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Dr. Lovell A. Jones

Molecular endocrinologist Lovell A. Jones was born January 12, 1949 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He attended the University of California, Berkeley where he received his Ph.D. degree in the field of zoology, with an emphasis on endocrinology and tumor biology. Upon completing his Ph.D., Jones worked as a post-doctoral fellow/instructor in the department of physiology and obstetrics, gynecology & reproductive sciences at the University of California Medical Center at San Francisco.

In 1980, Jones joined the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center as an assistant professor in the department of gynecology and biochemistry, where he has served for over thirty years. As the first African American to be hired in the basic/behavioral sciences, he rose through the ranks to a tenured full professor. During his tenure, he focused on the role of steroid hormones in reproductive cancers and health disparities that exist in minority and medically underserved populations. Jones served as founder of the Biennial Symposium Series: Minorities, the Medically Underserved & Cancer and co-founder of the Intercultural Cancer Council. He has served as director and co-principal investigator of the National Black Leadership Initiative, the first major minority outreach project sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. In 2000, Jones was named the first director of M.D. Anderson’s Congressionally Mandated Center for Research on Minority Health (CRMH). In 2011, he assumed the positions of research professor of social work at the University of Houston and director of the joint Dorothy I. Height Center for Health Equity & Evaluation Research (DH CHEER).

Jones chaired the training session of the strategic fact-finding meetings on Minority Health and Training in Biomedical Sciences for the Office of the Associate Director for Research on Minority Health (now the National Institute on Minority Health & Health Disparities (NIMHD) at the National Institute of Health (NIH). Jones also served as a member of the Clinical Research Panel of the National Task Force on the National Institute of Health (NIH) Strategic Plan. In addition, he served on the Breast Cancer Integration Panel for the Department of Defense, and has published over 150 scientific articles on subjects ranging from hormonal carcinogenesis to health policy. By 2012, Jones had received more than $40 million dollars in research and educational funding.

In 2002, Jones received the Humanitarian Award from the American Cancer Society and was honored on the floor by the U.S. House of Representatives for his work. Jones was awarded the NIH/NICMHD Director’s Award for Health Disparities Excellence in Research, Policy & Practice. He received the 2012 Ruth Kirschstein Diversity in Science Award from the American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, as well as the NAACP Unsung Hero Award. In September 2013, upon his retirement from the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Jones became the first African American to be honored by the University of Texas System with Professor Emeritus status at Anderson. He then became the first African American in the University of Texas System to be awarded a second title of Professor Emeritus at the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in 2014.

In retirement Jones is continuing his efforts to address the issue of health disparities and mentor the next generation.

Lovell A. Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on 08/14/2012.

Accession Number

A2012.198

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/14/2012

Last Name

Jones

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Allan

Schools

Perkins Road Elementary School

McKinley Elementary School

Southern University Laboratory School

Robert E. Lee High School

Louisiana State University

California State University, East Bay

University of California, Berkeley

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on schedule

First Name

Lovell

Birth City, State, Country

Baton Rouge

HM ID

JON31

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Open

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Depends on audience

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Emergency #: 713-628-6005

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Big Island, Hawaii

Favorite Quote

If you don't care who gets the credit, you accomplish a lot.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

1/12/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chinese Food

Short Description

Molecular endocrinologist and biology professor Dr. Lovell A. Jones (1949 - ) is founder of the 'Biennial Symposium Series: Minorities, the Medically Underserved & Cancer' and co-founder of the Intercultural Cancer Council.

Employment

University of California, San Francisco

University of Texas

Delete

Intercultural Cancer Council

University of Texas, Austin

Center for Health Equity & Evaluation Research

University of Houston

University of California

Favorite Color

Blue

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Lovell Jones' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones describes his mother's family background - part one

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones describes his mother's family background - part two

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his grandfather, Eddie Lockhart

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about his great grandmother and her family ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones talks about his great grandmother's curse on her slave owner

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Lovell Jones talks about his mother's growing up and the unique racial politics of Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones talks about how he is related to Phylicia Rashad and Debbie Allen

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his mother's education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about the lasting impact of war on his father and his father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his parents' relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about his likeness to his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones describes his childhood neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Lovell Jones describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience in elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones talks about the challenges of being an advanced student in school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience in junior high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones talks about his participation in the integration of Baton Rouge schools

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience with racism in school - part one

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience with racism in school - part two

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones reflects upon his experiences in high school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones describes how he came to attend Louisiana State University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience at Louisiana State University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones talks about his transition from Louisiana State University to California State University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about his grandmother and mother's influence on him

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his impetus to study science

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about how he met his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones talks about his decision to attend the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Lovell Jones talks about his experience at the University of California, Berkeley and his mentor, Howard Burn

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones talks about how he came to his dissertation research topic on the influence of natural estrogens on carcinogenesis

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about the impact of his dissertation research on the influence of natural estrogens on carcinogenesis

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones talks about his post-doctoral work at the University of California, San Francisco

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about his reaction to his mother's diagnosis with cancer

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about his career and his parents' experiences with cancer

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about his decision to work at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones talks about his efforts to increase awareness about the high incidence of cancer in black people

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones talks about his education, policy, and research initiatives

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his initiatives for addressing health disparities

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones talks about cancer and race

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about race and the difference in how cancer effects certain populations and communities

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones talks about slavery's legacy on racial politics in the U.S and society's declining value for people

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about the problems with the U.S. healthcare system

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones shares his views on the U.S. healthcare system

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Lovell Jones reflects on his career and talks about how people of color are valued in society

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Lovell Jones talks about his wife's encounter with discrimination

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Lovell Jones reflects on his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Lovell Jones talks about his students and mentee's

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Lovell Jones reflects on his life choices

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Lovell Jones talks about his children

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Lovell Jones talks about his wife and their marriage

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Lovell Jones talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$7

