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Anthony Jackson

Professor Anthony Jackson was born on June 20, 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio to Geneva Jackson and Houston Jackson. He attended Washburn Elementary School in Cincinnati. While briefly living in Cleveland, Ohio, Jackson attended Frederick Douglass Elementary School and Empire Junior High School. He then returned to Cincinnati where he graduated from Hughes STEM High School in 1964. As a member of the school’s track and basketball teams and the starting quarterback of the football team, Jackson received a full athletic scholarship to the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio. There, he served as the first president of the United Black Student Association. Jackson earned his B.B.A. degree in accounting from the University of Cincinnati in 1968, and received his M.B.A. degree in finance from the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business in 1970. He later earned his Ph.D. degree in accounting from the University of Cincinnati in 1985.

Jackson was invited to training camp for the San Francisco 49er’s football team, but was cut from the team and enrolled in graduate school. While there, Jackson helped establish the National Black MBA Association and helped organize the first annual conference in Chicago, Illinois that included twenty-six schools, two representatives from each school, area business persons, university deans and academic administrators. Jackson also worked with the Breadbasket Commercial Association, Inc. that helped support local black businesses in Chicago, Illinois, and co-founded an accounting practice with James Hill, Jr. After earning his Ph.D. degree, Jackson became a professor of accounting at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio and remained for three years until he accepted a position at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio, where he served as chair of the accounting department. He also held faculty positions at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana; Loyola University in Chicago, Illinois; and Virginia State University in Petersburg, Virginia. In 1998, Jackson secured a teaching position at Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia, where he remained until his retirement in 2005.

Jackson and his wife, Ellen Jackson, have two children; Anthony Jackson, Jr. and Meghan Jackson.

Anthony Jackson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 15, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.112

Sex

Male

Interview Date

06/15/2017

Last Name

Jackson

Middle Name

W.

Schools

Empire Junior High School

Hughes STEM High School

University of Cincinnati

University of Chicago

Washburn Elementary School

Frederick Douglass Elementary School

First Name

Anthony

Birth City, State, Country

Cincinnati

HM ID

JAC40

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Warm, wet places.

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

6/20/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Professor Anthony Jackson (1946 - ) co-founded the National Black MBA Association and served as an accounting professor for thirty years at institutions like Miami University in Oxford, Virginia and Hampton University in Virginia.

Employment

Miami University (Oxford, Ohio)

Operation Breadbasket

Central State University

Hampton University

Ball State University

Loyola University

Governors State University

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:3300,55:3740,60:4510,70:5390,79:6820,109:7590,237:9570,272:16415,331:16840,337:20005,350:20755,364:28035,416:35860,524:36924,541:42175,567:44001,644:45495,665:46242,675:48649,795:48981,800:49479,808:50724,829:51637,841:52467,852:75190,1019:75990,1051:76550,1060:76950,1072:79350,1112:83510,1153:85580,1158:88091,1199:88901,1213:89954,1241:111738,1461:114745,1494:116006,1512:120662,1584:126660,1647:128660,1653:129025,1659:129390,1665:133348,1688:139914,1804:154522,1922:157845,1960:158966,1988:162830,2030:163158,2035:164930,2040:166129,2054:170690,2121:174584,2163:181177,2244:181662,2250:188953,2333:189736,2343:196150,2377:205798,2497:207800,2507$0,0:8490,71:9255,81:14226,118:18952,138:24178,282:24664,289:25474,302:26122,313:26446,320:26932,345:34933,402:35590,414:39360,458:41590,473:43358,492:44038,498:47284,525:47828,534:53863,651:58048,714:64705,764:67015,802:72390,844:73900,860:75108,876:79330,888:82372,937:85336,1018:88300,1079:93760,1192:107445,1317:111340,1396:112005,1404:116913,1478:117714,1488:118159,1494:128990,1612:132750,1658
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Anthony Jackson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Anthony Jackson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Anthony Jackson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Anthony Jackson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Anthony Jackson talks about his early household

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Anthony Jackson describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Anthony Jackson describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Anthony Jackson remembers the de facto segregation in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Anthony Jackson talks about his early interests in sports

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Anthony Jackson remembers attending Hughes High School in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Anthony Jackson talks about race relations in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Anthony Jackson recalls receiving an athletic scholarship at the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Anthony Jackson talks about the racial issues at the University of Cincinnati

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Anthony Jackson talks about not being eligible for the draft during the Vietnam War

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Anthony Jackson describes Breadbasket Commercial Association, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Anthony Jackson recalls the founding of the National Black MBA Association, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Anthony Jackson recalls the founding of the National Black MBA Association, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Anthony Jackson talks about the growth of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Anthony Jackson talks about his experiences while pursuing a Ph.D. at the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Anthony Jackson remembers developing an interest in teaching

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Anthony Jackson recalls teaching at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Anthony Jackson remembers becoming the chair of the finance department at Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Anthony Jackson reflects upon his teaching career and his former students

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Anthony Jackson talks about his retirement

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Anthony Jackson describes his family

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Anthony Jackson reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Anthony Jackson reflects upon his life

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Anthony Jackson shares his advice for young African American entrepreneurs

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Anthony Jackson narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

