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Carl Edwin Anderson

Student affairs administrator Carl Edwin Anderson was born September 29, 1934, in St. Louis, Missouri. He attended Dunbar Elementary School and graduated from Charles L. Sumner High School in 1952. He received both his B.A. in government in 1956 and his M.S. in college personnel administration in 1958 from Southern Illinois University. Anderson later earned an Ed.D in administration in higher education from the University of Maryland in 1969.

His lifelong relationship with Howard University began in 1958 when he was the head resident of Cooke Hall. By 1960, Anderson was director of student activities and by 1964, he was associate dean of students. In August of 1969, Anderson was appointed vice president of student affairs and as such he developed and administered a broad range of services for 12,000 students, overseeing a of $40 million budget and 400 employees. Anderson also worked as a part time lecturer for graduate and undergraduate level courses in the education department. Serving through the Black Power and Vietnam eras on a college campus, Anderson’s job was often complex. In addition to his professional affiliations, Anderson is a member of the NAACP, the National Urban League, and the Washington, D.C. Board of Education Advisory Committee for Alternative Schools. For over ten years Anderson served as president of the Kappa Scholarship Endowment Fund. From 1991 to 1995, he was a member of the professional staff of the Post Office and served on the Civil Service Committee of the United States House of Representatives.

Anderson is active in a number of groups and organizations, including the Pi Sigma Alpha Honor Society in Political Science, Psi Chi Honor Society in Psychology, and the Phi Delta Kappa Honor Society in Education. He is also the recipient of many awards. Anderson and his wife, Ida, have three children, all graduates of Howard University.

Accession Number

A2003.278

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/19/2003

Last Name

Anderson

Maker Category
Middle Name

Edwin

Organizations
Schools

Charles H. Sumner High School

Paul Laurence Dunbar Elementary School

Southern Illinois University

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Carl

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

AND01

Favorite Season

None

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

New York, New York

Favorite Quote

You Can Never Achieve Excellence By Practicing Mediocrity.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/29/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chinese Food

Short Description

Academic administrator Carl Edwin Anderson (1934 - ) has served the Howard University community as director of student activities, associate dean of students, vice president of student affairs and part time lecturer in education. He has also held appointments with the D.C. Board of Education Advisory Committee for Alternative Schools, and served as president of the Kappa Scholarship Endowment Fund.

Employment

Howard University

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carl Edwin Anderson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carl Edwin Anderson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carl Edwin Anderson lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks briefly about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood neighborhood in St. Louis, Missouri, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood neighborhood in St. Louis, Missouri, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his childhood personality and playing cork ball

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carl Edwin Anderson explains how he was awarded a scholarship to cover his tuition at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carl Edwin Anderson remembers the faculty of Paul Laurence Dunbar Elementary School and Charles H. Sumner High School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carl Edwin Anderson explains why he chose to attend Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his extracurricular activities as a student at Charles H. Sumner High School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about his interest in a career in public service and remembers local newspapers in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his experience in an integrated academic setting as an undergraduate student at Southern Illinois University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his extracurricular activities as an undergraduate student at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes being admitted into a graduate assistantship program at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes joining the administration at Howard University in Washington. D.C. in 1958 and acting as dean of students in 1969

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about student unrest and social justice organizing at Howard University in Washington, D.C. in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about Dr. Armour J. Blackburn's management of student unrest and political protest as dean of students at Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about the nature of disciplinary action and respectability politics at historically black colleges and universities

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about the culture of civil unrest developing on college campuses in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about conflict between students, faculty and the institution at Howard University, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carl Anderson talks about conflict between students, faculty and the institution at Howard University, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about student protest and demonstration at Howard University, in Washington, D.C., pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carl Edwin Anderson remembers Stokely Carmichael and other student leaders at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about student protest and demonstration at Howard University, in Washington, D.C., pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about the dual nature of his role as an educator and administrator at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carl Edwin Anderson talks about guiding student decisions as an administrator at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes his philosophy as an administrator

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carl Edwin Anderson remembers former president of Howard University Dr. Mordecai Wyatt Johnson

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carl Edwin Anderson remembers past Howard University president Dr. James Madison Nabrit, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes being named vice president for student affairs of Howard University by HistoryMaker Dr. James E. Cheek

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carl Edwin Anderson reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carl Edwin Anderson describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

