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Fay Ferguson

Advertising chief executive Fay Ferguson graduated magna cum laude with her B.A. degree in English, speech, and drama from Concordia College in Minnesota in 1973. She then received her M.B.A. degree from Indiana University in 1978

After graduation, from 1974 to 1976, Ferguson taught eighth grade English for two years in Michigan City, Indiana. She began her advertising career in 1978 at the Leo Burnett Company and progressed from an account management trainee to account executive. While there, Ferguson coordinated marketing and advertising campaigns for several Pillsbury Company products, including the refrigerated dinner rolls, the sweet rolls, the turnovers, and the slice’n bake cookies. Ferguson then served as senior account executive at Bozell & Jacobs, Inc. where she managed the Alberto Culver account and oversaw the national rollout of their premier line, Mrs. Dash and Alberto Mousse. In March of 1984, Ferguson joined Burrell Communications Group as an account supervisor. She was promoted to vice president in 1986 and became an account director in 1988. After being promoted to management supervisor in 1992, Ferguson was named client service director in 1993 and managed the company’s accounts with the Procter & Gamble Company and the McDonalds Corporation. In addition, she served as co-chair of the new business committee for Burrell Communications Group. In November of 1997, Ferguson became the managing partner of account management and operations. Later, Ferguson was appointed as co-CEO of Burrell Communications Group.

Ferguson has been active on several boards, including the Perspectives Charter School, the Chicago Advertising Federation, The Chicago Network, the North Shore Chapter of the Links, Inc., the American Association of Advertising Agencies – Purple Forum, and the Economic Club of Chicago. She was appointed to the advisory board at Turner Patterson, LLC. In addition, she co-chaired the advertising book benefit for the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools.

Ferguson has received numerous awards, including the “Advertising Working Mother of the Year, Trailblazer Mom” award from Working Mother magazine, and the Target Market News “Advertising Executive of the Year MAAX” award. She was also recognized the “Most Influential Woman” award from the Women’s Leadership Federation; the “Outstanding Women in Marketing Communications” award from Ebony magazine; and the “Advertising Woman of the Year Award” from The Women’s Advertising Club of Chicago and the Chicago Advertising Federation.

Fay Ferguson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 27, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.247

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/27/2013

Last Name

Ferguson

Maker Category
Schools

St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Grade School

Central Junior High School

La Porte High School

Concordia College

Indiana University

First Name

Fay

Birth City, State, Country

La Porte

HM ID

FER04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Rancho Mirage, Palm Springs, California

Favorite Quote

If You Don't Have Anything Positive To Say, Keep Quiet.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

12/6/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Cake (Chocolate)

Short Description

Advertising chief executive Fay Ferguson (1951 - ) served as an account executive with the Leo Burnett Company and went on to become co-chief executive officer of Burrell Communications Group.

Employment

Burrell Communications Group

Lee King & Partners/Bozell & Jacobs

Leo Burnett Company, Inc.

Michigan City Elston Junior High School

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:1827,43:2958,64:4350,112:5481,126:7830,174:8265,183:10962,239:12006,252:13311,275:13833,282:15312,302:28509,392:30003,413:32742,459:33821,478:38137,546:38469,551:39050,559:40959,596:41291,601:42868,630:46188,700:54320,828:58120,919:76732,1124:77838,1140:86530,1199:87490,1228:90850,1303:92210,1315:93330,1331:95970,1381:96850,1394:97170,1399:98050,1413:98770,1423:100610,1456:100930,1461:101410,1468:102690,1486:108724,1505:109372,1516:110020,1527:110956,1544:112180,1554:114746,1581:115257,1589:115549,1594:116133,1604:118323,1670:133133,1780:134904,1820:141141,1923:141911,1935:146222,1959:146726,1966:152942,2058:154958,2082:155882,2095:157646,2121:157982,2126:158738,2136:160166,2162:168194,2205:168746,2215:169367,2226:169712,2232:170057,2238:170747,2249:171851,2269:172403,2279:172817,2286:173576,2298:174059,2306:174335,2311:175370,2330:175853,2339:178268,2388:178820,2399:179303,2410:179924,2420:180269,2426:184400,2439:185060,2446:189130,2506:198464,2609:199608,2624:200224,2632:202248,2662:205388,2681:205898,2687:206408,2694:206816,2699:207224,2704:207938,2712:210794,2787:211202,2792:211814,2804:215690,2836$0,0:5092,100:5396,105:7676,135:8360,145:8664,150:11552,192:12084,253:12616,262:15276,324:16112,337:16872,349:17328,356:18468,375:19380,391:21508,427:22724,449:23028,454:23332,459:34054,576:35854,603:36430,612:37150,628:37870,641:41110,695:41398,700:41686,705:42406,719:42982,729:43630,742:43918,752:44350,760:44854,769:45502,779:58542,933:58898,938:59343,944:63470,1004:65822,1102:68006,1156:68762,1166:72710,1291:73382,1300:73718,1308:74642,1321:75062,1327:77414,1380:77834,1392:84806,1526:93342,1563:94587,1589:95915,1610:104796,1832:105709,1844:113160,1903:113727,1911:115590,1948:117777,2002:118182,2009:118668,2016:120531,2046:121827,2063:127700,2104:128900,2124:129220,2129:129940,2141:130900,2160:131620,2172:133860,2209:134260,2215:135140,2228:137620,2263:138740,2280:140420,2298:140980,2306:150250,2387:150775,2393:151510,2401:152770,2417:153295,2424:165144,2554:165872,2565:166873,2579:174335,2691:174881,2699:175427,2706:175791,2711:176155,2716:178703,2775:179704,2791:180250,2799:180614,2804:187322,2862:187826,2870:188710,2878
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Fay Ferguson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Fay Ferguson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Fay Ferguson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Fay Ferguson talks about her maternal grandfather's adoption

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Fay Ferguson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Fay Ferguson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Fay Ferguson remembers St. John's Lutheran School in La Porte, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Fay Ferguson recalls her experiences at the majority-white St. John's Lutheran School

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Fay Ferguson lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Fay Ferguson talks about her early interest in athletics

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Fay Ferguson talks about her parents' divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Fay Ferguson talks about the role of religion in her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Fay Ferguson remembers Sunday afternoons after church