DAStory

6$2

DATitle
Lovell Jones talks about the problems with the U.S. healthcare system
Lovell Jones talks about his wife's encounter with discrimination
Transcript
This idea of not caring about one's fellow man in terms of health coverage. The whole idea that we're already paying for it in other ways that's costing us more than doing it the right way, is just mind boggling for me.$$What would you see as the ideal health care system for the United States?$$I, I would say it would have to be one that--the European system is not going to work here. I mean we're too far down that road. I, I think the, the way that health reform was put--the bill that was, that came out was, was not the best bill that could have come out. And it came out primarily because of Civics 101, and that--what I mean by that is we lost it because of one election in Massachusetts. We had to deal with the House version. We could never take it back to the Senate because we're now down one vote as opposed to the 60 votes. And so we're left with this thing that should have been massaged, as most legislations are, legislative bills. House comes in, goes to the Senate, Senate does its thing. Then it goes to a consensus committee. They pound on it, they make it something that's presentable to some extent, and then it goes back to both houses to be voted on. This thing never happened that way. It was--I mean in that bill is the, the Secretary of Health and Human Services shell, 1,051 times, okay. You're giving the power to one person to make decisions with some said this, some said that, maybe you know it's up to you to make that decision. The whole issue with regards to the implementation of Medicaid expansion. The whole idea of exchanges. Well that process works well in Massachusetts. It would probably work well in Michigan, maybe California. But it is not going to work well in the southwest. The reason Texas has 25 percent uninsured. If we implement it in its best form, we're only going to get down to nine, ten, 11 percent. That's a lot of people. And then when you take away the safety nets that were in place, disaster is going to happen, okay. New Mexico, Arizona, southern California, same boat to a large extent. And it's not--people say it's those undocumented, it's not. Yes they're part of it. But these are American citizens that are too poor to be able to afford the exchange, but too rich to be covered in it in terms of being covered 100 percent. They're the out lies. Now in a state that has maybe two to three percent, it can be absorbed by other venues. A state that has six to nine percent, 11 percent, there are no other venues to absorb that. And so you still have this massive pressure on the health care system.$And sometimes we're our, we're our own worst enemies. I remember when my wife, who's a high risk patient, four of her aunts, her mother, all have had breast cancer. Only one is still alive. So either there's a genetic trait or some issue related to risk. And so she came here, and I would come with her most of the time, and so a few years ago she came by herself and she got sent down to Credit Counseling. And so she called me from Credit Counseling and said dear you didn't pay the insurance. I said what do you mean I didn't pay? I'm a full professor on faculty, you know it's automatically paid. What do you mean I--and you know, and she was telling me somebody came and saw her and said Mrs. Jones, and she said yes. And she said Mrs. Jones, Mrs. Jones married to Dr. Lovell Jones? Yes. The Dr. Lovell Jones that works here? Yes. We made a mistake. You know we're going to take you--dear they're taking me someplace, I don't know where they're taking me. Phone hangs up. I rush over to the clinic where she is. I said where's my wife? She's not here. What do you mean she's not here? So as I'm standing at the desk, I get a phone call from my wife. Says dear I'm on my way to the Galleria, I'm going to do something. I said what do you mean? She said got back, they saw me, everything's fine so I'm going to celebrate. So I turned and I said why did you guys send my wife down to Credit Counseling? Well you know Dr. Jones there was a $25 co-pay. Yeah. It hadn't been paid. Yeah. I said my wife could have written a check. I mean if I know my wife, she was dressed to the nines. She wears my wallet. So well you know Dr. Jones a large percentage of Hispanics aren't insured. I said what's that got to do with my wife? She's not Hispanic. Well you know--I said African--I said wait a minute. What does any of that have to do with my wife? Well you know first hired, last hired, first fired. I said no, what does that have to do with my wife? Our mission here is to take care of people. So what does that have to do with--all of a sudden people start gravitating and I said you haven't heard the end of this. You have not heard the end of this. And then I started talking to people. I said people in asking did this happen to you, did this happen? And I found out that this had happened to other faculty. So it's an issue of value, but the most interesting thing about this, the person who was asking the questions, the person who denied her care, was African American. And so we assume the value system of others. And so that's--so at some point we have to get past this and that's my greatest hope and one I work towards. And I have in my research group--in fact some people refer to it as the United Nations, blacks, Hispanics, Asians, Africans, whites all working together. And in fact at the bi-annual symposium a young student came up to me after one of the evening events and he says Dr. Jones I have to say this to you. This has been the best meeting I've ever been to. The things I've learned. He said but it's not what I've learned scientifically, he said I've learned that people from all walks of life, whether they're racially different, whether they're religious differences, whether they're cultural differences, whether they're political differences, can get together and work towards a common goal. I now know it's possible. And that's what I will take with me.

William Walden

Molecular biologist and biology professor William Walden was born in 1954 in Washington, D.C. to George Ray Walden and Erma Lucille Walden. After graduating from Suitland High School in 1972, he received his B.S. degree in biology from Morgan State University in 1976. During college, Walden worked as a research assistant for the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Baltimore Cancer Research Program. Walden went on to earn his Ph.D. degree in molecular biology from Washington University in St. Louis in 1983. His final dissertation was entitled," mRNA Competition in vivo."

In 1987, Walden started his over twenty-year career at the University of Illinois at Chicago as an assistant professor in the College of Medicine's Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He was a recipient of the Schweppe Foundation Career Development award from 1988 to 1991. In 1992, Walden was promoted to associate professor and associate department head of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He began working with the Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) in 1994, where he chaired the steering committee. Since 2004, Walden has held the position of full professor. In 2006 and 2007, he served as co-chair of the Campus Promotion and Tenure Committee. Walden was a fellow of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation-Academic Leadership Program from 2006 to 2007, which mentors administrators for higher leadership opportunities. Since 2006, he has served as director of the Office of Graduate Diversity Programs, which works to increase the number of underrepresented students who successfully earn a Ph.D. degree in the College of Medicine. In 2007, Walden became the Special Assistant to the Provost for Diversity. His research focuses on cellular iron regulation and iron-related gene expression in eukaryotes. Walden has published numerous scientific research articles including his 2006 paper, "Structure of Dual Function Iron Regulatory Protein 1 Complexed with Ferritin IRE-RNA," which was published in the journal, Science .

In addition to his research, Walden has mentored many graduate researchers, and has served on NIH grant review panels and as a peer reviewer for top scientific journals including, Science, EMBO Journal, Blood, and Journal of Biological Chemistry . William Walden lives in Oak Park, Illinois and has two adult children, William A. Walden and Michael D. Walden.

William Walden was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 21, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.004

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/20/2012

Last Name

Walden

Marital Status

Married

Schools

Morgan State University

Washington University in St Louis

Brooks Road Elementary

Suitland High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

WAL16

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

10/13/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Interesting Food

Short Description

Biology professor and molecular biologist William Walden (1954 - ) has been a leader in the area of cellular iron regulation and iron-related gene expression in eukaryotes. He has served as a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago since 1987.

