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Danny Glover

Actor Danny Glover was born on July 22, 1946 in San Francisco, California. His parents, Carrie and James Glover, were both postal workers and active members of the NAACP. Glover was a student at Daniel Webster Elementary School and Roosevelt Middle School. He graduated from George Washington High School in 1964. Glover went on to attend San Francisco State University in the late 1960s, where he played a role in the 1968 student strike, which led to the creation of the first ethnic studies department in the country. Glover went on to work for the City of San Francisco as an evaluations specialist and program manager in the Model Cities Program from 1972 to 1977. Glover trained as an actor in the Black Actors’ Workshop at the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco, as well as with Jean Shelton at the Shelton Actors Lab.

Glover’s career as an actor began in college, where he acted in a play by artist-in-residence Amiri Baraka. He went on to act in his first feature film, Escape from Alcatraz in 1979. Glover has been noted for his roles in The Color Purple, the popular Lethal Weapon series (1987, 1989, 1992, and 1998), Predator 2 (1990), To Sleep With Anger (1990), and Angels in the Outfield (1994). He served as a narrator of the animated films of The Prince of Egypt (1998), Antz (1998), and Our Friend, Martin (1999). In 1994, Glover co-founded the Robey Theatre Company, a Los Angeles-based non-profit with the mission of developing new plays about the Black American experience. In 2005, Glover co-founded Louverture Films, a company expressly dedicated to production of socially-conscious films from around the world. As a humanitarian, Glover has lent his voice and aid to the American Postal Workers Union, United Auto Workers, and Service Employees International Union, amongst many other causes.

Glover was the recipient of countless awards and honors, including the BET Humanitarian Award in 2004, an NAACP Image Award – Chairman’s Award in 2003, the 2002 Marian Anderson Award, several NAACP Image Awards for Outstanding Actor, an Independent Spirit Award for Best Male Lead in 1991, and a 2011 Pioneer Award from the National Civil Rights Museum. Glover also received the prestigious Medaille des Arts et des Letters from the French Ministry of Culture and was honored with a tribute at the Deauville International Film Festival in 2011.

A noted humanitarian, Glover served as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Development Program from 1998-2004, during which time he focused on issues of poverty, disease, and economic development in Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. He was a UNICEF Ambassador.

Glover lives in San Francisco with his wife, Eliane Cavalleiro. He has one daughter, Mandisa Glover, from a previous marriage.

Danny Glover was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 20, 2015.

Accession Number

A2015.014

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/20/2015

Last Name

Glover

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

George Washington High School

Roosevelt Middle School

San Francisco State University

Daniel Webster Elementary School

Irving M. Scott School

City College of San Francisco

First Name

Danny

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

GLO02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Home

Favorite Quote

I'm Too Old For This...

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

7/22/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Berkeley

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Mother's Cooking

Short Description

Actor Danny Glover (1946 - ) portrayed the detective Robert Murtaugh in the 'Lethal Weapon' franchise. His activism extended to the 1960s, when he was involved in the Black Student Union at San Francisco State College.

Favorite Color

Beige, Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:2430,29:3950,58:6910,114:7390,144:35802,684:36336,696:44410,787:49630,921:50530,937:56620,980:57460,989:61462,1048:77872,1372:78390,1381:85886,1495:90389,1581:96395,1620:96773,1627:105285,1854:121010,2138:140175,2337:141825,2381:145425,2474:152560,2547:159870,2715:165945,2823:182409,3236:202818,3527:205734,3593:206463,3605:206787,3610:208407,3712:211809,3759:219300,3939:219816,3970:226008,4154:226352,4272:238897,4422:253910,4536$0,0:246,393:37688,821:57319,1145:57684,1151:58706,1285:63451,1421:80245,1681:83950,1760:86420,1795:95820,1943:105225,1998:116050,2108:116610,2116:121570,2221:121890,2226:122290,2232:122610,2239:124530,2272:127650,2349:128450,2361:128850,2367:129250,2374:129730,2381:133570,2394:135620,2427:136112,2434:136686,2442:137096,2448:140376,2517:140950,2526:141360,2532:152487,2729:159612,2816:177248,3146:178194,3159:178968,3174:189240,3422:198795,3718:219470,3980:224464,4020:224866,4027:228290,4078:235985,4318:236390,4324:260719,4731:270763,4943:282774,5093:287004,5169:293882,5280:300796,5339:301160,5344:309100,5439:319390,5541
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Danny Glover's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Danny Glover lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Danny Glover describes his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Danny Glover talks about his parents' activism, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Danny Glover describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Danny Glover remembers his early influences

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Danny Glover describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Danny Glover lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Danny Glover describes his maternal grandparents' farm in Louisville, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Danny Glover talks about his early educational experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Danny Glover recalls his start at Roosevelt Junior High School in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Danny Glover recalls his early experiences of bullying

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Danny Glover describes his upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Danny Glover talks about his relationship with his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Danny Glover talks about his parents' activism, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Danny Glover recalls his parents' employment at the U.S. Post Office Department

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Danny Glover remembers his early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Danny Glover describes his teenage years

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Danny Glover talks about his long term friendships

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Danny Glover recalls his decision to attend San Francisco State College, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Danny Glover recalls his decision to attend San Francisco State College, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Danny Glover describes his involvement in the Black Student Union at San Francisco State College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Danny Glover remembers the student led strike at San Francisco State College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Danny Glover recalls the trials of the strike leaders at San Francisco State College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Danny Glover describes the popular music of his youth

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Danny Glover remembers his parents' perspective on his activism

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Danny Glover describes his connection to the Black Panther Party

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Danny Glover talks about his activism

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Danny Glover talks about the Black Power movement

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Danny Glover remembers the black studies movement

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Danny Glover recalls the founding of the College of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State College

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Danny Glover talks about the political views of African American scholars

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Danny Glover talks about his political ideology

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Danny Glover recalls his early work with the Model Cities program

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Danny Glover remembers the start of his acting career

