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Ione Teresa Vargus

Educator Ione Teresa Dugger Vargus was born on July 19, 1930 in Medford, Massachusetts. The daughter of the late Lt. Col. Edward Dugger and Madeline Dugger, the 1952 Massachusetts Mother of the Year, Vargus has continued her family’s dedication to education, family and public service. In 1952, she received her B.A. degree in sociology from Jackson College at Tufts University, and in 1954, she received her M.A. degree from the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration. That same year, Vargus began working professionally with families for non-profit organizations. In 1969, she extended her work to include the academic world of higher education. Completing her studies in 1971 at the Florence Heller School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare at Brandeis University, Vargus received her Ph.D.

At Brandeis University, Vargus served as assistant professor in the newly formed Black Studies Department from 1969 to 1971, as well as in the Heller School. Afterwards, she held the position of assistant professor at the University of Illinois where she served as the Director of the School Community Pupils Project. In 1977, Vargus published a book entitled, Revival of Ideology: The Afro-American Society Movement and in 1978, she became the first academic African American dean at Temple University.

In 1986, Vargus began researching African American family reunions. She interviewed families from the eastern, northern and southern parts of the United States in order to determine the reasons and benefits of family reunions. In addition, she produced a radio documentary on family reunions for station WRTI; as well as organized the Conference on African American Family Reunions. In 1990, Vargus founded the Family Reunion Institute at Temple University, an organization which boasts being the only one of its kind in America to focus exclusively on strengthening extended families. A recognized authority on family reunions, Vargus has been featured in numerous magazines, newspapers and on radio and television shows across the country.

From 1991 to 1993, Vargus served as Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education at Temple University. In 2005, Vargus was the keynote speaker at the inauguration of the 2015 Procter & Gamble Black Family Reunion Time Capsule, which collected artifacts donated by leading Philadelphia businesses, academic institutions and civic groups.

Vargus resides in the Philadelphia area where her daughter, Suzanne Holloman, is the Dean of Workforce Development and Continuing Education at a community college, and her son is Billy Vargus, the weekend sports anchor for Philadelphia’s Fox 29-TV. Vargus also has three granddaughters.

Vargus was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 19, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.182

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/19/2006

Last Name

Vargus

Maker Category
Middle Name

Teresa

Schools

Hervey Elementary School

Tufts University

Hobbs Junior High School

Brandeis University

University of Chicago

First Name

Ione

Birth City, State, Country

Medford

HM ID

VAR01

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Thelma D. Jones

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Keep The Faith.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

7/19/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Clams (Fried)

Short Description

Academic administrator and african american studies professor Ione Teresa Vargus (1930 - ) was the first African American dean in the history of Temple University, and helped found the Family Reunion Institute at Temple University.

Employment

City of Boston, Massachusetts

Brandeis University

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Temple University

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ione Teresa Vargus' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ione Teresa Vargus lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls her mother's occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her mother's civic engagement, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her mother's civic engagement, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ione Teresa Vargus talks about her parents and siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her community in Medford, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her childhood aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes Hervey Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls her African American history education

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ione Teresa Vargus talks about her brother

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ione Teresa Vargus talks about her uncle

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers Hobbs Junior High School

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls her family's experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers matriculating at Tufts College in Medford

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls her experience at Tufts College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers her decision to attend the University of Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls singing in Chicago and her musical idols

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls demanding black teachers be hired in Medford schools

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers the West Medford Civic Association

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers her early career as a social worker

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls discrimination she and her white husband faced

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls being hired by the City of Boston

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls what she learned as a social worker in Boston

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers meeting Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers attending Brandeis University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls becoming an assistant professor at Brandeis University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers the Brandeis student occupation of Ford Hall

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls teaching black studies at Brandeis University

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls her work at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls her sister's election to the Medford School Committee

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Ione Teresa Vargus talks about Dugger Park in Medford, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes memorials to her family in Medford, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls working at Temple University in Philadelphia

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls the publication of her dissertation as a book

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ione Teresa Vargus explains her racial politics

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ione Teresa Vargus talks about her research on family reunions

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls consulting for the African American Museum in Philadelphia

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes the history of African American family reunions

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes the Temple University Family Reunion Institute

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ione Teresa Vargus remembers serving as vice provost at Temple University

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Ione Teresa Vargus talks about discrimination against other ethnic groups

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Ione Teresa Vargus recalls directing the Temple University Family Reunion Institute

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Ione Teresa Vargus reflects upon her career

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her proudest accomplishment

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her children

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her most memorable awards

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ione Teresa Vargus describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ione Teresa Vargus talks about preserving her family's papers

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ione Teresa Vargus narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

10$1

DATitle
Ione Teresa Vargus recalls her family's experiences of racial discrimination
Ione Teresa Vargus recalls being hired by the City of Boston
Transcript
Were you aware of sort of the seeds of the Civil Rights Movement being planted in, in the, in the, during that time of your life when you're in elementary school [Hervey School, Medford, Massachusetts]. Or people talking about it in church the things that were going to sort of erupt, what, what was the talk at church?$$Well no 'cause it was still it was still that the discussion was still that what really made, mainly on the discrimination that existed and, and that kind of thing. And of course we faced a lot of it in my own family, my fath- my brother [Edward Dugger, Jr.] graduated from Tufts University [Tufts College; Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts] with a--college, it was Tufts College then--with an engineering degree and could not get a, could, and in spite of, his fame as the world's hurdler et cetera and the president of Tufts saying that my brother had put Tufts on the map, he couldn't get a job locally. So and none of the corporations hired him and he was considered a wonderfully young man, he always described as modest and gentlemanly and all of these things you know. So then he went to work for the government they went to work in, he went to work this would've been like 1941. He went to work for the government, he got hired you know through one of these (laughter) exams and so forth. And to Wright Air Force base [Wright Field; Wright-Patterson Air Force Base] in Dayton, Ohio and they didn't know what to do with him, when they found out he was black. So they had him emptying, you know emptying trash cans and things like for the first six months. And then the war [World War II, WWII] came and then that changed everything you know, and then they finally used his, he was an engineer, he had studied engineering. And then they finally began to use his engineering you know, but we had so much of it in my own family. My sisters who had gone through this Medford [Massachusetts] public schools and gone to college, gone to teacher's college and couldn't get a job in Medford as a teacher. Because the superintendent of schools said I will never hire a, a colored teacher, and so that was also in the '40s [1940s]. So, so one sister went to, to Palmer's [Palmer Memorial Institute] which was a private girls school in the South in Sedalia, North Carolina, and so Palmer Institute and she went there. And interestingly enough and of course this was before Rosa Parks, she always sat at the front of the bus. She wasn't supposed to, but she always did, and they just said you know, they said, he said the bu- she said the bus driver just thinks she was an uppity nigger. And so they didn't, they never threw her off the bus but (laughter) but she was sitting in the front of the bus, and all of that. And but they couldn't get jobs locally, my sisters; my other sisters could not get jobs right in our own hometown. And then they, they finally were able to get into the Boston [Massachusetts] system of teachers. And so they did, they did get jobs, but it, it you know it was, we just, just they so, so you know right up front. Because you see in those days people could say to you, we're not hiring you because you're black, and there was no law to say. I mean it was fine as far as the law went (laughter) legally went, they could say that okay.$$When did you become aware that that was happening, how old were you when you became aware that?$$Oh I was getting to be a teenager, and, and when those things were happening, yeah.$$And who, what were, was there specific incident for you to where as you realized that people were prejudiced or would discriminate against you, because you were black?$$Well that was, I think that was just always there, we always just knew that, as I said, because either the problems of my mother [Madeline Kountze Dugger-Kelley] had had, mother had a difficult time also finding work. And you know after my father [Edward Dugger, Sr.] died, she had a very difficult time, and she written letters to a lot of people. There, you know they all just tell her now you know either woman either because she was a woman or because she was black or whatever. So it was just so endem- it was just so much a part of our lives that I, I just, I, I always knew it.$Okay the housing situation, you say you have a few--very small amount of time before you have, you gotta get out of Chicago [Illinois].$$Get, gotta get out of Chicago, have to get out of Chicago, and so I did and I and I had to leave before well before he [Vargus' husband, Bill Vargus] left. Because of his, his job, he, by this time he had, he, after we got married, he went and also went to the universe- I graduated and he went, started the two year master's [degree] program at the University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois] as a social worker. So he also studied social work, so then, but so he was working for the Salvation Army in their family services department, when we had to leave. And he, he had to give a much longer notice, so he stayed behind for a couple of months. I went back to Boston [Massachusetts] and begin looking for a job for him (laughter) and I went to believe it or not the Urban League [Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts]. And so they couldn't find a job for him, but they called me and asked me if I would take a particular job that was a demonstration job, a new job. And would be working for the City of Boston as a social worker which they had never had, and there was only one other city in the country that had a social worker in its housing. Which was, happened to be Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] and so, so I did and it was a very interesting job, I learned so much. Began to really, as a matter of fact, begin to develop new ways of working with poor people. And there was a team of us, I was the case worker there was a group worker and a, what they call an administrator; those were two black, two white men and then myself. And we had an apartment right in the housing project and worked with these families about five hundred of them. Well anyway it was, it was a, such a wonderful experience, I had learned so much, I threw away the book. As far as what I had learned at the University of Chicago in terms of social work, and been, really we began working in a whole different way. The feds began coming to visit us, eventually they learned about it and they becam- came and come visit us. And we kind of started laying a lot of groundwork for what later became the antipoverty programs. And so that was a, a wonderful experience.

Dr. Rogsbert Phillips

Breast cancer specialist Dr. Rogsbert Frenzel Phillips was born on July 12, 1948, in Newnan, Georgia, to Olivia Louise Bohannon Mitchell and Zack Phillips. Phillips attended the University of Georgia and graduated in 1970. She also attended and graduated from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons with her M.D. degree. In 1982, Phillips became the first African American woman to complete the general surgery program at Emory University.

Phillips started her general surgery practice in Atlanta, Georgia, and decided to specialize in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. She is one of the top breast cancer specialists in the United States. In 1989, Phillips founded Sisters By Choice, a support group providing educational, emotional, spiritual, and physical resources to breast cancer survivors, their families, and other health care professionals. The organization strives to be a leading provider of innovative programs and efforts that increase breast cancer education and awareness. The organization provides support and counsel to individuals diagnosed with breast cancer and their families. Phillips also started an annual Breast Cancer Awareness Weekend in Atlanta.

In 2000, Phillips participated in conducting experimental surgical procedures to detect and prevent breast cancer called ductal lavage. The procedure entails inserting a small scope into the breast under a local anesthetic to remove and test cells for abnormalities that could lead to cancer. This procedure could lead to the prevention of possible future breast cancer patients and could save future lives.

Phillips continues her general surgery practices in Atlanta and Lithonia, Georgia, and has been practicing medicine for thirty years.

Accession Number

A2006.116

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/13/2006 |and| 2/24/2008

Last Name

Phillips

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

A.F. Herndon Elementary School

E. P. Johnson Elementary School

Murphy High School

University of Georgia

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

University of Bridgeport

Emory University

First Name

Rogsbert

Birth City, State, Country

Newnan

HM ID

PHI01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Rome, Italy

Favorite Quote

When You Learn, You Teach. When You Get, You Give Back.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

7/12/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Surgeon Dr. Rogsbert Phillips (1948 - ) conducted her general surgery practices in Atlanta and Lithonia, Georgia. One of the top breast cancer specialists in the United States, she founded Sisters By Choice and started an annual Breast Cancer Awareness Weekend in Atlanta.