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Fay Ferguson describes her community in La Porte, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Fay Ferguson recalls her transition to public schooling

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Fay Ferguson remembers LaPorte High School in La Porte, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Fay Ferguson remembers enrolling at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Fay Ferguson talks about the development of her racial identity

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Fay Ferguson remembers teaching at Elston Middle School in Michigan City, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Fay Ferguson talks about her experiences as a teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Fay Ferguson recalls the Indiana University School of Business in Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Fay Ferguson recalls her transition to the marketing industry

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Fay Ferguson remembers joining the Leo Burnett Company Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Fay Ferguson describes her responsibilities at the Leo Burnett Company Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Fay Ferguson remembers her first marketing presentation

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Fay Ferguson talks about the advertising industry

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Fay Ferguson remembers her transition to Bozell and Jacobs, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Fay Ferguson describes the account executive's role at an advertising shoot

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Fay Ferguson recalls being recruited by Thomas J. Burrell

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Fay Ferguson remembers Thomas J. Burrell

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Fay Ferguson talks about marketing to the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Fay Ferguson remembers her clients at the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Fay Ferguson talks about the growth of the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Fay Ferguson describes her role as the director of client services at the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Fay Ferguson talks about the work environment at the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Fay Ferguson remembers Thomas J. Burrell's retirement from the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Fay Ferguson recalls becoming co-CEO of the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Fay Ferguson talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Fay Ferguson talks about marketing to the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Fay Ferguson talks about black women in executive positions

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Fay Ferguson talks about the downfall of prominent advertising agencies

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Fay Ferguson talks about digital marketing

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Fay Ferguson describes the structure of the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Fay Ferguson reflects upon the marketing industry

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Fay Ferguson reflects on her legacy at the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Fay Ferguson reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Fay Ferguson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Fay Ferguson talks about the importance of healthy living

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

1$5

DATitle
Fay Ferguson recalls her transition to the marketing industry
Fay Ferguson describes her role as the director of client services at the Burrell Communications Group
Transcript
Well, you know, let's kind of touch, touch base a little bit on Xerox [Xerox Corporation]. Off camera you just mentioned the environment and I think you mentioned something about it being a--$$It was an all male environment as far as the professional careers and there were female secretaries, but in terms of any managers they were all white men and Xerox was a household name and so I was very gratified to be able to get an internship with them and to be able to I thought, contribute, who knows what interns are actually are able to do, but they gave me real world assignments as opposed to just make work, so that, that was really great. I had my own little apartment. It was, it was, it was wonderful.$$How as Rochester [New York] overall?$$Rochester, nothing to it (laughter).$$But it was nice to have your own place, have enough cash?$$Yes and could, could walk to work so it, it was, it was all very good.$$That was a summer internship?$$Yes.$$Okay, thank you, so let's go to Leo Burnett [Leo Burnett Company Inc.]. What was the woman's name again, Judy--?$$Carol Singer.$$Carol Singer, I'm sorry, I don't know where Judy came from, Carol Singer. How did you end up getting a position with Leo Burnett, I mean she came recruited, how, how did you get the job?$$And so then once Carol went back to the headquarters in Chicago [Illinois] at Burnett, obviously they get together and talk about all the different candidates that they've seen and then you're invited up for an interview and so I came up to Chicago to interview with a number of individuals and then I was invited back again for another follow up interview and then made a job offer.$$Okay, and time wise, this is when about, late '70s [1970s] or so?$$Yes, '78 [1978].$$Thanks and you got an offer to, to join Leo Burnett as, in what capacity? What was your position?$$Trainee (laughter). Back in those days we lovingly called the entrance level position as working in the pit, and that's because you went, when you went to work it was dark, when you left work it was dark and you were amongst your peers learning the ropes. You, you were put into different positions, whether it was research, spot buying, writing so that you learned a little bit about every discipline within advertising, which was really quite great because many companies don't do that now because they've become specialists, but I, I was able to be exposed to virtually every position and that's helped me as I worked my way up the ladder so to speak. My first assignment was on Kelloggs [Kellogg Company] and after I left the pit (laughter) and there I had ninety spot TV markets that I analyzed and purchased media for and then after that I went into account management on the Pillsbury account [Pillsbury Company, LLC] where you get into more of the strategic arm, of, of marketing.$Before we get to the 2000s, so you're, you're, you're moving up the, the ladder very nicely, senior vice president in the early 1990s, executive vice president. What was your role within the agency [Burrell Communications Group, Chicago, Illinois] and with the clients at those kinds of levels? What was that like?$$I was actually the director of client services, so I was over all of the accounts in the agency, but being a small agency--so I've gone from large to midsize to small, my job was not--I didn't, I had direct accounts that I worked on, but then I had accounts that I may not be directly involved with, but I was also charged with mentoring and nurturing the account directors to help them grow in their roles and also took on more of a role in terms of financial accountability and profitably for the agency, again the numbers are important on the agency side as well (laughter).$$Absolutely, absolutely, and you had some major clients, beside McDonald's [McDonald's Corporation] you had Exxon Mobil [Exxon Mobil Corporation], Sears [Sears, Roebuck and Co.], Kellogg [Kellogg Company], Coca-Cola [The Coca-Cola Company], Nation- Nationwide Insurance group [Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company], P and G [Procter and Gamble Company], did you, were you accountable with client services that if something is going awry you, you have to step in?$$Yes, yes, yes and in fact--$$Not that it ever did.$$(Laughter) No we all have our challenges.$$You have your challenges, thank you.$$So in fact, there was a point and time when the McDonald's account was going through a number of issues and I was not working day to day on the account at the time and so Tom [HistoryMaker Thomas J. Burrell] tapped me on my shoulder and said, "Hey, we need you over here." (Laughter) And I was like, "Oh god, no." (Laughter) Because it was interesting that the McDonald's folks were always busy, they're always running around, it was--I said, "I don't get that. What's going on?" (Laughter) I soon found out, it's a retail account, so it was one of the agency's busiest accounts because we were literally doing every month what it took most of the other accounts six months to a year to do, so we were in production every month of the year, which, and we were at client meetings all the time, so it was a totally different environment and it was, it was fascinating in a very different way. I never thought that I could go from a slow, steady, steady pace on a packaged goods client, like a Procter or a General Mills [General Mills Inc.] to a McDonald's, but once I was there it took about, you know, a little bit, six months before I accepted it (laughter), but once I was there I was like wow, this is really what it's about and I, I don't know that I could ever go back, that, that pace, that energy, that excitement, it's, there's, there's exhilaration, there's nothing like it.