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

7$4

DATitle
Danny Glover remembers his early experiences of religion
Danny Glover describes his involvement in the Black Student Union at San Francisco State College
Transcript
So, is education--what about religion in the hou- ? Are your parents religious or not?$$Yeah.$$Okay.$$Yeah. My mother [Carrie Hunley Glover] came out of, she, my grandparents--my f- my grandfather [Mack Hunley], Baptist. My grandmother, A.M.E. [African Methodist Episcopal]. Pine Hill [Pine Hill Baptist Church] was my grandfather's church in Louisville, Georgia. Lofton [Lofton A.M.E. Church] in Wrens, Georgia was my grandmother's church. And my mother converted, from my understanding, and it's to C.M.E. [Christian Methodist Episcopal] because she went to a C.M.E. college [Paine College, Augusta, Georgia]. And so, we went to C.M.E. church from my earliest memories, and still I'm a member of Missionary Temple [Missionary Temple C.M.E. Church], right on, right here in the city, in the heart of the black community in the Fillmore [Fillmore District, San Francisco, California]. And I remember going there from the child- from childhood, you know. Before we moved from the projects to buying a home, it was just--once we bought our home in the Western Addition, in Haight-Ashbury [San Francisco, California], it was closer; the church was closer. I didn't have to, we didn't have to come all the way across the other side of town to go to church. But yeah, my mother was very much involved in the church. She, her involve- the level of involvement--our level of involvement did not match my mother's level of involvement (laughter), or her desire. Because in the church, the church performed certain other things just besides spiritual uplifting. It gives you status, permanent status. And, and my mother would always try to put me and my sister and my brother in these pl- (laughter) in the Easter play or the Christmas play. And we'd be up there in the back holding a palm or something (laughter) in the corner or something like that. Mama would say, "How come I come to these and you have--you never have nothing to say? None of y'all never have nothing to say." We said, "Shoot, Ma, we don't even want to, we don't want to be here," (laughter). And then--because you, you know, you're anointed through your children. They'd say, "Oh, Ms. Riley [ph.]." (Cough) Or, "Oh, Ms. Hanberry [ph.], oh, Ms. Hanberry, your--," I don't think Ms. Hanberry had children, or whoever this member was, "your child was so wonderful." She never, my mother never got that from nobody (laughter) because I had--like, neither one of us never had, we never had a lead in a play. We never had the lead in a hymn. We were always in the background, and all that stuff like that. We were--it was me, Connie [Connie Glover Grier], and Reggie [Reginald Glover], you know. In fact it's funny, because for a long time--so this is 1958, '59 [1959] when 'Raisin in the Sun' ['A Raisin in the Sun,' Lorraine Hansberry] came out. And I was like--there was a woman named Lorraine Hansberry, and I was just enamored with her. I just watched it, and nobody ever come up to her. I said how come people don't come up to her and tell her how great her play is, you know (laughter)? I had heard about the play, I had read about the play and everything else.$$You read about the play and heard about the play?$$Huh?$$You heard about the play?$$Oh, I heard about the play. This is Lorraine Hanber- I thought--I didn't get the last--it's (pronunciation) Hansberry (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Hansberry.$$Hansberry. And I said, nobody ever--and I'm sitting up in the church, and I watch her. Moment I read it, I said--and I connected the name, because she was prominent in the church. But nobody ever said nothing. Nobody ever would ever come to her and say, and I thought--it was, it was funny. I thought that she, that she was the woman who wrote the play--$$(Laughter) Okay. Right.$$--'Raisin in the Sun'--as a kid you know (laughter).$$(Laughter).$$And (unclear) this is my secret, you know, as a twelve year old kid; you know, twelve year old kid, or eleven year old kid whenever this comes out I said, man, she goes to our church! (Laughter) You know, it's the thing--you know then somebody--I'm glad I found out. I forgot how I found out that it wasn't the same woman. But I'm glad I didn't kind of like announce it or (unclear) (laughter). But I wasn't that kind of person. I wasn't going to go out and say, "You know who goes to my church? Lorraine Hansberry," you know and everything. And I wasn't that kind of person, you know, and everything else. I just waited and I found out, boy, that's not her, you know.$So, there's just amazing--then, you, you'd hear, read everything. Like, like I remember--now that we've become good friends, Don L. Lee.$$Oh, right.$$Don, I remember him when he was Don L. Lee (laughter).$$Now, he's Haki--$$Huh? [HistoryMaker] Haki Madhubuti (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) Madhubuti. Right.$$Remember, I remember when he was Don L. (unclear) Don L. (laughter). So, all this stuff--he had to calm us down, all your stuff, it's just, it's terrific. And you're just saying, now--you're saying, there's a cat--okay, what's, what do I read, you know? Sort of struggling, what do I read? What is the conversation? What is, what is the narrative that's going on here? You're trying to figure--you don't put it in that terms and everything else. So, you have your first major book that you struggle through, Franz Fanon, 'Wretched of the Earth' ['The Wretched of the Earth'].$$Right.$$Nineteen sixty-seven [1967]. Say, whoa. Then you try to read it over and over and over to get the concepts and chara- learn the concepts, what he's talking about. And, and, and, really, your relationship to the concept is visceral the first time. You just feel it, the way he talks about the colonizing, the colonizing, everything else, in some sense. So, you have to, you have to now put on a little hat, and see yourself as a coloni- colonizer as well. So, all these kinds of things are the kind of things that San Francisco State [San Francisco State College; San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California], in a sense, began to shape there. I remember reading Nkrumah [Kwame Nkrumah] you know. I remember, I remember reading Julius Nyerere's African socialism. I wanted to major in economics, now. You know, I'd come out there with the idea I wanted to major in engineering because I was good at math. But it was economics now. So, all these kind of things. And, and it was always--I mean that three years, that three years through 1969, from the spring of--the summer of 1966 through the fall of 1969 and into 1970 were some of the most intense years of my life.$$Right, because there's a lot of activity.$$We brought [HistoryMaker] Nathan Hare out in 19- in the fall of 1967.$$Well, talk about that. Because this, when I was reading about this, I was thinking this would make a really good movie.$$Huh?$$I was thinking it would make a really good movie. Because this--first of all, what you're talking about with Nathan Hare and the takeover--$$Yeah.$$--you know is really the start of black studies. And--$$Well, I think on the one hand, Nathan Hare was the primary voice. He was at Howard University [Washington, D.C.]. And like I said, we know, we controlled the budget, the student budget, let's bring Nathan Hare out there, sp- fall of 1967. And Nathan Hare--and the strike came out of--. And we had Summerskill [John Summerskill], who was the president, who seemed to be one of--kind of like Kennedy liberals and everything else, and everything. He'd lived in Africa, worked in Africa and everything, was (unclear). So, you know, we got a lot of leeway. We'd go in there, and we're young and obnoxious in some way. You know, we go in there, in a meeting with him. And somebody--I'm not going to name who--would take their, have their bullet bandolier on, and then throw it on the table before the meeting (laughter). We'd do stuff like that. We planned stuff like that. We'd go into the meeting and say (laughter)--we would come in, we'd be meeting and someone would take off their bandolier, you know, the bullet--then throw it on the table first and start--you know what I'm saying (laughter). Some (unclear) (laughter). I mean (unclear). And I remember that stuff. You know, I remember we did that stuff, you know. We set the tone of the meeting, right here: "Now we have to have--," this and all, you know. And he was our friend, and--as much as he wanted to be a friend within the narrative and context of the school itself. And then, but the other things that came out of there--since they were organizers back as far as 1966, they were involved in the Western Addition Community Organization, WACO, another organization that were mobilizing in the black community, in the Fillmore [Fillmore District, San Francisco, California]--the traditional black community, in the Fillmore, mobilizing for the fight against redevelopment. So, we would attend meetings and sit there in meetings and just simply be observers; as students, as gophers, or runners, or whatever (unclear), whatever, and facilitate the meeting. So, we were assigned as the BSU meeting--as the BSU, as a part of the Black Student Union, to go to certain meetings in the community and re- and report back. That's how, that's how we functioned. So, we weren't just simply thought of us as students; we had an off-campus office. We got redevelopment agency, who we're barking at to give us an off-campus office right on Ellis [Street] and--between Fillmore, between Fillmore [Street] and Steiner [Street]. We had an office there right around the corner from the really wonderful soul food place. And there were all these things that were there. I think, I think on the one hand, to be--if you look at it now, it's certainly driven by our orientation and commitment, but, and driven--for those who were young, we followed those who had been in the struggle and everything else. And, but, a lot of that was sponsored by our own kind of, like bravado and naivete of youth, you know, all of that stuff.

