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Shirley Malcom

Education administrator and science education advocate Shirley Malcom was born on September 6, 1946 in Birmingham, Alabama to ¬Lillie Mae and Ben Mahaley. From an early age, she wanted to be a doctor because of her love of biology. At George Washington Carver High School, Malcom was a top student and graduated in 1963. She then attended the University of Washington and received her B.S. degree in zoology in 1967. Malcom went on to attend the University of California at Los Angeles where she graduated with her M.A. degree in zoology in 1968. She taught high school biology in Los Angeles before attending Pennsylvania State University where she obtained her Ph.D. degree in ecology in 1974.

After completing her education, Malcom joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Wilmington as an assistant professor. In 1975, she moved to Washington, D.C. where she began working as a research assistant in the Office of Opportunities in Science (OOS) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She co-published “The Double Bind: The Price of Being a Minority Woman in Science” in 1976. Then, Malcom served as a program officer for the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Science Education Directorate. She became head of the AAAS Office of Opportunities in Science in 1979 and head of the AAAS Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs in 1989. In 1993, Malcom was appointed to the National Science Board by President Bill Clinton and in 1995, she became a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She was also named to the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology from 1994 until 2001. Malcom has authored several reports on engaging women and minorities in science and is considered a pioneer in the field.

Malcom has served as co-chair of the Gender Advisory Board of the United Nations Commission on Science and Technology for Development and has chaired many national committees on scientific education and literacy. In 2006, she was named co-chair of the National Science Board Commission on 21st Century Education in STEM. Malcom serves as a trustee of California Institute of Technology and a regent of Morgan State University. She has sixteen honorary degrees, received the University of Washington’s Alumna Summa Laude Dignata Award in 1998, the university’s highest honor and in 2003, was given the Public Welfare Medal of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Shirley Malcom is married to Horace Malcom and they have two adult daughters.

Shirley Malcom was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 9, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.060

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/8/2012

Last Name

Malcom

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

M.

Schools

University of Washington

University of California, Los Angeles

Pennsylvania State University

George Washington Carver High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Shirley

Birth City, State, Country

Birmingham

HM ID

MAL06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

What Doesn't Kill You, Makes You Stronger.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

9/6/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Education administrator and science educator Shirley Malcom (1946 - ) is head of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs. She is a pioneer of minority science education serving on the National Science Board and the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology.

Employment

Los Angeles Schools

University of North Carolina, Wilmington

American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

National Science Foundation (NSF)

National Science Board

President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Shirley Malcom's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Shirley Malcom lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Shirley Malcom describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Shirley Malcom talks about her mother's growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Shirley Malcom describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Shirley Malcom talks about her father's growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Shirley Malcom talks about the demographics of Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Shirley Malcom talks about how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Shirley Malcom describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Shirley Malcom talks about her childhood neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Shirley Malcom talks about her high school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Shirley Malcom describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Shirley Malcom talks about her elementary school experience

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Shirley Malcom talks about her experience at Lewis Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Shirley Malcom talks about the significance of Sputnik to aspiring scientists

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Shirley Malcom talks about her teachers at Lewis Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Shirley Malcom talks about her interest in television, radio and football

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Shirley Malcom talks about her grandmother registering to vote

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Shirley Malcom talks about voting challenges for black people during the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Shirley Malcom talks about the bombing of Bethel Baptist Church and Sixteenth Street Baptist Church

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Shirley Malcom talks about Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Shirley Malcom reflects on her experience of being a student during the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Shirley Malcom talks about her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Shirley Malcom talks about her decision to attend the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Shirley Malcom talks about the civil rights disparities that women face

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Shirley Malcom talks about her experience at the University of Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Shirley Malcom talks about the disparity of educational resources between minority schools and white schools

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Shirley Malcom talks about innate scientific ability

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Shirley Malcom talks about her decision to forego medical school

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Shirley Malcom talks about her social life at the University of Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Shirley Malcom talks about her experience at the University of California in Los Angeles

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Shirley Malcom talks about her studies at the University of California in Los Angeles

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Shirley Malcom reflects on the challenges in her personal life during her graduate studies

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Shirley Malcom talks about Pennsylvania State University, where she received her Ph.D. degree in ecology

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Shirley Malcom describes her dissertation on the factors that relate to the termination of imprinting in birds