Employment

American Cyanamid Company

University of Bridgeport

Private Practice

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
288,0:672,8:1344,15:1824,22:2304,28:5760,87:6816,105:7776,123:25270,422:25618,427:27960,432:29117,453:31253,493:40331,641:51746,760:56154,883:56610,891:57066,898:58282,930:66870,1134:86038,1332:90688,1437:108074,1671:108466,1676:122920,1933:143248,2203:148250,2320:181215,2865:182788,2884:192448,3024:193240,3037:194032,3050:195832,3083:196264,3090:197416,3108:199990,3120:200529,3127:201145,3137:201453,3142:201761,3147:207824,3212:218000,3332:222824,3354:224056,3369:226080,3407:227664,3439:231465,3458:237604,3485:240268,3523:267500,3685:268025,3693:273110,3733:273855,3739:280144,3776:291110,3939$0,0:4512,115:21956,285:22430,292:22746,297:23062,302:23536,316:35910,428:36750,436:46054,553:46662,562:58372,714:61126,756:61774,766:62098,771:62584,785:65419,838:69388,905:70036,916:72304,967:78346,1023:81838,1036:82995,1051:83529,1058:85576,1094:86733,1107:91221,1157:91666,1163:92111,1181:93090,1200:93446,1205:96917,1255:98964,1283:101456,1330:105422,1381:107226,1410:110260,1457:110588,1462:111080,1469:111572,1477:112310,1491:112802,1498:116380,1535:116860,1543:117260,1549:120300,1606:121420,1628:123340,1706:130900,1739:131495,1747:134130,1797:152232,2047:158120,2127:166750,2252:167344,2263:171302,2287:172822,2297:174038,2307:175254,2316:185090,2365:198001,2515:198694,2527:208242,2711:209397,2736:210090,2754:227560,2954:228835,2973:229435,2983:229810,2990:231760,3021:232360,3028:233035,3039:240428,3096:241260,3111:242196,3123:243860,3154:246044,3177:254286,3211:255087,3222:257490,3261:258291,3273:260820,3282:261180,3288:261468,3293:261756,3298:263484,3331:266796,3407:268380,3432:269100,3444:269388,3449:271044,3478:271620,3488:271908,3493:272412,3501:273132,3512:276372,3554:281930,3560:282524,3567:283415,3577:283910,3582:284504,3590:286781,3623:289454,3664:298350,3743:298819,3760:300159,3787:300695,3798:301298,3808:303370,3829
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Rogsbert Phillips' interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her parents' elopement

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes the story behind her name

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips recalls family dinners and holidays

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips remembers Atlanta's Southwest neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips remembers Atlanta's Summerhill neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her childhood pastimes with her family

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes Atlanta's Kirkwood neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her experiences of racial discrimination at the University of Georgia, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips remembers J.C. Murphy High School in Atlanta

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips recalls the deaths of political and civil rights leaders

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her admiration for her sister

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips recalls choosing to attend the University of Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips recalls her arrival at the University of Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her experiences of racial discrimination at the University of Georgia, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips reflects upon discrimination in schools and the work force

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her organizational involvement in college

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her graduate studies at Bridgeport University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her decision to attend medical school, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her decision to attend medical school, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her classmates at Columbia University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips reflects upon her decision to become a doctor

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her decision to specialize in surgery

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips recalls her graduation from Emory University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips remembers opening her private practice

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips remembers meeting her research partner, Susan Love

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips remembers founding Sisters By Choice

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes the programs organized by Sisters By Choice

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her frustrations over cancer treatment

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her work with Susan Love

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Rogsbert Phillips' interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her work at American Cyanamid Company

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her residency program at Emory University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her work in clinical trial studies

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips recalls other doctors' support for her private practice

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips recalls how she became a breast disease specialist

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips reflects upon the impact of race on her practice, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips reflects upon the impact of race on her practice, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her relationship with Dr. Harold Freeman

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips shares her reasons for creating Sisters By Choice, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips shares her reasons for creating Sisters By Choice, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her involvement with clinical trials, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her involvement with clinical trials, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes the history of breast cancer treatment

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips talks about breast cancer's prevalence in the media

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes the goals of Sisters By Choice

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips shares her thoughts on universal healthcare policies

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes preventative breast cancer treatments

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips talks about hereditary breast cancer

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes the importance of preventative methods

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips reflects upon the need for breast cancer education

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips explains when to begin having mammograms

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips remembers individuals who influenced her, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips remembers individuals who influenced her, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips shares her advice for future generations

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Dr. Rogsbert Phillips narrates her photographs

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$5

DAStory

6$6

DATitle
Dr. Rogsbert Phillips describes her decision to attend medical school, pt. 2
Dr. Rogsbert Phillips recalls how she became a breast disease specialist
Transcript
Then it became major, major problem for me you know. Because when I applied to medical school, it was an option, it was an option of two you know. And I had seriously started thinking about it you know whether or not I wanted to do it and then I had gone to my boss, my supervisor at American Cyanamid [American Cyanamid Company] and I had told him that I wanted to do some traveling, I wanted to go overseas to work. And they were saying, "Yeah, we'll support you." American Cyanamid, we had three lady docs as scientists, and I was the only one with a master's [degree] and the boss' wife and another young lady. And so I really, and this company is really like family, I mean, it was just a nice environment. And being a researcher, you know, they give you projects, you do it on your own time, you know. If you finish the project you out of there, you know what I mean. And so I really, really enjoyed it. And so it was a big question you know, do I go to medical school or you know. And this time I'm making good money too and then they telling me you know, whatever you want to do you know, we'll do it. And so it was a company that I saw myself growing old in, okay. So I decided I'm not going to medical school, you know. And so my boss came to me and he says, "What?" I said, "I'm not going." He said, "Before you decide," this is in Greenwich, Connecticut, all right, "before you decide just go down to New York [New York] and talk to them," and so I said, "Okay." So on a Friday I took off, go down to New York and I drive. And although I've gone to New York and you know when you go in just for entertainment, drive down to New York, you don't see all of New York City, right. So Columbia University [New York, New York] is up 169th Street, you know. And you drive down and you try to figure out, now where am I going to park, I mean, I can't see myself living down here, what's going on here. So I go in and talk to the people, and we talk and I say to them, you know I really appreciate the invitation to join your class but I can't come, and they want to know why and it's I don't have any money. Well they had given me some money, but they said, "Okay, you know, go over and talk to the financial people," so they give me more money, you know what I'm saying. Okay so I go back to work and here it is my excuse for not coming you know. So I go back to work Monday and my supervisor said, "Okay Zel [HistoryMaker Dr. Rogsbert Phillips] what you going to do?" "I am not going to medical school, I'll be here." He said, "You sure?" "Nope I'm not going to medical school." All my colleagues, "You sure you're not going?" "Nope, I'm not going," you know. So I was sitting down Tuesday night writing the Columbia University a letter looking at the Knick [New York Knicks] game, writing a letter, typing, you know, you typing. Typing a letter to Columbia saying, you know I appreciate the opportunity, but I'm not coming to Columbia. And I couldn't write that letter, I just could not. So instead I wrote a letter resigning my position. So that's how I ended up in medical school because it was an opportunity that I could not walk away from. I mean and so that's how I ended up in medical school, and that was you know one of the pivoting decisions in my life. And you know I went to medical school and I enjoyed medical school. It gave me an opportunity to further you know grow and mature as a person. But more importantly it really opened up a world where I think, to be able to every, day in and day out, to impact one's life. It's overwhelming, you know, and I don't take for granted being a physician on any level. And my experience in medical school and subsequently meeting patients and interacting with patients. Every patient that I see it confirms to me that I'm doing what I'm supposed to be doing. I thoroughly enjoy my life, I enjoy being a physician. And I just can't think of doing anything else, I really can't.$When you first started, when you first opened your office, you were not focusing on the breast surgery.$$I was not focusing on breast surgery and as I said, being an African American female there were certain doctors who just didn't refer patients to me because of that. Not because I didn't take good care of their patients, it was, it was just a good old boy system, you know. But as I, you know, made a statement here in the medical community, and that statement was that I was an excellent doctor taking care of their patients. I mean, there was no question about the level of care, quality of care I gave that patient. You cannot ignore that, I mean, no matter how you want to, and because of that, you know, people start you know giving me more of a chance to take care of their patients, and they were satisfied, the patients were satisfied, and by word of mouth, you know, and referring, patients came to me because, you know, their mother you know, or their father I took care of. But one thing that was unique is that the, my reputation for taking care of breast disease you know was dominated by everything else I took care of. And it got to the point that my referring doctors, no matter what else, you know, walked in their doors for disease process, if it was a breast problem, it was just automatically sent to Dr. Phillips [HistoryMaker Dr. Rogsbert Phillips]. And early on you know if I think about how my practice kind of evolved you know into taking care of patients with breast disease you know I look back and you know my first operation as a student with a breast case, you know, the first, you know, as a resident [at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia], you know, I was on a breast service, my brief, my advisor in medical school was a breast specialist, all right. And so everything, I mean, I keep saying, you know, breast, breast, breast, I mean, it just kept coming, you know, hitting me right square in the eye, you know. And I enjoy taking care of breast patients. And so it just developed, you know, I was there and people you know were referring me, you know, their breast problems.$$And was it because of the great success you were having with their patients?$$You know if we look at how medicine has evolved for women doctors in general, there has been different aspect of medicine that women naturally excelled in. If you look at pediatrics, okay when women were allowed by the male you know, well, I shouldn't say that, when women was allowed to go to medical school, and if you look at the number one field they went into, it was pediatrics and then if you look at in late '80s [1980s] and '90s [1990s], you know, the OB/GYN [obstetrics and gynecology] dominated, you know, choices for women. And I think it was just easier for us. I mean, let's face it, it's not easy being in a male dominated field, profession. I mean, no matter, you can go outside medicine, and I think it was just easier for men to accept us in different roles in medicine. When I came out in surgery, there was only a handful of women throughout the United States was into surgery. And most of us you know if you look at the development of our practice, particularly people in my age, breast was just easier for people to you know to refer to us. And then if you look at, women felt more comfortable you know coming to a woman doctor with breast disease. And that's not to say that men are not as compassionate and or not equipped to take care of the disease, I would never say that because even today medicine is still dominated by men, but I think people recognize that when it comes to breast disease, I bring something to the table that a man cannot bring to it, and that's my you know gender, you know. And women today you know will, you know I have a lot of patients who come to me primarily because I am a woman.

Barbara Wright-Pryor

Classical soloist, educator, and music critic Barbara Wright-Pryor was born Barbara Wright in Stamps, Arkansas, to Bernyce Eleanor Hayes Wright and Joseph Dudley Wright. Growing up in Chicago’s Ida B. Wells Projects, she idolized Marian Anderson. Wright-Pryor attended Willard School and graduated from Wendell Phillips Elementary and High Schools in 1951. A mezzo-contralto, Wright-Pryor studied voice as she pursued an undergraduate degree from Roosevelt University, Chicago State University, and the Chicago Conservatory of Music, where she majored in vocal performance. She received her M.A. degree, magna cum laude, from Roosevelt University.

As a mezzo-contralto recitalist and soloist of oratorio, her first performance was with the Dorian Choral Ensemble. In 1961, she performed with Irving Bunton’s Chicago Concert Chorale. Duke Ellington featured the group in his 1963 My People musical revue, celebrating the accomplishments of Blacks in the one hundred years since Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. In 1968, Wright-Pryor was choral director for Ellington’s Sacred Concert. Over the years, Wright-Pryor has performed with the members of Chicago’s Lyric Opera, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Civic Orchestra of Chicago, South Shore Philharmonic, Southside Family Chamber Orchestra and String Quartet, and the Chicago Park District Orchestra. Her concert stage performances have featured Sir Michael Tippett’s A Child of Our Time; Rossini’s Stabat Mater; J. S. Bach’s Cantata No. 54 for Contralto and Orchestra, Christmas Oratorio, and Mass in B Minor; Handel’s Messiah and the works of Mozart, Mendelssohn, and Verdi. Wright-Pryor has performed Saul of Tarsus by Betty Jackson King, and in addition to Betty Jackson King, composers Rollo Dilworth, Barry K. Elmore, Robert L. Morris and Howard Savage have dedicated compositions to her. For the 1998 Sixteenth International Duke Ellington Conference, Wright-Pryor served as producer/director and vocalist to restage Ellington’s lost 1963 My People musical revue. Her musical accomplishments were achieved while serving for thirty-five years as counselor-educator with the Chicago Public Schools and adjunct professor at DePaul University.

A charter member of the Community Advisory Council of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (CSO), Wright-Pryor helps monitor the CSO’s progress in achieving its diversity agenda. She also serves on the Artistic Planning Committee of the Chicago Symphony. Wright-Pryor is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Civic Orchestra of Chicago, and for over a decade, she has been president of the Chicago Music Association, which was founded as the first branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. in 1919. Wright-Pryor was honored by the Society for the Advancement of the Vivian G. Harsh Collection of Afro-American History and Literature of the Chicago Public Library in 1999, and they have requested her papers. She was inducted into Wendell Phillips Elementary and High Schools’ Hall of Fame and received an honorary Doctor of Music degree in 1999. An expert and critic of African American contributions to classical music, Wright-Pryor serves as the classical music critic for the Chicago Crusader.

A soloist at Northfield Community and St. Mark United Methodist Churches, Wright-Pryor is married to organist George Williams.

Accession Number

A2006.106

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/24/2006

Last Name

Wright-Pryor

Maker Category
Schools

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Wendell Phillips Elementary School

Roosevelt University

Chicago State University

Chicago Conservatory of Music

Willard Elementary School

First Name

Barbara

Birth City, State, Country

Stamps

HM ID

WRI02

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Southern California

Favorite Quote

You Can Do Anything That You Want To Do. It Takes Work.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

5/30/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

School counselor and classical singer Barbara Wright-Pryor (1934 - ) was a classical mezzo-contralto soloist. In addition to her singing career, Wright-Pryor taught in the Chicago Public Schools, was a member of the Board of Trustees for the Civic Orchestra of Chicago, served as president of the Chicago Music Association, and was a music critic for the Chicago Crusader.