Sheila Talton

Technology executive and entrepreneur Sheila G. Talton was born on October 12, 1952 in Cleveland, Ohio. As a teenager, she became involved in the civil rights movement in Rockford, Illinois. Talton went on to graduate from Northern Illinois University with her B.S. degree in business administration and speech communications in 1980

Upon graduation, Talton was hired as a sales trainee at NCR Corporation. She became head of Midwest sales for Data Group Systems in Chicago in 1982, moving on to a position as team leader in the sales department of Applied Data Research (ADR) in 1984. Taking advantage of a void left by the breakup of AT&T, Talton founded Unisource Network Services, a provider of voice, data and video networking consultation and support services, in 1987. In 1996, while still leading Unisource, she helped establish the Information Technology Senior Management Forum, a mentoring group that cultivates executive talent among African American IT professionals. Talton sold her stake in Unisource in 2000, and was hired as the vice president of Cap Gemini, Ernst & Young’s Midwest technology consulting practice. In 2002, she was named president of global business innovation services for Electronic Data Systems (EDS). Talton was hired by the computer networking company Cisco Systems Inc. in 2004 where she became vice president of advisory services in the Customer Advocacy Group. She was promoted to a role as vice president of Cisco’s Office of Globalization in 2008 and helped the company identify growth opportunities in emerging markets around the world. She left Cisco in 2012 to found the consulting firm SGT, Ltd. In 2013, Talton established Gray Matter Analytics, Inc., a business providing consulting services and cloud hosting service for analytics.

Talton has served as a member of the board of directors of the ACCO Brands Corporation, the Wintrust Financial Corporation, the Chicago Shakespeare Theater, the Northwestern Memorial Hospital Foundation, the Lighthouse for the Blind, and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her honors include selection as a Congressional appointee on the US White House Women’s Business Council, as one of the “Top 10 Women in Technology” by Enterprising Women, and as “Entrepreneur of the Year” by the National Federation of Black Women Business Owners. She is also a recipient of the “Entrepreneurial Excellence Award” from Working Woman magazine and a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award. She was named a 2007 “Woman Worth Watching” by Profiles in Diversity Journal, received a 2008 Egretha Award from the African American Women’s Business and Career Conference, and was named a 2009 Business Leader of Color by Chicago United. In 2010 she was honored as a Woman of Achievement by the Anti-Defamation League, and as the Outstanding College Alumni of the Year by the Business School of Northern Illinois University. In 2011 she was named one of “25 Influential Black Women in Business” by The Network Journal and received the “Diamond Leadership Award” from the Information Technology Senior Management Forum.

Sheila G. Talton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 23, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.216

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/23/2013

Last Name

Talton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Gayle

Schools

Harvard Business School

Northern Illinois University

West High School

Rock Valley College

Roosevelt-Perry Elementary School

Franklin School

First Name

Sheila

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

TAL01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Vail, Colorado

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

10/12/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Vegetables

Short Description

Technology executive Sheila Talton (1952 - ) had extensive global operations experience as a business leader and entrepreneur in the information technology industry. She founded Gray Matter Analytics in 2013.

Employment

Gray Matter Analytics, Inc.

Sterling Partners

Sgt, LTD. (Sheila Talton, LTD.)

CISCO Systems

EDS

CAP Gemini Ernst & Young

Unisource Network Services

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:1408,41:2368,65:3776,104:4288,114:14436,254:14684,259:15242,270:16110,290:17288,315:17660,322:17908,327:18466,337:19396,361:20202,377:20450,382:25129,424:34316,524:34564,529:34812,539:35060,544:37335,559:37860,565:38700,576:43364,599:46580,673:46982,680:47451,688:53848,793:65801,942:66206,948:68814,971:69402,978:69794,983:72984,1000:74010,1018:74442,1028:75036,1041:80358,1094:80939,1103:81769,1114:84176,1153:85006,1168:89268,1198:90128,1205:90816,1214:91418,1222:91762,1227:92192,1233:92536,1238:93310,1248:100019,1329:100383,1334:100747,1339:103650,1411:109752,1459:112064,1505:112336,1510:112948,1522:113288,1528:121971,1629:128060,1663:128448,1668:129030,1676:134508,1758:134910,1768:135848,1792:144490,1893:156948,1984:161040,2022:161680,2032:163290,2041:163898,2050:165190,2083:172410,2184:173488,2201:181386,2312:184410,2416:185970,2426$0,0:27542,75:28018,80:31350,116:39069,157:39504,163:58102,308:58708,316:63270,364:76926,524:77664,536:80134,552:86875,629:87215,634:87810,642:98514,732:103844,822:107105,836:109270,850:109985,864:110245,869:113880,905:114810,918:117946,936:119206,959:119710,968:120298,976:125312,1045:135348,1188:136076,1197:138748,1237:140856,1311:144862,1358:151595,1491:151855,1496:152245,1503:152570,1509:155854,1539:156253,1548:169940,1788:185360,1968:186140,1975:190890,2009:193378,2036:213020,2166:215380,2172:218250,2268:226000,2320:226360,2326:231540,2581:270180,2993:271800,3027:272250,3034:272700,3040:284610,3180
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sheila Talton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton describes her mother's personality and education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton talks about her father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton lists her father's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton remembers her parents' divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sheila Talton recalls living in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sheila Talton remembers Perry Elementary School in Louisville, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Sheila Talton describes her home life in Louisville, Kentucky, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Sheila Talton describes her home life in Louisville, Kentucky, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Sheila Talton remembers the holidays

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton describes her family life in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton describes the Hough neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton recalls visits from her father after her parents' divorce

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton remembers moving to Rockford, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton remembers the Franklin School in Rockford, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton remembers her parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton talks about the African American community in Rockford, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton remembers reconnecting with her father

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton recalls her involvement in the Black Power movement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton remembers her teenage years

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton describes her experiences at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton talks about the Black Panther Party in Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton recalls her decision to attend Northern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton remembers leaving Northern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton remembers entering the secretarial workforce