Hilary Shelton

NAACP lobbyist and policymaker Hilary Otis Shelton was born on August 12, 1958, in St. Louis, Missouri. Shelton received his B.A. degree in political science from Howard University in Washington, D.C., and went on to attain his M.A. degree in communications from the University of Missouri in St. Louis.

Shelton first worked as the federal program policy director for the United Methodist Church’s social justice agency, The General Board of Church and Society. There, he worked on the church’s public policy agenda, particularly on issues pertaining to black colleges and universities. He was highly involved in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1991, and also advocated for several other important acts including the Violence Against Women Act. A champion of causes affecting the African American community, Shelton then went on to serve in the position of federal liaison/assistant director to the government affairs department of The College Fund/UNCF, also known as The United Negro College Fund, in Washington, D.C. There, Shelton worked with federal government agencies and departments, as well as colleges and universities to secure the survival, growth, and educational programming excellence of the forty private historically black colleges and universities throughout the United States.

From there, Shelton moved on to the NAACP’s Washington bureau, where he handles federal and legislative affairs as well as public policy concerns for the organization’s Washington, D.C., office. Shelton serves on a number of national boards of directors including The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, The Center for Democratic Renewal, the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence and the Congressional Black Caucus Institute among many others. Shelton has been honored numerous times for his work. He was the recipient of the National NAACP Medgar W. Evers Award for Excellence, the highest honor bestowed upon a national professional staff member of the NAACP; the American Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee’s Excellence in Advocacy Award; and the Religious Action Center’s Civil Rights Leadership Award in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Shelton lives in Washington, D.C., with his wife, Paula Young Shelton, and their three sons, Caleb Wesley, Aaron Joshua, and Noah Otis Young Shelton.

Accession Number

A2008.098

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/28/2008 |and| 3/5/2012

Last Name

Shelton

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Harrison School

Beaumont High School

Humboldt Academy of High Learning

University of Missouri - St. Louis

Northeastern University

Howard University

First Name

Hilary

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

SHE04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

There's Nothing You Can't Get Done If You're Willing To Let Someone Else Get Credit For It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/12/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Crepes (Fruit)

Short Description

Civic leader Hilary Shelton (1958 - ) was the head of the NAACP Washington Bureau. He helped to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1991 and the Violence Against Women Act. He also served as the United Negro College Fund's federal liaison, and as the federal program policy director for the United Methodist Church’s social justice agency, The General Board of Church and Society.

Employment

NAACP Washington Bureau

Washington Office on Africa

National Impact

United Methodist Church General Board of Church and Society

United Negro College Fund

Greater Boston Legal Services

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:664,17:4068,94:4620,101:5448,111:6368,127:15188,232:15650,247:15958,252:17190,271:18884,308:19423,316:25562,414:26178,427:27487,452:29566,493:30105,501:32030,541:32646,556:34186,589:35110,603:39922,630:41434,659:42442,675:43306,688:43666,694:44458,707:45394,732:46042,744:55658,900:56346,910:60130,961:60474,966:62108,984:66770,1013:67586,1026:69014,1062:69490,1071:73230,1153:74250,1180:75814,1214:76086,1219:76630,1229:77174,1238:81839,1280:82115,1285:83081,1301:90671,1471:91016,1477:91361,1483:104670,1758:109710,1860:113280,2108:114190,2122:114470,2127:121242,2199:122016,2204:126230,2421:136921,2488:137407,2498:137812,2504:139999,2560:147630,2669:148120,2678:149170,2702:150080,2721:155470,2826:156800,2859:157640,2875:158550,2899:159110,2909:159670,2958:163150,2970:163540,2976:164320,3001:164970,3012:167310,3057:167830,3067:171210,3126:171535,3132:172250,3145:173030,3163:173810,3178:174395,3188:175890,3221:176735,3245:177515,3260:177970,3268:179985,3312:180830,3325:181155,3331:181805,3355:182325,3370:182585,3375:183040,3383:189860,3440:190490,3450:190910,3459:191820,3490:192730,3504:193850,3527:194900,3569:195180,3574:195460,3579:195880,3597:196790,3611:197210,3619:206306,3772:206554,3777:206926,3785:208786,3881:209964,3919:211700,3959:212878,3985:213374,3995:213746,4002:215916,4044:216908,4063:217714,4078:223074,4131:223538,4146:224176,4158:224930,4173:225394,4187:227250,4239:227540,4245:230816,4283:231248,4293:231626,4302:232004,4326:232706,4338:235942,4379:236865,4394:237149,4399:237575,4406:242261,4514:243184,4530:244178,4550:245740,4583:249858,4682:250213,4688:252485,4756:260970,4863:261510,4874:263430,4925:264750,4954:265290,4964:265590,4970:268834,4997:269698,5011:270490,5025:271426,5041:280660,5200$0,0:204,4:2244,44:5100,111:9860,236:11288,271:12036,284:17408,392:19584,439:25119,471:27455,522:27893,528:28696,543:33733,630:34171,637:40449,756:45100,770:57506,939:57989,950:63302,1120:65165,1178:66683,1204:67373,1215:68408,1239:68822,1252:70409,1284:70754,1290:71720,1305:72065,1311:72479,1318:74135,1349:74549,1356:88860,1563:91345,1618:91771,1626:94895,1691:96102,1714:96812,1727:97309,1735:98374,1761:104834,1802:106120,1813:106400,1818:107240,1834:108710,1867:108990,1872:110530,1904:114450,1978:118090,2056:118370,2061:118790,2069:129967,2248:135004,2364:138385,2432:139903,2465:149760,2546:152055,2577:152480,2583:153160,2593:153585,2602:153925,2607:154690,2618:155370,2631:160090,2668:160505,2674:167477,2772:172878,2814:177170,2916:178354,2939:178724,2945:179242,2954:180944,2982:181240,2987:181610,2993:185216,3007:185654,3013:186895,3030:189085,3065:189523,3071:190034,3079:191348,3113:192954,3167:195509,3205:196093,3220:197334,3239:197772,3247:198210,3255:207145,3363:208180,3388:212458,3480:212941,3488:213217,3493:215839,3557:219013,3629:221221,3670:227689,3695:228103,3703:230242,3753:231829,3804:234934,3853:239005,3926:240799,4012:241351,4021:242800,4091:243076,4096:248335,4116:248579,4121:254435,4283:268214,4587:273398,4713:275254,4762:275638,4769:278390,4826:281974,4922:286590,4934:294585,5139:296340,5280:296795,5288:304654,5391:305206,5400:307414,5508:312727,5634:313624,5647:313969,5653:314659,5664:317488,5712:324270,5788:326719,5828:331222,5914:339122,6056:353813,6316:354129,6322:362173,6424:370660,6571
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Hilary Shelton's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton remembers the attacks on his maternal family in Gore Springs, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton describes the African American community in Gore Springs, Mississippi