Employment

Chicago Public Schools

Chicago Crusader

DePaul University

Favorite Color

Green, Pink

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Barbara Wright-Pryor's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Barbara Wright-Pryor lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her mother's education in Hope, Arkansas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her mother's education at Arkadelphia Presbyterian Academy

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describers her maternal uncles

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her family's connection with Maya Angelou

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes Maya Angelou's family in Stamps, Arkansas, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes Maya Angelou's family in Stamps, Arkansas, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her family's musical heritage

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her family's move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Barbara Wright-Pryor reflects upon the negative portrayal of Stamps, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Barbara Wright-Pryor recalls her homes in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her parents' separation

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her parents' professions in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Barbara Wright-Pryor remembers the community in the Ida B. Wells Homes, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Barbara Wright-Pryor remembers the community in the Ida B. Wells Homes, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Barbara Wright-Pryor remembers Chicago's Wendell Phillips Elementary School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Barbara Wright-Pryor remembers Chicago's Wendell Phillips High School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her high school extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Barbara Wright-Pryor reflects upon her high school experience in Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Barbara Wright-Pryor remembers hearing William Warfield sing

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her marriage and college education

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Barbara Wright-Pryor remembers Marian Anderson and Leontyne Price

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes how voices change with age

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Barbara Wright-Pryor recalls her performances in the Chicago church circuit

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Barbara Wright-Pryor remembers working with Duke Ellington, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Barbara Wright-Pryor remembers working with Duke Ellington, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Barbara Wright-Pryor recalls recreating Duke Ellington's 'My People', pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Barbara Wright-Pryor recalls recreating Duke Ellington's 'My People', pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Barbara Wright-Pryor shares the history of the Chicago Music Association, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Barbara Wright-Pryor shares the history of the Chicago Music Association, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Barbara Wright-Pryor recalls her work with Theodore Charles Stone

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes Theodore Charles Stone's career

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes the history of African American composers

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes how African American composers were ignored

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Barbara Wright-Pryor explains the differences between jazz and classical music

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Barbara Wright-Pryor lists her favorite composers and genres of music

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Barbara Wright-Pryor reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Barbara Wright-Pryor reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Barbara Wright-Pryor talks about her children

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Barbara Wright-Pryor recalls a former student at George T. Donoghue Elementary School

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Barbara Wright-Pryor describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

6$3

DATitle
Barbara Wright-Pryor remembers working with Duke Ellington, pt. 1
Barbara Wright-Pryor shares the history of the Chicago Music Association, pt. 1
Transcript
In 1961, Irving Bunton, who is now, he's a retired supervisor of music with the Chicago Public Schools, but he formulated, called together singers and colleagues of his to form a musical unit called Chicago Concert Choral and we did sacred works, Poulenc [Francis Poulenc] 'Mass,' ['Mass in G Major'] we did various, Mozart [Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart] 'Requiem,' we did various oratorios and classical works similar to what the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Chorus does, but this was an opportunity for blacks who were classically trained or interested in seeing classical music, for a great number of them to come together in music. At that time, in 1962, Duke Ellington was in the process of, he had been commissioned to write a show to commemorate the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation and our organization, our Chicago Concert Choral was one of the choral groups that went to audition to be the chorus in this particular work and Duke selected us as the choral group to appear in his musical revue entitled 'My People.' And, as I said, it commemorated the hundredth anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and it showed the progress that Negroes had made. That was the terminology of the day in that one hundred years in the arts, in literature, in science, in, in all arenas, but especially in music. And, as a result of that, being in that, in the chorus and being part of the cast because the chorus was used to depict various scenes and the like, in 1968, when Duke came to do his sacred concerts that he had begun at that time, he said that, you know, the first, that first portion of his life he had done jazz and, in fact, he didn't call it jazz. Music is a beyond category. Those are his words. Music is, there are only two kinds of music, good music and bad music, and so, and that was his terminology as well. But he said he was going to spend the rest of his life because he had been so blessed in doing sacred music, so then he did these sacred concerts one [A Concert of Sacred Music], two [Second Sacred Concert], and three [Third Sacred Concert]. Well, he was contracted to come to Chicago [Illinois] to do a sacred concert at the Auditorium Theatre [Chicago, Illinois] and I was sought as the choral director to train the chorus for this performance. It was November 8, I think, 1968. I was only five years old. I was just a prodigy (laughter) and that was the, the 1963 experience with 'My People' and the 1968 experience of being his choral director were the highlights of my life, to work with this genius who had composed more than three thousand pieces in his lifetime, and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I remember from that period seeing him on television, on Sunday morning, on CBS, with, I think the New York Philharmonic, or something, you know.$$Yes. He was an amazing person. I just adored him. In fact when Mercedes [HistoryMaker Mercedes Ellington], his granddaughter, and I worked together at later years. I told her, you know, "I was in love with your grandfather," (laughter) and we had a big laugh about that. And, in love as far as being, adoring him and seeing him for, as the person he was. He was a magnificent person. He was a humanitarian. He was truly America's cultural ambassador. They designated that he was and he was. I mean, he did state department tours and the like, and just spread, he was just full of love, just full of it and embraced all sorts of humanity, gave dignity to people in all walks of life. He was a magnificent person.$Tell us about the, about the, I'm still trying to get the name right, like I had it wrong earlier, but the Chicago Music Association and its origins in 1919; that's a long time ago (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) It's a long time ago. Yes, for the very reasons that we were talking about, the discrimination against blacks and the performing arts, Nora Douglas Holt, who was the music critic for the Chicago Defender, called together musicians, black musicians here in Chicago [Illinois], and they were all professionally trained and to form an organization in which blacks could perform on stage concerts and classical music and create music themselves, and to promote the use of a Negro spiritual as indigenous form of music to this country. She called musicians up around Chicago and they established this organization called Chicago Music Association. It was to provide performance venues for blacks who were traditionally left out when it came to performing on major concert halls and opera, opera stages. At the same time, or in fact prior to 1919, these series of meetings took place before 1919, but Chicago Music Association was officially formed on March 3 of 1919. At the same time that all of this was going on, Henry Grant [Henry L. Grant] in Washington, D.C. was attempting to form an organization composed of black musicians nationally, Negro musicians, that was the terminology then, Negro musicians nationally, for the same reason. Incidentally, Henry Grant was Duke Ellington's high school music teacher in Washington, D.C. And he actually was the first president of the National Association of Negro Musicians [NANM] after it was formed. Well, they heard about this fledging, fledgling group in Chicago and they contacted Nora Douglas Holt, and said we'd like to come and meet with you, and so musicians came from all around the country and met in Chicago during the last of July and the first of August 1919, during the most horrendous race riot that ever occurred here in Chicago. They met at the Wabash Avenue YMCA [Chicago, Illinois], and from accounts of the recording secretary that we have in our archives, they could hear the noise of the riot that was going on further to the north, the shots and various things that were going on. They met and they hammered out and they saw and were led by Chicago Music Association as to how they came into formation and the purposes and what they did, their constitution and the like, and out of these meetings, the National Association of Negro Musicians was formed and Chicago became the first chapter, even though it preceded, so NANM was formed like August 9th. Earl [HistoryMaker Earl Calloway] can correct me. He remembers those dates. It was either August 8th or August 9th of 1919, and Chicago Music Association was formed March 3, 1919.

The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco

On July 16, 1929, Wilhelmina R. Delco was born to Juanita and William P. Fitzgerald in Chicago, Illinois. She attended Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago where she served as president of the student body and was a member of the National Honor Society. Delco received her B.A. degree in sociology from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1950.

In 1952, Delco married, had four children and relocated to Texas. As a concerned parent, Delco became an active leader in the Parent Teacher Association of her children’s school. Delco ran and was elected to the Austin Independent School District Board of Trustees in 1968, three days after the death of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This landmark victory made Delco the first African American elected to public office in Austin, Texas. Following her first term on the school board, Delco sought to become a force in statewide policy-making and ran a successful campaign for the Texas House of Representatives, making her the first African American elected official elected at-large in Travis County.

Delco served ten terms in the Texas Legislature and served on more than twenty different committees. Delco was a founding member of the Austin Community College Board. In 1979, Delco was appointed chair of the House Higher Education Committee where she served until 1991 when she was appointed speaker pro tempore. This made her the first woman and the second African American to hold the second highest position in the Texas House of Representatives.

Since her retirement from the Texas Legislature in 1995, Delco remains an active force in education. Having been awarded honorary doctoral degrees from ten colleges and universities, Delco is the chair of the Board of Trustees at Houston-Tillotson College in Austin, Texas, and serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Texas at Austin with the Community College Leadership Program. She and her husband, Dr. Exalton A. Delco, Jr., live in Austin, Texas. They have four children and nine grandchildren.

Accession Number

A2006.090

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/4/2006

Last Name

Delco

Maker Category
Schools

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

Fisk University

First Name

Wilhelmina

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

DEL04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere with Family

Favorite Quote

Don’t Do Today What You Can Put Off To Tomorrow 'Cause Tomorrow You Might Not Have To Do It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

7/16/1929

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Austin

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salad, Soup

Short Description

State representative The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco (1929 - ) served ten terms in the Texas Legislature and served on more than twenty different committees. In 1991 she was appointed speaker pro tempore, the first woman and the second African American to hold the second highest position in the Texas House of Representatives.

Employment

Austin Independent School District Board of Trustees

Texas House of Representatives

Texas Congress of Colored Parents and Teachers

Favorite Color

Royal Blue, Periwinkle

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her parents' marriage and divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls the death of her father

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls her childhood community in Chicago

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls her childhood family activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her mother's focus on education

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls attending Nashville's Fisk University

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes the community of Fisk University

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco remembers joining the Catholic church

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes the values espoused by Fisk University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls her marriage to Exalton Delco, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls her husband's service in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls moving to Austin, Texas in 1956

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls her involvement in education in Austin, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls the deaths of American civic leaders

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes the course of her political career

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her achievements in elected office

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco talks about being a black woman in the Texas House of Representatives

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco recalls the desegregation of Austin's public schools

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco talks about the decline of urban public schools

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her hopes for community organizing

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her concerns for future generations

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco reflects upon her life, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco reflects upon her life, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco talks about hopes for her grandchildren