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Shirley Malcom talks about football at Pennsylvania State University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Shirley Malcom talks about her professional activities with the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and the NAACP

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Shirley Malcom talks about the book she published called, 'The Double Bind: The Price of Being a Minority Woman in Science'

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Shirley Malcom talks about her work at the National Science Foundation and the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Shirley Malcom talks about her work with the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Shirley Malcom talks about her professional activities and the importance of STEM education

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Shirley Malcom talks about her work with the United Nations (part one)

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Shirley Malcom talks about her work with the United Nations (part two)

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Shirley Malcom talks about women's access to science education

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Shirley Malcom talks about her professional activities with the AAAS

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Shirley Malcom reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Shirley Malcom talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Shirley Malcom talks about society's perceptions of scientists and celebrities

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Shirley Malcom reflects upon her life choices

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Shirley Malcom talks about her family

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Shirley Malcom reflects upon how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$5

DAStory

2$5

DATitle
Shirley Malcom talks about her professional activities and the importance of STEM education
Shirley Malcom talks about the book she published called, 'The Double Bind: The Price of Being a Minority Woman in Science'
Transcript
Early 90s [1990s] you're saying--?$$Yes, it would be, it would have been kind of the early 90s [1990s]. And so we had a number of places apply and we had independent selection process and the people came here for training cause we wanted them all to do something that related to building math skills, whatever they happened to be. And then we basically sent them computers and they established community computing centers. We were trying some of everything. The notion is that we saw, we found holes we wanted to plug you know. We were trying to help communities, trying to build awareness to start with and then trying to build strategies so that you would get some sense that you weren't at, you know you weren't hanging out there by yourself. I mean there were things that you could do to try to move this. At the same time that you're trying all these projects, you're also trying to establish or support policies that you knew in the long run would likely provide federal resources or something for undertaking these efforts. You were protecting disaggregated data because you know if you lose it you're not going to be able to keep score and know how, know if you're making any kind of difference. So you're working on various fronts you know all at the same time, building, trying to build capacity in organizations, trying to build awareness in the scientific community, trying to get other organizations within the scientific community to take on some of these issues. So you have lots of different stuff going on at any one time. In 1989, there was a reorganization that pulled not only office of opportunities but also the general issues that relate to science education as well as public understanding of science into the same unit and I became the head of that unit. And again this was a situation where you are coming to understand that this is a system's problem and you've got to figure out how to take on different parts of a system be it K-12, be it higher education, be it graduate education, be it community engagement and community literacy that you've got to build partnerships, that you've got to reach out beyond yourself. You have to engage the media, the technology and what have you in order to make a difference. I had the opportunity too to kind of do more in the policy world and around the policy, and the policy area to effect things as well. I served on the National Science Board, the policymaking body of the National Science Foundation and participated in their efforts around strategic planning, around the systemic initiatives that they undertook. I instigated the activity that eventually led to the change in criteria at the foundation that--around broader impacts to try to get people to focus on the fact that it was great to be able to do your research but maybe we should be able to expect that you would do things to support education, do things to support diversity, do things to support other kinds of worthy efforts and initiatives within the sciences and engineering. And I served on President Clinton's counsel of advisors se science and technology at the same time and so trying to lift the discussion to the numerous agencies, trying to help people understand that this was an area of national need. We had once again returned to the Sputnik [1957] moment. It might not look like it but we were there again and that if we didn't really understand that the demographics were headed in one direction but we really weren't capitalizing on the need to build talent out of all those groups that had been marginalized in the past and we had a real problem. And so we were trying to change the discourse and tried to get the science community to own this problem at the same time that we could get the national policies to own all of this as an issue that had to be addressed. And I think that to a very large extent we look at, we look today and we listen to President Obama and his remarks, he's there. He gets that in fact that we--that stem education is critical to being able to move ahead in terms of our national security, our defense, our health, our economics but also that we have to be very smart about talent development and talent utilization. But you, when I think about kind of the odyssey that it has taken to kind of get to that point it's really amazing that we can still be having this conversation this many years later. You know I have these regular moments of deja vu all over again. I was you know I undertake on a--I can get an open slice of time every once in a while to start trying to attack the mess in my office and I'll find a speech that I gave in 1980 something and I read the presentation. I shouldn't, I should just go on and file it. But I read it and I thought oh my goodness this is too fresh. I could have given this speech last week. And I think that as much progress as we have made and the numbers tell us and we have in fact made progress, as much progress as we have made, the movement has been glacial. I mean it's so slow but we have just, we are just not taking hold of these things with the speed and urgency that is really required.