Employment

University of Illinois, Chicago

Washington University

United States Drug Administration

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center

NIH, NCI, Baltimore Cancer Research Program

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:2000,22:2700,30:5000,66:12556,189:13054,196:13469,202:19029,253:21222,270:25424,287:25856,292:26396,298:27152,306:31480,321:32362,338:32803,348:33370,366:33811,374:38707,430:40366,482:40919,490:49219,593:49912,605:50416,616:50794,623:53840,672:56745,747:69288,843:71070,871:71598,883:72654,903:73116,911:73446,917:73710,922:73974,927:74370,949:75096,956:79032,972:79322,979:79670,987:80308,1000:87166,1029:88498,1050:88794,1055:89090,1060:89682,1070:89978,1075:95836,1114:98390,1145:99160,1163:99440,1168:99930,1178:100420,1187:100770,1193:101050,1198:101400,1205:102030,1216:102660,1226:108160,1258:108560,1263:115540,1312:115990,1319:117340,1350:118330,1362:124470,1406:124745,1412:124965,1417:126840,1432:127132,1437:127497,1443:129085,1458:130647,1485:130931,1490:131712,1505:136999,1561:137414,1568:138410,1584:139074,1593:139987,1606:140817,1619:146149,1648:146464,1654:150160,1702:151240,1721:155556,1768:156300,1777:158876,1787:159450,1795:159860,1801:163459,1827:163998,1836:164691,1846:164999,1851:165923,1862:167001,1877:167694,1888:168002,1893:169311,1915:175500,1941:177320,1951:177556,1956:178264,1972:179562,2006:180034,2015:180329,2022:180801,2031:181509,2047:181804,2054:182335,2095:182689,2102:183043,2113:188285,2149:189320,2160:190125,2169:192096,2177:192520,2187:192732,2192:193050,2199:193633,2215:198354,2251:200391,2277:200779,2282:201943,2304:205047,2378:205532,2384:218070,2487:218954,2502:219702,2516:220178,2525:220450,2530:221334,2544:221810,2553:227950,2586:228730,2605:229870,2625:230410,2636:230950,2646:231670,2661:232150,2669:232450,2675:232870,2690:233290,2699:235200,2710$0,0:6302,26:7268,48:12012,102:12348,107:13860,128:14700,138:15456,148:16212,158:22030,184:22504,191:23531,210:23847,215:25582,227:28802,282:29814,306:30458,314:31102,322:31470,327:32298,338:34640,347:36481,365:36749,370:39520,393:40570,405:41395,418:42895,445:43345,452:43870,460:44845,475:49547,514:50310,523:51182,533:53067,544:54015,559:54489,566:54884,572:57179,588:57677,595:58092,601:58424,606:59171,628:59503,633:59918,639:60416,646:62180,651:65991,671:66326,677:66929,689:69006,724:69408,731:71420,737:73058,755:73760,767:74540,778:74852,783:75164,788:80752,835:81167,841:82329,858:82827,875:83408,883:85170,889:86276,912:86829,920:87990,926:88710,936:90758,944:91898,961:92962,977:95166,991:95622,999:100678,1036:101547,1049:102258,1060:102969,1071:103838,1084:105339,1105:109836,1131:110316,1137:111276,1150:112044,1158:114156,1180:115020,1191:119792,1233:120478,1241:121948,1259:124556,1276:125200,1285:125568,1290:128208,1314:128874,1321:129392,1330:130132,1338:130576,1345:131686,1362:132574,1378:133906,1402:140348,1445:140804,1452:141108,1457:141488,1463:142400,1478:144148,1505:144908,1517:147584,1533:148216,1542:148532,1547:148848,1552:150270,1576:151929,1603:152324,1609:153983,1641:155405,1662:158890,1687:159610,1700:161210,1731:169022,1813:173515,1834:174180,1884:186620,1971:187259,1983:187969,1994:188253,1999:188821,2010:189247,2015:189815,2023:190383,2032:191377,2042:191945,2051:192513,2061:192939,2068:193507,2077:194430,2093:197286,2109:198254,2123:199398,2137:199750,2142:200102,2147:202892,2163:203445,2172:204156,2182:205025,2196:205815,2212:208003,2224:209991,2260:211340,2280:211624,2285:211979,2291:213044,2313:213399,2319:213754,2325:215387,2352:215884,2361:216736,2376:220866,2411:221378,2421:221698,2427:222274,2439:224120,2452:224680,2463:225240,2472:226220,2487:226850,2497:227480,2508:228250,2523:228600,2529:229300,2541:229580,2546:230070,2555:230560,2563:231470,2577:231960,2586:232520,2595:233150,2606:233640,2614:233920,2619:238770,2630:239490,2643:240282,2658:240642,2664:241074,2671:241434,2678:247271,2721:248720,2744:249350,2755:250547,2777:250862,2783:251177,2789:251429,2794:252248,2812:252689,2821:255220,2829:255724,2839:255976,2844:257488,2877:258055,2887:258811,2904:259378,2917:259693,2923:260134,2932:261142,2961:271242,3021:271676,3030:271924,3035:272792,3052:274330,3058:274685,3064:275679,3081:276318,3093:277170,3107:277596,3115:279949,3128:280532,3141:281380,3161:281698,3169:282705,3190:283182,3200:283659,3210:284083,3220:287575,3263:292970,3303:294050,3322:299410,3360:301127,3382:301935,3392:302642,3401:303147,3407:304561,3423:309236,3432:310250,3446:311654,3465:312122,3472:316501,3492:318338,3500:319262,3514:320690,3525:321320,3537:321880,3546:322510,3558:324550,3579
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of William Walden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - William Walden shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - William Walden talks about his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - William Walden talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - William Walden discusses his paternal family's way of life

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - William Walden explains his paternal family's influence in the church

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - William Walden talks about his father's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - William Walden explains his father's experience in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - William Walden discusses his father's return from Navy service

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - William Walden describes how his parents met in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - William Walden describes his parents' personalities and his mother's dedication to her family

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about his siblings and describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - William Walden reflects upon his father's character and disposition

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - William Walden talks about his elementary school experience in Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - William Walden describes his first exposure to science and the natural world

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - William Walden talks about his interests as a high school student

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - William Walden describes his experience with integration in junior high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - William Walden describes his introduction to running the 400 meter race on the junior high school track team

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - William Walden talks about his experience on the high school track team

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about his childhood scientific influences

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - William Walden discusses the scientific views of his parents, friends, and the church

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - William Walden talks about his social experience in high school and applying to college

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - William Walden talks about the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his high school black student union

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - William Walden describes his experience at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - William Walden describes his interest in biology at Morgan State University and the National Institutes of Health

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - William Walden describes his general chemistry professor at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about cafeteria food and religious discourse at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - William Walden talks about his history class at Morgan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - William Walden describes his decision to pursue a Ph.D. degree after college

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - William Walden describes his decision to attend Washington University in St. Louis for graduate school

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - William Walden describes the flexibility of his graduate program at Washington University

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - William Walden describes his interest in the control of iron metabolism by cells

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - William Walden describes the cellular response to a surplus of iron

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - William Walden discusses iron deficiency and nutrition - part one

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - William Walden discusses iron deficiency and nutrition - part two

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - William Walden describes his Ph.D. dissertation research on the rate of protein synthesis