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Hilary Shelton talks about his maternal grandparents' land

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Hilary Shelton describes his parents' courtship

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Hilary Shelton describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Hilary Shelton describes his father's education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Hilary Shelton talks about his parents' marriage and move to St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton describes his father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton describes the personalities of his parents and grandparents

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton remembers his household in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Hilary Shelton describes the North City neighborhood of St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Hilary Shelton describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Hilary Shelton recalls the prevalence of crime in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Hilary Shelton talks about the '20/20' investigation of segregation in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Hilary Shelton describes his experiences of racial discrimination in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Hilary Shelton remembers the gang violence in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton remembers the faculty of the Harrison School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton talks about his parents' interest in politics

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton recalls his introduction to the NAACP at the Antioch Baptist Church in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton recalls the civil rights leadership of St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Hilary Shelton describes his experiences at the Humboldt School in St. Louis, Missouri, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Hilary Shelton describes his experiences at the Humboldt School in St. Louis, Missouri, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Hilary Shelton describes his experiences at Beaumont High School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Hilary Shelton remembers the band at Beaumont High School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton recalls the music of his youth

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton remembers the Black Student Union at Beaumont High School

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton recalls the films and television shows of his childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton recalls the films and television shows of his childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Hilary Shelton describes his involvement with the NAACP Youth Council

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Hilary Shelton talks about Clarence Thomas

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Hilary Shelton describes his early aspirations

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Hilary Shelton's interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton recalls his influences at Beaumont High School in St. Louis, Miss

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton talks about the demographics of St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton describes his early involvement in civil rights activities

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton remembers meeting Frankie Freeman

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Hilary Shelton describes the activities of the Black Student Union at Beaumont High School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Hilary Shelton recalls his decision to attend Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Hilary Shelton describes his involvement with the American Indian Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Hilary Shelton talks about his experiences at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Hilary Shelton recalls the notable speakers at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton describes his work at Greater Boston Legal Aid, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton describes his work at Greater Boston Legal Aid, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton remembers the United States Student Association

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton describes his forensics professor at the University of Missouri - St. Louis

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Hilary Shelton talks about the administration of President Ronald Reagan

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Hilary Shelton talks about the administration of President James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr.

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Hilary Shelton describes his master's thesis on the Iran Contra Affair

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Hilary Shelton remembers lobbying the University of Missouri to divest from South Africa

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton describes how he came to join the Washington Office on Africa

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton describes his work with the Washington Office on Africa, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton describes his work with the Washington Office on Africa, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton talks about the Civil Rights Act of 1991

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Hilary Shelton recalls the appointment of Clarence Thomas to the U.S. Supreme Court

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Hilary Shelton recalls his experiences at the University of Missouri - St. Louis, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton recalls his experiences at the University of Missouri - St. Louis, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton remembers the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1991

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton describes his position at the United Negro College Fund

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton describes how he came to head the NAACP Washington Bureau

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Hilary Shelton remembers the Million Man March

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Hilary Shelton describes the history of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Hilary Shelton describes his work at the NAACP Washington Bureau

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Hilary Shelton talks about racial profiling, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton talks about racial profiling, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton reflects upon President Barack Obama's administration, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton reflects upon President Barack Obama's administration, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton describes the NAACP's current lobbying activities, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Hilary Shelton describes the NAACP's current lobbying activities, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Hilary Shelton reflects upon the racism in the United States today

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Hilary Shelton describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Hilary Shelton reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Hilary Shelton reflects upon his life

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Hilary Shelton talks about his family

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Hilary Shelton talks about the influence of his grandfathers and uncles

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Hilary Shelton describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