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton recalls her return to Northern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton remembers studying business administration at Northern Illinois University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton describes her motivation for completing her college education

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton remembers joining the NCR Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton recalls her decision to leave the NCR Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton talks about her technological aptitude and training

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton describes her salesmanship skills

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton remembers her role at Data Group Systems

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton remembers working for Applied Data Research

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton remembers her prejudiced manager at Applied Data Research

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton remembers founding Unisource Network Services

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton describes what she learned at Applied Data Research

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton remembers her divorce

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton talks about her daughter

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton remembers running Unisource Network Services

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton remembers leaving Unisource Network Services

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton describes her role at Ernst and Young

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton remembers working at Ernst and Young

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton describes her civic involvement in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton recalls her transition from Capgemini SE to Electronic Data Systems

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Sheila Talton talks about the importance of community service

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton talks about her role as a mentor

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton remembers her second marriage

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton remembers being hired at Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton recalls working for Cisco Systems, Inc. in China

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton talks about challenges for African Americans in Silicon Valley

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton remembers working for Cisco Systems, Inc. in Mexico

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton remembers working for Cisco Systems, Inc. in Brazil and Chile

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton talks about her interest in big data

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton remembers founding Gray Matter Analytics

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Sheila Talton describes the workplace culture at Sterling Partners

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Sheila Talton describes her business plan for Gray Matter Analytics

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Sheila Talton describes her hopes for Gray Matter Analytics

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Sheila Talton reflects upon her values

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Sheila Talton shares her advice to young people

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Sheila Talton reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Sheila Talton reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Sheila Talton talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Sheila Talton reflects upon her parents' lessons

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Sheila Talton narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$3

DAStory

9$7

DATitle
Sheila Talton remembers founding Gray Matter Analytics
Sheila Talton recalls her return to Northern Illinois University
Transcript
And when I went back out there I started looking around, who was investing in all the big data and then where the money was going, and it was pretty much going all in software; and I thought to myself, hm, that's probably not a good thing 'cause I think that there's an opportunity for the services piece, which is really more important because it's having the people that can read what the data's telling them. I ended up landing at a private equity firm here [Sterling Partners] that had not done a lot in technology but they said that they wanted to, and quite frankly, I believe because of the discrimination in those firms, I didn't have a lot of options. I mean, I wasn't getting firms, "Oh, yeah, Sheila [HistoryMaker Sheila Talton], come on in, come on in," but there was an African American principal at this firm and he wanted me to come into this firm. So I did. I joined the firm as, what they call an executive in residence, which means that, you're not making much money but you're looking to invest where you might end up running the new entity that they invested in. So, I wrote an investment thesis, spent about eight months doing that and I was becoming very, very bored and then I probably brought them about four different deals. They didn't like any of them.$$Right.$$And I went back out to California this past March and met with some old Cisco [Cisco Systems, Inc.] colleagues, met with some venture funds and told them all about this investment thesis I wrote and how I know that this is the sweet spot in big data, where there's a void. Consistently, I got asked, "So why aren't you launching the company?" I said, I don't know. Came back to Chicago [Illinois], thought about that, went skiing out in Vail [Colorado] with a couple of friends, talked to them about my investment thesis and they said, "So why aren't you launching it?" And I said, you know, I think I will. So, I came back to Chicago and started Gray Matter Analytics and we're nine people now, office in Silicon Valley, office in Chicago, thinking about whether we need one on the East Coast because right now our biggest customer is out there on the East Coast.$$Okay.$$I sit on a couple of public company boards and still on the Northwestern Memorial Hospital [Chicago, Illinois] board, Chicago Urban League board and the Shakespeare Theatre [Chicago Shakespeare Theater, Chicago, Illinois] board, so I've got a full life.$Then in, let's see, 1975, 1975, I met my husband--maybe '74 [1974]. And we were married and he was a machinist at a factory in Belvidere, Illinois and I was still working at the printing place, and then I became pregnant and I had my daughter. And when I had my daughter, life changed for me. I did not go back to work at the printing place, I went to work at a place called Allis-Chalmers [Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Company], they manufactured forklifts and I was a clerk there. And my daughter was young, a baby, and there was a salesman there, first name Greg [ph.], I cannot think of his last name, white guy, and I had been working there for about, say maybe a year or so, and he says to me one day, he says, "Why are you working here?" And me being as militant as I am, I'm thinking, and why are you asking me that? And he said, "You're capable of so much more, why is it that you're a clerk here at this showroom?" And I said, "Well, I have to work, my husband works, we have a daughter." And he says, "Well, why didn't you go to college?" I said, "Oh, I did." I said, "That didn't work so well." He says, "What do you mean?" And I said, "Oh, I partied a lot, I was on academic probation." He says, "Why don't you go back?" I said, "Well they're not going to take me back." He says, "They would take you back." And I said, "What do you mean they would take me back?" He says, "Well, if you would go to a junior college and you take calculus and quantitative analysis, some really tough classes and ace those, they'd take you back at Northern [Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois]." And I said, (makes sound), I said, "Well, you know, I've never been really good at math." He says, "Well, I'll tutor you." So I took his advice. I went and enrolled in classes at Rock Valley junior college [Rock Valley College, Rockford, Illinois] and he kept his word. I would go to his house, his wife and he, and he would tutor me. I ended up taking about, I don't know, twelve hours there and then I reapplied back at Northern. I had a young child at this time. They accepted me back. I quit that job. I got a loan and a scholarship, a grant from Sundstrand [Sundstrand Corporation; UTC Aerospace Systems], it was one of them where I had worked as a secretary, and I was on the dean's list every semester.$$Can we hold that for a minute 'cause you're, you're going to where I'm going to be in a few minutes, but let's back up just a hair. You ended up getting married in 1970--$$I think we got married, my daughter was born in '77 [1977], so we must have got married maybe in '74 [1974], '75 [1975].$$Okay, and your husband's name?$$Henry [Henry Talton].$$Henry, thank you, and your daughter's name?$$Shannel [Shannel Talton].$$Shannel, thank you. These are important details, I want to make sure I get them.$$Ex-husband.$$Ex-husband, okay, no, I can deal with then-husband, later on, ex-husband. And this salesman, I'm sorry, what was his name?$$Greg was his first name. I wish I, I actually wish I could find him, but Greg was his first name.$$All right, and he just, so he took you under, under his wing (unclear)?$$Right.$$He's white?$$Um-hm.