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - William Walden describes the significance of his Ph.D. dissertation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - William Walden describes his decision to work at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - William Walden talks about balancing his research and teaching responsibilities at the University of Illinois, Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - William Walden talks about the future of his research on the regulation of iron metabolism

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - William Walden relates his involvement in studying the role of metals in human health

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - William Walden discusses the metal silver as a health food fad

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - William Walden talks about his research on a national level

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - William Walden discusses the challenges of funding research

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - William Walden talks about his involvement in university administration and diversity development - part one

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - William Walden shares his love for the city of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - William Walden talks about his involvement in university administration and diversity development - part 2

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - William Walden talks about the leaders in the field of cellular iron metabolism

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - William Walden talks about his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - William Walden reflects on his legacy and his life choices

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - William Walden talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - William Walden talks about his membership on the Molecular Cellular Hematology Review Committee

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - William Walden reflects on the supportive nature of his parents

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - William Walden recalls his brother-in-law as a mentor during graduate school

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - William Walden shares his interest in golf and how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

5$8

DATitle
William Walden describes his decision to pursue a Ph.D. degree after college
William Walden talks about his involvement in university administration and diversity development - part 2
Transcript
Now did you--now at a certain point did you sort of see a path, a career path out of what you were doing at Morgan [State University, Baltimore, Maryland]?$$No. Well yes I did, but it was really quite late. It was--I, I was a, you know, member of the biology club and very interactive with other biology majors there. Virtually all of them were planning to go to medical school and so I went through a period of thinking okay, this is what I'm going to do, I'm going to apply to medical school and see if I can get in and go down that road. And so I was moving in that direction and in my senior, the fall of my senior year as I'm preparing all of these applications, getting ready to take the MCAT [Medical College Admission Test] and all of that, and just one day I stopped and I said why are you doing this? Don't--the way I put it to myself, which I often times will say to students as they're talking about what they want to do now is you know I really realized that I have no patience for patients. I, I cannot in my personality; I can't deal with people at that level every day, virtually twenty-four hours a day. And if I had not realized that and gone down that road, it would have been a very, very different outcome for me now, and may not have been a pleasant or positive one because it's not what I like to do. It's not what I'm comfortable doing, so why do it? And so once I came to grips with that, embraced that whole notion, then I could see a career path at that point, but not until. So it was fairly late then--$$Okay.$$That I saw that I wanted to go to graduate school and I wanted to go directly for the Ph.D. I was never interested in getting a master's [degree] and I actually looked at programs for whether they required you to do a master's first and favored those that did not because--and this was something that some of my instructors at Morgan had also pointed out to me was that there, there isn't a whole lot more that you can do with a master's if you want to do research with a master's than you can do with a B.S. [Bachelor of Science degree] if you really want to do research and you want to be more in control of your own path of research, what you're doing, then you have to get the Ph.D., and so that, that sort of crystallized that path for me.$$Okay so control and latitude to do what you want to do.$$Do what you want to do.$$Comes with the, the license is the Ph.D.$$That's right, that's right. That's minimal. And then, then it is developing the ability to do that and then demonstrating that you actually can do that and you can think of important questions and start working on important questions that people, other people want to know the answers to.$Okay now what are some of your responsibilities right, right now as an assistant to the provost?$$The main responsibility is to develop a diversity strategic plan for the campus. And that's almost complete at this point. But that has been the main responsibility, that's the main task. It's been a long process because I've decided to take the approach that the plan itself is irrelevant. It's really changing the culture of the campus, and that's through communication, through conversation, through dialogue that one begins to change the mindset of the campus about diversity. And that's taken some time but I'm, I think that we're seeing that take hold now. The other part of the responsibility though is to, is to really bring diversity into as many of the activities that come through the provost office as possible. So to bring diversity to the table when we're talking about curriculum, when we're talking about certainly student demographics and recruitment and retention, to bring a perspective that may be a little bit different to efforts to change the outcomes for students, to improve outcomes for students, to think about how to improve faculty diversity and success of faculty, the environment and climate that faculty experience at the university. And then the most difficult one is to, to really start to address issues around the staff that are at the university. I mean the university is, is a jobs place, but how do people feel about working at the university, and how do the talents and skills and, and benefits that each individual bring to the university get realized in their activities, in the way that the university interacts with them. So those are things that, that fall into the realm of my responsibility for, with the provost.$$Okay now do you have any responsibility in advising the various student associations? I don't know if there's an association of African American scientists or Hispanics or you know.$$There, there are offices and activities that might deal with African American students, Hispanic students, Native American students and so forth, and I do engage in, in conversations with them about how to do certain, different things and so forth, and, and provide any leadership or guidance that I might there, or listen to what their concerns are and then bring those concerns to the provost so that the actions can be taken and that sort of thing. But these are still more at the level of, of more of an official administrative structure within the university. I don't interact so much with the student organizations that are centered within the student body itself. I really leave that up to the other bodies that I might interact with to do that. But it is something that--from a university perspective and as we think about this position evolving into the future, where its best positioned in that regard is, is something that we ought to consider. I don't think it would be at the level of the student or the--if we truly want to make--I mean one of the goals of this initiative is to truly drive diversity to the core of the university as much as research and teaching and learning are at the core of what a university is about, so diversity should be sitting there along side. That means that everybody has to be engaged in bringing diversity into the activities of the university. If you place too much on one office in terms of being responsible for that, we don't move it into the core. We really simply have it as a surface layer for the university that can be stripped away as the individual goes away.

Edwin Cooper

Biologist and immuno-biology professor Edwin Cooper was born on December 23, 1936, in Houston, Texas. Cooper attended Jack Yates High School, graduating with honors in 1957. He won the first prize in a state art contest, for which his ceramic vase was sent to the national competition at the Carnegie Art Institute. Although Cooper was interested in art, he was more attracted to the field of biology, studying butterflies, earthworms, and other animals as a youth. Cooper pursued his interest in biology at Texas Southern University, where he earned his B.S. degree in 1957 with honors. Continuing his studies in biology, Cooper earned his M.S. degree in biology from Atlanta University in 1959 and his Ph.D. degree from Brown University in 1963.

Upon completing his doctorate, he became an assistant professor of anatomy at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine in 1964 and attained full professorship by 1973. Cooper taught immunology around the world, beginning with an exchange program (sponsored by the Agency for International Development) with the Instituto Politecnico Nacional in Mexico City, Mexico. He later received a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship to the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden in 1970, while maintaining his position at UCLA. Cooper founded the Division of Comparative Immunology of the American Society of Zoologists in 1975 and was a founding editor of the International Journal of Developmental and Comparative Immunology, and its society, the International Society of Developmental and Comparative Immunology. He has founded similar national groups in Japan and Italy. From 1989 to 1993, Cooper served as the vice chair for UCLA’s Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology. He became the founding editor in chief of "Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine" in 2004.

