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John E. Jacob

Civil rights leader and corporate executive John Edward Jacob was born on December 16, 1934 in Trout, Louisiana to Emory and Claudia Jacob. Jacob was raised in Houston, Texas and graduated from Jack Yates Senior High School in 1953. He went on to attend Howard University, where he received his B.A. degree in economics in 1957 and his M.S.W. degree in 1963.

Jacob first worked as a social worker for the City of Baltimore’s Department of Public Welfare in the early 1960s. In 1965, he joined the Washington, D.C. Urban League, where he served as director of education, and then as acting president. Jacob became president and chief executive officer of the San Diego, California Urban League in 1970, and was appointed president and CEO of the Washington, D.C. Urban League in 1975. In 1979, he was hired as executive vice president and chief operating officer of the National Urban League, Inc. Then, in 1982, Jacob was named president and chief executive officer of the National Urban League, replacing Vernon Jordan. As president and CEO of the National Urban League, Jacob fought cutbacks in federal social programs, solidified the League’s internal structure and expanded its outreach. He established the League’s Permanent Development Fund, the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Training Center, the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Race Relations Program, the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Commemoration Ceremony, and the NULITES youth-development program. During his time as president and CEO, Jacob also authored a syndicated column on national and international issues that appeared weekly in 600 newspapers.

In 1994, Jacob stepped down as head of the National Urban League and joined Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. as executive vice president and chief communications officer. Later, he was named executive vice president – global communications. There, he chaired Anheuser-Busch’s Charitable Contributions Committee and served as a member of the company’s Strategy Committee and Business Practice Committee. He retired in 2008.

Jacob has served on the boards of Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc.; Coca-Cola Enterprises, Inc.; Morgan Stanley; LTV Corporation; NYNEX New York; Continental Corporation; National Westminster Bancorp; the Legal Aid Society; the Drucker Foundation; the National Conference of Christians and Jews; the Economic Policy Institute; the National Parks Foundation; the Local Initiative Support Corporation; and the PGA of America. In addition, he served as chairman of Howard University’s board of trustees.

Jacob’s honors include the National NAACP’s Lifetime Achievement Award, Howard University’s Distinguished Alumni Award, the National Network for Social Work Chauncey A. Alexander Lifetime Achievement Award, The National Action Network “Keeper of the Dream” Award, United Way of America’s National Professional Leadership Award, the Laurel Wreath Award from the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, the International Civil Rights Walk of Fame, and numerous honorary degrees. In honor of Jacob’s corporate leadership and contribution, the Anheuser-Busch Foundation contributed a gift of $1 million to endow the Anheuser-Busch/John E. Jacob Chair in the Howard University School of Business, the first endowed chair in the university’s history. In addition, Anheuser-Busch established the John E. Jacob Community Service Award in recognition of his lifelong commitment to serving communities across the United States. In 2012, Jacob and his wife funded the John E. and Barbara S. Jacob Distinguished Professorship in the Howard University School of Social Work, the first funded distinguished professorship in the school’s history.

John E. Jacob was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 8, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.202

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/8/2014

Last Name

Jacob

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Edward

Schools

Douglass Elementary School

Dodson Elementary

Jack Yates High School

Howard University

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

Trout

HM ID

JAC35

State

Louisiana

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

12/16/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Short Description

Civil rights leader and corporate executive John E. Jacob (1934 - ) was president and CEO of the National Urban League from 1982 to 1994.

Employment

Anheuser-Busch Cos, Inc.

National Urban League, Inc.

Washington, DC Urban League

San Diego, CA Urban League

Baltimore City Department of Public Welfare

The Honorable Gabrielle Kirk McDonald

Judge Gabrielle Kirk McDonald was born on April 12, 1942 in St. Paul, Minnesota to James Kirk and Frances English. McDonald was raised in Manhattan, New York and in Teaneck, New Jersey, where she graduated from Teaneck High School in 1959. In the early 1960s, she attended Boston University and Hunter College. She then went on to attend Howard University School of Law, where she was Notes Editor for the Howard Law Journal and received several academic awards. McDonald graduated cum laude and first in her class with her LL.B. degree in 1966.

Upon graduation, McDonald was hired as a staff attorney for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. From 1969 to 1979, she was a founding partner, with her then-husband, attorney Mark T. McDonald, of the Houston, Texas law firm of McDonald & McDonald. While in private practice, she also taught law as an assistant professor at the Thurgood Marshall School of Law, Texas Southern University, and then as a lecturer at the University of Texas School of Law.

In 1979, McDonald was appointed as a judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas. She was the first African American to be appointed to the federal bench in Texas (and the South) and only the third African American woman federal judge in the country. McDonald resigned from the bench in 1988 and joined the law firm of Matthews & Branscomb. She also returned to academia, teaching first at St. Mary’s University School of Law, and then at the Thurgood Marshall School of Law. In 1991, she became counsel to the law firm of Walker & Satterthwaite, and later served as Special Counsel to the Chairman on Human Rights for Freeport-McMoRan, Inc.