$Okay. Now in '76 [1976] you wrote, you published 'The Double Bind'--$$The Double Bind.$$--The Price of Being a Minority Woman in Science.$$Yes.$$Okay.$$And that was, it was interesting how that happened. The person with home, for whom I worked said at that time, what's it like basically to have these two things hitting you at the same time? She had gone to a meeting of people who were writing projects that related to minorities in science. There had been no women there. Then she went to a meeting on women in science projects and there had been no minorities there. And I said to her, I said what it is like is that you're in no person's land because if you--for example you go into a living room and you have a lamp that's there and there's a switch on the lamp and there's a switch on the wall. The switch on the lamp can be on but the wall switch isn't. The wall switch can be on but if the lamp switch isn't on the lamp still won't light. Essentially the light, the wall switch has to work and the lamp has to be on in order for anything to happen. I mean it's similarly that you know this notion of following slavery when the amendment was put in place giving blacks the right to vote, black women couldn't vote. You know so women were arguing at the time that women should, white women should be allowed to vote before these illiterate black men who had been slaves. But until both of those things happened, we weren't going to get the vote. So it didn't matter who you told, who you tossed your hat in with, nothing was going to happen for you until both of those things happened. And that's really the major issue that we began to understand as women of color that early on we might be more affected by the issues of being members of minority groups in terms of our early education. But at some point we were also going to be hit by sexism and the realization that there were certain things that women were expected to do and not do. And that we, until both of those sets of conditions were addressed that we weren't really going to be able to progress. And not having being able to put those ideas, to articulate those ideas and begin to understand what might a pathway be for women of color, I mean that was the first time that that had actually been discussed as an issue. And trying to help people understand what that was like was a really hard thing to do and it was a hard thing to do in terms of putting it to words. One young woman who wrote me at the time kind of--after she found 'The Double Bind', she was looking for something that spoke to her to the situation that she felt at the time. And I was trying to help her sort through it and make suggestions about what she should do as she was trying to map out her life, is now the Dean of the College at Harvard [University], Evelyn Hammonds. She was at Spelman [College] when she wrote to me after that book. And it means a lot that she felt that for the first time that someone understood, someone was articulating her reality. And unfortunately while a lot of things have changed from that reality, a lot of things haven't changed from that reality. There's a recent piece that I did with my daughter for Harvard Educational Review that kind of brings it, this up to date at the thirty-fifth anniversary you know of 'The Double Bind.' And we entitled it, 'The Double Bind-The Next Generation,' you know looking at how now younger women are experiencing some of the same issues that their mothers did and how, what is likely--what we now understand is likely to be necessary in order to really address these things.$$Now culturally, did you get more, I mean for those who were aware of what you wrote, did you get more pushback form the black community or the white community?$$Did we get pushback?$$No, from those who actually read what you wrote, did you get more pushback from the black community or the white community or did it make any difference?$$Okay, that's a hard one. We got probably more pushback from black males. White females didn't like it either because in a way when you're kind of in the middle of a women's movement the idea that you're going to call out that our separate needs aren't being addressed. And largely our separate needs weren't being addressed, partly our separate needs weren't being addressed because there was this in some corners kind of a condemnation of what, of the behavior of all men. And what we were trying to say is, hey wait a minute. Our brothers have issues, have had issues trying to move ahead as well. So even though they aren't necessarily being the most supportive people right now by saying we, you know we're calling out things that we need to keep in the family--I mean you think about it. You think about the civil rights movement and you think about the fact that the women in many cases were organizing things and they got pushed to the side. You don't hear about the women who were critical in the civil rights movement.$$Like Ella Baker [Ella Josephine Baker, African American civil rights and human rights activist].$$Yeah. You don't hear about Ella Baker. You don't hear about Diane--$$Nash [Diane Nash, student leader and strategist of the 1960s civil rights movement].$$You know, you don't hear about them. You may hear about Dorothy and I think that Dorothy Height [Dorothy Irene Height, administrator, educator, social activist: former head of National Council of Negro Women] who was a great supporter of our work because she understood this science/technology connection to really being able to take hold of one's future moving forward. I think that she, they gave her some props because she was senior to them all you know. And, but you know how that worked. It was, there was the expectation that you provided the coffee, you provided the support, you made the signs, you did whatever, but you were not out in front and that was a part of the reality. Did people like to be called on it? No. And I think that that's just the way it was.