Audrey Peeples

Former YWCA executive and women's rights advocate Audrey R. Peeples was born in Chicago on May 22, 1939 to Thelma and John Rone. For nearly thirty years, she has held leadership positions with some of Chicago's - and the country's - preeminent women's organizations.

Raised in Chicago, Peeples earned her B.A. degree in 1961 from the University of Illinois at Champagne. After twelve years working as a trust manager for Continental Bank, she became associate regional director for Girl Scouts USA in 1973. Three years later, she rose to executive director of the Girl Scouts of Chicago, and held the position until September 1987. At that time, she left the Girl Scouts to become CEO of the Young Women's Christian Association.

Under Peeples' leadership, the YWCA made significant inroads into helping improve the lives and rights of women. Peeples spearheaded efforts to end racist practices within the organization as well as to expand the YWCA's childcare initiative. Additionally, she promoted violence and pregnancy prevention for children and young teens, and introduced new cancer education and screening programs for women. Peeples' stewardship also saw the agency's annual budget quadruple, from $3 million to $12 million, enabling the YWCA to extend its offerings. In anticipation of her retirement, Peeples successfully recruited Patricia Ireland, former president of the National Organization for Women, to succeed her in 2001.

Peeples is currently the co-chair of the Alumnae Council of the Chicago Foundation for Women, and a member of the Executive Committee of the Chicago Community Trust. She has served on the Board of the Executive Services Corps, and as vice president of the ACLU of Illinois. She is on the Dean's Advisory Board of the School for New Learning at DePaul University, and is a member and past chair of the Chicago Network, an affiliate of the International Women's Forum. Peeples has also served on the Board of Directors of the United Way of Chicago the Chicago Foundation for Women, Junior Governing Board of the Chicago Symphony, and Girl Scouts of the USA. She is the recipient of the Thomas and Eleanor Wright Award from the City of Chicago Commission on Human Relations for her work on the YWCA's Racial Justice Program.

Peeples was married for twenty-nine years to Anthony Peeples, who died in 2001. They have two children, Jennifer and Michael. Peeples lives in Chicago.

Accession Number

A2003.203

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/25/2003

Last Name

Peeples

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow (3/27/2001)

Schools

John B. Drake Elementary School

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Northwestern University

First Name

Audrey

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

PEE03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Arizona

Favorite Quote

Good Grief.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

5/22/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Association chief executive and nonprofit chief executive Audrey Peeples (1939 - ) served as the CEO of the YWCA and the executive director of the Girls Scouts of Chicago.

Employment

Continental Bank

Girl Scouts USA

Girl Scouts of Chicago

YWCA

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:824,4:1436,15:3068,46:3408,52:4700,80:6196,107:6604,114:12460,181:13540,203:17537,261:18089,270:22383,330:22880,338:23306,348:24300,363:30648,440:33842,470:34106,475:36999,508:37971,533:38619,542:43144,587:49700,710:51425,741:59685,835:60020,841:60288,846:64730,913:68912,992:82323,1115:84500,1126:85084,1136:87055,1163:87420,1169:88442,1198:89245,1210:92466,1229:93177,1241:99339,1356:100366,1374:104158,1450:108895,1476:110085,1486:110510,1492:112160,1509:112640,1514:119970,1595:133089,1822:144615,1998:146690,2014:149761,2070:150425,2079:151421,2104:163916,2261:165284,2274:166538,2298:170370,2353$0,0:14553,240:18170,262:19780,296:20270,304:24190,364:26740,371:27480,383:27776,388:48430,698:49630,727:63663,930:68410,1030:96280,1455:96755,1461:106700,1551
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Audrey Peeples' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Audrey Peeples lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Audrey Peeples introduces her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Audrey Peeples talks about her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Audrey Peeples describes her mother's migration to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Audrey Peeples describes her paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Audrey Peeples describes her father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Audrey Peeples describes her father's experience during The Chicago Race Riot of 1919 when he first moved to Chicago, Illinois' Black Belt

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Audrey Peeples recalls her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Audrey Peeples describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Audrey Peeples describes her childhood activities and interests

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Audrey Peeples talks about her family's religious faith and practice

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Audrey Peeples talks about her parent's disbelief in organized religion

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Audrey Peeples describes her favorite childhood radio shows

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Audrey Peeples talks about attending John B. Drake Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Audrey Peeples remembers her teachers at John B. Drake Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Audrey Peeples describes her experience as a student at Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Audrey Peeples remembers teachers at Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Audrey Peeples remembers teachers at Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Audrey Peeples describes her extracurricular activities at Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Audrey Peeples explains her decision to attend the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Audrey Peeples describes her social experience as an undergraduate student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Audrey Peeples remembers her professors at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Audrey Peeples talks briefly about the absence of civil rights activity at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana in the 1950s, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Audrey Peeples talks briefly about the absence of civil rights activity at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana in the 1950s, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Audrey Peeples describes her father's skepticism toward integration

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Audrey Peeples describes being hired at Continental Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Audrey Peeples talks about earning an MBA degree from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Audrey Peeples career remembers the world's first electronic stock transfer performed at Continental Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Audrey Peeples explains how her marriage and pregnancy affected her career at Continental Bank

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Audrey Peeples describes becoming associate regional director for the Girl Scouts of Metropolitan Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Audrey Peeples remembers becoming executive director at the Girl Scouts of Metropolitan Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Audrey Peeples describes joining the YWCA in 1987

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Audrey Peeples talks about anti-racist and anti-sexist programming at the YWCA

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Audrey Peeples talks about the significance of the Harriet M. Harris YWCA on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Audrey Peeples describes challenges she faced as CEO of the YWCA of Metropolitan Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Audrey Peeples talks about women recognized at the YWCA Women of Achievement Leader Luncheon

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Audrey Peeples explains the history and mission of the YWCA