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

6$7

DATitle
The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes the course of her political career
The Honorable Wilhelmina Delco describes her achievements in elected office
Transcript
I decided to run for the school board [Austin Independent School District Board of Trustees] and--on that basis--and I was elected, and I served--I was elected in April; in August, the first team from the federal government came to Austin [Texas] to say that we were in noncompliance with the desegregation rule, so immediately from being this quiet little board that nobody knew what they did, it--we were on the news every night. And of course, since I was the black on the board, everybody was asking me, "What do black people think? What do black people want?" And I'd tell 'em, "I can't tell you what my husband [Exalton Delco, Jr.] thinks; I'm not about to speak for no whole race." But I had no problem telling them how I felt, so I got to be very well known because I was so visible in the news. And, of course, then--before then, it was ministers and the black precinct chairs that were always invited and involved in things, but now since I was a bona fide elected official, and I was elected at-large because we didn't have single member districts then, so I was elected at-large; that meant that I really was in a sense more representative of black people than all these other people, so anytime anybody came to town, I was in the receiving line, I was invited because I was an elected official. And I had no idea that that was part of what I was getting into when I ran for the school board. And six years later, I--'cause the school board term was six years, and I was trying to decide whether I was gonna run again or just come home 'cause my kids then were getting in--out of high school and, and my oldest daughter [Deborah Delco] was going to her first year in college. And the Rodriguez decision [San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez, 1973] was handed down in the [U.S.] Supreme Court about public school finance, and I decided, given the financial situation in Austin, that I needed to be there, and so I ran for the legislature [Texas Legislature] and became the first African American from Travis County [Texas] elected to the legislature, and I served there twenty years, mostly in legis- in education areas. And I chaired the Committee on Higher Education [Higher Education Committee] for twelve years, and I was speaker pro tempore, and I'm still the only woman that's been speaker pro tempore of the House [Texas House of Representatives].$What were some of the things that you wanted to see change that happened during your terms?$$Well, there are a lot, but the one I think that was the most significant, when I became chair of Higher Education [Higher Education Committee, Texas House of Representatives], the disparity between Prairie View [Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas] and the University of Texas system--it was a member of the University of Texas system, but in every sense of the word it was a stepchild, and I think the thing I'm proudest of in education is getting them to be a permanent part of the Permanent University Fund, and getting them a lot of money, and getting them the status and the recognition that they should have had from the beginning. There were all sorts of horror stories around what happened to Prairie View; they got all the leftover books, they got all the hand-me-downs. As a matter of fact, one of the stories was that the man who was principal--they didn't even call the president of Prairie View [Prairie View State Normal School; Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas], president, they called him principal, like it was in a high school or an elementary school, and they decided that instead of giving the money to Prairie View that year, the legislature [Texas Legislature], they gave it to the University of Texas because they were building the medical school in Galveston [Texas], and the comptroller said, "We don't have enough money to do both," so he simply took Prairie View's money to put into Galveston for this medical school. Well, Mr. Anderson [Laurine Cecil Anderson], who was principal, got on his horse and came to Austin [Texas], and he appealed to the legislature. He said--and he was very eloquent--he said, "My young men raise their own food, they make their own clothes, they work very hard, but gentlemen, they have got to have books, and we can't make books, and without your help we can't buy books." And he was so eloquent, when he got back to Prairie View, they had put his furniture and his family out on the road for having the audacity to go by what they said was over them, to appeal to the legislature. Well, the man who was president of the school board [Austin Independent School District Board of Trustees] here in Austin was so impressed, he sent for him and hired him and he became the first black principal in Austin, and L.C. Anderson [L.C. Anderson High School, Austin, Texas] was named after him, and that was another story when I was on the school board. One of the things that HEW [U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services] mandated was that we close Anderson High School, the black high school, and our kids had to get on the bus to go to the other schools. But they promised those kids that the next high school that they built would be named Anderson. Well, of course--so that they'd have some preservation of their history and heritage. Well, of course, when the high school was built, it was built out in northwest Austin, and they didn't wanna name it Anderson. Well, I said, "Well, I was going to vote to name it Anderson if nobody else did," I was going to honor what I felt was a commitment that the board had made. And this guy that was very quiet--he was a little doctor, Dr. Pat Cato, and he says, "If you make the motion, Mrs. Delco [HistoryMaker Wilhelmina Delco], I will second it." And they tried to talk me into saying we'll name it after any other black--blah, blah, blah. I said, "No. If you recognize me, I am going to make the motion," I said to the president of the school board. When we got out in the meeting--then, you could have meetings before the meeting. When we got out into the meeting, he said, "Are there any nominations?" I'll never forget it. He said, "Are there any nominations for the name for the new high school?" And I raised my hand and he said, "Yes, Mrs. Delco." I said, "I move that we name it L.C. Anderson." Dr. Cato said, "I second the motion." And the vote was unanimous; they all chickened out (laughter). But--and incidentally, Will Davis [Will D. Davis] went on to be president of the state and the national--the School Board Association [National School Boards Association]; he'd been chair of the Democratic Party for Texas, and Carole Keeton Rylander Strayhorn was on the school board with me, and now she is a comptroller running for governor.$$Oh, that's wonderful.$$Yeah, so that was, that was one of my really proud achievements on the school board. And when I decided to run for governor [sic.]--the school board didn't cost a lot and I didn't--I wasn't ever gonna go into debt using my grocery money; if I couldn't raise the money, I just wouldn't do it. And I was so fortunate; when I got ready to run for the legislature, they kept telling me I had to raise money, so this guy Charles Miles was--had worked at UT [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas], and he knew a lot of students out there. He said, "We gotta get you somebody that can raise money." And he sent this lady to my office and she walked in and she says--to my campaign office--and she said, "Are you Wilhelmina Delco?" And I said, "Yes." She said, "You wanna be in the legislature?" I said, "Yes." She said, "We need you there. Put on some comfortable shoes. Let's go raise some money. I'm Ann Richards."$$Oh.$$And she raised every dime for my first campaign--she really did.

Monica Pearson

Monica Pearson has led a distinguished career in journalism at WSB-TV in Atlanta, Georgia, as the anchor of Channel 2 Action News at five, six and eleven o’clock. Pearson has received over twenty-eight Emmy Awards as well as other awards for her reporting and her “Closeups” segments. She is also a humanitarian who assists in charitable, non-profit, and community causes.

Born on October 20, 1947, in Louisville, Kentucky, Pearson is the daughter of Hattie Wallace Jones Edmondson and the late Maurice Jones. Like her mother, Pearson attended Catholic schools during her formative and high school years. Her mother, who worked her way through school, attended St. Mary’s Academy in New Orleans, Louisiana, a prestigious boarding school for black females. Her mother was also one of the first black women to work at the Louisville Post Office.

Pearson knew at an early age that she would pursue a career in communications. One of her part time jobs in high school included working at the local black owned radio station where she did voice over work and read prayers on the station’s religious programs. She also sang country music as a teenager on a television show called Hayloft Hoedown. Pearson pursued and obtained her B.S. degree in English from the University of Louisville. She also participated in the Summer Program for Minority Groups at the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University in New York City. Before joining WSB-TV Channel 2, Pearson worked in public relations for Brown Forman Distiller; as an anchor and reporter for WHAS-TV in Louisville, Kentucky; and as a reporter for the Louisville Times. Pearson began her career as the first African American and the first female to anchor a daily evening newscast in Atlanta at WSB-TV in 1975.

Pearson is a recipient of numerous awards: the Women’s Sports Journalism Award, Citizen Broadcaster of the Year Award, Broadcaster of the Year Award, Women of Achievement Award, and the Southern Regional Emmy Awards. She also won first place for excellence in journalism/documentary from the Atlanta Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists for her documentary, Hot Flash: The Truth About Menopause.

Pearson is a mother and resides in Atlanta with her mother and husband.

Accession Number

A2006.030

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/21/2006

Last Name

Pearson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Presentation Academy

St. William School

University of Louisville

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Monica

Birth City, State, Country

Louisville

HM ID

KAU01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Kentucky

Favorite Vacation Destination

Destin, Florida

Favorite Quote

It Is What You Do With What You Have That Makes You What You Are.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

10/20/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lasagna

Short Description

Television anchor Monica Pearson (1947 - ) began her career as the first African American and the first woman to anchor a daily evening newscast in Atlanta at WSB-TV in 1975. She has won numerous awards for her journalism and documentary work.

Employment

Liberty National Bank and Trust

Louisville Times

WHAS-TV

WSB-TV Atlanta

Favorite Color

Baby Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:8550,193:8930,210:10450,229:12920,273:14155,317:23182,389:23893,399:24920,415:30687,552:31240,560:32109,602:38903,736:39377,743:42142,802:43090,820:52103,929:55315,995:55607,1000:57213,1046:59330,1072:59987,1082:61885,1132:62469,1143:62980,1152:63272,1157:67686,1186:68190,1194:71934,1294:72222,1299:75462,1368:82158,1537:101470,1860:103150,1884:105630,1927:106110,1934:114910,2221:115630,2231:116110,2238:118110,2262:118430,2267:121070,2303:122430,2321:122750,2326:125310,2370:145834,2593:146389,2599:151014,2648:154209,2716:159246,2781:159534,2786:160542,2801:161046,2812:161694,2823:162774,2845:163062,2850:177710,3111$0,0:4050,131:4779,141:25839,613:46109,877:61745,1052:69395,1185:70075,1194:70585,1283:71350,1294:72030,1303:73220,1337:73815,1345:74155,1354:74835,1368:77810,1395:95112,1577:96765,1761:97461,1770:104334,1855:110337,1954:111120,1966:114948,2042:117123,2087:117471,2092:119211,2131:119994,2141:121038,2164:122256,2184:136472,2441:138992,2494:139424,2501:139784,2507:166024,2851:177806,3047:192486,3376:195474,3435:196138,3444:209584,3829:212406,3941:212904,3948:246132,4486:248004,4526:248394,4532:250890,4592:252996,4627:253308,4632:253698,4638:256100,4644
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Monica Pearson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Monica Pearson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Monica Pearson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Monica Pearson describes her mother's education and occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Monica Pearson recalls Presentation Academy and Louisville's Smoketown neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Monica Pearson describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Monica Pearson recalls tracing her mother's ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Monica Pearson explains why she cannot trace her father's ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Monica Pearson describes her maternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Monica Pearson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Monica Pearson describes her mother's parenting style

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Monica Pearson describes her relationship with her mother

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Monica Pearson describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Monica Pearson describes her mother and father's wedding

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Monica Pearson describes her childhood home and early education

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Monica Pearson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Monica Pearson describes the neighborhood where her mother grew up

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Monica Pearson recalls her family's Easter and Christmas celebrations

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Monica Pearson describes her cousins' complexions

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Monica Pearson remembers when her family's home was sold against her wishes

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Monica Pearson describes her mother's high school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Monica Pearson recalls her Catholic school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Monica Pearson recalls visiting her mother's high school, St. Mary's Academy

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Monica Pearson lists her elementary and high schools in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Monica Pearson remembers her dresses for special occasions

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Monica Pearson remembers her Cousin Lee's cooking and pastimes

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Monica Pearson recalls Presentation Academy and other Louisville high schools

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Monica Pearson describes the Presentation Academy's sports teams

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Monica Pearson explains her religious background and her name's origin

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Monica Pearson describes the jobs she held as a teenager

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Monica Pearson recalls singing on television and working at WLOU Radio

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Monica Pearson recalls winning Miss Congeniality in a beauty contest

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Monica Pearson recalls her decision to attend the University of Louisville

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Monica Pearson describes Dr. Eleanor Young Love

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Monica Pearson reflects upon the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Monica Pearson describes the demographics of her elementary and high schools

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Monica Pearson recalls her coursework at the University of Louisville

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Monica Pearson remembers becoming a television reporter

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Monica Pearson recalls becoming the Atlanta's first African American evening anchorwoman

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Monica Pearson recalls enduring criticism as an African American anchorwoman

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Monica Pearson details her volunteer work

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Monica Pearson describes her experiences of racial discrimination in Atlanta

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Monica Pearson recalls lessons learned from her mother and grandmother

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Monica Pearson reflects upon her relationship with her father

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Monica Pearson reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Monica Pearson shares her advice to aspiring broadcasters

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Monica Pearson describes her husband, John E. Pearson, Sr.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Monica Pearson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Monica Pearson reflects upon her spirituality