2$7

DATitle
Anthony Jackson describes Breadbasket Commercial Association, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois
Anthony Jackson remembers developing an interest in teaching
Transcript
So you, you are not drafted, you're, you're exonerated from that; you graduate from, then, the University of Chicago [University of Chicago Graduate School of Business; University of Chicago, Booth School of Business, Chicago, Illinois] with an M.B.A.?$$Yes.$$In, in what field?$$Accounting and Finance.$$And so what was your plan after going to get your M.B.A.?$$Well was--it was, it was, it was dealing with black business. I was in Chicago [Illinois] at the time and, you know, I wanted, you know, to be involved in the community and so forth. And (cough) Jesse Jackson [HistoryMaker Reverend Jesse L. Jackson] at that time, you know, was operating, you know, Operation Breadbasket [Rainbow PUSH Coalition, Chicago, Illinois].$$Um-hm.$$Okay. And he had a half-brother [Noah Robinson, Jr.] that came to town and started the Breadbasket Commercial Association [Breadbasket Commercial Association, Inc.]. And (cough) I think that was, who was that? I can't--I have to come back to it--$$That's--$$--don't remember that. But that's who I went to work for first.$$For Operation Bread- for--$$The Breadbasket Commercial Association.$$Okay.$$It dealt with small businesses--black businesses--that were apart of Operation Breadbasket.$$And what year was that?$$Well, I's was started--would have been, let's see, did I get out in--$$Seventy [1970], right?$$Seventy [1970]? Yeah. The summer of 1970. 1970.$$Okay. And what did you learn there, because this is grassroots, right? Helping black businesses in the community? What were you exposed to in that environment?$$Well for one that, you know, it was an environment where you could see that black folks could make money. But to go over the hump, to get to the next level, you know, we had to deal with white folks. You know, and that's where the problems happened, you know. So there was a construction division, you know, so, you know, we'd had a black plumbing company. And I that--I mentioned that because that was one of the firms that we worked with. But to get to that next contract, you know, the--to work on the new buildings, you know, you had to have some influence. You know, some play. So working with the black businesses was a routine, was a daily routine. There was black sanitation company, you know, that picked up debris and garbage. That was another situation where you needed to be, you know, careful. You know, you needed to be conniving, you know; and you had to, to put forth the effort, you know, to get the contracts.$What did you do for work during that time?$$Well in fact, I recall the beginning that, I guess, it was my second year down there. In the program, the Ph.D. program [at the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio], I was in, you know, you had coursework, you know, and you had a couple classes, you know, that were a part of the deal. Okay, that you went to school for. But I didn't see how I was going to do that, how I was gonna make it through. And literally, the weekend before the first class was starting up, the chairman called me--chairman of the accounting department--called me and asked me did I wanna be, you know, had, you know, an instructor, which gave me a full load of, I think, maybe three courses. But a base salary. So it was that base salary that allowed me to do that, to make that through.$$Okay. And making the choice to teach versus being an accountant, what drew you to teaching as opposed to, really, working in your own accounting firm and continuing along that path?$$Well it was something I'd done even as a kid, you know, interacting with folks, you know. We, like you said, the math thing, you know, was always something, I would interact with of the students about and so forth. And I kind of liked it, the teaching thing. The learning thing and, you know, when I got this first teaching thing that I was doing in Chicago [Illinois] at, I think was at Chicago State [Chicago State University], I said, "Well, you know, maybe I can do something about these kids." Maybe I can help this, you know. So that was the notion for, you know, going on pursuing the Ph.D. and thereafter, you know, going into it full time.

Sandra Miller Jones

Marketing executive Sandra Miller Jones was born on August 6, 1946 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. In 1968, Jones received her B.A. degree in sociology from Howard University, where she was a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. She then became the first African American woman to graduate from Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Business when she received her M.B.A. degree in 1971.

Upon graduation, Jones was hired as the first African American woman manager at Quaker Oats Company, where she managed several of the company’s major franchises including the $100 million-plus Quaker Oatmeal franchise. In 1978, Jones left Quaker Oats and founded Segmented Marketing Services, Inc. (SMSi), a national marketing services company. SMSi’s client list includes Procter & Gamble, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Revlon, Quaker Oats, Kraft Foods, General Mills, and the United States Postal Service, among others. In 2013, Jones founded SMSi Health Insurance Solutions, whose mission is to help underserved consumers acquire affordable health insurance. She also became an adjunct professor of marketing at Wake Forest University’s Babcock School of Management.

Jones helped establish the National Black MBA Association and the Chicago Minority Purchasing Council, and helped start a business initiative for the League of Black Women in Chicago, Illinois. She has served as board chair of the Jack and Jill of American Foundation’s WIN (We Invest Now) for Tomorrow, a program that teaches financial and investment skills to African American teenagers. She has also served on the boards of Family Services, Inc. and Summit School in Winston-Salem, as well as board chair of the Winston-Salem YWCA. In addition, she was active in women’s and youth activities at Goler Memorial AME Zion Church in Winston-Salem.

Jones is married to her business partner, Lafayette Jones. They have one daughter, Bridgette.

Sandra Miller Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 14, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.214

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/14/2014

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Miller

Schools

Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Business

Kimberley Park Elementary

Paisley IB Magnet School

Howard University

First Name

Sandra

Birth City, State, Country

Winston-Salem

HM ID

JON39

Favorite Season

Summer

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

8/6/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Winston-Salem

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Marketing chief executive Sandra Miller Jones (1946 - ) was the founder and CEO of Segmented Marketing Services, Inc.

Employment

Quaker Oats Company

Segmented Marketing Services, Inc.

Job Corps RCA

Winston-Salem Journal

First National Bank of Chicago

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
0,0:5250,62:9436,198:49136,840:49808,848:58040,984:60315,1047:71680,1206:74110,1261:74470,1266:76360,1294:91136,1478:97080,1561:97935,1574:104015,1695:104490,1701:108005,1747:117442,1911:119193,1935:119914,1944:120532,1950:124432,1976:126588,2009:126980,2014:127960,2022:128352,2027:128842,2033:129724,2045:130704,2056:131586,2068:132272,2078:138924,2113:140902,2178:141762,2207:142106,2212:144084,2324:145116,2391:161630,2563:184712,2845:187400,2867:187958,2873:188702,2882:189167,2889:190748,2914:191957,2931:192329,2936:192794,2942:195677,2989:196049,2994:196700,3006:197630,3018:198188,3024:206050,3121:206626,3128:208930,3174:215503,3226:219598,3283:220334,3292:227786,3438:233377,3566:233791,3572:235630,3595:236070,3601:240646,3663:241174,3669:247450,3740:248300,3751:249745,3791:250595,3803:250935,3808:260030,3906:260800,3920:269348,3987:270644,4001:271940,4014:273776,4047:289442,4220:290351,4234:291664,4249:292775,4263:296613,4317:305568,4403:306304,4412:306856,4419:307316,4425:307684,4430:313960,4492$0,0:2772,43:14060,123:23606,286:30394,359:37090,458:37927,468:38671,477:39415,489:39787,494:47070,561:48855,594:49620,604:49960,609:50470,616:50810,621:58029,726:61935,801:62400,807:72260,869:72685,875:74130,896:74895,906:76255,923:77105,950:100758,1095:106510,1356:115950,1540:123089,1838:142700,1950:144026,1965:152989,2077:156742,2118:157066,2123:160954,2187:162979,2228:167824,2262:171432,2311:174248,2390:180510,2432:193748,2548:207610,2644:208576,2710:218340,2855
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Sandra Miller Jones' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Sandra Miller Jones lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about her father's education and profession