William Lupton

Computer scientist William Lupton was born on May 26, 1941, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He attended Central High School, graduating in 1959. That same year, Lupton joined the United States Navy and became a sailor, eventually becoming a U.S. Naval Flight Officer and attained the rank of Commander. He logged over 5,000 flight hours in his career and earned five Strike/Flight air medals for his combat cruises to Vietnam. In 1972, Lupton attended the Naval Postgraduate School in California where he received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in computer science. In 1980, Lupton served as chairperson of the computer science department at the United States Naval Academy. While there, he designed one of the most innovative and complete computer science majors in the country.

In 1981, Lupton took a position as a Professor of Naval Science at Louisiana State University and while there, he earned his Ph.D. degree in expert database systems. Following his tenure at LSU in 1987, he joined the faculty at Jackson State University and chaired the computer science department from 1987 to 1991. In 1991, Morgan State University invited Lupton to chair its computer science department, where he presently serves. Since 2007, Lupton has been the principal investigator of Morgan State University’s Network Resources and Training Site in the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network project which aims to inspire young minority scientists and engineers.

Lupton has been president of the Baltimore and National chapters of the National Technical Association and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He was also the inaugural national president of the Association of the Departments of Computer Science and Engineering at Minority Institutions (ADMI). He has generated over $5 million in funding to improve science and science education.

Lupton is married to Monica McKinney and has three sons, Michael, Steven, and Scott Lupton.

William Lupton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 13, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.058

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/13/2010

Last Name

Lupton

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Bill

Schools

Naval Postgraduate School

Louisiana State University

Meade Elementary School

Vaux Junior High School

Central High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

LUP01

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Curacao Island

Favorite Quote

It Is Better To Have And Not Need Than To Need And Not Have.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

5/26/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Hoagies

Short Description

Computer science professor and computer scientist William Lupton (1941 - ) was chairman of the computer science department at Morgan State University beginning in 1991.

Employment

Louisiana State University

Jackson State University

United States Naval Academy

Morgan State University

United States Navy

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of William Lupton's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - William Lupton lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - William Lupton talks about his grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - William Lupton discusses how far back he can trace his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - William Lupton shares stories of his maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - William Lupton describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - William Lupton describes memories of growing up with his cousin

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - William Lupton shares his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - William Lupton recalls fixing his family's broken stereo

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - William Lupton reminisces about Christmas in his youth

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - William Lupton reflects upon his family's connection to the Navy

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - William Lupton describes his memories of attending school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - William Lupton recalls how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - William Lupton remembers some of his elementary school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - William Lupton details his childhood neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - William Lupton recalls the sights, sounds and smells of his neighborhood in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - William Lupton describes the type of student he was

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - William Lupton recalls an emergency visit to the doctor as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - William Lupton explains how he developed a sense of critical thinking

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - William Lupton recalls some of his high school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - William Lupton explains the "Philadelphia Syndrome"

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - William Lupton remembers meeting a friend from high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - William Lupton discusses his college aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - William Lupton describes his interest in math, computer science and in track as a youth

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - William Lupton considers the role of religion in his life

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - William Lupton describes his path from high school to the United States Navy

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - William Lupton recalls his early United States Navy experiences and his plans to get an education

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - William Lupton discusses receiving an education through his career in the United States Navy

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - William Lupton considers the number of African Americans in his United States Navy programs

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - William Lupton describes his Naval career path from the USS Forrestal to serving in the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - William Lupton describes receiving an education at the Naval Postgraduate School

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - William Lupton describes the nature of his military activity as a pilot in the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - William Lupton describes an incident landing at Da Nang, Vietnam, Part 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - William Lupton describes an incident landing at Da Nang, Vietnam, Part 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - William Lupton discusses his education at the Naval Postgraduate School

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - William Lupton describes his experiences at the United States Naval Academy

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - William Lupton discusses building the computer science department at the United States Naval Academy

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - William Lupton describes the social atmosphere of the United States Naval Academy