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

9$5

DATitle
Monica Pearson recalls winning Miss Congeniality in a beauty contest
Monica Pearson remembers becoming a television reporter
Transcript
Then, I would volunteer to do columns for the Louisville Defender, which was the black-owned newspaper, the Louisville Defender, owned by Frank Stanley [Frank L. Stanley, Jr.]. So, I would do that. Now, they also had a pageant every year--the only time I can remember my mother [Hattie Wallace Edmondson] not being supportive of me. I was--the year of the Emancipation Proclamation one hundredth anniversary, so that would have been maybe 1963 (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Nineteen sixty-three [1963], '64 [1964].$$I wanted to be in their beauty contest because it would give you some money--you would win some money. And my mother--I came home and told my mother I'd applied. And my mother said, "I think you're beautiful, but nobody else is. I don't want you being in this." And I said, "I really want to do this." She said, "Well, I'm not going to help you." So, I took one of her old formals, and took the little money I had made, and had her formal cut up into a dress that was more contemporary. I practiced singing and all of this. And there was this wonderful woman, Mrs. Lois Morris [Lois Walker Morris], who went on to become a city councilman, who actually was working with them on this pageant. And my mother went to her and said, "I don't want my daughter in this. Your daughter is, is--can be in it but, you know, they're going to pick a light girl to win. My daughter doesn't have a chance. I don't want you all tearing down her self-esteem." And Mrs. Morris told my mother, "Please let her do it--it's important." It ended up--I won Miss Congeniality, and I was third runner-up, so I didn't do too badly. But she was right--the girl who won it was light and bright, and damn near white (laughter).$$(Laughter) Even in Louisville [Kentucky]?$$Even in Louisville, even in Louisville. But also, you know, that's just the way things were back then. That's just--you don't take it personally, that's just the way it was.$$Well, that still didn't deflate your ego (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Oh, no, no, no, no--$$--or your self-esteem?$$--I was happy to be Miss Congeniality. It had great pictures and it had a huge trophy. At the University of Louisville [Louisville, Kentucky], something really happened that showed me that people can change. And many times, where we are now, it's because of the strength of people who said, this is the way it should be, and I'm not going to be. I ran for Miss U of L [Miss University of Louisville], and I think I won Miss Congeniality in that one, too. But one of my sponsors, the main sponsor, actually was a white fraternity. And I'm--I, I bet you if I found--I cannot remember--I tell you, my mother remembers everything. But a white fraternity sponsored me for that pageant, and I came in as Miss Congeniality. That was a very brave move on their part, a very brave point on their part.$$Did you solicit them or they volunteered (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) No, they--what happened is they--all the girls needed sponsors. And this group, you know, the different fraternities and sororities, and so, they sponsored me.$But in my sophomore year [at the University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky], I decided to get married, so I dropped out in my sophomore year. My mother [Hattie Wallace Edmondson] nearly died. Got married, and took a job working at a bank as a teller. And the teller, the bank, Liberty National Bank [Liberty National Bank and Trust Company, Louisville, Kentucky] was across the street from the Courier-Journal and the Louisville Times newspaper. And after I'd been there, I guess, about a year, I kept wanting to get into the management training program. And they told me that women would never be bank managers. And so, I said, "Well, if I can train these people how to figure out when I'm out of balance, while I'm out of balance, and if I can teach them to do what I'm doing, I surely could be a bank manager." So, I started looking for a job. The newspaper at that time--John Herchenroeder was the ombudsman. It was a new thing where people could call and complain, and Mr. Herchenroeder would then solve their problems.$$Right.$$So, they hired me as a newsroom clerk. Then, in the summer of 1969--well, actually, I need to back up. In 1968, the summer program for minority groups [Summer Program in Broadcast and Print Journalism for Members of Minority Groups] started at Columbia University [New York, New York]. Because what had happened, the riots of 1968, white owned media looked around and said, oh, my God, we don't have any black people in here, and the white reporters we're sending in to cover these riots are being seen as the enemy. We need some black reporters (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Right.$$So, the Ford Foundation [New York, New York] and Columbia University in New York [New York] started the summer program for minority groups in 1968. In 1969, they added print. They started with television, then they added print in '69 [1969], and I went to the first print class. I came back from that program and worked as a reporter at the Louisville Times in the women's department, and then on the city desk. When I had been there a total of five years, I decided I really wanted to do something else. I wanted to get into this new thing called television. So, one of the TV stations actually had an opening, and I went to apply for the job. And I am so happy to say that the guy who talked to me said to me, "You know, we like you, you're very nice, but you're never going to make it in this business." And so, I said to him, "What do I need? What's wrong with me--tell me." And to his benefit and to his credit, he said, "Well, you sound like Mickey Mouse. You dress like you're still in high school. You need to--." And just gave me a laundry list of things to do. So, then took a charm course to learn how to dress--$$Charm--okay.$$--to learn how to dress--$$Okay.$$--how to do makeup. Now, this is at a time when Diane Sawyer was the weather girl at an independent station [WLKY-TV] in Louisville, Kentucky. This was a woman with a degree who was the weather girl. So, you know, back then, they were looking at hair down to here, chest out to here, and not much up here.$$Okay.$$So, he basically--they were more interested in you being pretty than they were in being smart. Diane Sawyer was the weather girl.$$(Laughter) Okay.$$So, I took a charm course to learn to do makeup, learn to do hair, learn to sound a certain way. And part of that charm course involved doing informal modeling for Byck's department store [Byck Brothers and Company, Louisville, Kentucky]. We're back at Byck's.$$Right, okay.$$You would put on a dress at Byck's out at the mall. You'd go into this restaurant. You'd walk through, and tell people what you were wearing. So, I ran into a woman one night who said, "What are you doing? You don't do this." I said, "Well, I'm a former newspaper reporter, now working for Brown-Forman Distillers [Brown-Forman Corporation, Louisville, Kentucky] in public relations, and trying to get a job in television." Her husband was the news director of WHAS-TV in Louisville, Kentucky. She said, "My husband will be here in a moment. I want you to come back and talk to him." I talked to Tom Dorsey, who is now the critic at the, at the newspaper [Courier-Journal] in Louisville--television critic. And he said, "Well, come in, and I want to," you know, "interview you some more." I went in--got the job as a reporter. What I didn't know, when they finally put me on as an anchor, that I was the first black anchor in the city.$$Okay.$$Never knew that--first black woman anchor in the city, never knew that, never knew it. They told me that years later.

Dr. Catrise L. Austin

Dentist and entrepreneur Catrise L. Austin was born on May 2, 1970, in Flint, Michigan. She discovered her passion for dentistry at age 15 while visiting the orthodontist for braces. Austin was voted prettiest smile in 1988 at Flint Central High School, where she received her diploma that same year. Austin went on to receive her B.A. degree in psychology from the University of Michigan in 1991 and her Doctorate in dental surgery from the University of Maryland in 1996. Moving to New York in 1996, she completed her advanced dental training at Brooklyn’s Lutheran Medical Center.

Working as a dental hygienist motivated Austin to start her own practice which she did in 1998, becoming the Chief Operating Officer of VIP Smiles, a successful New York cosmetic and sports dental practice. The practice boasts an impressive and loyal following, including such entertainment luminaries as Isaac Hayes, Toni Braxton and Missy Elliot. In addition, The Discovery Health Channel, The Queen Latifah Show, and The Ricki Lake Show have used her services.

Austin has broken gender and racial boundaries and established herself in a field traditionally dominated by men. She is one of the most well-known and highly regarded dentists in the entertainment industry. The Network Journal named her one of the 25 Most Influential Black Women in Business in 1999. She holds professional memberships in the American Dental Association, New York County Dental Society, American Association of Women Dentists, American Academy of Cosmetic Dentists, and the Academy of Sports Dentistry. She also holds social memberships in the National Association of Black Female Executives in Music & Entertainment, the Black Sports Agents Association and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority.

Austin resides in New York City.

Accession Number

A2006.001

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/6/2006

Last Name

Austin

Maker Category
Middle Name

L.

Schools

Flint Central High School

University of Michigan

Dort Elementary School

Flint Southwestern Academy

University of Maryland School of Dentistry

First Name

Catrise

Birth City, State, Country

Flint

HM ID

AUS02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Cancun, Mexico

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

5/2/1970

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Collard Greens

Short Description

Dentist and entrepreneur Dr. Catrise L. Austin (1970 - ) was the COO of VIP Smiles, a cosmetic and sports dental practice whose clientele included Missy Elliot, Earl Graves and Toni Braxton.

Employment

VIP Smiles

Favorite Color

Pink

Timing Pairs
0,0:1512,22:2940,39:4032,54:4368,59:5292,80:8484,136:9240,153:9576,158:20864,360:25148,509:25652,516:26492,527:26912,533:27668,542:33125,565:34315,584:35505,600:35930,606:38565,653:42815,734:47890,786:49106,800:49486,809:50018,817:50702,827:51462,840:56090,879:56783,887:58070,905:59060,917:59555,925:63911,986:64604,996:74568,1174:79962,1247:92584,1393:96470,1422:96845,1433:97370,1442:98045,1452:98420,1459:99020,1469:102695,1519:112110,1618:115470,1668:115750,1673:116380,1684:118690,1721:119040,1727:119390,1732:119950,1741:120510,1751:120790,1756:123170,1798:123590,1809:124010,1817:124640,1827:126950,1872:127230,1877:127790,1888:138312,2022:138648,2027:140076,2096:141000,2110:141588,2118:142344,2130:144696,2164:147240,2174$0,0:3770,86:7475,156:11245,261:11700,269:12155,277:14690,335:21710,370:22310,379:26510,516:27635,534:33335,646:35360,679:35660,684:36035,690:44564,770:47452,810:47908,817:53152,970:53456,975:58852,1079:59460,1088:61588,1134:61892,1139:68296,1202:68686,1208:69778,1230:70090,1235:71572,1264:71884,1269:75542,1290:76466,1304:77054,1312:83270,1401:84362,1427:84698,1432:86798,1492:87722,1513:89318,1541:103710,1734:106482,1787:106986,1796:107322,1801:107658,1806:108246,1824:121688,1998:122073,2009:122689,2020:128079,2122:129234,2146:144449,2358:144741,2386:145252,2395:146274,2415:147150,2429:152552,2513:160751,2546:165063,2606:165833,2617:166449,2626:169452,2675:169760,2680:170068,2685:171608,2710:174611,2793:178076,2882:185100,2952:187270,3002:190770,3083:195460,3167:195880,3175:198050,3220:198960,3241:203160,3250
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Catrise L. Austin's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her mother's side of the family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her mother's side of the family, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her father and her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her neighborhood in Flint, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers Dort Elementary School in Flint, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin recalls attending Flint Academy High School

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her activities at Flint Academy High School

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers her social group as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers her favorite high school subjects

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers her younger sister's birth

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers her calling to dentistry

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her interest in dentistry and her part-time job

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers her family's move from Flushing to Flint

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes choosing the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers attending the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers attending the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her best friend, Darlene Tolbert

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her mother's support

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her ambitions as a high school student

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes pledging Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin talks about her sister's pregnancy

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers applying for dental school

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her time at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her time at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes Dr. Oscar Wright's support

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin recalls her dental residency at Brooklyn's Lutheran Medical Center

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her decision to stay in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin recalls her early dental career in New York City, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin recalls her early dental career in New York City, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers meeting Issac Hayes

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her friendship with Isaac Hayes

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin recalls meeting Toni Braxton and Missy Elliott

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her dental practice

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Catrise L. Austin describes her plans for the future

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

4$4

DATitle
Dr. Catrise L. Austin remembers her calling to dentistry
Dr. Catrise L. Austin recalls her early dental career in New York City, pt. 2
Transcript
At what point did you start to, or who introduced the idea that you would go to college to you? Who starts--talk to you about going to college and that high school wouldn't be the end for you?$$The, I, I would probably would say my aunt [Angela Austin (ph.)] and my [maternal] grandparents [Carlean Austin and Wilman Austin (ph.)] definitely encouraged me to continue on and my, and my mother [Michele Austin] (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) What did they say--what did people say to you?$$Well once my aunt became successful after having a college degree. At an early age, she was able to buy her first home and buy a car. So, you know, we were all looking her like wow she's, she's really making it and the college education has paid off. So I think seeing her achieve the things that she did, with her college education there was no question that I would go on and get my college education. But I discovered, also at fifteen, that was the age I discovered that I wanted to be a dentist. Because I--actually had a large space between my teeth and had a routine dental visit. And just expressed to the dentist, you know, they asked, is there anything about my smile that I didn't like. And told 'em that I didn't like the gap, and he was like, "You can get braces." So I begged my mother, you know, to get braces for me. And the whole dental experience of wearing braces at the age fifteen, opened my eyes that maybe that this was something that I wanted to explore as a career. Particularly when I got the braces off, I got so many compliments on my smile, my self-esteem just sky rocketed. I really, at that age, discovered how important a smile is and that people pay attention to your smile. And how it could have positive impact on your life. So at that point having discovered that this, this is something that I may want to do for a living I knew at that point that college was definitely was gonna be. 'Cause I had to go to college in order to become a dentist. So at that point, I was focused in high school [Flint Central High School, Flint, Michigan], I knew I had to take math and science courses. I really became focused on that, on that path.$I was already motivated and planning how I'm gonna start this practice and collecting business cards. So I said, well, I guess I'm just gonna have to find another office. And I'm, I'm already dec--I've already decided that I'm gonna to do this. I've already started telling people that I'm gonna have a practice opening soon. So I started to--I went to the S--small business association [U.S. Small Business Administration] and I said, well, I think I need a loan, I need to get some money, need to just plan my practice, start a business plan. So I had a counselor, I don't remember his name. But my counselor had met another black female dentist, Dr. Karen Gear, who's a root canal specialist. And he thought it would be a good idea that her and I meet. It so happened that she had affiliations with Harlem Hospital [Harlem Hospital Center, New York, New York]. She knew a lot of dentists in the area. We met, and she said, "I know plenty of dentists in the area that would rent space to you. As a matter of fact I have a dentist that's on 57th Street. He's African American male who's been there for thirty-five years. He's looking to rent space, you should give him a call." So it was great because I--it was the same street I wanted to be in the high profile area. And I would be with someone like me, so we met Dr. Thompson, Albert Thompson, and we decided that I would rent space from him. Now here's the good part, he knew that I didn't have any money saved. I didn't know how I was gonna really pull this starting a practice thing off.$$And you didn't get the loan?$$I did not get the loan at the time.$$At the time, okay, so you didn't have any money saved and he--continue.$$He said, "Listen, I know you're starting out, I'm gonna let you have the space at no charge. Just come here, work, work, work, you can use my instruments just get some of the basic things that you need to operate. You can rent my--you can have my space. And I'll see when you're starting make money, and when I see that you're starting to make money, then I'll charge you rent." So I worked in his office rent-free, until I built up enough clientele for me to afford to pay him rent. And I, that ex--that in, in itself I don't, I think it was priceless to have someone recognize the good in me and want to help me. And you don't find a lot of people that would be willing--that would be willing to give you something for nothing in return, so I definitely commend him. So I built my practice sharing the office with Dr. Thompson on 57th Street. And when it's--was time for me to open, I had been collecting business cards, I sent out a mass mailing. I'd signed on with some insurance plans. And my first patient was actually a friend of mine, a Kappa [Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity], from University of Michigan [Ann Arbor, Michigan]. Who said, "You know what, I know you from back when, and I know you're a good person I'm sure. I know you were always smart, I'm gonna give you a try." He worked for Pfizer [Pfizer Inc.], the pharmaceutical company, and he went back--I impressed him so much--that he went back and told all of his friends at Pfizer they have to support me. And he was very instrumental in helping to build the practice.