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Sandra Miller Jones lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Sandra Miller Jones describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers Kimberley Park Elementary School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Sandra Miller Jones describes the African American community in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers John W. Paisley Senior High School in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about the Safe Bus Company in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers Goler Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Sandra Miller Jones recalls her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers the entertainment of her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers her favorite teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about the influence of Winston-Salem Teachers College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Sandra Miller Jones recalls her decision to study sociology at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Sandra Miller Jones recalls the takeover of the administration building at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her decision to attend the Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about her extracurricular activities at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her experiences at the Graduate School of Management in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about the influence of sociology in business

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her position at the Quaker Oats Company

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers the black business leadership of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Sandra Miller Jones recalls the founding of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers Charles H. Curry

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about the administration of the Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her role at the Quaker Oats Company

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers working with minority businesses at the Quaker Oats Company

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her accomplishments at the Quaker Oats Company

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her reasons for founding Segmented Marketing Services, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers her first client at Segmented Marketing Services, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about her parents' involvement in her company

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about the early clientele of Segmented Marketing Services, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers meeting her husband, Lafayette Jones

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Sandra Miller Jones remembers Harold Washington's mayoral campaign

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about the logistics of Segmented Marketing Services, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her civic involvement

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Sandra Miller Jones reflects upon her success as an entrepreneur

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Sandra Miller Jones reflects upon the success of Segmented Marketing Services, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about the development of SMSi Health Insurance Solutions

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about the future of SMSi Health Insurance Solutions

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Sandra Miller Jones reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her business philosophy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Sandra Miller Jones reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Sandra Miller Jones shares her advice to aspiring entrepreneurs

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Sandra Miller Jones describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Sandra Miller Jones talks about her adopted daughter

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Sandra Miller Jones describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Sandra Miller Jones narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$3

DAStory

2$8

DATitle
Sandra Miller Jones talks about the development of SMSi Health Insurance Solutions
Sandra Miller Jones remembers working with minority businesses at the Quaker Oats Company
Transcript
Oh, 1999, you launched Shades of Beauty. Now that, that's--is that again Lafayette's, or (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) That's Lafayette's.$$Okay.$$Yes, yes.$$But--okay. And how is that different from Urban Call? Did it have the--did it focus on the cosmetology industry?$$Well, that's a Lafayette [Jones' husband, HistoryMaker Lafayette Jones] question, so--$$Okay. All right. All right (unclear).$$(Laughter) All that is his--all that publishing stuff is, is his area.$$Okay. Well, then I'm going to jump way ahead, you know (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay (laughter).$$Past the election of Barack Obama [HistoryMaker President Barack Obama] and everything else to 2013--$$Okay.$$--to the founding of SMSi Health Insurance Solutions [Winston-Salem, North Carolina].$$Yes.$$Yeah.$$Yes.$$So this is an affordable health--$$Yes, yes. When we found out that the Affordable Care Act [Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010] was coming into existence, we knew that the message was not getting out to our community, African American community especially and Hispanic community secondarily, because we weren't hearing anything. All that we knew was what we heard on the media, and that was so often very negative, and we knew that there was--that, that having people insured was a good thing, so we had to find a way to get that message out. We wrote to the president of Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina [Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina], Brad Wilson [J. Bradley Wilson, Jr.], and asked him if we could come in and talk to his people about sponsoring an outreach effort, and we were able to get that done, so we went in, and we talked to Blue Cross Blue Shield about starting an outreach effort to inform African Americans throughout North Carolina about the Affordable Care Act, and although our business [Segmented Marketing Services, Inc., Winston-Salem, North Carolina] is national, to be able to focus on North Carolina, we had to build territories that--just as though they were in some other part of the country or part of the world, so instead of our territory being the Chicago [Illinois] market, now we built a territory that was the Greensboro [North Carolina], High Point [North Carolina] market, and the Durham [North Carolina], Wake [Wake County, North Carolina] market until each one of our markets in North Carolina we treated as a separate market as opposed to just a part of the--of one whole state execution. So we built teams in each of those markets just like we have in our other cities, and these teams of people went out and developed relationships and continue to do so now with the gatekeepers in churches and community organizations; beauty salons, barbershops, to help us get the message out about the Affordable Care Act. We were able to do this. We were able to reach about a half million households in North Carolina with a message and face to face presentations to over three thousand opinion leaders, and, as a result, we were part of the movement in North Carolina that enabled us, as North Carolina, to be the fifth largest state in terms of number of people signing up for the Affordable Care Act in the nation, and by far, the largest state in the nation that did not accept Medicare [sic.]. North Carolina--the Medicare expansion that was offered as a part of the Affordable Care Act, North Carolina was one of the states that didn't accept that Medicaid expansion. South Car- (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) With a Republican governor [Pat McCrory] or something or--$$Absolutely.$$Yeah.$$And South Carolina, for example, right next to us, North Carolina did about 350,000 enrollments, and South Carolina did about thirty-two thousand enrollments, so you can see the difference between the efforts that were made here despite the fact that we didn't have the support of the government here and the results. One of the things that we learned as we were doing our executions is that there just are not enough agents servicing our community to even sign up or enroll, help the people to enroll, into the Affordable Care Act, so that's why we decided to start an agency, and that's SMSi Health Insurance Solutions, so that we could; one, provide this excellent job opportunity to people in our community to be their own boss because that's what an insurance agency is, their own boss. They're an entrepreneur. And to--to develop some residual income while also being of such a significant service to the community at large.$And would you--how--now how did you--were, were you able to--well, how much of your job had anything to do with, you know, marketing the products to the black community specifically?$$None.$$Okay.$$But I did connect with the black community only because I had an interest there and did some outreach to the community, and that's why I knew all of the African American advertising agencies. I worked very hard to get agencies both advertising and promote and marketing research agencies at that time. I didn't know of any black promotion agencies, but marketing research, yes. Tried to get them contracts with Quaker Oats Company. I brought them in and introduced them to the powers that be who could make those decisions, and whenever I was able to make a decision that would enable me to work with a black supplier, I did that, so I was quite aware of the need to, to bring more blacks into the marketing world, to the--$$Were they working with any black or, or contractors before you started?$$Probably not. Probably not, yeah.$$That's what I would guess. Just--$$That's what I would guess at that (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I, I figured I would ask.$$Yeah. (Laughter) Yeah.$$And were you ever criticized for, for bringing in too many black people?$$No.$$No, okay.$$No, no, no, never was. I, I think it was quite a fascination for them. We brought groups in to, to do things with us, and, so, yeah.$$Well, that's good because there's some many times I hear the story that someone gets into a position to hire black contractors that have never been involved before in, in the--that--in a particular business, and then they criticize for you're, you're only, you know, you're trying to make our organization--make all the contractors black and that sort of thing.$$Yeah. No. It wasn't that.$$But, but you never did get that.$$Never that problem.$$Okay.$$[HistoryMaker] Byron Lewis who started UniWorld advertising agency [UniWorld Group, Inc.] recently had a tribute to him in New York [New York] and invited us to come and speak at--to be one of those people who talked about him. And, oh, he always credits me with saving his agency, and that can't be so, but he credits me with that. He says that his agency was on the skids, and we came to Quaker Oats Company. And I was able to help them get a major contract to do a black soap opera ['Sounds of the City'], as a matter of fact, that was what they had proposed, and that contract he maintained saved his agency. He was able to go on and build from there, and so I'm always pleased about that.$$Right. Well, that's, you know, heretofore, and I guess, prior to '68 [1968] or so, there were very few blacks in business that had--that got any contracts from major corporations.$$Absolutely.$$For any reason, so--$$Yeah.$$--so this is, this is all ground breaking at this time, so Byron Lewis, okay.