3$2

DATitle
Carl Edwin Anderson remembers Stokely Carmichael and other student leaders at Howard University in Washington, D.C.
Carl Edwin Anderson describes being named vice president for student affairs of Howard University by HistoryMaker Dr. James E. Cheek
Transcript
Do you have any reflections on some of the activists at Howard [University, Washington, D.C.], for instance, Stokely Carmichael or Kwame Ture I mean? What he is like?$$Who? Stokely?$$Yeah. What was your personal reflection of him?$$Stokely was a very bright, articulate student, very capable, and affable, very likeable. And one of the things I remember most about him and liked most about him was that he could disagree with you, and the disagreement could be in a gentlemanly fashion. He and I didn't always see eye to eye on things, particularly as it related to the university, but we never had a disagreement that erupted into any kind of personal animosity. We remained friends throughout; and when Stokely was in town, I would go to his rallies and would make a point of seeing him, and when he was around campus, if he would see he would embrace and hug me. H. Rap Brown, I did not get to know. I'm not even certain that he ever enrolled as a student formally, but he was always here, and he would engage in football and other little activities on the field with others when he was around, but I didn't get to know him very well. Courtland Cox, a very able, controlled, stately presence-type individual, for whom I always had the utmost and respect and he reciprocated and in turn accorded me that Jarrod Green [ph.] in the law school, who gave them a fit there--in the law school, the same thing. The interesting thing was that no matter the provocation, no matter the issue, no matter the level or intensity of the effort, they never refused to communicate with me. And some of my warmest moments were in communicating one-on-one with them. When the students took over the administration building, being the vice president for student affairs, again, I was the lead administer in communication, going back and forth, and in no time did the students ever deny me access to their inner circle. At no time did they cut off communication directly with me. If they blocked the building and I needed to communicate with them, the door was open for me. I could go in and speak with them. I could go to my office and function. They would come to my office and talk to me. We had a relationship that I think facilitated the resolution of a lot of the issues that we were wrestling with. And I'm not saying it to boast. This isn't a boastful presentation. This is I think a manifestation of the respect that I had for them, and they in turn reciprocated and accorded me. And I deeply appreciated it, and I can't remember all of the leaders, but even when Larry Henry, back before the big protest on the campus started, led the effort to integrate Glen Echo Amusement Park and what have you, and was under great strain and pressure. That never stopped Larry from being cordial, and respectful, and cooperating with university officials, many of whom supported everything he was doing, but could not do it as official representatives, but had to do it in their own individual capacity, so we had to walk that fine line.$And Dr. Cheek [HM Dr. James E. Cheek] came in 1969, and the very first day that he took over as president, I got a call from his secretary that said the president would like to see you in his office tomorrow morning. I said, "Fine." I went to his office the next morning. He informed that he was going to restructure the administration of the university and that he was creating a position called, "Vice President for Student Affairs," and he was offering me that position. I had never met the president before, so I figured that Dr. Nabrit and other people must have said something to him or Dr. Blackburn said something to him for him to do that because I did not even know Dr. Cheek, and Dr. Cheek offered me a position. I said, "Dr. Cheek," I said, "I'm very grateful, and two things that I would like to do. One, I'd like to talk it over with my wife," I said, "just as importantly I want to know what this means in terms of Dr. Blackburn's position," who was the dean of students. What does this mean? I said, "Dr. Blackburn has been my guide and mentor for these many years and I said, "I would not want to come in any situation where his statue is diminished by my so called 'promotion," and he said, "You don't have to worry about that." He said, "Dr. Blackburn has indicated that he wishes to retire." So the next day, I called the president and told him that I would be glad to accept the position. And I worked with Dr. Cheek for twenty years. Dr. Cheek was a man or is a man of considerable vision. He has a broad view of education and the role that African Americans ought to be playing in it. And he articulates it extremely well, and when he came to the university, he sought to put that into play and I was pleased to be part of that team. And the thing that I like most about him was once he gave you your charter and your assignment, he allowed you to do it, and he supported you and he got the resources necessary to enable you to achieve your objectives. So I had the privilege of working with three truly outstanding educators.

Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr.

While other investors cursed the dot-com bust in the late 1990s, business executive Herb Wilkins amassed a fortune. Born to Katherine and William Wilkins in Boston on January 9, 1942, Wilkins has accumulated his riches by tapping into minority businesses in the communication industry as managing general partner of Syncom Capital Corporation.

Wilkins attended public school in his hometown of Boston. After receiving his bachelor's degree from Boston University in 1965, Wilkins graduated from the Harvard School of Business in 1970 and began a long, successful career in finance and management consulting. Wilkins operated his own consulting company, Wilkins & Company, from 1975 to 1977, before taking over as president of Syndicated Communications in Washington, D.C. He served in that capacity through 1989 before taking posts as managing general partner of Syncom Capital and president of Syncom Management Company.

With Syncom, Wilkins developed a profitable strategy of investing in communications companies that targeted inner-city neighborhoods. The corporation's long-term investment in Radio One, a black company that was the fastest-growing radio broadcasting company in 2000, paid tremendous dividends when the corporate stock went public in 1999. Syncom's assets reached $150 million and Wilkins' net worth topped the $75 million mark. Wilkins also served as director of BET Holdings, the parent company of Black Entertainment Television.