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - William Lupton tells of another landing incident aboard the USS Nimitz

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - William Lupton explains what happened to his aircraft aboard the USS Nimitz

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - William Lupton describes his career trajectory as a Professor of Naval Sciences at Louisiana State University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - William Lupton shares some experiences from his service as a Professor of Naval Sciences

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - William Lupton describes the cultural differences between Louisiana State University and Southern University and A&M College

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - William Lupton describes his arrival at Jackson State University

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - William Lupton describes his departure from Jackson State University and the reception of his Ph.D. degree

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - William Lupton discusses his arrival at Morgan State University and his development of the computer science department

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - William Lupton discusses balancing his roles as researcher and department chair

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - William Lupton discusses the National Technical Association

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - William Lupton describes the importance of computer science

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - William Lupton reflects on the progress being made in computer science

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - William Lupton discusses topics in the future of computer science

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - William Lupton discusses government funding in the field of computer science

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - William Lupton describes the decisions his faculty are faced with in the Department of Computer Science at Morgan State University

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - William Lupton considers the importance of service in academia

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - William Lupton reflects on the changing academic atmosphere of Morgan State University

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - William Lupton discusses the things he enjoys about his job in computer science

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - William Lupton describes the awards he has received

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - William Lupton talks about his sons

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - William Lupton shares advice for a student interested in science

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - William Lupton explains why he would be a medical doctor if he was not doing computer science

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - William Lupton considers his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - William Lupton narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - William Lupton narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$2

DAStory

9$7

DATitle
William Lupton recalls fixing his family's broken stereo
William Lupton recalls an emergency visit to the doctor as a child
Transcript
Did you like to challenge your father?$$Not so much as challenge, but to verify (laughter), to verify. I know when stereos first came out, my dad bought us a stereo. And, oh, we loved it. We used to play it all the time. In fact, my favorite artist back then was a singer named Dakota Staton. You probably--most people never even heard of Dakota Staton, but she, she was a jazz singer; loved her. One day, the stereo broke, and I said, oh, wow. And I asked Dad [Clement M. Lupton] to fix it. Dad didn't have any money to fix it. His position was, you shouldn't have broke it in the first place (laughter). So I said, okay. One day when I got just tired of waiting, I took the stereo apart. My brother came in, and he said, what are you doing? I said, I'm fixing the stereo. He said, you'd better get that back together before Dad gets (laughter). Okay, he's gonna kill you. So, sure enough I found the piece that was broken on it, and I didn't have any way to replace it so I glued it and glued it and put some scotch tape on it and put it back together. The thing worked. Dad came home. The stereo was working. He noticed the music, but he didn't ask how it got repaired. So I never told him (laughter).$So what would you say was your earliest encounter with science?$$My earliest encounter with science was kind of an accident. We had--I don't know what had happened. We were in the house and either the hot water heater wasn't working or it had broken down or something. Anyhow, we had no hot water. And it was bath time so I was boiling some water on the stove and I was gonna pour it in the bathtub. And I recall when the water was boiling, I got some mits and I lifted this pot up off the stove, and I was gonna take it into the bathroom. And my brother came behind me and bumped me and I spilled the whole pot of boiling water on my chest which as I recall felt like ice cold. And I put the pot down and I was calling my mother [Mary Katherine Thomas Lupton], oh, oh, look what he did. And I was concerned about spilling the water on the floor. And then I took my shirt to pull it up to show my mother how wet it was, and I looked down, and I had no skin (laughter) to about my waist because it had all boiled off. My mother grabbed me and took me out the house and around to this hospital which is on the other side of the wall there that was Girard College [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania]. And this doctor was putting this salve and stuff on me, and I'm looking, saying what is this he's doing? And he was explaining what he was doing 'cause I was, between tears I was trying to listen to find out what he was doing because I was always conscious of what was happening to me. And I made the connection and said, hum, this guy's a doctor and I see what the doctor is doing, putting this salve, it looked like salve on me. And that was supposed to have some kind of reaction with the skin and the blood and the stuff and then he wrapped it. And I got to thinking about that, and I thought well,--$$About how old were you then?$$Oh, I guess I was about ten [years old], maybe eleven, somewhere around there.