Princell Hair

Broadcast executive Princell Hair was born on February 2, 1967 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Hair attended Fort Lauderdale High School and graduated in 1985. That same year, he enrolled in the U.S. Naval Academy, where he spent the next four years. Hair was then admitted to Florida International University in Miami, graduating two years later with his B.S. degree in broadcast journalism. He entered the world of journalism soon after, working as a writer and producer for WPLG-TV and WSVN-TV, ABC and Fox-affiliated stations, respectively. In 1993, Hair was hired as an executive producer for Chicago’s WSVN-TV. After two years, he was hired as an assistant news director for the CBS station WKMG-TV in Orlando, Florida. Hair was then named news director for Hearst television station WBAL-TV in Baltimore, Maryland, where he served from 1998 to 2001.

In 2001, Hair was hired by Viacom to oversee thirty nine CBS television stations. After two years with Viacom, he was appointed general manager for the Cable News Network (CNN) and later promoted to senior vice president at Turner Broadcasting, Inc. After enrolling at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School in Atlanta, Georgia, Hair obtained his M.B.A. degree in 2006. He was then named senior vice president of news operations for Comcast SportsNet, two years later; and, in 2012, was promoted to senior vice president of news and talent for NBC Sports Group, overseeing talent recruitment, negotiation and development.

Hair has served on the board of directors of the Radio and Television News Directors Association/Foundation (RTNDA/F), and the board of visitors at Florida A&M University’s School of Journalism and Graphic Communication. He won a 1994 Emmy Award in Chicago as Executive Producer of "Our Future Crisis," a broadcast special about inner-city violence. He is a former member of the National Association of Black Journalists, the National Black MBA Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. He and his wife have five children.

Princell Hair was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 21, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.130

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/21/2012

Last Name

Hair

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Emory University

Florida International University

Fort Lauderdale High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Princell

Birth City, State, Country

Fort Lauderdale

HM ID

HAI01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anyplace Warm and Tropical

Favorite Quote

Managers do things right, but leaders do the right thing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

2/2/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Broadcast executive Princell Hair (1967 - ) is an Emmy Award winning journalist and senior vice president for NBC Sports Group.

Employment

NBC

Comcast SportsNet

Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.

CNN

Viacom Productions

WBAL TV

WKMG TV

WMMB TV

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:15084,175:15606,218:17893,243:18297,254:21529,316:30556,379:32530,391:33041,400:33406,406:34063,417:35231,432:40487,516:43188,571:47028,577:47668,583:48564,592:49588,601:52988,623:54229,647:56638,713:63535,782:64210,792:64510,797:64810,802:67505,813:68270,824:68695,830:77701,912:78177,917:78653,922:81980,959:82276,964:83608,990:86124,1049:98914,1248:101048,1306:102988,1337:107645,1348:107985,1353:108665,1364:109515,1378:110025,1385:111640,1403:112150,1410:113425,1433:121980,1585:138790,1901:145710,1971:159056,2044:161656,2082:164281,2092:164920,2107:165346,2114:166269,2132:169720,2160:173370,2193:187160,2378:190380,2384:193288,2411:193774,2418:194827,2437:197380,2448:198970,2473:203672,2510:203960,2515:204464,2529:205760,2555:206048,2560:206840,2576:207200,2582:210990,2589:211255,2595:211573,2603:212770,2620$0,0:6128,52:7155,78:7471,83:10315,173:14976,269:17583,316:18768,335:19716,348:20980,373:21375,380:21770,386:26302,407:27464,422:28460,437:30452,455:31199,465:32195,479:34270,514:34768,521:35183,528:42590,606:43586,649:44250,658:44997,670:45661,681:46076,687:46408,694:47155,703:48566,725:49479,737:51637,769:55266,790:56076,803:56562,811:57048,825:57777,837:58425,847:59235,860:61908,912:63852,965:64743,982:70365,1017:71714,1037:71998,1042:72566,1051:74838,1107:75193,1113:75619,1120:76116,1131:76613,1139:77039,1145:83605,1218:84130,1226:84730,1245:85255,1254:86530,1286:86830,1291:92312,1359:92844,1369:93376,1378:93680,1383:94136,1392:95960,1418:99912,1495:105422,1542:105758,1549:106262,1560:107214,1596:111213,1628:112023,1642:114210,1677:114858,1686:116559,1723:117207,1732:118098,1752:118584,1763:119799,1785:120528,1801:122391,1859:129426,1970:144671,2148:147594,2204:148226,2214:148621,2220:163506,2363:163874,2368:164242,2373:164610,2378:168290,2431:169026,2442:172790,2452:173640,2463:174320,2472:177140,2497:189454,2676:195525,2705:196128,2715:196664,2732:197803,2754:198674,2775:199411,2795:200282,2808:218916,3025:221184,3180:227470,3247:227944,3264:229129,3283:230393,3297:230867,3304:232526,3335:240135,3421:242449,3448:243962,3470:246988,3521:252408,3558:252923,3563:253438,3569:258518,3605:259706,3619:261542,3640:262946,3655:265256,3663:266114,3678:267150,3685
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Princell Hair's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Princell Hair lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Princell Hair describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Princell Hair talks about his mother's education and her childhood aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Princell Hair describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Princell Hair reflects upon his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Princell Hair describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about moving around during his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Princell Hair describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Princell Hair describes the church he attended, the National Church of God in Christ