Fannie Lee Brown

Civic leader and non-profit executive Fannie L. Brown, Ph.D., was born on June 29, 1954, in Montezuma, Georgia, and raised in Akron, Ohio. After graduating from Akron Public Schools, Brown earned her B.A. degree in business management from Malone College in 1990; her M.S. degree in technical education from the University of Akron in 1991; and her Ph.D. in secondary education from the University of Akron in 1995.

Brown assumed the role of executive director of The Coming Together Project USA in 1997. The Coming Together Project was created following a 1993 year-long series in the Akron Beacon Journal entitled A Question of Color, which analyzed the difficult state of race relations and the disparity of opportunity between blacks and whites in Akron. At the end of the series, the newspaper called on the community to work together to address the challenges addressed in the articles. After operating for its first year under the auspices of the newspaper, the Coming Together Project attained its own autonomous standing as a nonprofit organization.

In addition to her work with the Coming Together Project, Brown is a member of Books for Africa and University of Akron College of Business Diversity boards. Brown received numerous awards and honors, including the 2000 Gimbel Child and Family Award, and an appointment to the Ohio Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission by Governor Bob Taft.

Accession Number

A2005.069

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/17/2005

Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Lee

Occupation
Schools

Central Howard High School

Flint River Farms School

D.F. Douglas Elementary School

University of Akron

Malone College

First Name

Fannie

Birth City, State, Country

Macon County

HM ID

BRO27

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

For Those of You Who Don’t Believe It Can Be Done, Get Out of the Way to Allow Those of Us Who Do Believe It Can Be Done to Get It Done.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

6/29/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Akron

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cornbread Dressing

Short Description

Nonprofit executive Fannie Lee Brown (1954 - ) is the executive director of The Coming Together Project USA.

Employment

Babcock and Wilcox Company

Akron Public Schools

Coming Together Akron

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:690,28:8142,185:8694,199:14145,306:14559,314:24678,429:25068,435:32556,538:34038,563:34584,572:34974,578:44575,696:51775,825:65531,1004:65863,1009:74814,1119:75776,1137:84952,1281:97512,1424:101901,1495:102209,1500:104596,1558:106598,1586:113680,1635:114004,1640:126316,1849:150170,2174:156580,2224$0,0:128710,1771
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Fannie Lee Brown's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Fannie Lee Brown lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Fannie Lee Brown describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Fannie Lee Brown talks about growing up with her maternal grandparents in Macon County, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Fannie Lee Brown remembers her upbringing and the role of the church

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Fannie Lee Brown describes Baren Lane A.M.E. Church and Piney Grove Baptist Church in Macon County, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Fannie Lee Brown talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Fannie Lee Brown describes her grandfather's work as a farmer in Macon County, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Fannie Lee Brown recalls working on farms as a child in Macon County, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Fannie Lee Brown recalls the schools she attended in Macon County, Georgia, and moving to Akron, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Fannie Lee Brown recalls moving to Akron, Ohio, and her father's work there

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Fannie Lee Brown describes her mother's work at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Fannie Lee Brown recalls her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Fannie Lee Brown reflects upon her years at Central High School in Akron, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Fannie Lee Brown recalls her teachers at Central High School in Akron, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Fannie Lee Brown talks about working as a draftsperson while attending the University of Akron, Hiram College, and Malone College in Canton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Fannie Lee Brown describes her technical drawing work at the Babcock and Wilcox Company in Barberton, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Fannie Lee Brown talks about pursuing graduate degrees at the University of Akron in Akron, Ohio while working as a draftsperson

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Fannie Lee Brown talks about receiving her Ph.D. degree from the University of Akron and getting a job in the Akron, Ohio public school system

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Fannie Lee Brown recounts teaching college courses in Akron, Ohio and managing an Akron Public Schools education program for homeless children

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Fannie Lee Brown describes the Coming Together Project of Akron, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Fannie Lee Brown talks about the future of racial diversity in education and Akron's Coming Together Project

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Fannie Lee Brown describes the Coming Together Project's success

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Fannie Lee Brown talks about the role of Bridgestone-Firestone Company and Akron, Ohio community members in Akron's Coming Together Project

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Fannie Lee Brown reflects upon her professional legacy and her husband and children

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Fannie Lee Brown talks about the role of religion and spirituality in her life

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Fannie Lee Brown describes her involvement with the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, the NAACP, and other organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Fannie Lee Brown reflects upon her professional legacy as an educator and a nonprofit manager

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Fannie Lee Brown comments on President Bill Clinton's hosting his first town-hall meeting on race in Akron in 1997

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Fannie Lee Brown describes President Bill Clinton's 1997 town-hall meeting in Akron, Ohio and her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Fannie Lee Brown narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Fannie Lee Brown narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

9$2

DATitle
Fannie Lee Brown recalls working on farms as a child in Macon County, Georgia
Fannie Lee Brown describes the Coming Together Project of Akron, Ohio
Transcript
Un-huh--$$And you mentioned earlier in our discussion that sometimes on the Fourth of July [July 4], the children would work and then the celebration would begin. So is that farm work also that the children were involved in?$$Yes it was farm work, but it was farm work for other entities. In Georgia, of course, it's known as the peach state. So in the summer there were a lot of peaches to pick. And we would, of course, if there were peaches to pick and--and there were field owners all over the place and they always had different grades of peaches so you know you could work for one the first part of the week and another the second part of the week. It all depended on when the peaches were ripe. And so of course, if there was work to do, we would do that on the Fourth of July and then come home and then have a very, very nice meal. But you know if work--if there was work to do you worked.$$Okay$$There was no--you had no option as a child. You know you couldn't say "I don't want to do that today". That was what you were going to do.$$Great. Now did you find that you were able to combine work and school or did the work stop during the school year?$$Wow that's a very, very interesting question. And you're catching a big part of my history. A piece that I really didn't like. I really enjoyed school. And there were all different types of crops in the South: cabbage, peaches, peas, cotton and so because we were very poor, you know we were among the population to do that kind of work and we did it. And my mother [Bertha Grant] would take one of us out of school one day of the week you know and we would work with her while the other three would go to school. And so that was a time that I hated because I loved school and I never wanted to take a day out. I could find zillions of excuses why I had to go to school that (laughter) day but sometimes--sometimes it worked but not very often (laughter)--$$Okay.$$--unfortunately.$$All right.$$So that's a very interesting question and I think even to this day you know I enjoy the learning process and I think some of those early days had something to do with my--I--I just have a passion for learning, a passion for being in that environment.$Well can you just tell us please a little bit about the mission of the Coming Together Project?$$Well the mission of the Coming Together Project basically is to assist community groups with developing relationships so that they can work together and build a stronger community. The mission advocates every person has equal worth and that by working together we can build a stronger community and we will do that through our innovative programs. And I believe the--the words in the stated mission is "through creative and innovative mechanisms, it will ensure racial harmony and cultural awareness."$$Okay. And what kinds of programs do you offer here?$$Well, we offer a--a variety of programs. We have three types. We've categorized them into three areas. Social programs, cultural programs and educational programs. Educational take up approximately 60 percent of all that we do. And we have of course adult programs, youth programs. And we have a lot of collaborations as well. Our education programs are across the board for young people, for corporations. And our social programs are those where we try to attract large number of people. We have a--an event with the Triple-A Baseball team in town [Akron, Ohio]. We also have an annual unity walk where we just invite everybody to come and walk and make that commitment to build a stronger community. And then our social prog--I mean our cultural programs tend to be collaboratives. And we collaborate with entities all over the community. With the performing arts hall, with the art museum, with the hospitals, with Akron Public Schools, of course. With different departments at the University of Akron [Akron, Ohio]. With Kent State University [Kent, Ohio]. You name it we collaborate with them.

Vicki Hallman

Vicki Hallman was born in Dallas, Texas on October 20, 1954. She grew up in the Hamilton Park neighborhood in Dallas, attending public schools there. After graduating from Hillcrest High School in 1972, Hallman attended East Texas State University, where she earned her B.A. degree in pre-law and psychology in 1976.

After graduating, Hallman was hired by the Paris Outreach Clinic in Paris, Texas, and in 1977, she joined the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Over the ensuing years, Hallman rose through the ranks, and by 1989 she was a parole supervisor. In 1995, she was named the assistant regional director for Dallas, and on August 1, 2002, she became the region II director of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice/Parole Division. There, she managed the development, implementation and planning of all parole-related functions for thirteen offices. She also instituted programs such as Females, First and Foremost (F3), Cognitive Restructuring, African American Male Survival Skills, Hispanos Survival Skills and anger management courses for parolees, all of which have been highly effective.

Hallman has received numerous honors and recognitions over the years, including the Governor’s Award, Outstanding Woman of the Year and the Dr. Emmett J. Conrad Leadership Award. She is a member of Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, the National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice and serves as a board member of EXODUS Ministries.

Accession Number

A2004.215

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/26/2004

Last Name

Hallman

Maker Category
Schools

Hillcrest H S

Hamilton Park Elementary School

Richardson H S

Texas A&M University - Commerce

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Vicki

Birth City, State, Country

Dallas

HM ID

HAL08

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Would accept honorarium, though not required

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ Who Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

10/20/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Barbecue (Ribs)

Short Description

State government appointee Vicki Hallman (1954 - ) has served as the Assistant Regional Director for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice and was later named Region II Director of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice/Parole Division.

Employment

Paris Outreach Clinic - Paris, Texas

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:2948,66:3767,77:4131,82:5830,91:6244,99:7141,113:9004,161:17198,376:19565,400:19865,405:20165,410:20465,415:27935,571:43882,869:51089,1024:52630,1057:71888,1338:80185,1428:81054,1465:82713,1497:94434,1639:94762,1644:99026,1746:105824,1834:109928,1951:122602,2226:136430,2407:137536,2439:139748,2471:149660,2577$0,0:1878,31:2346,38:2892,49:3984,68:4452,80:5466,98:7416,141:7884,148:14670,317:15060,323:17088,362:18258,378:18882,387:19428,502:41800,760:42423,769:47072,807:57535,944:58444,1078:63790,1132:79710,1368:81530,1408:81894,1413:97514,1689:97982,1698:110470,1883:112655,1915:118268,1968:119820,1973:120486,2133:125888,2224:139350,2338:139646,2343:147046,2530:154650,2651:154930,2659:155420,2667:158132,2694:158606,2779:159396,2801:174780,2975:177480,3043:181660,3060:182188,3074:187270,3153
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Vicki Hallman's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman describes her mother's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman talks about her mother's childhood in Arthur City, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman describes her father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman talks about her father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman describes her mother's work and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman describes her childhood household in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Vicki Hallman describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Vicki Hallman describes the Hamilton Park neighborhood where she grew up in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Vicki Hallman recounts the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman recalls her temperament as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman describes the African American middle-class community of Hamilton Park, Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman remembers Reverend Zan Wesley Holmes, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman recalls transferring to the majority-white Richardson High School in Richardson, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman remembers playing a joke on her classmates

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman explains how she began to feel accepted at Hillcrest High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman remembers a difficult decision to participate in a walkout at Hillcrest High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman describes her role as a mediator during the integration of Hillcrest High School in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Vicki Hallman talks about her favorite school subjects

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Vicki Hallman remembers influential teachers from her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman describes her younger sister

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman describes the impact of her late sister on her family

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman talks about her decision to attend East Texas State University in Commerce, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman describes the strong African American community at East Texas State University in Commerce, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman talks about her academic interests and habits while attending East Texas State University in Commerce, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman talks about the importance of her sorority advisor

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman talks about her lack of political involvement during her time at East Texas State University in Commerce, Texas at college

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman recalls her first post-college job as an intake officer at Paris Outreach Claim Clinic in Paris, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Vicki Hallman describes her experience at Paris Outreach Claim Clinic at Terrell State Hospital in Paris, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Vicki Hallman describes meeting her husband

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Vicki Hallman recalls her hiring at Texas Department of Criminal Justice in 1977

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman talks about her job as a parole officer with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in 1977

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman describes challenges she faced as a young woman parole officer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman describes her promotion at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman remembers the challenges of being a regional supervisor at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman describes her work as assistant regional director for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman recounts holding a job fair for ex-offenders, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman recounts holding a job fair for ex-offenders, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman talks about opening a Day Resource Center in Dallas, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman describes implementing changes as Region II director of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, parole division

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman talks about her community outreach as a parole officer for the Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman describes her innovative approach to countering recidivism among ex-offenders

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman talks about her promotion to regional director for Region II of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, parole division

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman talks about the cultural programs she implemented for parolees

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman talks about the support of her staff at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman describes an influential experience with a client, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman describes an influential experience with a client, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Vicki Hallman describes the success celebrations for parolees organized by the community