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Audrey Peeples talks about the history of the Jane Addams Hull House in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Audrey Peeples talks about the YWCA's collaboration with the Urban Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Audrey Peeples talks about right-winged criticism of the YWCA after having hiring Patricia Ireland as CEO, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Audrey Peeples talks about right-winged criticism of the YWCA after having hiring Patricia Ireland as CEO, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Audrey Peeples talks about surrounding YWCAs in the Chicagoland area and the future of the YWCA

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Audrey Peeples describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Audrey Peeples tells a story about her father's encounter with notorious African American Chicago policeman "Two-Gun Pete"

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Audrey Peeples reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Audrey Peeples describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Audrey Peeples narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

6$9

DATitle
Audrey Peeples explains how her marriage and pregnancy affected her career at Continental Bank
Audrey Peeples describes joining the YWCA in 1987
Transcript
And then I got married and it was like, oh no she's married. She's a woman and she's married and then six months after I got married I got pregnant 'cause I was already thirty-one years old, and it was like, oh no you're gonna have a baby. And so I worked in personal trust and they thought it was an embarrassment for me to be walking around in personal trust pregnant 'cause you had to wear maternity clothes. So, they put me in trust operations, which I hated. I just absolutely hated it, and by that time I had gotten on the national board of the Girl Scouts and the bank let me have the time because I was, it was good for the bank and it was good for publicity and you know. So, I would go to these national board meetings in New York all the time, and when I got pregnant I told them I was gonna take maternity leave and I would come back after my baby was born, because black women go back to work. Well, they had never had a white woman who got pregnant who came back to work, never. And so after my baby was born and I came back nobody took me seriously. I mean, first of all they put me in trust operations division, which was a division where young kids who were training to be supervisors were coming, and I made at the time $10,000 more than anybody they had in the department, but it was sort of like, you know, we're not taking you seriously anymore because you obviously are going to stop working, you know you're gonna be a mother and a wife. So, I went to a board meeting with the Girl Scouts and the lady said, "How do like being back at work?" I said I hate it, I just hate it, and she said, "How would you like to come and work for the Girl Scouts?" and I said--I didn't even ask her what the job was. I said what are you paying? And she said what are you making? And I told her and she said well we could probably match your salary. So, I took the job and I went back and quit. I was shocked at myself. I didn't think I would--I had a incredible encouragement from my husband because the bank was I had ever known, I had been there fourteen years already and it was like oh no what am I going to do, I can't leave the bank and he said sure you can. So, he was an incredible supporter, and so I left, and I think had I not left I never would have achieved the success that I achieved in my life, so I'm glad I left.$And I stayed there until a search firm came and got me for the Y [YWCA] and I stayed there, let me see--oh I forgot that part. When I went over to the Girl Scouts, I found out I was pregnant. I took a month off and I got pregnant with my second child, and the major difference in working for a women's organization and working for a men's organization presented itself because the Girl Scouts were absolutely wonderful. They--I was pregnant and they just said you know this happens, you know, you need any time for the doctor do what you need to do. But, anyway so then I had my baby. So, by the time I became the executive director I had two babies, two children. But, the, the thing was is that when I went to the Girl Scouts I loved my job. I did a real good job there. I loved it. And then the search firm came and said, you know, we've got a job at the Y would you like to interview, and I said no. And the guy was really good. He has a search firm in Chicago, Willie Carrington, Carrington and Carrington, and he said, "Well can we just meet for dinner." I said I don't know--(unclear)--and he said please just come for dinner and when I went for dinner with him I had no idea the Girl Scouts, I mean the YWCA did so many things. So, I said hey I might be interested in this job and it was a lot more money. So, I with a bigger agency, had more staff, you had a broader array of opportunities, so I went for the interview. I went for about five interviews and when I got the job in 1987 and I stayed there until I retired in 2000.

Dr. Gloria Jackson Bacon

Dr. Gloria Jackson Bacon has made a career out of caring for the health and welfare of those less fortunate. Bacon was born on September 21, 1937, in New Orleans, Louisiana. Her father, Henry Johnson, was a postal clerk and her mother, Vina V. Johnson, was a schoolteacher.

Bacon earned a B.S. from Xavier University in New Orleans in 1958. She moved to Chicago to attend medical school, attending the University of Illinois School of Medicine, graduating in 1962. Bacon did not intend to stay in Chicago for an extended period of time. However, the inner-city patients she saw reminded her of the people she knew growing up in Louisiana.

In 1968, Bacon was fired from a publicly supported medical facility at the Altgeld Gardens' Murray Homes on Chicago's South Side for making her views on the need to improve the meager care provided there known. In response, Bacon opened the Clinic in Altgeld, Inc., a not-for-profit agency offering total health care and serving as the primary medical resource for the Altgeld Gardens area. The facility handles 15,000 patients a year. The center was funded out of her personal savings and Medicaid reimbursement until 1991, when it began to receive federal funding. The clinic has greatly improved the health of Altgeld Gardens community residents. When Bacon first opened the clinic, the infant mortality rate was 50.2 per thousand, in 1990 this number was reduced to 9.2 per thousand. In 2001, Bacon retired as medical director of the clinic.

In 1992, Bacon returned to singing. Singing had played an important role in Bacon's early development. She performed in many recitals and concerts throughout her youth and college years, but the demands of practicing medicine took precedence. She has been a featured soloist at Chicago Orchestra Hall, ETA Theater and numerous churches.

Accession Number

A2002.129

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

7/10/2002

Last Name

Bacon

Maker Category
Middle Name

Jackson

Schools

Xavier University of Louisiana

University of Illinois College of Medicine

McDonogh No. 35 Senior High School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Archival Photo 2
Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

Gloria

Birth City, State, Country

New Orleans

HM ID

BAC01

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Louisiana

Birth Date

9/21/1937

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New Orleans

Country

USA

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Medical director and physician Dr. Gloria Jackson Bacon (1937 - ) dedicated her life to providing health services to the underprivileged housing project Altgeld Gardens. Dr. Bacon founded the Clinic in Altgeld, which reduced the infant mortality rate in Altgeld Gardens from 50.2 per thousand to 9.2 per thousand.