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Princell Hair talks about his experience at North Side Elementary School

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Princell Hair talks about his neighborhood peers' fear of white people

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Princell Hair talks about the demographics of Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Princell Hair recalls his mother's initiative in helping him get a good education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Princell Hair describes his mentors in elementary school and high school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about the demographics of his school classrooms

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Princell Hair talks about his brother's trouble in school due to his mental handicap

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Princell Hair describes the challenges of growing up in the projects while attending school in a more affluent neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about his musical interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Princell Hair documents his interest in television as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Princell Hair talks about competing in the state championship with his high school track team

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about the history of Fort Lauderdale and Fort Lauderdale High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Princell Hair reflect upon a negative encounter with the Fort Lauderdale police

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Princell Hair discusses his high school extracurricular activities and early career ambitions

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Princell Hair talks about his high school heroes in journalism including Max Robinson and Dwight Lauderdale

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Princell Hair talks about his decision to join the U.S. Navy after high school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about being named Mr. Fort Lauderdale in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Princell Hair talks about why he joined the U.S. Navy and the reason he was discharged

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Princell Hair discusses his dropping out of Florida Community College in Gainesville, Florida after becoming a father

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about the end of his relationship and moving to South Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Princell Hair talks about how he met his wife, Jodie Hair

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Princell Hair talks about his internship and job offer while attending Florida International University (FIU)

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about one of his mentors, Joel Cheatwood

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Princell Hair describes his journalistic philosophy

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Princell Hair talks about the coverage of Hurricane Andrew in 1992

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Princell Hair talks about important skill sets needed in news productions

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about producing news in a crisis situation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Princell Hair talks about his job offer from WDIV in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Princell Hair shares a story about his move to Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about an employment offer from WBBM Chicago in 1993

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Princell Hair shares some of the news stories from WBBM in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Princell Hair talks about his decision to leave WBBM Chicago after his mentor, John Lansing, departed

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about his first opportunity to run a newsroom in Orlando, Florida in 1995

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Princell Hair talks about workplace tensions at his first news director job in Chicago, Illinois in 1997

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Princell Hair discusses the backlash at WMAQ Chicago after they hired Jerry Springer

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about his decision to move to WBAL Baltimore in 1998 after WMAQ Chicago's staff overhaul

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Princell Hair remembers some of the major stories at WBAL Baltimore

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Princell Hair discusses having to think on your feet during live coverage

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about WBAL Baltimore's superior coverage of the 2000 mayoral election

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Princell Hair discusses the importance of understanding live reporting in the newsroom

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Princell Hair remembers some of his favorite reporters

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about leaving the Hurst Group for Viacom in 2001

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Princell Hair talks about his opportunity to join CNN in Atlanta, Georgia in 2003

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Princell Hair talks about lessons he learned as CNN's Domestic News Director and workplace politics

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Princell Hair talks about his time at CNN in Atlanta, Georgia and his decision to move into sports

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Princell Hair talks about going into sports news with the Comcast Sports Group in 2008

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Princell Hair describes Comcast Sports' news programs and coverage

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Princell Hair describes what it is like to work in local sports news

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Princell Hair talks about Philadelphia's sports fans

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about developing sports news based on regional preferences

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Princell Hair describes his expanded role with NBC Sports Group

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Princell Hair discusses hiring former athletes and how they fare on air

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about the most successful regional sports stations

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Princell Hair describes his goal in broadcasting to own a network

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Princell Hair discusses the impact of his M.B.A. on his career

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Princell Hair talks about what he might do differently

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Princell Hair reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Princell Hair talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Princell Hair describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about his favorite phrase

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Princell Hair talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

4$11

DATitle
Princell Hair describes the challenges of growing up in the projects while attending school in a more affluent neighborhood
Princell Hair talks about his time at CNN in Atlanta, Georgia and his decision to move into sports
Transcript
Now--so you're living in two different worlds basically--back and forth. You even have the social dynamic in the white world--$$Right.$$--going on sleepovers and things like that.$$Right.$$So how were you accepted in your own community? You know, with that kind of background, was it tough on you?$$Yeah, that's a great question. It was a little challenging at times; I spoke differently than the other kids in my neighborhood. They always told me I talk white or I think I'm white, or I'm an Oreo--black on the outside, white on the inside. I got all of those, you know, those kinds of comments growing up. A lot of kids in my neighborhood just didn't understand me and didn't understand why I was the way that I was and, you know, again, it was just--I was different; I was different than they were. You know, I, I found acceptance at church. I think that may have been why I gravitated; it was just a much more accepting environment but, you know, when you're out on the, on the playground or out on the, on the basketball court and, you know, I'm the only one that talks the way that I do, you get ridiculed 'cause people don't understand it--$$Okay.$$--or they're threatened by it, or whatever it is, you know.$$So you didn't make any attempt to try to change the way you talked when you were back home?$$No, I, I, I didn't because it just wasn't, it wasn't me; it wasn't true to me and no matter what I--no matter if I tried, you know, if that's not who you are, you know, people are gonna see right through that so I just dealt with the, with the ridicule; I just dealt with the jokes, you know, and just tried to, you know, laugh it off and, you know, not, not allow it to, to get me angry.$$Okay. Now I don't know if this is fair or not, but I got almost an even chance of speaking like you did in the projects in school--I guess, because you could have chosen to do that--$$I could have.$$--you know, but that probably wouldn't have been successful in school.$$Probably not, probably not--$$So--$$--and I don't know why, you know, I grew up--well, I do know why; because I spoke like the people that I was around most of the time, you know, growing up.$$Okay. So you spent most of your time in school?$$Yeah.$$Okay, all right.$$It was a safe place for me--$$Yeah, okay.$$--'cause I was just as smart as the other kids, smarter than most of 'em, so there was this, there was this--even if it wasn't equal, there was a feeling of equality, and they would look at me and they would admire the fact that I was as smart as they were, so on some level, I was on their level, which made it easier to fit in.$So what you've experienced, it sounds like a book I heard of called "Swimming with Sharks," (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--Yeah, yeah, very similar.$$Yeah. So is this a typical experience in the news and the TV news world?$$I think it's a typical experience in the corporate world--the corporate news world; big organizations, big corporations that are, you know--have these, these intricate, you know, organizational structures and relationships are sometimes difficult for outsiders to navigate, and that's, that's what I experienced.$$Okay. So you were there for--$$I was running the Domestic News Operation [at CNN in Atlanta, Georgia] for fourteen months, and then I was moved into a position overseeing talent and programming across all of the different CNN platforms. I was in that job for about a year, and the fact of the matter is that's a job that really didn't have a lot of teeth because--the network heads, they wanna hire their own talent, you know, they don't really need me telling them who to hire; they got into that position because they know a little something about talent, so I found myself running up against walls with the various network heads who I was, you know, really liaising with because they had their own ideas of what their talent should be--as they should. So I went to, to Jim and Phil [Kent] and just said, "Look, guys, I'm happy to stay here and collect a paycheck and do this for as long as you want me to, but the fact of the matter is you're not really getting the value out of me; you're not really getting as much as you can out of me; I can do more, I'd like to do more." So they moved me into corporate strategy. It was a position that I was--or it was an area of the business that I didn't know, that I was interested in, and it also gave me an opportunity to go back to school and get my MBA, which is what I did at Emory [University, Atlanta, Georgia], so I was working full time while getting my MBA, and I was working on a project--we were going to take WTBS which is, you know, Turner[ Broadcasting]'s first station, and figure out what we were gonna do with that locally, and turn that into a--you know, there's the TBS Superstation and then there's a local station in the market--WTBS, and at the time, their programming was the same, but Phil Kent who's, who's running Turner at the time, wanted to turn that into something else--more of a local station, so that TBS could be a separate, completely separate station. So that was my project and, you know, amongst working on other things with the, with the, the strategy group--and at the end of that year, and after I got my MBA and had finished--completed the projects, I was ready to run something else; I was in a position now where I, where I was down two years removed from, from running something, and I went to Phil and said, "Hey, look, I'm ready to run something; you know, I can stay in corporate strategy as long as you want, but I'm really ready to run something." And, you know, "We don't really have anything for you to run," to which--I, I saw that as a sign that, you know, maybe it was time for me to, to move on and try something else, take some time off, which is what I did. I took about a year and a half off which, you know, fortunately, I was able to do to really figure out what I wanted to do next. I had been in news for now 20--20 years, and was really burned out with, with, with news. I didn't wanna really go back into a local news situation because it, it had changed so much, and resources had been drained from local markets, local news stations, and I wanted to try something, something different; and that is what led me to sports.