Throughout his professional career, Cooper’s research has been at the forefront of the discoveries made in the field of immunobiology, better known as comparative immunology following the publication of the first textbook and many others related to comparative immunology: he is credited with having established that discipline. His research on invertebrate immune systems and the evolution of immune systems has been published in several immunology journals including the Journal of Biological Chemistry and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. From studying chronic allograft rejection in earthworms to the identification of characteristics of the fish, amphibians and other invertebrates, Cooper shifted the focus of his work to better understand vertebrate and human disease. The products of terrestrial and marine invertebrates are useful in certain diseases as was discovered in ancient cultures like in China and India.

The impact of Cooper’s work has been recognized; Cooper has received five honorary degrees internationally, including one from his alma mater, Brown University, in 1988. He has also been awarded other international prizes in the sciences, such as the Alexander von Humboldt Prize in Germany, The Eleanor Roosevelt Award for Cancer Research to work with the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in Switzerland, and the S.M. Nabrit Achievement Award in Science from Atlanta University.

Cooper and his wife, Helene, have two adult children.

Edwin Cooper was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 27, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.033

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/27/2011 |and| 11/30/2012

Last Name

Cooper

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

L.

Schools

Jack Yates High School

Texas Southern University

Clark Atlanta University

Brown University

Charles W. Luckie Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Edwin

Birth City, State, Country

Oakland

HM ID

COO10

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Everyday

Favorite Quote

If You Aim Low You Can't Fall, If You Aim High, You Have A Place To Fall.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

12/23/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Biologist and biology professor Edwin Cooper (1936 - ) was a leader in the fields of invertebrate immune systems and comparative immunology. He conducted research at the University of California, Los Angeles for more than forty years.

Employment

University of California, Los Angeles

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Edwin Cooper's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper talks about his mother's side of the family, part 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper talks about his mother's side of the family, part 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper talks about his mother's desire to go to college

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper talks about his father's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper discusses his great-grandfather's involvement in the Civil War

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Edwin Cooper talks about his great-grandfather, a Methodist minister

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Edwin Cooper talks about his paternal grandparents

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper talks about his father's loving to work with his hands

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper talks about which parent he takes after most

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper shares a story about his birth

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper shares his opinion on healthy diets from a biologist's perspective

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Edwin Cooper talks about his childhood interest in animals

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Edwin Cooper describes the schools he attended in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper describes his neighborhood in Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper talks about his childhood activities and academics

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper recalls the radio programs he listened to as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper talks about his educational influences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper discusses race relations in his Houston community

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper talks about his high school

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Edwin Cooper talks about his interest in art

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper recalls his influences at Texas Southern University and Atlanta University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper explains his parallel interests in biology and art

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper describes his master's thesis in developmental biology

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper relates his graduate school experience at Atlanta University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper talks about his experience at Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper recalls his experience at Brown University during his Ph.D. studies

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Edwin Cooper discusses his interest in comparative immunology

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper discusses the importance of studying primitive animal systems

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper talks about his family's pride in his academic achievements

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper talks about his experience as a faculty member at UCLA

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper describes his connections with Mexico

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper discusses his experience publishing papers in the field of comparative immunology

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Edwin Cooper's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper talks about his first book being republished without permission

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper describes the changes at the UCLA School of Medicine

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper recalls the controversy of pioneering comparative immunology

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper describes the role of the thymus in the generation of immune response

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper describes his discovery of immune responses in primitive invertebrates

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper recalls pursuing his research interests at the University of California, Los Angeles

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Edwin Cooper describes the reception of his research outside of the United States

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Edwin Cooper remembers the creation of the journal, Development and Comparative Immunology

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper recalls his research fellowships

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper talks about his research laboratory choices

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper describes the meetings of the International Society for the Development of Comparative Immunology

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper recalls editing 'Animal Models of Comparative and Development Aspects of Immunity and Disease'

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper recalls working with Agustin Zapata

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper talks about writing 'Comparative Histophysiology of the Immune System' with Agustin Zapata

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Edwin Cooper remembers his work in Scandinavian countries

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Edwin Cooper talks about visits from international researchers

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Edwin Cooper recalls his Fulbright Fellowship to Cairo University in Cairo, Egypt

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper recalls his scientific work internationally

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper talks about innate and adaptive immune systems, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper talks about innate and adaptive immune systems, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper describes his presidency at the American Society of Zoologists

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper talks about the discovery of the cytotoxic T cell receptor by Leroy Hood

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper talks about serving as vice chairman of the department of anatomy and cell biology at UCLA, School of Medicine

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Edwin Cooper describes the interpersonal challenges he faced as a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Edwin Cooper describes the discovery of peptides' role in MHC class II structure

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper talks about the extensive publication of his research

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper describes immune toll-like receptors

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper recalls his work with tunicates

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper recalls his research on soil pollution's effects on earthworms

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper describes the use of leeches and maggots in the removal of dead tissue

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper talks about the anti-microbial properties in honey

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Edwin Cooper remembers creating the Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine journal

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Edwin Cooper describes the importance of evidence based complimentary remedies

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper talks about the use of lumbrokinase for dissolving blood clots

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper remembers changing publishers for Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper describes the restrictions for accepting publications in 'Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine'

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper describes his opinions on the use of medical marijuana

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper describes the United States' lack of preparation to care for its aging population

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper talks about centenarians and aging

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Edwin Cooper talks about the scientific study of centenarians

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Edwin Cooper describes aspirin's natural origins

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Edwin Cooper talks about the treatment of emeritus professors

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Edwin Cooper reflects upon his life

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Edwin Cooper reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Edwin Cooper talks about his family, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Edwin Cooper talks about his family, pt. 2

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Edwin Cooper describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Edwin Cooper narrates his photographs

George Jones

Biologist and biology professor George H. Jones was born February 21, 1942 in Muskogee, Oklahoma. He received his B.A. degree in biochemical sciences from Harvard University in 1963. Jones continued his education at the University of California, Berkeley, where he attained his Ph.D. degree in biochemistry under the tutelage of Dr. C. E. Ballou. Jones then worked for two years as a visiting scientist at the National Institutes of Health between 1968 and 1970. After this, he moved on to the University of Geneva in Switzerland, where he completed a postdoctoral fellowship in 1971. Upon returning to the United States, Jones was hired by the zoology department at the University of Michigan, and in 1975, he moved to the department of biology and chaired the department of cellular and molecular biology within the Division of Biological Sciences between 1980 and 1982.