Reverend Frances Murphy Draper

Born on December 18, 1947, in Baltimore, Maryland, the Reverend Frances Murphy Draper is the great-granddaughter of the founder of the Afro-American. Draper attended Morgan State University, earning a B.A. in Spanish education in 1969, and then enrolled in Johns Hopkins University to earn a M.Ed. in 1973. Draper then attended the University of Maryland, earning an M.B.A. in 1981, and picked up graduate credits at St. Mary's Seminary before receiving an M.S. in pastoral counseling in 1996 from Loyola College in Baltimore. That same year, she received a doctorate in ministry from the United Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio.

After completing her bachelor's degree, Draper began teaching in the Baltimore public schools in 1969 and continued to do so for four years. Joining the family business in 1973, she became the manager of the New Jersey edition of the Afro-American. In 1976, she left the paper to become an account executive at Merrill Lynch Pierce Fenner & Smith, before returning to her alma mater of Morgan State to serve as an assistant vice president of development in 1978. She remained there for eight years, becoming an instructor in 1984, and then returned to the Afro-American in 1986 as president. Leaving the paper for a second time in 1999, Draper is today the pastor of Freedom Temple African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in Baltimore, formerly known as John Wesley A.M.E. Zion Church.

As a lifelong citizen of Baltimore, Draper has been extraordinarily active in the community. She serves as vice hair of the Board of Regents of Morgan State University, treasurer of the Board of the Afro-American Newspapers and Loyola College, has served on the boards of the United Way of Central Maryland and Loyola University Maryland and was the vice chairperson of the Baltimore's Literacy Foundation. Three times she has been honored as one of Maryland's Top 100 Women, and she has been placed in the Maryland Circle of Excellence for women demonstrating sustained achievement. Draper and her husband live in Baltimore. They have four children.

Accession Number

A2003.235

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/26/2003

Last Name

Draper

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Murphy

Occupation
Schools

Morgan State University

Johns Hopkins University

University of Baltimore

St. Mary's Seminary

Loyola University Maryland

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Frances

Birth City, State, Country

Baltimore

HM ID

DRA01

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

All

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Spring

Speaker Bureau Notes

Honorarium Specifics: $1,000-1,500, plus travel and lodging expenses
Preferred Audience: All

State

Maryland

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere New

Favorite Quote

I Will Bless The Lord At All Times; His Praise Shall Continually Be In My Mouth.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Interview Description
Birth Date

12/18/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Salad

Short Description

Pastor Reverend Frances Murphy Draper (1947 - ) is the former president of the Afro-American newspaper and is the pastor of John Wesley A.M.E. Zion Church.

Employment

John Wesley AME Zion Church

Afro-American Newspapers

Morgan State University

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Reverend Frances Murphy Draper's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper identifies her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about her father's family ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about her maternal grandfather, John H. Murphy, Sr. and the founding of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about her father's personality and career in the music industry

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes working at the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper as a girl

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about playing sports as a little girl

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes her childhood neighborhoods in Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes the influence of the church in her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper lists her favorite musicians growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about meeting Smokey Robinson in New York, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper remembers touring with her father and her step-mother, singer Damita Jo

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper remembers 'The Buddy Deane Show'

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes her elementary school experiences in Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about playing sports in her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes her experience at William H. Lemmel Junior High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes her experience at Western High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about the 1963 March on Washington in Washington, D.C. and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes her experience at Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper remembers her teachers from Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes her high school career interests

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about attending Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about meeting her husband and starting a family in her sophomore year of college at Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about teaching in Maryland middle schools and relocating to New Jersey to run the New Jersey Afro-American

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about working for Merrill Lynch and Morgan State University as assistant vice president of development in university relations

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper explains how she became president of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes how she became president of the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper explains how she assumed control of the Baltimore Afro-American Newspaper in 1986

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes problems she encountered as the new president of the Baltimore Afro-American Newspaper

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about the consequences of replacing the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper's senior management

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes Operation Afro and the difficulties new management experienced at the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes the Baltimore Afro-American's readership and influence base

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes making her transition into the A.M.E. Zion Church ministry in 1991

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper explains what influenced her to become a pastor

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about doing outreach work in the Baltimore, Maryland community

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes the demographics in her congregation at the John Wesley A.M.E. Zion Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper remembers a moment with a young member of the congregation

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about the presence of young people in the John Wesley A.M.E. Zion Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes the vision of the John Wesley A.M.E. Zion Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes her hopes and concerns for the African American demographic