Antoinette Malveaux

Born March 19, 1958, in San Francisco, California, Antoinette Malveaux has spent most of her career helping others. The youngest of five children, Malveaux attended public schools in San Francisco. In 1981, she graduated with a B.A. in economics from the University of San Francisco. As part of the management track, she worked in the financial analysis and management division, specializing in international markets.
In 1985, Malveaux earned an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and was hired by American Express Bank as director of global marketing and strategic planning.

Malveaux left American Express in 1991 to assume the position of director of operations for the National Black M.B.A. Association. From there, she was named executive director in 1993 and was then promoted to president and CEO. Under her leadership, the National Black M.B.A. Association developed into a multinational organization and its membership tripled. She left the group in 2003 to pursue other interests, including traveling through Europe.

Malveaux is actively involved in the community, serving on the Board of Trustees of the University of San Francisco; the Better Business Bureau; and the Girl Scouts USA, Chicago chapter. She has been listed in Who's Who in American Business; received the Rainbow/PUSH Reginald Lewis Trailblazer Award and served on the Council on Graduate Minority Education.

Accession Number

A2003.198

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/21/2003

Last Name

Malveaux

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Schools

Paul Revere Elementary School

Aptos Middle School

Lowell High School

University of California, San Francisco

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Paul Revere College Preparatory K-8

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Antoinette

Birth City, State, Country

San Francisco

HM ID

MAL02

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Spring

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

3/19/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream (Rocky Road)

Short Description

Association chief executive Antoinette Malveaux (1958 - ) served as the director of global marketing for American Express, and in the capacities of director, president and CEO of the National Black MBA Association.

Employment

Bank of America

American Express Bank, LTD.

National Black MBA Association

Favorite Color

Green, Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:11861,282:16759,403:21736,498:29564,557:38502,715:49720,865:52008,885:53152,899:54032,910:54736,922:55088,927:65629,1040:67021,1107:74242,1206:75025,1218:78592,1272:79201,1282:80245,1294:87536,1349:88768,1362:89216,1367:90336,1386:93112,1399:93532,1405:94288,1415:99916,1510:100252,1515:102604,1565:103024,1571:108005,1593:108600,1601:109790,1614:110130,1619:111320,1649:111660,1654:124952,1812:126070,1830:126500,1836:129682,1883:130542,1895:131746,1911:146850,2056:149700,2082$230,0:570,5:10430,193:26138,365:26794,377:27204,383:27942,397:30566,445:33190,496:36962,561:38274,581:68340,1033:69620,1056:70340,1066:70980,1075:71940,1091:72260,1096:72740,1111:73300,1119:73620,1124:74180,1133:85184,1302:86680,1336:87156,1345:87904,1368:88516,1378:90080,1422:98007,1498:98469,1506:98854,1512:102011,1574:102781,1585:103628,1606:105476,1656:105938,1667:114468,1769:114796,1774:117748,1824:118814,1842:136316,2106:140192,2156:141256,2174:141788,2183:142700,2196:143080,2202:145610,2210:146108,2218:148100,2249:149096,2265:150756,2293:153578,2342:154242,2356:154574,2361:155155,2370:155570,2376:155902,2381:161335,2416:167880,2527:173235,2632:179350,2678:184470,2780:188390,2852:194575,2885:195903,2909:196401,2917:196982,2928:198227,2948:198559,2953:199638,2971:207274,3113:207938,3139:212480,3149:215363,3246:218525,3299:219269,3308:225795,3422:226862,3436:227444,3443:228317,3453:229384,3467:229772,3472:230839,3484:237046,3593:246480,3701
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Antoinette Malveaux's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux shares stories from her maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her mother's personality and her family's emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about how her parents met and their divorce

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Antoinette Malveaux names her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in San Francisco, California

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls food from her childhood and attending the local Catholic church as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux lists schools she attended in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux explains how developing a racial consciousness affected her academic studies

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her educational mentors in elementary school and high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her family's civil rights activism and recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her experience at Lowell High School in San Francisco, California