In 1993, McDonald received the highest number of votes from the General Assembly of the United Nations and served as one of eleven judges on the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. In 1997, she became the Tribunal’s president. Then, in 2001, McDonald was called to serve as an arbitrator on the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal in The Hague, Netherlands, where she remained until her retirement in 2013.

Her publications include the co-edited volume, Substantive and Procedural Aspects of International Criminal Law: The Experience of International and National Courts, and numerous articles including The International Criminal Tribunals: Crime and Punishment in the International Arena, and Problems, Obstacles and Achievements of the ICTY.

McDonald was a member of the Board of Trustees of Howard University for twenty-three years. She also served on boards for the American Bar Association Human Rights Center and the American Arbitration Association, as well as on the Genocide Prevention Task Force. In 2014, she was elected Honorary President of the American Society of International Law. Her honors include the National Bar Association's first Equal Justice and Ronald Brown International Law Awards; the American Society of International Law's Goler T. Butcher Award for Human Rights; the Open Society Institute's first Women Groundbreakers in International Justice Award; the Dorothy Height Lifetime Achievement Award; and the Doctor of Laws Honoris Causa from several institutions. She was inducted into the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame in 1993 and the National Bar Association Hall of Fame in 2008.

McDonald has two children, Michael and Stacy, who are both lawyers.

Gabrielle Kirk McDonald was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 27, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.184

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/27/2014

Last Name

McDonald

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Kirk

Occupation
Schools

Howard University School of Law

Hunter College

Boston University

Teaneck Senior High School

The Manumit School

JHS 101

Ps 108 Philip J Abinanti School

St Peter Claver School

First Name

Gabrielle

Birth City, State, Country

St. Paul

HM ID

MCD07

State

Minnesota

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/12/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Judge and educator The Honorable Gabrielle Kirk McDonald (1942 - ) was the first African American to be appointed to the federal bench in Texas and the third African American woman federal judge in the country. She also served as a judge on the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and as an arbitrator on the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal.

Employment

NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.

McDonald & McDonald

Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall School of Law

University of Texas School of Law

United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas

Matthews & Branscomb

St. Mary's University School of Law

Walker & Satterthwaite

Freeport-McMoRan, Inc.

International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

Iran-United States Claims Tribunal

Frank Savage

Investment banker Frank Savage was born on July 10, 1938 in Rocky Mount, North Carolina to Grace Savage and Frank Savage, Sr. When Savage was six months old, his mother and his twin sister, Frances, moved to Washington, D.C., where Savage’s mother opened up a beauty salon. In 1961, Savage earned his B.A. degree from Howard University, and in 1964, he received his M.A. degree in international relations from Johns Hopkins University.

In 1962, Savage joined Crossroads Africa where he was assigned, along with two hundred and fifty other students, to build tennis courts at an all-boys school in Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia). Upon earning his M.A. degree in 1964, Savage joined Citibank, as the first African American in its international division, and worked in the Middle East and Africa. In 1970, Savage joined Equitable Life Insurance as president of Equico Capital Corp., the largest Minority Enterprise Small Business Investment Corporation in the United States. In 1973, Savage joined TAW International Leasing as executive vice president. He then went on to become vice chairman of the board and head of international operations for Equitable Capital Management Corporation; and, in 1987, he was named senior vice president of The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States (now the AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company). In 1992, Savage became chairman of Equitable Capital Management Corporation, where he spearheaded the firm’s global investment management business. Following the merger of Equitable Capital Management Corporation and Alliance Capital Management International in 1993, he served as chairman emeritus of Alliance Capital.

In 1998, Savage became a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and in 2001, he resigned from Alliance Capital to form the Africa Millennium Fund. After the events of September 11, 2001, Savage delayed his plans for the Africa Millennium Fund and started Savage Holdings, where he serves as CEO.

Savage is chairman emeritus of the SAIS advisory board and of Howard University’s board of trustees. He has also served on the boards of Bloomberg LP, New York Academy of Medicine, Lockheed Martin, Qualcomm, and the New York Philharmonic. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters from Hofstra University and an Honorary Doctorate of Humanities from Howard University. In addition, Savage won the Lord Nelson Trophy as part of the 2003 Antigua Race Week Regatta, the premier sailing event in the Caribbean.

Savage is married to Lolita Valderrama Savage. They have six children.