2$2

DATape

8$7

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
Hilary Shelton describes his position at the United Negro College Fund
Hilary Shelton remembers lobbying the University of Missouri to divest from South Africa
Transcript
How long did you work for the United Methodist?$$About ten years.$$Ten, okay.$$And I left the United Methodist Church to go to work for the, for the United Negro College Fund.$$Okay.$$Of course, the, the name is slightly different. It's still the same organization. They just changed their name to UNCF, the college fund. So I spent some time working with Bill Gray [HistoryMaker William H. Gray, III], who at the time was the president and CEO of the United Negro College Fund or U--UNCF the college fund, working at the government affairs office here in Washington, D.C., to try to help find, really, resources, money and other resources for those--at that time, forty-one historically black colleges and universities.$$Okay, now this is the beginning of the Bush administration, right?$$Yes--$$Okay.$$--it, it was part of the Bush administration. But interestingly enough, when it comes to HBCUs, there's a tendency for even Republican administrations to be very helpful to HBCUs. Education seems to be one of those areas, most of the time--sometimes it gets used for political pra- in, in a politically problematic way as well, but most of the time education, particularly in support for those HBCUs, seems to rise above the partisan fray. It is something good to see. So the Bush administration, both Herbert Walker Bush, and more so than, than George W. Bush [President George Walker Bush], was very, very supportive of HBCUs and, and other programs, including the White House office on HBCUs [White House Initiative on Historically Black College and Universities], in addressing those concerns.$$Yeah, I think George W. Bush during this period made his famous statement that a Negro is a terrible thing to waste [sic.]--$$Oh--$$--or something, it was something (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) I, I, and I think that was Dan Quayle. Yeah, yeah--$$Oh, that, yeah, yeah--$$--his vice president at the time (laughter).$$--the convoluted--yeah, during the old Bush (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, they've got--$$I'm sorry.$$No, no, but you're right; that was, that was [President] George Herbert Walker Bush's vice president at the time. And I remember how, how he kind of sloshed that, that slogan, but (laughter)--$$A mind is a terrible thing to waste, and he added convoluted--$$Yeah, ex- exactly, exactly (laughter).$$Right. Okay, all right--$$I think he had a little problem swallowing potato too during that time.$$Okay, UNCF, so, so what were--well, the, the issue was always to raise money for--$$Absolutely, absolutely. It was a different approach for me. You know, I've, I'd always been more actively involved in not for profit organizations that focus on really bringing as many people on board to support moving the agenda forward. So in essence, we leveraged our policy positions by educating as many people and then coordinating how they approached their members of [U.S.] Congress, House [U.S. House of Representatives] and [U.S.] Senate, the White House, and even, and the government agencies and the like. So, but the UNCF, the focus was less that and more focusing on engaging those historically black colleges and universities, the support of the corporate community along those lines, but also the engagement and support of the federal government to address, you know, helping to secure those black colleges, to be able to provide a good high quality education at an affordable price. So it was a little bit different than the work we'd done around the more controversial issues. As a matter of fact, you kind of, in, in that arena, you stay away from a lot of the controversial issues. You're primarily go- primary goal all the time is to raise money. And I, I remember sitting down with Bill Gray the first time. And I had in my mind the same kind of construct we use here at the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] that we'd use at the United Methodist Church and other groups I'd worked for, which is the construct in which you engage members, have them join a network, set up coalition partners throughout the country, and then leverage them when we're trying to pass pieces of legislation throughout the House and the Senate or trying to, to engage the president of the White House in what we're trying to do. But there was always a concern that if we went that route, that it might become too partisan in its perception and that having people engaged along those lines, writing letters to those businesses and so forth, might actually create a problem for the continuation of the fundraising. Even though we knew that everything we'd be doing would be quite legal within the construct of a 501(c)(3), there were those concerns, so we kind of changed the approach. Quite frankly, that's also why I ended up missing the civil rights community, missing that engagement for those membership units across the country, whether it's in churches or, or whether a small civic organizations or groups in local communities. I missed that engagement of people in the process and the struggle for civil rights advancement. And the, and of course, that's why I decided to leave the United Negro College Fund and, and come to work for the NAACP.$Now what did you do after graduate school?$$That came to the--I came to Washington, D.C. As I was finishing my program at the University of Missouri - St. Louis [St. Louis, Missouri], one of the big issues for us was apartheid in South Africa. And the big movement among colleges and universities was to divest holdings in all corporations that do business in South Africa. This is a time in which, of course, Nelson Mandela was in Robben Island [South Africa]. It was a time in which apartheid was the law of the land in South Africa, and of course, the colonial power of the, the, of South Africa was one that was affecting the entire region. So it was an amazing time along those lines. We were working then as students in a progressive movement to not support those corporations or U.S. interests that would exploit people of African descent in South Africa. So, I had, I met with a guy named Damu Smith. Among other things I did as a student, I also sat on advisory board while with the U.S. Student Association [U.S. National Student Association], with the American Committee on Africa out of New York [New York], with TransAfrica [TransAfrica Forum; TransAfrica] here in Washington, D.C., and the Washington Office on Africa, which also here in Washington, D.C. These were the three premier Africa focus groups working on apartheid and South Africa issues and focusing on those nine southern states of South Af- of Southern Africa and how the Republic of South Africa was affecting even their stability. So, Damu Smith was someone I'd met in some of those meetings. I was finishing up and really wanted to come back to Washington and get involved in an advocacy type organization and position but wanted to focus on the federal government, on the [U.S.] Congress and the government agencies, of course. We were finishing up my program at the same time we were also finishing up a disinvestment of corporations doing business in South Africa that were in the university's portfolio, both their endowment portfolios as well as their pension funds. We were able to convince then Governor Ashcroft [John Ashcroft] from Missouri, that later became the attorney general of the United States and Senator Ashcroft prior to becoming attorney, as, as well as a Republican treasurer in Missouri, a guy named Wendell Bailey, that it was not in the best interest of the State of Missouri nor the University of Missouri to invest funds in corporations that do business in South Africa that many argued took over 750,000 jobs out of the United States to South Africa, where they force black people to work for less money than white folks, where the law of the land prohibited black folks from supervising over white folks, or moving to high--and corporate structure, so and where security and--well, where, where calm was created through force, the guns. And we were seeing all the videos of Soweto [South Africa], the, the videos of uprisings in other parts of South African, and, and the very harsh response from South African military forces and others, killing so many South African blacks along the way. So with all that going, we were able to convince the governor--at first the, first the treasurer of the state, who was also a Republican, that it made no sense for Missouri to invest money in corporations that are taking jobs out of Missouri anyway and actually working against the very issues of the students. Most students were going to college to prepare themselves for jobs. Doesn't make sense for us to take student money and put it into corporations that are taking those jobs our students want out of the country to have people doing it that were, they pay much less money. We shouldn't have to compete with that, especially with our money. And they got it, and indeed the governor signed a bill that was introduced and passed through the state legislature that the students were actually involved in pushing. We were able to get the board (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So this is--I'm sorry. This is nineteen eighty--'84 [1984]?$$Yeah.$$Eighty-four [1984], okay.$$Yeah, yeah. We were able to get the, we were able to get the university to divest all of this money from holdings in corporations doing business in South Africa through its Board of Curators. It's what they called their board of regents, and they call it in some other place the Board of Curators. And I remember those fights and whatnot during my years at the University of Missouri.$$You all were good then. You, you were really paying attention in class.$$We, we, we worked it out. As a matter of fact, I, I think I, I had to be, be too pushy about it, but I think in some ways we, we added something to those classroom conversations with what we did outside. Some of the professors really appreciated it. As a matter of fact, because this was as much a movement in the political science arena, most of the political science apret- professors were really fascinated by the work we were doing and very supportive along those lines. But also, when you talk about disinvestment, that's actually a business term, and the University of Missouri also had a business school [University of Missouri - St. Louis College of Business Administration, St. Louis, Missouri]. And we were able to engage the business student government as well into some of the things we were doing that draw a parallel for us to even Harvard's business school [Harvard Business School, Boston, Massachusetts]. I mean, the arguments we were making were not just social justice arguments. They were business arguments. They were investment stabilities arguments. They were arguments about which divet- which investment portfolios would derive the best return for the university, for its professors as they retired, but also the running of the school, as we're talking about programs along those lines. See, it was a, it was a fascinating thing, getting those different sectors, and very eye opening for me, involved in a movement to actually impact what was going on in South Africa by involving ourselves into social corporate behavior here in the United States.$$Okay. Now, were you getting paid to do any of these, these activities at that time?$$Not really. As a matter of fact, while I was at the University of Missouri, because I held office, we got a stipend, you know, which went to pay my tuition and that kind of thing and whatnot. So it freed me up in some ways to be able to do this kind of work, but it was all voluntary.$$Yeah, so I figured you kind of on a lean budget there.$$Oh yeah, yeah, I was poor student.