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux recalls her mother's decision to teach at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the University of Mississippi's campus atmosphere in the 1970s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her experience as a college undergraduate in San Francisco, California, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux explains her decision to attend the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her mentors and the curriculum at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about working for American Express Bank after graduating from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about the culture and management of American Express Bank in the late 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her relationship with George Carmany, chief administrative officer for American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux describes the corporate citizenship projects she worked on at American Express Bank

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her work as executive director of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her successes as president and chief executive officer of the National Black MBA Association

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Antoinette Malveaux considers the contemporary state of black entrepreneurship in America, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about contemporary differences in black entrepreneurship between the United Kingdom and United States, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Antoinette Malveaux describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Antoinette Malveaux talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Antoinette Malveaux reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Antoinette Malveaux describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Antoinette Malveaux talks about her job as a student loan officer for Bank of America
Antoinette Malveaux talks about developing a strategic plan for the National Black MBA Association and becoming executive director
Transcript
Okay, so, so you were at Bank of America?$$I was at Bank of America. I had started--when I was at univer- when I was at City College [of San Francisco, San Francisco, California], Bank of America was one of the three jobs that I had, and I quit the other two jobs and kept Bank of America. Then, when I went back to school to the University of San Francisco [San Francisco, California] I continued to work at Bank of America. By then I had gotten a promotion. I had moved forward and now I was working in the collections department collecting on credit cards as opposed to processing the payments. So, I worked there in the evenings. Again, one of the strongest, strongest and best individuals in the, in the department and while I was at University of San Francisco my supervisor had, he and I'd had a conversation and he, he was pretty good. He was always looking out for--as opportunities came up he always made sure that he would talk to employees about putting them forward. And an opportunity had come up to be a student loan officer, and he sat down and talked with me and put me forward for that position. I said yes that's something I wanna pursue, and so I became a student loan officer which was a different kind of position then. Bank of America had created a position in this, in two branches in the city where there would be students who were trained to be loan officers and their portfolio would be student loans. They would also carry the title of student relations representatives, very much a community relations representative, and we would represent the bank at college campuses and high schools, and so I would go to high schools and talk to high school students about savings accounts and credit and banking, about student loans and how to pay for your education, how to pay for cars and what you might want for yourself in life, but primarily about savings and investments and loans and then I would also manage the student loan portfolio and, and extend loans to students. And so I was a student loan officer. And so I worked and went to school.$Your involvement with the National Black MBA Association begins to grow in the early '90s [1990s] and--$$Yeah, after the late '80s [1980s] I joined, I joined in '86 [1986], late '86 [1986]. I became the chapter president in '87 [1987] of New York. I went on the board, I think it was in '89 [1989] and, and then came to a crossroads, and I had when I came to the board I was asked because of my background in strategic planning I was asked to take the organization through a strategic planning process. And up to that point, they hadn't had--they hadn't had anybody or too many people that I was aware of who, who was involved in strategic planning, who had discipline in strategic planning or experience in strategic planning, and you typically that's one of those parts of corporate America you typically didn't find African Americans in. You might have your little ghettos, but you, you typically didn't find them there. So, I took the, created a committee and, a strategic planning committee and my committee and I took the organization through a strategic planning process, and we took them through a process from start to finish, so we extended the process into--after we finished with the strategic plan got them into business planning and action planning so that we could really make sure that the, the plan was not just a piece of paper, it was not just something that we could hold up and say okay we got a plan, but we wanted to keep driving the discipline into the organization so that we could really focus and--on what it was we wanted to do and we could understand what it was going to take to do what we wanted to do, so we weren't as much of an organization that was full of talk, but one that could move to action. And when we got to the end of that process, we did some visioning with the executive committee, worked with a gentleman by the name of Horace Smith [ph.] who was an advisor to the group and he, he worked with me to do some visioning and with the executive committee and get them to a place of decision-making around what we were going to do with this plan and how we were going to take this plan forward. And so the decision was made that the organization would change, that it would build its own management capability. At that point, we had a lot of outsourcing managed by an association management firms and had just begun to bring some things in house and so they made a decision to hire an executive director, and they asked me and another person if we would do that and the other person decided--we were supposed to go in together--the person decided that he couldn't do it. He had a family, I didn't. The organization could not meet his expectation and his needs in terms of what he needed for his family. You know, I was either young and dumb or I had the angel sitting on my shoulder and I made the decision to go forth and, and it took us, but it took us about a year and a half to get through that dialogue and that discussion and get to that decision that I would leave corporate America and come head the National Black MBA Association.$$Okay.$$But by the time that I had made that decision, George Carmany had left the bank [American Express Bank, New York, New York]. He was still with American Express; he had gone to another division of American Express in Boston [Massachusetts]. He had asked if I wanted to go, I said no. I was not interested in moving to Boston, and I wanted something different and this opportunity came, so I was at a crossroads and this was the opportunity that was put before for me at the time that, you know, things were moving. You know, they were moving at parallel paths and then they went like that and so.

James Hill, Jr.

Accountant James Hill, Jr. was born in Baltimore on August 20, 1941, to Joyce and James Hill, Sr. Hill graduated from Central State University with a B.S. in accounting in 1964, and received his M.B.A. in personnel administration and accounting in 1967 from the University of Chicago. He is CPA-licensed in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin.

In 1964, Hill began his career as a cost accountant for Union Carbide in New York, where he stayed for one year. After receiving his M.B.A., he began working as a Chicago staff auditor for Alexander Grant & Company. Between 1968 and 1970, Hill worked as the deputy director of the Chicago Economic Development Corporation. In February 1972, he founded his own accounting firm. In 1975 he took on a partner to become Hill, Taylor, Certified Public Accountants where he presides today as chairman and CEO.

Hill has received numerous awards and honors for both his professional and community work. His professional affiliations include the American Institute of CPAs, the Illinois CPA Society, the National Black Association of Accountants and the National Black MBA Association. He is a board member of various community and nonprofit organizations, including the Illinois Institute of Technology, the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce, the Better Government Association, Citizen Information Service, the Chicago Commons Association, the Economic Club of Chicago, the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition, and the Chicago Economic Advisory Committee. He is also a council member to the graduate business schools at both the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois.

Hill married Sheree in 1995. He is father to two adult sons, James III and Brian.