Employment

Clinic in Altgeld Gardens

Chicago Department of Health

Cook County Hospital

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:2345,93:2881,102:3551,117:4020,129:7303,237:7705,244:8107,252:8509,275:8844,283:9782,302:13199,408:13467,413:14338,438:20280,491:23032,556:28920,694:35174,800:35630,811:38309,893:41900,967:42527,985:42926,993:43325,1000:43667,1007:44180,1019:44864,1035:51818,1068:52719,1098:53037,1106:53249,1111:54521,1148:54733,1153:55369,1159:57880,1177:58938,1211:61040,1223:65240,1311:65480,1316:65720,1321:66320,1338:67700,1379:69080,1405:70700,1455:71300,1469:76028,1480:76376,1485:76724,1490:78810,1507:79130,1513:79386,1518:79770,1525:80154,1533:80474,1539:81370,1558:81690,1564:84081,1604$0,0:1582,17:2050,25:3142,42:10786,226:11332,235:11878,244:13594,281:14920,314:15466,322:15778,327:17260,347:17728,354:18040,359:33488,621:33824,628:34048,633:34552,645:36904,740:37184,746:37632,755:37856,760:39592,787:40320,820:40600,827:41048,837:41328,843:41720,851:42224,864:42616,873:42840,878:43064,883:43344,889:43568,897:46256,966:54600,1026:56504,1073:57388,1091:57660,1096:58136,1104:58680,1144:59088,1153:59700,1158:60108,1165:63294,1232:63614,1238:64254,1250:64574,1256:64830,1261:65662,1277:67326,1335:69438,1381:70334,1392:70974,1407:71230,1412:73534,1462:74750,1494:79880,1518:81980,1556:83870,1588:85760,1611:89230,1620:90112,1638:92569,1687:93577,1705:94333,1719:94963,1733:97609,1784:98617,1803:99247,1814:99499,1819:100003,1828:100444,1838:100822,1846:106362,1896:106758,1903:107286,1916:107616,1922:108870,1952:110520,1997:113249,2023:113676,2032:115323,2083:115567,2095:116909,2122:117214,2128:118556,2179:119044,2184:119715,2197:123674,2237:124122,2250:124378,2255:125018,2268:125594,2278:126682,2300:127514,2316:128026,2326:128730,2344:129050,2350:129434,2357:129882,2365:130138,2370:130586,2379:131610,2399:131930,2405:132698,2423:133402,2452:133914,2461:134490,2476:139529,2512:140200,2527:140505,2533:141420,2564:142152,2578:144140,2584:144690,2633:145990,2684:146590,2698:146990,2708:147790,2730:148040,2738:148290,2744:149590,2782:150140,2795:150540,2806:150940,2816:151290,2824:153100,2830:153820,2845:154396,2859:155260,2873:155836,2884:156988,2896:157708,2908:160338,2934:160674,2942:163530,3000:166140,3008:166767,3021:168306,3058:168534,3063:168876,3070:169560,3081:169788,3086:170130,3093:172410,3101:176690,3121:177104,3128:177518,3136:177863,3142:178415,3155:179864,3179:182704,3206:185424,3264:186172,3279:186920,3289:188212,3318:191908,3355:192778,3397:195388,3424:196374,3445:196664,3451:197360,3478:197940,3484:198810,3496:199158,3503:199506,3510:199738,3521:201362,3558:201710,3565:201942,3570:202174,3575:206170,3582:206590,3590:216830,3729:218730,3773:221930,3790:222710,3814:222950,3819:224750,3855:225530,3877:226310,3903:228110,3970:228470,3978:229010,3995:229610,4015:229850,4024:230630,4043:230990,4051:231350,4059:231590,4064:231830,4069:232310,4078:234470,4132:239896,4175:240832,4202:241264,4209:241984,4223:243784,4260:244288,4272:247460,4291:247688,4296:248144,4305:248372,4310:248714,4318:249170,4331:250082,4350:251450,4384:254310,4439:254970,4444:255510,4457:256290,4475:256590,4481:257130,4499:261649,4524:261941,4529:262306,4535:268629,4611:273606,4683:274001,4691:274554,4700:275976,4745:277319,4778:277635,4783:283376,4809:284510,4840:284834,4847:285212,4857:288644,4896:291063,4965:291653,4978:294059,5006
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gloria Bacon interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gloria Bacon's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gloria Bacon describes her mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gloria Bacon discusses her father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gloria Bacon explains how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gloria Bacon describes her two siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gloria Bacon recalls her earliest memory, learning her ABCs

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gloria Bacon describes her greatest familial influence

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gloria Bacon remembers the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Gloria Bacon describes her response to being the oldest child

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Gloria Bacon describes activities in her childhood neighborhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Gloria Bacon describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gloria Bacon confronts pressure to become a doctor

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gloria Bacon recalls memorable moments in elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gloria Bacon remembers an influential teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gloria Bacon discusses her limited early exposure to white people in New Orleans

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gloria Bacon describes herself as a well-rounded high school student

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gloria Bacon chooses to attend Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gloria Bacon experiences school life in an all-black environment

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gloria Bacon describes her experience at Xavier University of New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Gloria Bacon describes incidents of colorism from her college years

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gloria Bacon discusses her coursework at Xavier University, New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gloria Bacon discovers her interest in singing

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gloria Bacon chooses to attend Howard University's Medical School, Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gloria Bacon explains her interest in sewing

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gloria Bacon finds ways to succeed in medical school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gloria Bacon considers diversity at Howard University's medical school

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gloria Bacon describes her interests in the medical profession

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gloria Bacon discusses the issues that women in medicine face

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Gloria Bacon discusses her move to the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gloria Bacon experiences a chilling Illinois winter

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gloria Bacon becomes pregnant during her second year of medical school

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gloria Bacon describes her first job after medical school at a Medicaid clinic

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gloria Bacon finds similarities between Altgeld Gardens, Chicago and New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gloria Bacon describes her inspiration for opening a new clinic

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gloria Bacon reflects on the opening of her new medical clinic

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gloria Bacon discusses the historical and political context of the opening of her clinic

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gloria Bacon describes patient volume at her Chicago medical clinic

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gloria Bacon discusses the early stages of her medical clinic's development

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gloria Bacon considers the socioeconomic situations of her patients

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gloria Bacon considers black self-determination with respect to the healthcare industry

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gloria Bacon discusses the beginning of her involvement with Chicago's Provident Hospital

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gloria Bacon remembers the closing of Chicago's Provident Hospital