Bishop John Hurst Adams

Bishop and college president John Hurst Adams was born November 27, 1927 in Columbia, South Carolina to Charity Nash Adams, a homemaker and Reverend Eugene Avery Adams, an African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) minister and educator. Adams graduated from Booker T. Washington High School in Columbia, South Carolina and in 1947 earned an A.B. degree in history from Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina. Subsequently, he earned his Bachelor of Sacred Theology (S.T.B.) degree and Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.) degree from Boston University School of Theology in 1952 and 1956, respectively. Adams also studied at Harvard University and Union Theological Seminary, as well.

As a seminary student, Adams was assigned to the pastorate of Bethel A.M.E. Church in Lynn, Massachusetts. Upon graduating, he served on the seminary teaching faculty at Payne Theological Seminary, Wilberforce University in Ohio. In 1956, Adams was selected to serve as President of Paul Quinn College, Waco, Texas during which time he also served as campus pastor to all the students. In 1972, Adams was selected as the 87th Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church after a prophetic ministry at First A.M.E. Church in Seattle, Washington and Grant A.M.E. Church in Los Angeles, California. At the time of his retirement in 2004/2005, Adams had served as Bishop of five separate Episcopal Districts to include his home district of South Carolina from 1992 to 2000. He was Senior Bishop of the A.M.E. Church from 1988 until his retirement.

Adams served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC), Allen University, Edward Waters College and Morris Brown College. In addition, he served as transitional Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the Atlanta University Center. He founded and was the Chairman Emeritus of the Congress of National Black Churches, Inc. (CNBC). Moreover, Bishop Adams is the initiator of Executive Management Training for Black Church Leaders and Chairman of the Institute of Church Administration and Management (ICAM) Board of Trustees. He was active with the Joint Center on Political and Economic Studies, Transafrica, National Black United Fund, King Center Development Board and Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.

Adams was the husband of Dr. Dolly Deselle Adams of New Orleans, Louisiana. They had three adult children and eight grandchildren.

Adams passed away on January 10, 2018 at age 90.

Accession Number

A2005.249

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2005

Last Name

Adams

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Hurst

Occupation
Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

Wilberforce University

Johnson C. Smith University

Boston University School of Theology

Case Western Reserve University

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Columbia

HM ID

ADA08

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

We Pray Much Your Strength.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

11/27/1927

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potatoes

Death Date

1/10/2018

Short Description

Bishop Bishop John Hurst Adams (1927 - 2018 ) served as Bishop for the African Methodist Episcopal Church for thirty-two years and rose to national prominence as a religious and civil rights leader.

Employment

Bethel AME Church

Payne Theological Seminary

Paul Quinn College

First A.M.E Church

Grant Memorial A.M.E Church

87th Bishop, African Methodist Episcopal Church

Tenth Episcopal District

Second Episcopal District

Sixth Episcopal District

Seventh Episcopal District

Eleventh Episcopal District

Emory University Candler School of Theology

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop John Hurst Adams' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his family's land ownership

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about his family name and his ancestry

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his wife and family

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his father's confrontation of the Ku Klux Klan

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers hearing Thurgood Marshall argue a case

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his childhood in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes notable individuals from Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the Waverly neighborhood of Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the changes to the Waverly neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Waverly Elementary School in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his early interests

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Carver Junior High School in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his early religious experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his early employment

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls Booker T. Washington High School in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his activities at Booker T. Washington High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Johnson C. Smith University, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Johnson C. Smith University, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his decision to attend Boston University School of Theology

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his decision to attend Boston University School of Theology

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls notable theologians at Boston University School of Theology, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls notable theologians at Boston University School of Theology, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his early experiences as a pastor and teacher

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his election as president of Paul Quinn College in Waco, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his role as a pastor at Paul Quinn College

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers his civil rights activism in Waco, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about the legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his role in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the history of activism in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his pastorate of First A.M.E. church in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers the Central Area Civil Rights Committee

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls his pastorate of Grant A.M.E. Church in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his ministry

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his election as a bishop

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his role as bishop of the Tenth Episcopal District, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his role as bishop of the Tenth Episcopal District, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the Congress of National Black Churches

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers the Vietnam War

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about the military industrial complex

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls serving as bishop to the Second Episcopal District

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his time as bishop of the Sixth Episcopal District

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about Morris Brown College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the legacy of the African Methodist Episcopal church, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the legacy of the African Methodist Episcopal church, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Bishop John Hurst Allen talks about biblical history, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about biblical history, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers serving as bishop of the Seventh Episcopal District, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers serving as bishop of the Seventh Episcopal District, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about female clergy in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the role of technology in the African Methodist Episcopal church

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams recalls serving as the bishop of the Eleventh Episcopal District

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers his retirement as a bishop

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst describes the Institution of Church Administration and Management

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about The HistoryMakers project

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his values, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Bishop John Hurst Adams shares advice for those pursuing the ministry

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his career

Tape: 7 Story: 13 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his missionary work in Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Bishop John Hurst Adams talks about affirmative action and civil rights

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the role of religion in the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes the role of sports in the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his values, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Bishop John Hurst Adams describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Bishop John Hurst Adams shares a message to future generations