Accession Number

A2003.007

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/15/2003

Last Name

Hill

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Dunbar High School

Central State University

University of Chicago

First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Baltimore

HM ID

HIL03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Bermuda

Favorite Quote

Begin Today To Mold The You of Tomorrow.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/20/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fish, Vegetables

Short Description

Business chief executive James Hill, Jr. (1941 - ) owned the accounting firm, Hill, Taylor, Certified Public Accountants.

Employment

Union Carbide Corporation

Alexander Grant & Company

Chicago Economic Development Corporation

Hill, Taylor Certified Public Accountants

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:5320,63:20051,292:26751,424:27488,442:35300,509:63586,840:76136,1001:77504,1025:78584,1050:79664,1065:86720,1202:100122,1451:102168,1576:125026,1930:125458,1937:143802,2340:155460,2499$0,0:15066,312:16686,344:17577,357:21870,440:43750,752:46975,834:52480,865:53000,881:53260,886:60475,1015:61320,1030:64245,1097:64570,1103:86818,1521:90316,1595:102015,1760:112675,1972:123332,2106:124160,2120:136840,2353
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Hill's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Hill lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Hill describes his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Hill talks about his father, James Hill, Sr.

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Hill describes his mother, Joyce Lee Hill

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Hill talks about how his parents met and his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Hill describes the sights, sounds, and smells of Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Hill describes his interest in sports as a boy

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Hill talks about his elementary school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - James Hill remembers attending Dunbar High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - James Hill recalls his high school activities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - James Hill talks about his post-high school plans

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Hill talks about deciding to attend Central State University

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Hill describes attending Central State University in Wilberforce, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Hill describes his professors and the president of Central State University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Hill talks about pledging the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity at Central State University

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Hill talks about majoring in accounting at Central State University

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Hill describes the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Hill remembers his first accounting job at Union Carbide in Niagara Falls, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Hill describes Niagara Falls, New York in 1964

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - James Hill talks about getting his MBA from the University of Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Hill talks about his reasons for taking a job at a CPA firm in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Hill talks about his divorce and children

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Hill remembers working for Graham Thornton and the Chicago Economic Development Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Hill recalls briefly entering the car wash business in 1970

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Hill describes starting his own accounting firm in 1972

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Hill describes his accounting firm's specialty areas

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Hill describes the highlights of his accounting career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - James Hill talks about his accounting work with nonprofits

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - James Hill gives advice to young people who are interested in accounting

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - James Hill shares his view on the Arthur Andersen scandal

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - James Hill describes his hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - James Hill talks about his volunteer activities

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Hill describes the technological changes in accounting since the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Hill talks about ethics in accounting

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Hill reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Hill talks about his father's pride in his success

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Hill describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Hill talks about the future of his accounting firm

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Hill talks about the key to business success

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - James Hill reflects upon his skills

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - James Hill describes how small nonprofits do not understand accounting

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - James Hill talks about his business partner, Kenneth Yu

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - James Hill describes ABLE, Alliance of Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Hill narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
James Hill remembers working for Graham Thornton and the Chicago Economic Development Corporation
James Hill describes the highlights of his accounting career
Transcript
So who did you get hired by after you got your certification?$$After I got--I wasn't certified. What happened after I got my MBA, I got accepted to Graham Thornton. I had done an internship with them, they were called Alexander Graham at the time and they hired me as an intern. I was the first black to work for them also in the history of their company. And so I worked for them and then after I got--after I finished school, I went to work for them full time. So that's how I gained my experience. I still have an excellent relationship with them even today as we speak.$$Now this takes us--where are we now in terms of time?$$We're in 1967, that's when I graduated and that's when I started to work for them. So I worked for them for a couple of years and then I got an opportunity I couldn't refuse. I went to work for Chicago Economic Development Corporation and they made me a job offer I couldn't refuse because at the time they were going to make me the number two person, I was very young then. I was like twenty five/twenty six. They had about twenty five people that I was going to be in charge of and they were a nonprofit organization so they were totally out of accounting. I still had not gotten my CPA [Certified Public Accountant] at that point in time but I had the experience now. I could take the exam but you still had to have the experience in those days. So I had the experience but once you had a Master's degree that gave you years of experience automatically. In the state of Illinois, I think you only needed one year's experience or that Master equivalent so I had that. So I was able to take it or it might have been two years because I had the extra year. But anyway I went to work for Union Carbide-I mean, I'm sorry, I went to work for Chicago Economic Development Corporation. I was there number two man there and so I stayed there until 1970. The reason why I left because the person that was my boss whose name was Garland Guice who is deceased now. He was a young man, he was only about five/six years older than me so I had nowhere to go. I mean being the number two man is fine if you are older, if that happened today and I was the number two man, I probably would stay on longer. But when you're twenty five/twenty six years old and you're the number two man, you don't have no place to go so if you've got ambition then you want to do something else. But by then I wasn't sure whether or not I wanted to go back into a corporation, so.$What are the--looking back on this, what are--I don't know much about accounting but what are the highlights of a career as an accountant? Are there some memorable--(simultaneous) (unclear)?$$I think some of the highlights of being able to be a trailblazer. We've been a trailblazer for the state, we were the first minority firm to do state auditing and that has open the door for other minority firms to do state auditing. We were the first minority firm to do any work for corporations here in this state, that's opened the door for other minority firms to do it. I was the first black to work for Union Carbide as a cost accountant or as an accountant, I'm sure they've got other blacks now in their accounting departments worldwide. I was the first to work for Graham Thornton, again that's open the door for other blacks to work there as accountants. So these have been some highlights in my career that I think, that's been good. I'm also very--I've been very involved in the profession. I was on the state board of directors of the Illinois CPA Society. I served on that board for three years. I was also on the state board of accountancy, I was appointed by Governor [James R.] Thompson on the state board of accountancy. I served five years on that, I believe. I've been on committees with the American Institute of CPAs, so I've been on two or three committees with them. So I've been very involved there. I headed the task force for the State of Illinois to deal with whether or not we should do quality review and quality review means that we get audited. So we did a study on that to determine whether or not the State of Illinois wanted to have quality review which they did do--a peer review we call it. So those are some of the highlights that we've had and also the fact that we've maintained a very good reputation over the years. People know us, people know our firm, they know what we do. If you talk to anybody about accounting, not just being a minority CPA, we're noted now as being a good CPA firm. You know, years ago you try to sell it based on minority but we don't try and sell it on that now. We try to sell it on our experience and what we do and what we do best and that's how we do. We can compete favorably with anybody our size and our size standards on what we do. So that's how, what we look at.