], and then I was at Camp Lejuene [Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, Jacksonville, North Carolina] for a minute. And then I was selected one of the first African Americans selected to serve on the Marine Honor Guard [U.S. Marine Corps Honor Guard] at Marine Barracks, 8th [Street] and I [Street] Southeast in Washington, D.C. where I, I was one of the first blacks to be at White House ceremonies. And I was burying people at Arlington National Cemetery [Arlington, Virginia] and other places, Iwo Jima [United State Marine Corps War Memorial, Arlington, Virginia] and that was another great experience, eye opening experience for me as well. And then af-$$Okay--$$And then after that I went to Vietnam.$(Simultaneous) Now what did--how did Vietnam come about though?$$Oh boy.$$Because this is, you go off to Vietnam.$$Yes ma'am.$$So you go off in--$$Nineteen sixty-seven [1967].$$--sixty-seven [1967].$$Yes ma'am. My platoon commander said to me, I was hoping after my--two year tour, that was a two year tour. Vietnam [Vietnam War] was raging at that time and that was a two year tour, you were guaranteed to stay on the President's honor guard [Marine Presidential Guard] once you did you, once you got there, which kept me out of combat early. So I thought I would go to Quantico, Virginia [Marine Corps Base Quantico], and kind of skate Vietnam and kind of move on the rest of my life. But no, my platoon commander said to me one day, "Ah, Corporal Brewington [HistoryMaker Rudolph Brewington], you haven't had any combat," and he sent me to Vietnam. And that was an eye opener, I mean you know, to see people be around you and they die, they get killed and you're shooting at people and they're shooting back at you. It was a, it was a religious experience for me because it strengthened my faith in God. I mean, you know, everybody is scared. Everybody is afraid of dying and you see death around you and it doesn't touch you. But something did happen in Vietnam that was interesting. The day Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.] was killed, April 4, 1968, I was in Vietnam. I was serving this country, on patrol and we came back and we heard that Martin Luther King had been, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., had been killed. And so, us black Marines [U.S. Marine Corps] got together to hold a memorial service and all of a sudden we heard this clank, clank, clank, clank, clank and it was Marines on an armored personnel carrier pointing weapons at us telling us to break up this unlawful and treasonous, that was the word, treasonous assembly, like what? We're here to give respect to Martin Luther King, Jr. And they pointed rifles at us and for a few days black and white Marines was like, you know, they were like aiming rifles at each other, the shots were fired at each other; they don't say that much about it but it happened. You know, and I came back from Vietnam angry, politicized. I didn't want to deal with the [U.S.] military ever again in my life, ever. That changed later on.$$Well then it was a hard time in many ways--$$Yes.$$--and so you're there, 'cause emotions are popping over here but, I want to--so what other, can you describe--because you were there a year?$$Yes ma'am, thirteen months.$$Okay. So where were you? There are thirteen?$$Thirteen months (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay.

Charles Henry

African American Studies professor Charles Patrick Henry III was born on August 17, 1947 in Newark, Ohio to Charles Patrick Henry, II and Ruth Holbert Henry. Henry attended Central School for elementary and junior high school. As a member of the National Junior Honor Society, he received honors for his studies in business. In 1965, Henry was accepted to Denison University in Granville, Ohio. As a student at Denison University, Henry co-founded the Black Student Union and the Experimental College. As a college student, he also participated in anti-war rallies and programs to improve race relations. After receiving his B.A. degree in political science in 1969, he attended graduate school at the University of Chicago.

As a graduate student, Henry was awarded an American Political Science Congressional Fellowship during which he worked for six months in the office of Hubert Humphrey, and then for six months with the Congressional Black Caucus. While Henry continued his studies, he obtained a teaching position in the political science department at Howard University. In 1974, Henry earned his Ph.D. degree in political science from the University of Chicago. He then left Howard University to teach Black Studies at his alma mater, Denison University. In 1979, Henry received a NEH post-doctoral Fellowship at Atlanta University where he began his research for the biography on Nobel laureate Ralph J. Bunche. After completing his fellowship in 1981, Henry taught at the University of California, Berkeley in the African American Studies department. Henry has since written over seventy articles, and authored six books including Ralph Bunche: Model Negro or American Other?.

From 1986 to 1988, Henry served as Chair of Amnesty International, U.S.A. Board of Directors. In 1994, Henry was appointed by President Bill Clinton for a six year term to the National Council on the Humanities. He also served as a Fulbright Chair in American History and Politics at the University of Bologna, Italy in 2003. Henry lives in Berkeley, California with his wife, Loretta, and their three children.

Charles Patrick Henry, III was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 5, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.062

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/30/2005

4/5/2006

Last Name

Henry

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

P.

Schools

Central School

Newark High School

Denison University

University of Chicago

First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Newark

HM ID

HEN03

Favorite Season

October

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

China

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

8/17/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Oakland

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Lobster

Short Description

African american studies professor Charles Henry (1947 - ) is the author of the prolific biography Ralph J. Bunche: Model Negro or American Other?