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Vicki Hallman describes the contributions of her support staff

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Vicki Hallman describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Vicki Hallman talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Vicki Hallman reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Vicki Hallman reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Vicki Hallman describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Vicki Hallman talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Vicki Hallman narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Vicki Hallman narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$4

DAStory

7$3

DATitle
Vicki Hallman describes an influential experience with a client, pt. 1
Vicki Hallman describes her promotion at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice
Transcript
And then I get a card like I got today through the mail that says thanks for your support. This is from a female client who I was about to send back to prison a year ago. I was so fed up with her addiction. And I really don't have, most directors [in Texas Department of Criminal Justice, parole division] don't have anything to do with clients one on one. They don't have that time. I can't get away from them because they're, they're in my blood, and they're what keeps me going. And so I do a lot of intervention counseling. When all my staff have done all that they can do before, in a lot of instances I wanna send 'em back to prison. I say send 'em to me. I either do one thing, have my come to Jesus meeting, close the door, or we sit down and we really talk. I'm going to get through a street game, 'cause they're gonna bring the game to, to, to me at first. But even though I wasn't from the streets, I've been educated. I got a Ph.D. in the streets because I spend so much time with my clients, so they teach me. I know the game. And this individual lady, so special to me, because I was about to give up. It was one of those days. It was a Friday evening. I'd been doing intervention counseling all day. Here she comes at 4:00 full of game, all the excuses, wanting to blame everything, the white man, the job situation. Broke it down, wasn't gonna deal with it. I'm real up front. I learned that that same negative connotation that, placed on me as a parole office became my strength. I'm an in-your-face, upfront individual. If I'm wrong I'm the first to apologize. That's what I like about me. And in this case, she and I were battling. I was tired. I was ready to go home. I was about to give up, and my spirit wouldn't let me do it. And so I said look, you're gonna go back to prison. She says I'm (unclear). I said you're gonna go back to prison, or you're gonna die on the streets, 'cause she was doing cocaine really bad. Her attitude was I'm going to die anyway. I'm HIV [human immunodeficiency virus] positive. Wow, diffused all that anger. I had immediately, instantaneously diffused me. I was at a loss for words. I am never at a loss for words. I was at a loss for words. So I said a silent prayer: God, with the words in my mouth, meditation in my heart, be acceptable in your sight, let me say something to this lady that's gonna cause her to think and feel, didn't even ask that he allow me to change her, just allow her to think and feel. And so I shifted, went from one hip to the other, had a whole new wind.$The biggest was believing in a system that I was working for. Man, people were coming out, going right back, because we had nothing. And I really just thought, I'm working; I'm doing a job, but it's not working. It's not impacting recidivism. It's not doing anything. And I will tell everybody around me: one of these days, if I'm an opport- in a, in, in a decision-making position here, if I'm ever--at the time the title was regional supervisor [at Texas Department of Criminal Justice]--if I'm ever regional supervisor, I'm gonna change some things. Everybody laughed at me. It's not gonna happen, [HistoryMaker] Vicki [Hallman]. You're black, girl. Did you look in the mirror? You're black, and you're a female, plus you got a big mouth, and you talk too much. You're so unorthodox, you make people mad; you piss 'em off. You're not, it's not gonna happen and lo and behold. I prayed about it. I kept saying, God, make me the person you'll have me to be. I told you earlier I come from a very spiritual family. And whereas we're not Bible toting evangelists that evangelize to people, this is within, and I know that I can do anything. That's why my favorite saying and scripture is, "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me," [Philippians 4:13] because he took me through a lot. I had a supervisor that could not stand my, the air that I breathe, and he gave me a really hard time. He tried to run me away. And I would have run. My daddy [Curtis McCarty] wouldn't let me (laughter). He was like you don't run away from anybody or anything, you know that. You stand there, and you fight, and you do the best you can. And so I went through several years of really being treated really bad by this guy. And I continued to do my job, and I continued to have trouble. But--(unclear)--things worked out. He was transferred out, and I prama- I applied for a unit supervisor's position probably about twelve times, never could go from this level. And he would tell me in an interview. I'd be one on one. As long as I'm regional supervisor, you're never gonna get promoted. And I'd leave out that interview, and I would cry, big crybaby. And I'd call my daddy, and he'd say shut up that crying, girl. (Unclear) go do better; next one come up, you apply again. And I'd go back in there. So the last time we were gonna be smart. We're take a recorder, a little bitty mini cassette recorder. We're gonna tape this guy telling me that I'm never gonna get promoted. It had nothing to do with my job performance or my abilities. It had to do he just didn't like me. Lo and behold, the one time I was ready, just as tickled pink. Well, the personnel person from Austin [Texas] sat in on the interviews, and so, of course, I didn't get that type of feedback from this guy. He was really sweet. I didn't get the job either, but I didn't that, to get a chance to record him. And so after he was transferred out, I got promoted the first time with the new regional supervisor. So that's my entrance into management, didn't really like it.$$Now what year is this when you finally get promoted?$$In 1987.$$Okay.

The Honorable Lillian Burke

Attorney and retired judge Lillian Walker Burke was born in 1915, and grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. After graduating from high school, Burke attended Ohio State University, where she received her bachelor's of science degree in education in 1947. In 1951, she received her law degree from the Cleveland Marshall College of Law, now part of Cleveland State University, and was admitted to the Ohio Bar.

While pursuing her law degree, Burke worked as a teacher in the Cleveland Public Schools. After graduating from law school, Burke served three years as the assistant attorney general, specializing in workmen's compensation. Burke was later appointed to the Ohio Industrial Commission by Governor James Rhodes, and served in that capacity for three years. Burke became the first African American woman to sit on the bench in the State of Ohio with her appointment to the Cleveland Municipal Court in January 1969; she was later elected to that office in November 1969, where she served until her retirement in 1987.

Judge Burke worked with a number of community organizations and voluntary associations, including The Cleveland Restoration Society; the City Planning Commission; the Landmark Commission; The Cleveland Foundation African American Outreach Advisory Committee; the National Council of Negro Women; the City Club; the NAACP; and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. Burke also established the Lillian Walker Burke Scholarship for students attending the John Marshall College of Law.

Burke passed away on March 27, 2012 at age 94.

Accession Number

A2004.082

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/17/2004

Last Name

Burke

Maker Category
Middle Name

W.

Schools

Oliver School

Crawford School

Duquesne Junior High School

Duquesne High School

Duquesne University

The Ohio State University

Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

First Name

Lillian

Birth City, State, Country

Upson County

HM ID

BUR10

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

And What Does The Lord Require Of Thee?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

8/2/1917

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken Salad

Death Date

3/27/2012

Short Description

Municipal court judge The Honorable Lillian Burke (1917 - 2012 ) became the first African American woman to sit on the bench in the State of Ohio, when she was appointed to the Cleveland Municipal Court in 1969.

Employment

Cleveland Public Schools

Ohio Industrial Commission

Cleveland Municipal Court

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:1018,17:1666,39:2098,46:2386,51:4042,111:9298,216:15634,324:22042,498:31930,582:33355,610:41064,720:41434,726:42544,778:42914,784:48908,888:49870,905:51646,934:51942,939:53348,963:54236,977:55050,989:56530,1024:57862,1050:64780,1070:65464,1083:66604,1105:66908,1110:70176,1179:70480,1184:95750,1590:100710,1678:101030,1683:102390,1728:112790,1944:119292,1961:130022,2214:131428,2249:135276,2331:135720,2343:150210,2491:150885,2500:152235,2520:156285,2603:163386,2640:164178,2650:164538,2656:166986,2702:167490,2710:168426,2728:168786,2734:171594,2799:171954,2805:172242,2811:176634,2901:177930,2929:179586,2974:192170,3129:192681,3137:196039,3213:203193,3365:205456,3414:207938,3455:208376,3462:217640,3535$0,0:3170,52:9970,183:16770,352:29898,516:30546,524:31194,533:36864,624:37593,634:42534,705:42858,710:43506,719:43830,724:51897,797:58451,910:65030,952:100537,1419:100813,1426:105261,1458:106808,1481:107263,1488:116036,1596:116324,1601:118916,1653:120500,1686:122156,1722:123380,1746:125468,1792:127484,1824:129572,1834:140510,1940:142205,1947:142655,1954:143780,1968:158970,2206:159370,2211:160970,2240:183090,2594
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Lillian Burke's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lillian Burke lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about her mother and father's roots in Upson County, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about her immediate family

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lillian Burke remembers her grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes her mother and the beautiful tables she set

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about life during the Great Depression in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about her childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes the lack of African American role models when she was growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Lillian Burke remembers her encouraging fifth grade teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lillian Burke remembers her home economics class at Duquesne Junior High in Duquesne, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes her love of reading and surprising her class with her knowledge of the New York Stock Exchange

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lillian Burke reflects upon her experiences at Duquesne Junior High in Duquesne, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about reading and playing music as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about her music education

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes her work on Paul Laurence Dunbar

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks her concern about the education system in Duquesne, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes playing basketball at Duquesne High School in Duquesne, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Lillian Burke remembers playing basketball with students as a substitute teacher in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes going to The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio and her difficulty finding housing

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes her various jobs while earning her degree at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about her teaching career in Cleveland, Ohio after graduating from The Ohio State University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes studying for and taking the Ohio Bar Exam, pt.1

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes studying for and taking the Ohio Bar Exam, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about meeting her husband, and being reunited with her son after taking the Ohio Bar Exam

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lillian Burke recalls her husband's death and her relationship with her son

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about working on the Ohio Industrial Commission

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about having to commute to Columbus, Ohio while serving on the Ohio Industrial Commission

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about her early law career

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes being appointed the first African American woman municipal court judge in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes the support she received after being elected municipal court judge in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about the dean Cleveland-Marshall College of Law and her classmate HistoryMaker Stanley Tolliver, Sr.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about serving on the Commission on Accreditation

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about her work with The Cleveland Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about organizations she is involved in

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about her continuing education and working with former mayor of Cleveland, Ohio Michael R. White

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - The Honorable Lillian Burke recalls the working relationships she had with different Cleveland, Ohio political leaders

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes other African American women judges in Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - The Honorable Lillian Burke recalls well-known figures from Pittsburgh and Duquesne, Pennsylvania

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - The Honorable Lillian Burke describes her greatest accomplishments

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about the work she has been involved in since her retirement

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - The Honorable Lillian Burke reflects upon being a beneficiary of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about her son and Thurgood Marshall

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about the future of affirmative action and gives advice to those who hope to work in law

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - The Honorable Lillian Burke talks about how proud she is of her family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - The Honorable Lillian Burke narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