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper considers her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper considers what in her life she would have done differently

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper remembers an early civil rights organizing experience

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper talks about her maternal family's legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper considers how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Reverend Frances Murphy Draper narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

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DATitle
Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes working at the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper as a girl
Reverend Frances Murphy Draper describes making her transition into the A.M.E. Zion Church ministry in 1991
Transcript
Okay, well, tell us about growing up. What were some of the sights and sounds and smells of growing up? And kind of describe what your neighborhood was like.$$Well, I grew up in more than one place because of the newspaper business so most of the sights were through the lenses of somebody's camera or typewriter at that time, you know, before computers. My grandfather [Dr. Carl J. Murphy] believed, if you could walk, you could work. And where could you work? You could work at the paper [Afro-American, later Baltimore Afro-American, Baltimore, Maryland]. You could do something at the paper whether it was picking up something off the floor or, you know, calling up somebody. So we worked very early in the family business. My mom [Frances Louis Murphy II] tried, of course, to have us do some other things and to be balanced but I just remember spending a lot of time at the paper, watching the photographers develop pictures or, you know, if my mom or dad [James Edward Woods, Sr.]--'cause my dad worked at the paper a little bit too, when he and my mom were together, you know, going on assignments with them or going on trips wherever they had to go for the paper. And so that was a lot of what happened growing up. But I also recall, you know, going to church growing up, being a part of Jack 'n Jill [Jack and Jill] and play things like that growing up. And I was the oldest so I had a lot of responsibility when I wasn't traveling with-- with my mom.$Okay, now once you got the paper [Baltimore Afro-American] in a healthy position--$$Um-hum.$$--you pursued other things. You went into the ministry and--$$I did--$$--how did you--$$--I was already pretty involved in my work with the church when I went to the paper. And then in 1990, '91 [1991], I accepted my call to ministry but I stayed at the paper. I mean, I still stayed there and I served as an associate minister at one church and then at another church behind that. And so I did--I did the paper still pretty much full-time and that was my vocation and I worked in the church as my avocation until I really was convinced it was in--let's see, I left the paper--what year are we, 2003? I left the paper totally in 1998, December of 1998. So I think it was '97 [1997] or so when I was real clear that God was calling me to come out altogether. I mean, we had this kind of running dialogue, "You want me to do what? Leave and do what, God? No, I don't think so, you know." We had this little battle going on back and forth in my spirt anyway, in my mind, and so I thought, you know, could I could always come up with an idea--man, I said well, I'll tell you what, God I'll just take a--how about this, God, I'll take a sabbatical. I'll work half-time at the paper and half-time in the church and we made that announcement. It was in the paper that that's what I was going to do. I was going to leave for a little while. I mean, just to come--some part-time stuff but in September I was just convicted that that's not what God was telling me to do. And my daughter was getting married in October and we had just bought a house and she kind of looked at me and said, "Mom, what are you thinking about?" I said, "I'm just trying to be obedient of what God has said," and so that's--that's what happened. But I didn't--I didn't pastor right away but I was in ministry full-time and so I'd been blessed to be able to travel to a lot of places to preach like England and all over the country before I was appointed here to--to this church [John Wesley A.M.E. Zion Church, later, Freedom Temple A.M.E. Zion Church, Baltimore, Maryland].$$$$Now how did you get on that level of activity so quick and then you're traveling to England? I mean--$$I mean, it's--I mean the credit goes to God. I mean, I didn't really--I mean I was a willing vessel, amen, and God uses me in the ways that he wants to use me. Because I was an associate--I don't know whether it was because I was an associate minister at two churches, the one for five years and the other one for seven years.$$Are these the same denominations?$$One was a non-denominational church and the interesting thing was I was in the A.M.E. Zion Church and left with a young pastor to start a non-denominational church and God sent me back to the [John Wesley] A.M.E. Zion Church [later, Freedom Temple A.M.E. Zion Church, Baltimore, Maryland], but in those capacities I had a lot of opportunity to preach because if people would call for someone to preach at the church, the pastors usually couldn't go, they would send one of the associates to go. Or in my own right, I started another ministry called God's Love Ministry, another friend of mine in ministry and I did. And so we started ministering to, particularly to women, and we would have women's conferences and so out of those conferences we'd be invited to preach different places and--