Employment

Howard University

Denison University

University of California, Berkeley

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333228">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Charles Henry's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333229">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charles Henry lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333230">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Charles Henry describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333231">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charles Henry describes his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333232">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charles Henry describes his father's side of the family, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333233">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charles Henry describes his paternal grandfather's and great-uncles' Civil War service</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333234">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charles Henry describes his father's side of the family, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333235">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charles Henry describes his father's U.S. military service</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333236">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Charles Henry describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333237">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Charles Henry remembers his early family life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333238">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Charles Henry describes his brother, Oren John Henry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333239">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Charles Henry describes his neighborhood in Newark, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333240">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charles Henry describes his father's Republican Party affiliation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333241">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charles Henry describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333242">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charles Henry recalls his elementary years at Central School in Newark, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333243">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charles Henry describes his experience of racial discrimination at Central School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333244">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charles Henry recalls his experiences of racial discrimination in Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333245">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charles Henry describes a traumatic accident from his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333246">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charles Henry recalls suing the companies responsible for his foot injury</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333247">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charles Henry remembers his teachers at Central School in Newark, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333248">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Charles Henry describes his activities at Newark Senior High School in Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333249">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Charles Henry describes his childhood friends in Newark, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333250">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Charles Henry remembers applying to college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333251">Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Charles Henry describes the formation of his political science interest</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333252">Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Charles Henry describes his father's numbers business in Newark, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333253">Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Charles Henry describes his family's religious background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333254">Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Charles Henry remembers his mentor, HistoryMaker Julius Richardson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333255">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charles Henry remembers attending the A.M.E. church in Newark, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333256">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charles Henry recalls those who influenced him as a high school student</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333257">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charles Henry remembers joining Denison University's American Commons Club</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333258">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charles Henry recalls being dissuaded from studying political science at Denison University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333259">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charles Henry describes his time at Denison University in Granville, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333260">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charles Henry recalls race relations at Denison University in the 1960s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333261">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charles Henry reflects upon his time at Denison University in Granville, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333262">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Charles Henry describes his activism at Denison University in Granville, Ohio</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333263">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Charles Henry recalls his decision to attend the University of Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333264">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Charles Henry describes his political activities in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333265">Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Charles Henry talks about John Hope Franklin</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333266">Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Charles Henry describes his African American cohort at the University of Chicago</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333267">Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Charles Henry recalls his American Political Science Association Congressional Fellowship</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333268">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Charles Henry recounts how he met his wife, Loretta Crenshaw Henry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333269">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Charles Henry describes his work for Senator Herbert Humphrey</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333270">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Charles Henry recalls his work for the Congressional Black Caucus</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333271">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Charles Henry remembers teaching at Howard University in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333272">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Charles Henry recalls directing Denison University's black studies program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333273">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Charles Henry recalls his decision to pursue a postdoctoral fellowship at Atlanta University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333274">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Charles Henry describes his time at Atlanta University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333275">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Charles Henry describes University of California, Berkeley's Department of African American Studies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333276">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Charles Henry recalls his committee involvement at University of California, Berkeley</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333277">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Charles Henry describes his involvement with Amnesty International</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333278">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Charles Henry describes the impact of involvement with Amnesty International</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333279">Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Charles Henry describes his involvement with the National Council for Black Studies</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333280">Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Charles Henry recalls his work in affirmative action at University of California, Berkeley</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333281">Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Charles Henry describes his paternal grandfather's connection to Ralph Bunche's father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333282">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Charles Henry recalls his work for the U.S. Department of State</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333283">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Charles Henry talks about writing 'Ralphe Bunche: Model Negro or American Other?'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333284">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Charles Henry describes how he selected his research topics</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333285">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Charles Henry describes his research on racial reparations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333286">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Charles Henry describes his Fulbright awards</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333287">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charles Henry recalls his appointment to the National Council on the Humanities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333288">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charles Henry recalls his time on the National Council on the Humanities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333289">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Charles Henry reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333290">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Charles Henry reflects upon the trajectory of African Americans in higher education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333291">Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Charles Henry describes values that he considers important</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333292">Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Charles Henry talks about his future plans</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333293">Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Charles Henry shares a message for his descendants</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/333294">Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Charles Henry narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