In addition to his business positions, Wilkins has served on the boards of several companies and organizations geared toward minority broadcasting and communication. He worked as director of the National Association of Minorities in Cable TV and also was head of Chicago Cable Television. For his efforts to support rising minority communication companies, Wilkins has received several honors and awards and was named to the FCC's Advance Committee on Minority Ownership in 1984. Wilkins is married to Sheran R. Wlikins and has three children.

Herbert Wilkins, Sr. passed away on December 3, 2013.

Accession Number

A2003.158

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/17/2003 |and| 7/31/2007

Last Name

Wilkins

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Central State University

Boston Technical High School

Boston University

Harvard Business School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Sheran

Birth City, State, Country

Boston

HM ID

WIL03

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Herb and Sheran Wilkins Media Makers

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Charleston, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/9/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chicken

Death Date

12/3/2013

Short Description

Investment chief executive Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. (1942 - 2013 ) was the managing general partner of Syncom Capital Corporation and president of Syncom Management Company. He was also known for his investments in Black Entertainment Television, Radio One and communications companies that reach the inner city.

Employment

Wilkins & Company

Syndicated Communications

Urban National Corporation

General Electric

Lucas, Tucker, & Co.

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
264,0:30894,401:33344,446:38408,506:42152,562:42632,568:46280,628:53716,687:57940,750:58644,767:66560,839:67856,858:69260,873:75364,908:77144,961:77856,974:78212,979:83070,1007:87648,1082:104700,1207:105048,1212:106005,1227:107658,1251:108180,1258:109311,1269:109746,1275:115240,1311:115520,1316:116290,1328:116850,1338:117270,1345:117550,1350:117830,1355:121176,1390:123672,1445:124296,1454:125934,1480:126324,1486:127962,1519:128586,1528:142218,1685:142648,1691:145142,1737:145572,1743:151846,1790:153700,1812:160056,1882:162381,1911:166194,1992:171496,2039:174774,2077:177060,2093:179571,2135:180222,2150:180780,2158:188760,2244$0,0:4018,48:4704,57:9822,87:11067,109:11814,119:12395,127:19138,190:20674,244:27612,345:29498,388:38820,512:39212,517:45227,598:50266,635:50594,664:64267,879:84932,1147:95971,1246:99842,1315:113890,1445:115380,1451
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his maternal grandmother and the summer camp she ran in New Hampshire

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about having an enlarged heart as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up and moving to the Mission Hill projects in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about getting beat up and the gang wars in the Mission Hill projects in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the local black gang, the Emperors, from the South End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his favorite teachers in grade school

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his experience at Boston Technical High School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about working as a machinist after graduating from Boston Technical High School

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks his experience at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about returning to Boston, Massachusetts and graduating from Boston University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes his interview for Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the rigor and intensity of Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about graduating from Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about entering the venture capital sphere

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the black middle-class' aversion to financial risk

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes the type of people he wants to finance

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. gives an example of a successful and an unsuccessful businessperson he worked with during his career

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes Syncom's investment strategy and the firm's return on investment

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. lists some of Syncom's successful ventures and describes Syncom's largest investment, Iridium Satellite

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. details the amount of money he made on his best investment

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the process of making money, when to exit a deal, and shares his advice for young people entering the venture capital sphere

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about changes in Federal Communications Commission regulations and Motorola's failed Iridium Satellite business

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Slating of Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr.'s interview, session two

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. reconsiders his favorites

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes his mother's values

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. lists his siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. lists his siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about working at a hotel in Boston, Massachusetts during high school

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about moving to the Mission Hills projects and working as a jump boy on a news truck

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about learning to be a master painter from his father

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. states that he never attended the camp his grandmother ran

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes his earliest memories of his grade school years

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his activities and his academic interests at Boston Technical High School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the death of his best friend in high school

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his experience at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about pledging Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. lists the jobs he held between graduating from college in 1965 and entering business school in 1968

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes his experience at Harvard Business School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about entering the venture capital sphere and joining Urban National Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes the type of deals and investments that he worked on at Urban National Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes the differences between his investment strategy and Urban National Corporation's investment strategy

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about working for Lucas, Tucker & Company and operating his own consulting firm, Wilkins & Company

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. explains how he was recruited to manage Syncom, a venture capital firm investing in minority telecommunication businesses

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about Syncom's initial investment strategy for FM radio stations

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the process of licensing FM and AM radio stations

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about some of Syncom's early FM radio station deals

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about an unsuccessful investment in a radio station in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about financing HistoryMakers Cathy Hughes' purchase of WOL-AM in 1980 and WMMJ-FM in 1987

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about advising HistoryMaker Cathy Hughes and the business savvy of HistoryMaker Alfred Liggins

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about Radio One's initial public offering in 1999

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about Jimmy Miller and Syncom's investment in Miller's radio station in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about African American-owned cable franchises in 1980s

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about Syncom's successful investment in a cable company in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the politics involved in cable franchises and winning the franchise for a cable system in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the HistoryMaker Terry Jones and Duane McKnight, who form the core management team of Syncom

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. considers Syncom's success focusing its investment in the telecommunications industry

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the formation of NAMIC and differing philosophies between minority cable entrepreneurs

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about Robert L. Johnson's idea for BET, Black Entertainment Television

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about HistoryMaker Pluria Marshall, Sr.