In 1984, Jones assumed yet another post as professor and Associate Chairman for Space and Facilities at the University of Michigan; he also taught in the Division of Biological Sciences and served as Associate Dean at the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. Between 1986 and 1989, Jones served as a professor in the department of biology at University of Michigan, and then in 1989, he moved to Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia to serve as its Dean in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies. In 1990, he served as the college’s acting dean. In 1996, Jones received the prestigious Goodrich C. White Professorship in Biology at Emory University.

Jones’ numerous awards include the University of Michigan Excellence in Teaching Award (1989) and the Emory University Scholar/Teacher Award (1998), as well as membership in several distinguished professional societies, including the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the American Society for Microbiology. His research concerns the mechanism and regulation of antibiotic synthesis in the bacteria Streptomyces. He received a three-year National Science Foundation Grant in 2003 to study RNA degradation and antibiotic synthesis in Streptomyces, and another in 2008 to study RNA degradation and the regulation of antibiotic production. He resides in Atlanta, Georgia.

George H. Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 12, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.021

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/12/2011

Last Name

Jones

Middle Name

H.

Schools

Manual Training High School

Harvard University

University of California, Berkeley

Search Occupation Category
First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Muskogee

HM ID

JON24

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Vancouver, British Columbia

Favorite Quote

Never give up. Never slow down. Never grow old. Never ever die young.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/21/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cheeseburgers (Bacon)

Short Description

Biology professor and biologist George Jones (1942 - ) researched RNA metabolism and the production of antibodies in bacteria. He was named the Goodrich C. White Professor in Biology at Emory University in 1996.

Employment

National Institute of Health (NIH)

University of Geneva, Switzerland

University of Michigan

Emory University

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slates of George Jones's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - George Jones shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - George Jones talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - George Jones shares his mother's aspirations and career path

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - George Jones talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - George Jones describes his parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - George Jones describes his childhood family life

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - George Jones recalls his childhood neighborhood in Muskoegee, Oklahoma

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - George Jones recalls older extended family members

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - George Jones describes his early interest in science

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - George Jones describes the community influences of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - George Jones discusses the history of African Americans in Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - George Jones recalls the black newspapers of Muskogee, Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - George Jones describes the cultural influences of his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - George Jones remembers his interest in science, exploration and traveling

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - George Jones discusses living out West during the 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - George Jones describes the classes at Manual Training High School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - George Jones shares memories of his high school mentors

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - George Jones describes his interest in applying to Harvard University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - George Jones talks about his high school activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - George Jones discusses the importance of music in his community in Oklahoma

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - George Jones remembers his acceptance to Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - George Jones describes racial relations in Muskogee, Oklahoma

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - George Jones describes his trip from Muskogee, Oklahoma, to Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - George Jones remembers his transition to Harvard University as an undergraduate

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - George Jones talks about his college roommates and the black presence at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - George Jones discusses the tension of the Cold War and Civil Rights Movement during his time at Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - George Jones talks about his sense of responsibility as a black student at Harvard University from 1959 to 1963

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - George Jones recalls his classmates from Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - George Jones discusses not having any mentors at Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - George Jones recalls the lack of racism at Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - George Jones talks about his career aspirations after his Harvard graduation

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - George Jones talks about the field of biochemistry in the 1950s and 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - George Jones describes the social climate of the Bay Area, California, in the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - George Jones describes his graduate research on alpha-mannosidase

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - George Jones talks about the work environment at University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - George Jones describes his work with the National Institutes of Health

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - George Jones talks about his fellowship at the University of Geneva

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - George Jones recalls his decision to work with the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - George Jones recalls the riots in Washington, D.C. in April 1968

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - George Jones shares his regrets on becoming a dean at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - George Jones talks about his research on the bacteria, Streptomyces

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - George Jones talks about the antibiotic, actinomycin

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - George Jones describes his decision to work at Emory University in 1989

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - George Jones discusses the research environment in the biology department of Emory University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - George Jones talks about RNA degradation

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - George Jones discusses the use of DNA sequencing in his research

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - George Jones discusses the value of learning something new every day

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - George Jones discusses the dogmas of science and religion

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - George Jones talks about the importance of studying the evolution of microorganisms

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - George Jones discusses the dangers of antibacterials

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - George Jones discusses his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - George Jones remarks on the importance of science in modern society

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - George Jones talks about Atlanta as a center for research

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - George Jones answers questions about members of his family

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - George Jones shares his concerns for the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - George Jones reflects on how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

1$2

DATitle
George Jones discusses the importance of music in his community in Oklahoma
George Jones discusses the use of DNA sequencing in his research
Transcript
What was it like, seeing your mother [Bernice Imonette Weaver] operate in a professional capacity [as choir director at Manual Training High School, Muskogee, Oklahoma], you know, I guess...?$$Well, I guess I didn't think much about it, I knew she was good at what she did because I had seen--she used to put on these really extravagant programs, musical programs of various sorts that I would always attend. And I would see her doing those kind of things and frequently, she would have rehearsals at the house or she would need to take me to school in order to have a--for there to be a rehearsal because, again, there wasn't any other child care available. So, I knew that she was good at what she did, because I saw the products of her efforts. And, so, being in the choir, I knew that she was going to hold all of us to a high standard, and she did. And the thing that she used to do, and it was very clever of her, and I even knew that at the time--so I was in the baritone section and whenever anyone was misbehaving, she wouldn't try to identify them, she would always blame me. She would say, you know, "Somebody was talking back there." She would tell me to stop talking. So, what I had to do in order not to be blamed for that was I had to keep all of them in line, because I knew I was going to be blamed for it, no matter who was doing it. It was very clever, and it worked.$$Okay, that's interesting. There seems to be a strong musical tradition in Oklahoma, you know.$$Yeah.$$Dr. [Legand L.] Burge [Dean of the College of Engineering, Architecture, and Physical Sciences], we interviewed at Tuskegee [Tuskegee Inst., Alabama, on April 11, 2011], grew up in Oklahoma City, he plays the piano. He was a pianist in church and toured all over Oklahoma.$$I think that was a part of, again, the kind of, there weren't many artistic outlets for us as we were growing up. It was very difficult, I think, for anybody in my community, no matter how talented they were, to become an artist, a sculptor. There weren't even those kinds of classes in the high school, or anywhere for that matter that I'm aware of. So, when you thought about the kind of artistic outlets that people might both want and need to have, one of the ones that was available, one of the few that was available was music.$$Okay.$$And so a lot of really terrific musicians came out of my community.$Okay. Are you happiest doing research?$$Yes.$$Okay.$$Yeah, even at my advanced age [sixty nine years old], I still enjoy the research, and actually still enjoy doing experiments myself. I don't do as much as I used to, but I still work at the bench myself from time to time.$$So, is there an ultimate goal you want to, is there--that you want to accomplish before you...?$$Well, yeah there is, there really is. Not ultimate in the sense of answering the fundamental biological question, but really sort of serendipitously, we have used, or are beginning to use, a new approach to study the biology systems that we're interested in. It's called high throughput DNA sequencing. Just to give you an idea of sort of the way that that has an impact on the kind of stuff that we do in terms of understanding the structure of the genetic material and the genomes of organisms, the first living cell whose DNA was sequenced, probably took a year to get that sequence information. It might have taken longer than that, certainly six months to a year. Now you can do it in a week, maybe less. And that's because of the development of new techniques that allow you to do this kind of sequencing very rapidly. We've been able to use that technique in our system to understand some things about the relationship between RNA degradation and antibiotic production. To my knowledge, nobody yet in the entire world, has done that, and I'm hoping that before I actually step down as a practicing scientist, that we will be able to mime, to use that approach, to mime the system and get as much information out of it as possible that will help us to understand how these processes work.$$Okay.$$And that's one of the reasons why I'm still involved and excited about the science, because there are things that we can do now that we couldn't even do two or three years ago.$$In research, the nature of research, I've been told, is that you really have to stay on the new technology...$$That's right. You know, there's a real temptation to get something that works and just to keep doing it. And that's the quickest way to stagnate. You may become very good at it, but in the meantime, the likelihood is going to be that the science is passing you by.$$Yeah, we've interviewed others who have gone into administration and tried to get back to research, and find that the bus has left, the train has left the station.$$Exactly. That's one of the reasons why I was not willing to completely give up my science when I became a dean, because I knew from talking to other people, in part, that if you give it up completely, it's almost impossible to come back to it.