2$3

DATitle
The Honorable Lillian Burke describes her love of reading and surprising her class with her knowledge of the New York Stock Exchange
The Honorable Lillian Burke describes being appointed the first African American woman municipal court judge in Cleveland, Ohio
Transcript
Were there other classes in [Duquesne] Junior High School [Duquesne, Pennsylvania] that you really enjoyed?$$I enjoyed literature. I enjoyed literature because I was the type of person, I lived my character. I was always a character when I read. And I read--and I'm going to tell you about something else that happened. Because I read a lot. And we were without a minister at my church [Macedonia Baptist Church, Duquesne, Pennsylvania]. And a man came out from, a minister came out from New York [New York], and he met with the young people. And I might have impressed him, because he went back and he sent me a lot of books. And I was--and the books were very, very, good books. And it was about the New York Stock Exchange [New York, New York], and we didn't know a thing about that. And so what happened was--and I'm getting away from my story now, but I want to tell about this incident of reading. And I came--and so what happened was I was in a class, one of these large classes that they have. If you're pretty good, they let the people get together with current events. And I met in this class, and I think we were in eighth grade, I was in eighth grade at that time. And I had a brother who was older than I who was in this class. Seventh, eighth, and ninth graders met in this class. And of course we were, my brother was a 'W' alphabetically, and he sat behind me. And he worked in my grandfather's [Nelson Daviston] store. So the teacher wanted to know what did we know about the stock exchange, the New York Stock Exchange, and about the, whatever was--talk about the amount of money that they--the number of volumes and all. And so, I had read this book. And I had re-read it because I didn't have a lot of material, so I was re-reading. And so, my hand flew up. And my brother said "Put your hand down. You don't know what you're talking about." So, I put it down. And so the teacher caught him, and he said, "You don't want your sister to recite?" He said, "She doesn't know what she's talking about." So, he says, "How do you know?" He says, "Well, because I know she doesn't know." And so the teacher said to me, "Do you know what you're talking about?" I said, "I think I do." He said, "Get up and recite." I stood up and gave a dissertation on the stock market. (Laughter) Not that I, not that I understood everything that I was giving, but I knew I was giving what I had read. And so, even the teacher was shocked. So then when I sat down, he said, "Hm, now," he said to my brother, "now, how do you like that?" He was shocked. But see, what I found out later was at that time the people in those communities played numbers. And they got the numbers from the New York Stock Exchange that they won on every day. So, I didn't know anything about that, because we were at home; I didn't know anything about the numbers. But I found out later that he did not--he thought this was what I was going to get up and talk about, and I didn't know anything about it. That's all he knew, because he was at this store where the folks did a lot of talking. And he knew about the numbers they were playing, and about how they won it by getting it off the New York Stock Exchange by the newspapers. And I didn't know that, and I didn't know a thing about it. But this was why he did not want me to recite.$$Oh your brother?$$My brother. He was--and I didn't know that, but I did. And I will always feel pretty good that the teacher allowed me to get up and speak my piece, and I did.$You know I (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) See, at that time, I had no idea that I would be sitting on the bench. All I wanted--an opportunity to practice law in a civil courtroom, that's all I wanted. And later on I met the gentleman, and I was sitting on the bench. And it was kind of nice to meet him, I really liked it.$$You mentioned the fact that you became a [Cleveland Municipal Court] judge in an era when there weren't very many women on the bench (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) No.$$And certainly no African American women.$$None in Ohio.$$And few African American attorneys who were working--$$Right.$$--in prominent positions. But in 1969, you were appointed to the bench. So, can you just describe that moment in history, what that meant, how that changed history in Ohio for women in law?$$Well, let me say this. By the time--when I was appointed, I was serving on the [Ohio Industrial] Commission. I had a six-year term, and I only, I served a year on an un-expired term, and now I'm on a new six-year term. I had only done two years on the new term. So, now I've got four years that I can serve, and it was a very nice job. And I had learned--everybody, we were getting along beautifully. And it was something to give up something and come back to the bench. And you got to run the same year, plus the fact that I'm appointed in January and I got to run in November, and there's a chance that I might not make it. And so, the people were telling me that I should consider that. I had a son [R. Bruce Burke] who was getting ready to go to college, and he finished high school in January at the time. And he was going to college, either--if he went to a state school, he was going to go in January. But if he was going to an eastern school, he's got to go in September. So, he was going to school in September. And so I decided--the governor [James Allen "Jim" Rhodes] called me and gave me the assurance that I should take the job, that he was backing me. So I took the challenge, and I beat [Daniel O.] Corrigan. And I said that was something unheard of in the State of Ohio. The man that I beat was the president of the school board. And he, his name Corrigan was like magic in Ohio. And I took a hundred women and we got out here and we beat the bushes. They called it the wrecking crew. And when the votes were in, we beat this man.$$So, all of this is happening in 1969?$$Sixty-nine [1969]. My son had gone off the Yale [University, New Haven, Connecticut]. The kids were all on the phone. He had the whole thing, they were all pulling for me.

Geraldine D. Brownlee

Geraldine Brownlee has spent most of her life as an educator. Born in East Chicago, Indiana, Brownlee’s father was a skilled worker for Inland Steel and both her mother and her stepmother were homemakers. Brownlee attended West Virginia State College, where she graduated cum laude in 1947 with degrees in biology and Spanish. Brownlee earned an M.S.T. in urban education from the University of Chicago in 1967, and completed her Ph.D. there in 1975. She also spent time at both the University of Illinois and the University of Michigan graduate schools of social work.

In 1947, Brownlee took a job with the Cook County Department of Public Welfare, where she worked as a caseworker from 1948 until 1955 when she began a career in teaching. She taught elementary school for eleven years in the Chicago public schools. From 1967 until 1970, Brownlee worked with the University of Chicago graduate school of education as a staff associate, becoming assistant director of teacher training in 1970. The following year, Brownlee was made an assistant professor and assistant dean of student services in the University of Illinois-Chicago (UIC) College of Education. During 1975-1976, Brownlee served as director of Title VII desegregation projects for Illinois School District 163. She continued as an assistant professor with UIC until her retirement in 1990, teaching curriculum and instruction within the school of education to both undergraduate and graduate students. During that time, she worked as a visiting professor to Indiana University Northwest and was active evaluating programs within the Chicago public school system. In 1995, Brownlee became a consultant to the Center for Urban Education at DePaul University in Chicago, where she remained for a year.

Brownlee has been the recipient of numerous awards throughout her career. She has also been active both in professional and civic organizations. Some of her honors include the 1990 YWCA of Metropolitan Chicago Outstanding Achievement Award in the field of education; selection as a member of the Chicago Presbyterian Delegation to Cuba in 1998; and election as a commissioner to the 2000 General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of America. She has served on the YWCA of Metropolitan Chicago Board of Directors, the Chicago Urban League Education Advisory Committee and Links, Inc. Brownlee and her husband Brady live in Chicago.

Accession Number

A2003.302

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/17/2003

Last Name

Walker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Benjamin Franklin Elem School

East Chicago Central High Sch

West Virginia State University

University of Michigan

University of Chicago

First Name

Keronn

Birth City, State, Country

East Chicago

HM ID

BRO17

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Will send VITAE to Crystal. She's an Elder in Presbyterian Church - lc; Charles Branham

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Georgia

Favorite Quote

The Truth Of The Matter Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

4/13/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Education professor Geraldine D. Brownlee (1925 - ) has taught for many years at the University of Illinois Chicago.

Employment

Cook County Department of Public Welfare

Chicago Public Schools

University of Chicago

University of Illinois, Chicago

Illinois School District 163

Indiana University Northwest

Center for Urban Education at DePaul University

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Geraldine D. Brownlee's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Geraldine D. Brownlee lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about her mother's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about her stepmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about her father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes her father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Geraldine D. Brownlee recalls her birth mother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes the culture of reading in her household as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Geraldine D. Brownlee remembers her neighborhood growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Geraldine D. Brownlee recalls the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up in East Chicago, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes herself as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Geraldine D. Brownlee lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Geraldine D. Brownlee remembers Benjamin Franklin Elementary School in East Chicago, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about a racist experience at Benjamin Franklin Elementary School in East Chicago, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Geraldine D. Brownlee recalls her favorite subjects at Benjamin Franklin Elementary School in East Chicago, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about encountering racism at George Washington High School in East Chicago, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Geraldine D. Brownlee explains how discrimination kept her from entering the National Honor Society

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Geraldine D. Brownlee explains how she decided to attend West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes her experience at West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about her extracurricular activities at West Virginia State College, Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes her studies at West Virginia State College, Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Geraldine D. Brownlee recalls President John W. Davis at West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about her interest in the Quakers

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes the speaker series at West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Geraldine D. Brownlee remembers learning about black history in her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about the impact of World War II on West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Geraldine D. Brownlee explains how she entered the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor for special training in administering to the blind

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about encountering racism in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Geraldine D. Brownlee remembers declining a job with the W.C. Handy Foundation in Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Geraldine D. Brownlee recalls her experience as a social worker in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about her early teaching experience

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Geraldine D. Brownlee explains her motivation for pursuing graduate studies in education

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes her philosophy of curriculum development

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Geraldine D. Brownlee discusses the challenges facing contemporary education

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about the work of HistoryMaker Dr. James Comer

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Geraldine D. Brownlee philosophizes about leadership

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes her dissertation research on teacher leadership

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Geraldine D. Brownlee details her work with various community and social organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes her work as a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about black studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about her work as principal evaluator for the Chicago Public School system

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about her work as a director of a desegregation program

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about the importance of setting expectations in education

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Geraldine D. Brownlee explains the lack of pro-union sentiment in her family

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Geraldine D. Brownlee reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Geraldine D. Brownlee considers what she would do differently

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Geraldine D. Brownlee remembers her mentors

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Geraldine D. Brownlee talks about the challenges of implementing affirmative action effectively

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Geraldine D. Brownlee describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Geraldine D. Brownlee narrates her photographs pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Geraldine D. Brownlee narrates her photographs pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

6$5

DATitle
Geraldine D. Brownlee describes her experience at West Virginia State College in Institute, West Virginia
Geraldine D. Brownlee describes her work as a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago
Transcript
Okay. What was West Virginia State like? I mean, who were some of the teachers and personalities that you met there?$$Well, West Virginia State College [West Virginia State University, Institute, West Virginia] is a--on its sign it says, a liberal education, and I always knew from my mother that that was the best kind of education one could get. And when I went there, the dean of the college was Dr. Harrison Ferrell, who was from Chicago [Illinois] and had finished his doctorate at Northwestern [University, Evanston, Illinois]. And he greeted me right away, because you had to send in your picture with your application. And when I walked into the administration building, he said, "Hi, Gerri [HM Geraldine D. Brownlee]," the first day when I registered. And my psychology teacher was Dr. Herman Canady, who had received his doctorate at Northwestern. And I really have never regretted that decision. My whole life changed. I just felt as if I were just liberated from all of the racism, whether it was subtle or not, that I could go--belong to any organization I wanted to belong to. I wasn't afraid of failing, because I knew I had the ability to learn. And then it would put me in contact with my own people, because I was very limited in East Chicago [Indiana] in knowing people, black people--we were colored then--except for church and the limited number who went to school with me, 'cause there were only twenty-six in my graduation class out of over three hundred blacks. And so it was--I was very impressed with the faculty. I was impressed with the students. I didn't like the dorm. I thought the dorms were crummy. But it just made a different person out of me in my life.$$Were there a lot of restrictions on students at West Virginia, West Virginia State at that point (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Oh, yeah. Yes. In those days you couldn't get in a car. One could not leave campus without written permission from your parents. We had to be in the dorm at certain hours of night. You know, yes. There were a lot of restrictions. But I didn't mind that because I had restrictions at home. And then we--as we learned, we could do everything we wanted to do within a certain--anyway, within a certain time.$$(Laughter) Once you figured out the system.$$That's right.$$That's right.$$But then, I also didn't know, until I got to West Virginia State, and Dr. Canady gave everyone--now that I look back on it, it may have been the Stanford Binet test [Stanford Binet Intelligence Scales]; it was an I.Q. test, and then told us, you know, who did well and who did this. And I was the highest one in the class, and it was a very high I.Q. And he said--told them that. And I was so pleased, because I knew I had a good I.Q., but I didn't know how high it was or how good it was, because they never told me in high school. So with Dean--Dr. Canady and Dr. Ferrell, I could take as many--you know, how a load could be, like, sixteen hours? I was permitted to take twenty, twenty-two, twenty-four. You know, I could--they gave me a lot of privileges, because they said I could do it. And that's how I got the double major, 'cause with a double major, one has to have a double minor, which means you have to have certain courses in two dif- four areas. I had to do it.$Okay. Well, speaking of professing, you've been a professor at University of Illinois of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois] for a number of years. Right? And you're now professor emeritus. Right, or--?$$From the University of Illinois.$$Yeah.$$Um-hm.$$University of Illinois at Chicago.$$At Chicago.$$Yeah. Right.$$Um-hm.$$Right. Okay.$$That was an experience.$$Okay.$$That was truly an experience (laughter).$$Well, I can, you know, I see a balloon above your head, but you got to fill in the blanks. Now, what happened at the University of Illinois at Chicago?$$Well, because it is a large institution. And to leave a college like West Virginia State [College; West Virginia University, Institute, West Virginia] and to go to a university like the University of Chicago, where there are small populations and to go into a public urban university, where there are thousands and thousands of faculty and student is quite a challenge--students. It's quite a challenge. And it was an eyeopener because I went there because I've always been committed to urban education. And I got there and found that they were still searching for their urban mission. And it was very difficult because there's such a mix there of Hispanics, blacks, Indians, and whites of different origins. And there are very relatively speaking, very few tenured black faculty, which puts the burden on those of us who are tenured to meet the needs of the black students, and I--which even though there may not be more than 15 percent, to meet their needs. Because if one is there, one is likely to come to a person who is of, you know, of the same origin. And it was very, very difficult for white faculty to understand the demands made on black faculty in terms of publications and research and funding, when we have these other issues that have to do with race and our students. That was one eyeopener for, you know, for me. The fact that it's a revolving door for black professors was another issue. As a matter of fact, the chancellor asked me to serve as a--to chair his committee on the status of blacks at UIC, which I did for a couple of years before I left, and it was most challenging. I don't--but, I did get in to know a couple of other black faculties from what we call the other campus, the west campus, the medical science campus, who were most supportive, for example, [HM] Dr. [Maurice F.] Rabb, I don't know whether you know him.$$Maurice Rabb?$$Maur- that's how I got to know him. When I was president he was very, very supportive. There were other faculties I would not have gotten to know if I had not had that post. But it was--it also was at the expense of getting my own work done. I was not given off--you know, time off to do this. But that's, that's what happens to us when we are in certain positions. We have to take on certain responsibilities, because--not only because we're needed, but because we have a commitment to do so.$$Okay.$$So it was--there were--I guess I've touched on the primary problems, trying to serve and support minority students while doing what professors are expected to do was a real problem.