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about other minority venture capital firms, known as MESBICs, Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Companies

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes how he raised money for Syncom and formed Syndicated Communications Partners

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about investing in Buenavision Telecommunications

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. recalls one of Robert L. "Bob" Johnson's meetings with J.C. Sparkman

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his investment in the unsuccessful magazine Emerge

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. mentions John C. Malone and Peter R. Barton

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about a cable system deal he mismanaged

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes how Syncom financed World Space, which became XM Satellite Radio

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about investing in Iridium Satellite phones

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his profitable investment in Private Networks

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about the areas of growth in radio and cable and where the telecommunications industry is going next

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. reflects upon Syncom's role in growing the minority communications sector

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about arranging capital to finance Iridium and fighting with the Small Business Administration

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about getting the last investor for his fund, Syncom II

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Companies (MESBICs) and the Small Business Administration, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Companies (MESBICs) and the Small Business Administration pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. explains his decision to retire

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about his hopes for his family

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$10

DAStory

7$1

DATitle
Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about entering the venture capital sphere
Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr. talks about getting the last investor for his fund, Syncom II
Transcript
When you graduated [from Harvard Business School, Boston, Massachusetts] what did you do? What were your prospects?$$Well, when I graduated, I decided that I wanted to go into venture capital. I had worked with two other guys, Dan [Daniel] Denison -- Dennis and Tyrone Dickerson to set up a venture capital fund. And in the summer of '68 [1968], we worked on that fund with Charlie Cabot who was a lawyer at Sullivan and Worcester law firm in Boston [Massachusetts], and one of the Cabots. And Charlie really had a feeling that venture capital was a way for black people to move from where they were into the main stream of business. And so he was very supportive. But that effort just didn't -- it didn't make it. We just didn't have any big money -- moneyed person working with us to help us over the hump. And there was another group that started that summer, a white group, that was working with Morgan Guaranty [Trust] and Morgan Stanley to do the same thing. They actually got funding, Urban National [Corporation, Boston, Massachusetts]. And that's where I started work in 1973 at Urban National in the venture capital business. So I'm glad that they were successful, although they had no idea what they were doing. And they didn't really understand black people and black entrepreneurship. It's interesting because I always felt that culturally, there was a difference between the way white people pursue the development of business opportunities and the way black people pursue the development of business opportunities. And if you didn't understand that, you could end up in a wrong place. U.N.C. or Urban National wanted to finance what they thought were the right people for business development, middle-class black people, who I felt didn't have the chutzpah to make it. I felt that people who came out of the project and who had gone through the wars, fighting their way, were the right kind of people to finance. These are the guys who are going to make it in society. And the other guys would fall by the wayside. I turned out to be right, I really believe, based upon the success Syncom has had and based upon the lack of success that Urban National has had. I think that really is the proof in the pudding.$Fund two, Syncom II.$$Now, what year was this?$$This was back in 1992. We were having problems with all the investors because they wanted to cut our fees. And I remember being at Teachers Insurance [and Annuity Association of America] in New York [New York]. And they came in, and they said, "We're in, but you have to cut your fees." And I said, "If I have to cut my fees, you can't come in." I said, "I'm not cutting my fees." They said, "Well, you have to." I said, "No." I said, "I'm doing it at the same price that the other guys do. And it won't, it won't be for less. It'll be the same thing." And I said, "If that's your position, and you won't change it," I said, "We'll leave." And [HM] Terry [Jones] looked at me. He was stunned. He couldn't believe I was gonna walk out, and I was, I was read-- and I stood up, and they said, "Okay, okay, okay, you can keep the fees at the level that you propose." And I said, "Oh, okay," and we concluded the investment. And they were the smallest investor in the fund.$$And they were gonna tip the scale and benefit of everyone else except you?$$Oh, yeah.$$Okay. Were they the ones that were gonna close the loop? Were they the last entity in?$$They were the last ones.$$Okay, so that was it, and then you would have your deal closed?$$Um-hum.$$Any other stories like that, Herb [HM Herbert P. Wilkins, Sr.]?$$No, not really.$$You got me all excited (laughter). That was a good story.