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DATitle
Charles Henry describes University of California, Berkeley's Department of African American Studies
Charles Henry describes his involvement with Amnesty International
Transcript
Could you tell us a little bit about what's happened at Berkeley [University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California], not that long--$$(Laughter).$$--a little bit (unclear) (laughter)?$$Over the last twenty-five years (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes, in twenty-five words or less (laughter).$$In twenty-five words, a word for each year. Yeah, well, being in black studies it was a really serendipitous move for me because I think if I had been in a political science department I would have been a much more narrow scholar, like working on [U.S.] Congress and some of the issues. My first paper was on the Congressional Black Caucus, and you could easily spend your whole career just working on Congress. But by it--being in a department with people like Barbara Christian and June Jordan and psychologists and, and people from all these disciplines, I needed to learn something and did learn something whether you wanted to or not from each of them because you have to review their work and et cetera in, in, in a small department. And so it was very good and broadening of my perspective and it actually led to, my, my second book, 'Culture and African American Politics' [Charles P. Henry], which used folklore, which used black sermons, which used folk tales to look at black political thought from a kind of folk level. I don't think it would have ever occurred to me to do a book like that if I had been in a political science department.$$Tell me a little bit about the black studies department [Department of African American Studies; Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies]? They had a very interesting beginning, had it settled down when you got there (laughter)?$$Yeah, well, Berkeley never quite settles down, but it certainly wasn't the activist bed that it was in the '60s [1960s]. But we were by then an established department. But I do remember Eldridge Cleaver dropping by my office one day, brought in by one of my sort of community scholars who used to sit in on my courses. He had struck up a friendship with Cleaver and brought him by to meet me and I tried to figure out what Cleaver was really dropping by for. It turns out he wanted to sell some of his Panther [Black Panther Party] papers so we had a discussion about that. And, and I introduced him to our African American studies librarian in the library. But apparently we weren't able to work out a deal, I think he eventually sold them at, at Stanford [Stanford University, Stanford, California]. And we have a lot of interesting people who will come by your office, if you're teaching politics, come by your office with all kinds of interesting ideas that they want to try out on you.$While you were here, you were involved in some other activities that had very little to do with school.$$Absolutely. I think it was probably when I was at Denison [Denison University, Granville, Ohio] in 1977, I, I heard of Amnesty International because they won the Nobel Peace Prize. And, you know, I, I teach politics and, and, we talk about horrible political situations and you can feel kind of frustrated about not being able to do anything. And Amnesty was doing things on the ground even if it was just writing letters, they, you know, at least you feel better if you've done something even if it doesn't change anything. But there were no Amnesty chapters at Denison or in, in the central Ohio area that I knew of. But immediately when I got to Berkeley [University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California], I saw all these Amnesty posters and it turned out Berkeley had the oldest campus network and the largest at that time of all Amnesty's campus networks.$$What's their focus?$$Amnesty is the major human rights organization in the United States working for political prisoners and prisoners of conscience and against torture and against the death penalty. And obviously the politics of that appealed to me, the human rights aspects of it appealed to me. So I said, oh, they've got a Amnesty chapter, I'm gonna go. And so by the end of the first semester I had gone to their meeting. Well, they were thrilled to see a faculty member there. And so they took me under their wing, particularly Liola Herinaka [ph.], who was a staff person at Berkeley who had kind of been the chapter mother of these students for several years. And she, so she was very pleased to have a faculty member, she was an expert in sort of Japanese studies herself. And, and also a nun, which was quite interesting, she loved to dance and smoke cigarettes and was not your typical nun and, and very much an involved activist. And so by the summer, the annual national meeting of Amnesty was in Seattle [Washington]. So Liola and others said, well why don't we drive up for the annual meeting, you'll meet a lot of other people and the secretary general is coming from London [England] and so we all drove up to Seattle. And in Seattle I met Bill Watanabe, who was an Asian American member of the board of directors. And he said, "I'm trying to encourage Asians to participate in Amnesty, I need your help in encouraging African Americans, you're in black studies, you must know how to do this." And I said, "I'd be happy to do what I can." They invited me to several meetings with the staff in New York [New York] and with the board. I think within six months they said, "Why don't you run for the board of directors in Amnesty?" And I said, "I just joined the organization a year ago," you know, "won't people resent it?" And he said, "Well if they resent it, they won't vote for you for the board." So I said, "Well, that's democracy," so I ran for the board, I was elected. And in 1983 joined the board of directors of Amnesty. After three years I was voted chair of the board of directors of Amnesty. And so in 1986 I became chair that was also the year that we began rock concerts across the United States. And then two, three years later we did a global rock concert [A Conspiracy of Hope] involving U2 and Sting and Peter Gabriel and Tracy Chapman. So I got to know the rock music business. I got to know the direct mail business because we got into direct mail, so Amnesty's membership increased by threefold--its, its, contributions increased by threefold. You know, I became, it became like another full-time job at, at, at that level. And I also met my, my, I guess, it would be my second or third great mentor, Ginetta Sagan, who had founded Amnesty in the West. Joan Baez had helped her in that. She was Amnesty's major fundraiser. She had been worked in the opposition to the war, and to the Nazis in Italy in World War II [WWII] and been imprisoned and tortured by the Nazis and had escaped jail. So she had firsthand experience of human rights. And she was a, a great person, a humanitarian and an activist, who had a sense of humor and wanted to have a good time. And Amnesty people generally don't have great senses of humor and don't wanna have a good time so she, (laughter) she was a great person to be around. And so Amnesty turned out to be a great experience for me and, and remains an important part of my life today.