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Bishop John Hurst Adams reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Bishop John Hurst Adams narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Bishop John Hurst Adams remembers hearing Thurgood Marshall argue a case
Bishop John Hurst Adams describes his ministry
Transcript
And of course, one of my other sparkling memories was that when he [Adams' father, Eugene Avery Adams, Sr.] and others--and I give Columbia [South Carolina] credit. They had some clergy who were real serious about justice issues. My father, there was a Reverend Carl Klug [ph.] who was a C.M.E. [Colored Methodist Episcopal; Christian Methodist Episcopal], and Reverend Rita [ph.] who was a Baptist. There was a Reverend Jenkins [ph.] who was a Baptist, and a Reverend Hinton [James M. Hinton] who was in addition to being a preacher was the president of Pilgrim Insurance Company [Pilgrim Health and Life Insurance Company].$$Okay.$$And they had stuff going on. And they brought Thurgood Marshall to Columbia to file two suits. One was for equal teachers pay in the State of South Carolina. And the second one was for the right of blacks to vote in the Democratic primary. When Thurgood Marshall came to argue those cases, there was a Yankee judge who moved to Charleston [South Carolina] who heard the cases. His name was Judge Waring [Julius Waties Waring]. I remember all this like it happened yesterday, because it was, it was a pivotal part of my growing up experience. And my father took me out of school and took me to the court, because he wanted me to hear and see Thurgood Marshall argue the cases for equal teachers pay and the right to vote in the Democratic primary in South Carolina. Both cases he won, because Judge Waring ruled in his favor. And of course, the appeals court held it up.$$Praise God.$$Now, those are the kind of memories which I was privileged to have, not because of me, but because of my parents, my father in particular, and the kind of community in which I lived. Because he was one of many clergy and activists in that community at that time who sort of created this ferment, which influenced me greatly. So, if you want to explain why I'm branded as a militant, it's because of these childhood events (laughter).$$We thank God for your childhood events.$What are some of the highlights of your pastorate at Grant A.M.E. [Grant A.M.E. Church, Los Angeles, California] and First A.M.E. [First A.M.E. Church] in Seattle [Washington]? After all, these two pastorates would propel you to be the eighty-seventh bishop in the A.M.E. [African Methodist Episcopal] church.$$Well, I think the focus of my ministry has always been on two things. One is the empowerment of people. I'm not much of a builder of buildings, although I have shared in doing that several times. But that was not what I was about. I tried, more than that, to build opportunities for people, and to equip people to take advantage of the opportunities that might come their way. So, that has always been the focus of my ministry. Even the focus of my ministry as a bishop has been the enabling and empowering of young pastors to achieve as much as their talent and nerve would allow them to achieve. And so at both places, the second focus of my ministry has always been causes that are not unique to the church community, but unique to the community in which the church functions. Let me illustrate what I mean by that.$$Yes, sir.$$In Los Angeles [California], the church I pastored was at 103rd and South Central--105th [Street] and South Central [Avenue]. We took a survey of our membership, only to discover that within a mile of our church, in every direction, we had only three families that attended our church. Our church was a commuter church. Watts [Los Angeles, California] was the port of entry into Los Angeles. And as the people came and succeeded, they moved out of that area to nicer areas, allegedly nicer areas. I found nothing wrong with the Watts area--nice houses, nice people. But, that troubled me. Now, there's something wrong with this church if we're sitting in this residential community and none of the residents attend our church but two or three. There's something, something missing. So we designed a program which we call the Saturday ethnic school. And we went that same mile in every direction around our church and recruited children between the ages of four and twelve to come to the ethnic school on Saturday--$$Okay.$$--from nine to one [o'clock]. Now, first of all, we were providing parents with first-class babysitting services. So, the parents of these children could have four hours of free time on Saturday to shop, to run their errands. Secondly, we taught three subjects--reading, arithmetic, and black history. So the Saturday ethnic school taught competence and African American history, in supplement to the Sunday school, which taught Hebrew Christian history.$$Yes.$$And we couched it in how to teach black pride without teaching white hate.$$Okay.$$And that was designed to respond to what I thought was an important need for us--the need for the children to have an affirmation of their ego and know who they were, and to be prepared to do well in school. At the same time, it was a recruiting device for their parents to bring them to that church they went to on Saturday.$$Yeah.$$And both worked.$$Amen.$$So, the business of reaching for people at the point of their need is sort of the kind of emphasis my ministry had, both as a pastor and as a bishop.

Harriet Michelle Michel

Harriet Michel was born Harriet Richardson in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on July 5, 1942, to John Robert and Vida Harmony Richardson. Attending A. Leo Weil School and McKinley Elementary School, Michel also studied in Norway as an American Field Service exchange student before graduating from Coraopolis High School in 1960. In 1965, Michel earned her B.A. degree in sociology and criminology from Juniata College in Huntington, Pennsylvania.

From 1965 to 1970, Michel was a program officer for the National Scholarship Service (NSSFNS). Joining the New York Foundation as its executive director in 1970, Michel became the first African American woman to head a major foundation. During President Jimmy Carter’s administration, Michel served as director of the Department of Labor’s Office of Community Youth Empowerment Programs/CETA. She established the Women Against Crime Foundation at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in 1982 and served as president of the New York Urban League from 1983 to 1988. A resident fellow at Harvard University’s Institute of Politics in 1988, Michel later joined the National Minority Suppliers Development Council (NMSDC), eventually becoming its president and chief executive officer. At NMSDC, Michel encouraged African American businesses to compete with larger white businesses.

For her work, Michel has received many awards including the 2004 Enterprising Woman of the Year Award; the Executive Leadership Council’s Achievement Award; and the Legacy Award from the Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency. A member of three United States Agency for International Development missions to South Africa, Michel also served on the United States-Haiti Business Development Committee. She is a founding member of the Association of Black Foundation Executives.

Accession Number

A2005.059

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/7/2005 |and| 3/9/2005

Last Name

Michel

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Michelle

Schools

Coraopolis High School

A. Leo Weil School

McKinley Elementary School

Juniata College

Harvard Kennedy School

First Name

Harriet

Birth City, State, Country

Pittsburgh

HM ID

MIC01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Haiti

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/5/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Foundation executive Harriet Michelle Michel (1942 - ) became the first African American woman to head a major foundation when she joined the New York Foundation. Michel was also appointed director of the Office of Community Youth Empowerment Programs/CETA for the United States Department of Labor, and served as president and CEO of the National Minority Suppliers Development Council.