Tyrone Hayes

Biologist and biology professor Tyrone B. Hayes was born on July 29, 1967 in Columbia, South Carolina, to Romeo and Susie Hayes. In the forests near Columbia, Hayes first became interested in the way that frogs morphed from tadpoles to their adult form. He graduated from Dreher High School in 1985 and then earned his B.A. and M.A. degrees in biology in 1989 from Harvard University. His dissertation on the genetic and environmental mechanisms determining the gender of the wood frog would be indicative of the research he would pursue later. After graduating from Harvard University, Hayes continued his studies at the University of California, Berkeley, where he received his Ph.D. degree in integrative biology in 1993 for his study of the role of hormones in mediating developmental responses to environmental changes in amphibians.

Hayes worked as a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley before he became an assistant professor at the University in 1994. He was appointed to a full professorship position in 2003. Hayes’ scientific research continues to focus on the potential of genetic adaptation and the role of hormones in the development of the amphibian. His investigations have shown that chemical agents, such as a commonly used herbicide, have the ability to negatively impact the sexual development of the amphibian, even when such toxins are present in low concentrations. Hayes has taken an interest in the hormonal regulation and development of aggressive behavior. Hayes has also been active with the National Science Foundation Review Panel since 1995, and he has served on several other advisory boards as well.

Hayes has won several awards for his teaching and his research, including the Distinguished Teaching Award from University of California, Berkeley in 2002 and the President’s Citation Award from the American Institute of Biological Science in 2004. He was also awarded the National Geographic Emerging Explorer Award and the Jennifer Altman Award in 2005.

Hayes lives in California with his wife, Kathy Kim, and their two children, Tyler and Kassina.

Tyrone Hayes was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 7, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.001

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/7/2011

Last Name

Hayes

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

B

Organizations
Schools

Greenview Elementary School

Hand Middle School

Dreher High School

Harvard University

University of California, Berkeley

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Tyrone

Birth City, State, Country

Columbia

HM ID

HAY11

Favorite Season

Christmas

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

7/29/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Oakland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

All Food

Short Description

Biology professor and biologist Tyrone Hayes (1967 - ) is a leading researcher in amphibian endocrinology. Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, Hayes’s work has shown the herbicidal chemical Atrazine to act as an endocrine disruptor in the sexual development of frogs.

Employment

University of California, Berkeley

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Tyrone Hayes's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Tyrone Hayes shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Tyrone Hayes recalls his mother's childhood memories of Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Tyrone Hayes discusses his paternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Tyrone Hayes describes his father's memories of growing up in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Tyrone Hayes describes his father's career path

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Tyrone Hayes shares the story of how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his childhood neighborhood in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Tyrone Hayes shares his earliest childhood memories of growing up in Columbia, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Tyrone Hayes reflects on his interest in the outdoors and wildlife

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Tyrone Hayes considers his family's role in his interest in science

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his parents' views on toy weapons

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Tyrone Hayes recalls his dreams of becoming an explorer

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Tyrone Hayes shares memories of elementary school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Tyrone Hayes discusses learning about science outside of the classroom

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Tyrone Hayes describes his early fascination with frogs and reptiles

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Tyrone Hayes discusses his role models and the zoo as key influences during his junior high school years

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his musical influences

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Tyrone Hayes discusses attending a middle school for artistically talented and gifted students

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Tyrone Hayes describes his first interactions with white people

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Tyrone Hayes recounts his experiences with focusing and being tracked in school

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Tyrone Hayes remembers his high school experience

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Tyrone Hayes describes the difference between a vocational and an academically enriched program

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Tyrone Hayes describes his high school classes and teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Tyrone Hayes discusses youth including his breeding of lizards and locusts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Tyrone Hayes discusses the global decline of amphibians

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Tyrone Hayes describes the effects of industrialization on the environment

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Tyrone Hayes describes his interest in science fiction

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Tyrone Hayes discusses dating in high school and college

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his laboratory work during college

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Tyrone Hayes talks about applying only to Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Tyrone Hayes describes his difficult transition in college

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Tyrone Hayes recalls his Harvard University experience

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Tyrone Hayes recalls some of the African American individuals and organizations of Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Tyrone Hayes describes meeting his future wife

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Tyrone Hayes explains the importance of control and discipline for college success

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Tyrone Hayes discusses the importance of having the experience working in a laboratory during college

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Tyrone Hayes describes the title of endocrinologist

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Tyrone Hayes explains how he chose to do his graduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley [Berkeley, California]

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Tyrone Hayes describes the atmosphere of the endocrinology groups at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Tyrone Hayes describes the declining amphibian population and the role of frogs as environmental indicators

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Tyrone Hayes explains the role of hormones in amphibian metamorphosis

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Tyrone Hayes explains the term "endocrine disruptor"

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Tyrone Hayes responds to the question about the black presence on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley [Berkeley, California]

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his dissertation

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Tyrone Hayes discusses the problems of the African clawed frog, an invasive species

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Tyrone Hayes describes his research studies in Kenya

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Tyrone Hayes discusses his post-graduate studies

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his work for the Environmental Protection Agency and Ecorisk, part 1

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Tyrone Hayes talks about his work for the Environmental Protection Agency and Ecorisk, part 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Tyrone Hayes discusses his views on pharmaceuticals and herbicides