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gloria Bacon discusses lessons learned from managing a medical clinic

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Gloria Bacon describes her experience on the University of Illinois's Board of Trustees

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gloria Bacon speaks to her love for the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Gloria Bacon describes her concerns and hope for the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Gloria Bacon discusses elitism in the medical field

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Gloria Bacon gives advice for those considering the medical profession

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Gloria Bacon discusses her love of writing and performing

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Gloria Bacon discusses her legacy, showing care for the black comunity

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Photo - Gloria Bacon, valedictorian of her grammar school class

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Photo - Gloria Bacon poses as part of Xavier University's homecoming court, 1956

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Photo - Gloria Bacon is sworn in as a member of The University of Illinois Board of Trustees

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Photo - Gloria Bacon, elementary school spring festival queen

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Photo - Gloria Bacon with other members of her high school homecoming court

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Photo - Gloria Bacon is inducted into the American Academy of Family Physicians

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DATitle
Gloria Bacon confronts pressure to become a doctor
Gloria Bacon discusses the historical and political context of the opening of her clinic
Transcript
Well, the truth is, my mother [Vina Velma Johnson] made--I, had a challenge. I went to the, doctor's office. I was maybe in my teens and the doctor said, "Oh, I understand you're going to be a doctor." And I said, "That's what my ma- that's what my mother (with emphasis) wants," like the teenager, like the sullen kind of teenager is going to say. So I got home and my mother said, "No, now, that's the last time I want to hear that from you. You don't want to be a doctor. You don't have to be a doctor. You just do whatever you want to do, but I just was trying to give you some--." Basically, "I'm trying to give you a good start on life." You know what I'm saying, "But you don't have to be a doctor for me. I don't need you to do anything for me." (Unclear) so she fronted me off in such a way that it was, "Okay." (Laughs). I'd been getting all my passes based on the fact that I wanted to be a doctor. (Laughs) Now, you know, here I am in high school, you know, getting ready, people know me all around, all the things that I do. "Am I going to back out?" But I'll say it's like at that point, it was at--it was probably at that point that I took it on because, like I say, she threw it back at me, because I had really in a very sullen way, I mean I was a, good--I could--I had a good, some good years of being a really sullen, ugly teenager. Where you just give the really ugly answers. And so she just threw it at me. I mean just up in my face. And from that point on, then I think that having come to grips with the, with the whole piece of choice, then I made the choice.$Now, can you put this in context the, you know, the--you've done a little bit of it, but the Altgeld, you know, The Clinic at Altgeld [Bacon's medical clinic in Chicago, Illinois], can you put in context historical context in terms of what was happening in the medical industry at that time, you know, I mean what changes were happening, how poor people were actually being treated, you know, (unclear).$$Well, you have a lot of things going on, well, in terms of, now remember Altgeld [Gardens, public housing projects, Chicago, Illinois] was isolated altogether. Altgeld was not part even in 1969, '70 [1970], Altgeld wasn't even part of the regular CTA [Chicago Transit Authority] transportation line. So you had the south, we had the South Suburban line which was a, line that ran straight up [Martin Luther] King Drive, separate, which brought people. But that was like once every hour or once whenever it came. And, so you didn't and then you had to pay a separate fee to get on CTA to go from Alt- you know, to go from Altgeld any place else. So, a lot of the people in Altgeld used Michael Reese [Hospital, Chicago, Illinois] and some, to some extent Mercy [Mercy Hospital and Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois] as a, place because you could come directly on the line, get off on King Drive [Chicago, Illinois] and be by Mercy or be by, Reese. So that going out and going some place else was very difficult. I mean it was two or three bus lines, trips. It was two or three bus fares. It was a lot of time. So that's, one, that's part of what the impetus was in the, in writing of the, of the proposal because it was so difficult. It was not any place easy. Plus, the people in Altgeld basically had been from the projects as we all--it was sometimes in quotes and basically were not reasonably well accepted outside. Many of them did not venture outside. Many of them lived almost like insular lives inside of Altgeld. There's a school. There's a grocery store. There's a church. There's whatever else you basically, the kind of things you need inside. So many of the people lived inside and so going downtown to Marshall Fields [department store] was like going to New York [New York] on a (unclear). It was like, it was like really going away. So that part of it we're looking for was trying to figure out how to bring better quality care inside a development since a large percentage of the people were going to use the services inside and not outside. So that's part of, what's going on. The other piece that I alluded to in the beginning was just, Medicaid [federal medical insurance program] was beginning to evolve. So if you're talking about a population of people in public housing by and large a large percentage of them would be, would be eligible for Medicaid. We're now talking about increasing the access that's available for them to be able to use medical and health care services. So that's, really, what I had in mind. I, like I say, when I'm, I'm trying probably got caught up in the whole, you know, in much more a social, in much more a social, sociological model, rather than me being caught up in medicine. Medicine was like the, sticker. It was like the lost leader piece almost in terms of how you got people in that came for, services. But it really was looking at the total, the total life that was the, and, and some of the things that were missing and, and beginning to try and think about how to do that. And that, that's how, that's really what, the, what the clinic was. It was, it was always more than just a medical facility.$$Were, politics, Chicago politic, did they enter in at all in this? Or was that a factor? Are you--?$$You know, I kind of it's like I, I'm not, I don't read the newspaper daily during the last twenty--most of my life because I, initially, I was getting children ready in the morning and I didn't have time. And then after that, I never got to it. So in, there are a lots of things that I do sometimes which are good and sometimes are bad, where I live my life like separate from whatever the rest of the world's doing, what the rest of the city's doing on that day. And most of the time we didn't really have a lot of fights, and we didn't--I, didn't get into it too much in the way of many problems from time to time. I had good relationships with most of the commissioners of health, you know, basically, either who knew me or who knew what we were doing. And so we could make that kind of contact. I knew [Mayor] Jane Byrne just in terms of mayors by name, and I knew [Mayor] Harold [Washington]. I know the mayor, and, and I think he knows basically the as in--I didn't know, I just met briefly senior, [Mayor Richard J.] Daley. I know Mayor [RIchard M.] Daley at this point, but, not a lot of, interaction. You know, but we pretty much have been my job was to take care of my own business to try to make sure I'm not we didn't get in, we didn't we have not had much in the way of, a fight.