Employment

National Scholarship Service for Negro Students (NSSFNS)

New York Foundation

U.S. Department of Labor

New York Urban League

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Harriet Michelle Michel's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about her mother's side of the family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about her mother's side of the family, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about her father's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes Richardson family reunions and Rural Retreat, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers relocating from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her earliest childhood memory and shares a story about her birth

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her father's pranks

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her father's involvement with the Candy Kids on Pittsburgh's KDKA Radio

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel considers the impact of her relatives' choice to pass as white

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes moving from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers the advent of television

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her educational experiences in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel recalls her memorable teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers her American Field Service experience in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers traveling to Norway as part of the American Field Service's student exchange program

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her experience living abroad in Norway

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon Europe's progressiveness in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers having formative discussions about race in Norway

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon Norwegians' understandings of American racism in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her return to Coraopolis High School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers being recruited to attend Juniata College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes challenges of attending Juniata College

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes joining a jazz group at Pennsylvania State University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her friendship with Galway Kinnell at Juniata College

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes protesting in Montgomery, Alabama in 1965

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Harriet Michelle Michel recalls being photographed by Charles Moore when attacked by state troopers in Montgomery, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the aftermath of the civil rights demonstration in Montgomery, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her graduation from Juniata College in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her employment with the National Scholarship Service and Fund for Negro Students and the New York Foundation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers assassinations of political leaders during the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the New York Foundation and her responsibilities for the John Lindsay mayoral administration

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the heroin epidemic of the 1970s and founding the Association of Black Foundation Executives

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers the formation of black organizations in the late 1960s and early 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her appointment to President Carter's U.S. Department of Labor

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her transition from the U.S. Department of Labor to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in the 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes changes in government funding under the Reagan administration

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes being selected as first female president for New York Urban League

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers leaving the New York Urban League

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel recalls her fellowship experiences at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her appointment as president of the National Minority Supplier Development Council

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the National Minority Supplier Development Council

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel explains the National Minority Supplier Development Council impact on minority businesses

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes the impact of supplier diversity programs for minority businesses and corporate America

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes National Minority Supplier Development Council's senior board management

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel shares a success story of a minority supplier

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes challenges businesses face to retain their minority status

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel narrates her photographs

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel explains HistoryMaker Earl G. Graves Sr.'s disagreement with the National Minority Suppliers Development Council

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her leadership for the National Minority Suppliers Development Council

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel explains how her foresight affects her leadership

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes Robert L. Johnson's sale of BET to Viacom, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel explains the economic challenges of keeping black owned businesses strictly independent

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes economic and social effects of the offshore industry, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes economic and social effects of the offshore industry, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her evolving worldview

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her role as a liaison between corporations and minority businesses

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her identity as an African American female executive

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers the impact of 9/11, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Harriet Michelle Michel remembers the impact of 9/11, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 3

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about the opportunities for minority suppliers

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about the need for African Americans to regain a stronger sense of community

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her life

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Harriet Michelle Michel considers her future plans and goals

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes her hope to assist in Haiti's economic development

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Harriet Michelle Michel reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 12 - Harriet Michelle Michel talks about her family's response to her accomplishments and success

Tape: 8 Story: 13 - Harriet Michelle Michel describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$7

DAStory

3$9

DATitle
Harriet Michelle Michel remembers having formative discussions about race in Norway
Harriet Michelle Michel describes her role as a liaison between corporations and minority businesses
Transcript
Yeah, I know in this country, especially in those days, we were told that America is the freest country in the world, and all that--even with the racism and stuff (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well--the transformational, and I, and I call this--I do a speech where I talk about transformational things happening in my life; it wasn't just going to Norway and living in a different culture. I--at that time, Orval Faubus was preventing the Little Rock Nine from going to school [Central High School, Little Rock, Arkansas], and the Russians [Citizens of the USSR] were broadcasting these very negative programs. The, the men of the village would come to the house where I lived--my father's house, my Norwegian father's house, every night to smoke and drink and discuss the day's--the world's events, and they would listen to both the 'Voice of America' [VOA], and whatever this Russian broadcast was, and the Russians, of course, were making a big deal out of this discrimination thing, right?--that was going on, and the men started asking me about race and how I felt about being black, and it was the first time in my life, at age sixteen, that I really began to talk to white people about what it meant to be black, and it changed my life 'cause I've done that since then in almost every job I've ever had. But that's where it started. I, I began thinking about things that had never even crossed my little mind before, and thinking about them in a very different way. And we used to have long discussions and I would listen to the broadcast--I would listen to the one from Russia. It was broadcast in English, by the way, and I'd listen to the 'Voice of America,' and to the extent that I knew anything, I would try to explain to them 'cause they were very curious wanting to know about America and the race situation and that sort of thing, so I began becoming a race woman, I think, with that experience.$What you've kinda revealed in this discussion is a level of understanding about the business world that I think few people really (laughter) entertain, but yet at the same time, you recognize a need for opposition to some of those two distinct (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And I, and I understand also--I understand the, the pain and I, I talk about corporations mostly because the corporations are our members and they fund this organization [National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC)], so it's certainly a big part of my job to try to keep them happy and give them what they come to this organization seeking. On the other hand, though, I have to be mindful of the issues that face these minority suppliers and the unreasonableness with which some of the, the corporate--corporations demand of them. For example, part of the new procurement paradigm now is doing what they call reverse auctions, where they get people on computer terminals and they have a commodity paper--it's probably not paper, but a commodity--something that people make, and you as a supplier hoping to get the business, you sit there and you bid by Internet--via Internet against other people, and the reverse auction means that it starts with a price and you just keep goin' down, down, down, down, down. Well, the big boys can do that because they're doing volume, and so if they make a few--fewer pennies per item, they can tolerate it because they're making it up in volume. A smaller business, and often a minority business, just doesn't have that latitude, and while some minority entrepreneurs have won these reverse auctions, it's a brutal, brutal playing field, and people are left bloody, you know. Some corporations do it just to bring down the price of their existing supplier; they're not really serious about giving the, the business to somebody else. They want to force their existing supplier, i.e., very often a large white company, to bring their prices down, but everybody's out here so price conscious now--corporations are, consumers are, that it's a rough and tumble world, and I have to keep reminding corporations, "Listen, you know, some of this stuff that you say is a level playing field ain't really level," you know? So I, I have to be sensitive about the suppliers' issues as well; I can't just look at, you know, through the lens of corporations. I have to really be able to see both sides. And when I do speeches, as a matter of fact, I spend time lashing at the corporations, and I spend other time talking to the MBEs [minority business enterprises] saying, "Listen, if you want to stay in this game, these are the things you better do." And everybody walks away feeling good because I basically (laughter)--not chastised, it's probably too strong a word, but I've given direction and I've criticized and--but I've encouraged both sides of the equation. This is a partnership between minority businesses and corporations, and we are the glue that brings the stuff initially together, and I wanna make sure that everybody's doing things in the right way so the relationship can be successful.