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Tyrone Hayes discusses the results of his tests on the effects Atrazine on frogs

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Tyrone Hayes discusses the effects of Atrazine on human health

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Tyrone Hayes reveals companies that sell chemicals to cause and cure disease

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Tyrone Hayes discusses the reactions of Novartis in response to his publishing his findings, part 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Tyrone Hayes discusses the reactions of Novartis in response to his publishing his findings, part 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Tyrone Hayes explains how he has funded his research

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Tyrone Hayes explains his patent, the Hyperolius Argus Endocrine Screen [HAES]

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Tyrone Hayes details the work in his laboratory

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Tyrone Hayes explains that his lab has studied fish in the past

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Tyrone Hayes discusses how others have become involved in the fight against the use of Atrazine

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Tyrone Hayes describes the importance of blind sampling

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Tyrone Hayes describes his scientific philosophy

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Tyrone Hayes describes the balancing of his personal and professional lives

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Tyrone Hayes discusses his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Tyrone Hayes addresses the problem of education in the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Tyrone Hayes describes the importance of exposing nonscientists to the scientific professions

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Tyrone Hayes describes the additional effects of Atrazine

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Tyrone Hayes discusses the problem of putting his scientific findings in a social context

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Tyrone Hayes reflects on the honors he has received

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Tyrone Hayes describes his fitness regime

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Tyrone Hayes reviews his life decisions

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Tyrone Hayes responds to questions about his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Tyrone Hayes talks about how he wants to be remembered

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DATitle
Tyrone Hayes reflects on his interest in the outdoors and wildlife
Tyrone Hayes reveals companies that sell chemicals to cause and cure disease
Transcript
Now, when you explored the woods around there, did you have any, did anybody--was anyone around to tell you like, this is the type of tree you were looking at or to explain or decode what the what the different animals and trees(unclear) (simultaneous)--$$No, but my grandmother [Agnes Elizabeth Bailey] gave me a lot of books. So I had a lot of field guides, and they had, you know, they had I guess what you'd call sort of folk stuff that they would say about the lizards. I think, you know, if the toad pees on you, you'll get warts. I mean my grandmother and great grandmother taught me a lot of things like that, "don't let it pee on you, you'll get warts". And, you know, there were certain things they'd say about fireflies and making wishes and that kind of thing. So, and my grandmother--and it had been a farm, and so there were still some remnants of the farm. So there were some plum trees and my grandmother had a peach tree that grew over the well. And I remember it was still this kind of wild asparagus that grew. So she knew things kind of about farming. And my grandmother was really into flowers. So she was always planting flowers, and we'd talk about fertilizers. And I remember I had a little guide to insect pests, and I would go around and inspect the flowers and try to figure out what pests she had on her flowers, you know, Japanese beetles on her roses and things like that. But not, I mean not really hardcore science stuff, but just sort of--$$Interests, keen interests.$$Yeah, and then there were some things like snakes. Every snake was bad. I mean, and so--and in fact, I was because of that, sort of afraid of snakes until I was in college. And that's when I just decided, you know, this is silly 'cause I loved all animals. And I just really made an effort to learn about how to handle snakes and all that. But it was, you know, and my father [Romeo Hayes] was more of a, anything on his property was dead, you know, I mean lizards, I mean he killed everything (laughter), insects, lizards, everything was a threat somehow, you know, In fact, I remember my neighbor with these big skinks, actually interesting story, these big, you know, these blue-tailed skinks, these big lizards, my neighbor used to shoot them with a twenty-two [rifle], just pow, pow, blow 'em up. And people in the South, black people called them scorpions. In fact, my grandmother told me this story. She said that if you stepped on them, when she was working in the fields when she was little, that they would sting you with their tail. You know the lizard I'm talking about? They're big and they have bright, blue tails.$$Big blue--$$So the interesting thing is--$$You call them a skink?$$It's a skink, yeah. It's a, the family that the lizard belongs to, and they're ground-dwelling lizards. And when they turn adults, they turn into adults, they turn into the bright gold with a bright, red head. And black people in South call them scorpions. So here's an interesting story. When I started working in Kenya, the Swahili word that they use for a similar lizard in Kenya means scorpion and they tell the same story, that if one of them bites you on the toe in your field, then you'll get sick for a week, exact same story. So I don't know the root of it or how, you know, how it got transferred into the story that black people tell in the South, but obviously, it has an origin in Africa somewhere.$$Hmmm. Okay.$Turns out that the same company [Novartis, sister company of Syngenta] sells a chemical to block aromatase that they sell to breast cancer patients. So to me, that's the biggest piece of evidence. How are you gonna argue that Atrazine turning on aromatase does not increase the likelihood of breast cancer when you're selling a chemical that does exactly the opposite with the promise that it's gonna keep your breast cancer from spreading or occurring.$$This is amazing.$$And they, you know, I'm not sure what their argument is, but they write these letters to my dean. And, you know, I joke all the time. I told them, my Daddy [Romeo Hayes] lives in South Carolina. Writing letter to my dean ain't gonna get you nowhere (laughter). If my father calls me up and says, son, do something else, then I'd think about it. But writing to my dean, no. So, because I published that relationship. I published a paper called the "One Stop Shop, Chemical Causes and Cures for Cancer". And you'll see this. If you look across the board, okay, that same company under a different name, for example, sold DDT [dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, a pesticide], Cepegigge or gigge (ph.). DDT we know is an estrogen mimi. You know, it's like getting in this room. It fits into the estrogen lock, even though it's not. Okay, they sold an estrogen mimic. The same company sold Tamoxifen which is an estrogen blocker to treat breast cancer. So you have these big chemical companies really getting paid on both ends so to speak. And whether or not there's a conspiracy and anybody's doing, that's not what I'm saying. But the case of Atrazine, in the year 2000, January, that guy, John Giesy I was telling you about published a paper where he actually wrote in the paper, John Giesy, the former advisor of the vice president of Novartis [Gary Dixon], wrote a paper where he said, the induction of aromatase by Atrazine may explain some of the tumor-promoting properties of Atrazine. They wrote that in January 2000. In July 2000, they applied to the FDA [U.S. Food and Drug Administation] to start selling their aromatase blocker, just six months later. In November 2000, Novartis spins off this company, Syngenta, who keeps selling Atrazine. And now Novartis only sells the aromatase blocker. But come on. At some point you have to know there were two men in the same room who went, "Oh, shit" (laughter), right, but, you know, but treat it how it is. Those are the facts. All in one year, they discover that Atrazine turns on aromatase. Six months later, they start--they apply to start selling an aromatase blocker, and then by November, they spin off another company--they keep selling Atrazine, and they start selling the aromatase blocker. Come on. (laughter)