Frank Savage was interviewed The HistoryMakers on May 5, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.122

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/5/2014 |and| 5/7/2014

Last Name

Savage

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Thomas P. Morgan Elementary School

Benjamin Banneker Academic High School

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies

Howard University

First Name

Frank

Birth City, State, Country

Rocky Mount

HM ID

SAV02

State

North Carolina

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/10/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Investment banker Frank Savage (1938 - ) was CEO of Savage Holdings. He held leadership roles at Equico Capital Corp, TAW International, Equitable Capital Management Corporation, AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company, and Alliance Capital Management International. In addition, he was the first African American to work in Citibank’s international division.

Employment

Citibank

Equico Capital

TAW International

Equitable Life Assur. Co.

Equitable Capital Management

Alliance Capital Mgmt Intl.

Savage Holdings LLC

H. Mitsy Wilson

Entertainment executive H. Mitsy Wilson was born on December 13, 1950 in Georgetown, Guyana. She grew up in New York, where she spent her formative years. Wilson graduated from the College of Mount Saint Vincent with her B.A. degree in sociology and social work.

In 1972, Wilson worked as a commercial coordinator for the New York broadcast station WPIX-TV. In 1973, she was hired as a social worker for the Seamen’s Society for Children and Families. Wilson went on to work for the New York Board of Education as director of counseling and special projects. In 1981, she was hired at New York Airlines, where she worked as both manager of training and consumer relations and manager of consumer affairs and baggage services until 1986. Continental Airlines acquired New York Airlines in 1986 and Wilson was promoted to director of consumer affairs and training.

In 1988, Wilson was hired as manager of management training and diversity at Times-Mirror Cable Television. She was promoted to director of leadership development and diversity at Times-Mirror Company in 1995; and, in 1999, she was named corporate vice president of leadership and organizational development. Then, in 2000, Fox Entertainment Group hired Wilson as senior vice president of diversity development, where she was responsible for development, execution and evaluation of all diversity initiatives. The appointment made her the highest-ranking African American female executive at the company. In 2005, she assumed responsibility for all diversity efforts for News Corporation. In 2011, Wilson became a founding partner of ForAfrica, an international consultancy firm specializing in leadership development solutions.

Wilson has received numerous awards, including the New York Governor’s Award in 1980, the Minorities in Broadcasting’s Phoenix Award in 2003, the 2006 NAACP President’s Award, and the 2010 Corporate Executive of the Year Award from the Jewish Community Relations Council of New York. She is the Chairperson of Workplace Hollywood, a non-profit organization dedicated to developing, training and placing a diverse workforce in entertainment, and is a former member of the UCLA Medical Affairs Board, Nielsen Media Research African American Advisory Council, and Howard University School of Communications Board.

Wilson lives with her husband, Greg James, and has two daughters, Meisha and Alia; a stepdaughter, Shermian; and three granddaughters, Sherine, Shermika and Esther.

H. Mitsy Wilson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 20, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.355

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/20/2013

Last Name

Wilson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Common Law

Middle Name

Eloise

Schools

University of California, Los Angeles

Queens College, City University of New York

College of Mount Saint Vincent

St. Nicholas Of Tolentine High School

St. Nicholas of Tolentine Elementary School

P.S. 91- Bronx School

St. Philip's School

First Name

Hazel

Birth City, State, Country

Georgetown

HM ID

WIL70

Favorite Season

Christmas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Costa Rica

Favorite Quote

That's Phenomenal.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

12/13/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

Guyana

Favorite Food

Roti And Curry Chicken

Short Description

Diversity specialist H. Mitsy Wilson (1950 - ) was a founding partner of ForAfrica and worked in diversity management for over twenty-five years. She became the Fox Entertainment Group’s first senior vice president of diversity development in 2000.

Employment

ForAfrica

News Corp. Fox Entertainment

Times Mirror Company

Continental Airlines

New York Airlines

Board of Education

Society of Seaman's Children

Favorite Color

Bright Colors

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of H. Mitsy Wilson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Slating of H. Mitsy Wilson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about her mother's career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about her father's role in her upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her father's immigration to the United States

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers her paternal family's legacy in the sciences

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - H. Mitsy Wilson lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers moving with her family to the Bronx, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about her early experiences of religion

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers her early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls her athletic achievements during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her academic success

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls her favorite television programs

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers her social activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls her college applications

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her experiences at College of Mount Saint Vincent in the Bronx, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers her professors at College of Mount Saint Vincent

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her social activities at College of Mount Saint Vincent

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about her decision not to attend law school

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls her position at WPIX-TV in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers working at the Seamen's Society for Children and Families in Staten Island, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about learning martial arts

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers working at a drug prevention program in Queens, New York, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers working at a drug prevention program in Queens, New York, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her role at New York Air in Queens, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers New York Air's merger with Continental Airlines

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls joining Times Mirror Cable Television, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls the start of her career in diversity development

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her work in management development at the Times Mirror Company

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers her promotion to corporate officer at the Times Mirror Company

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls the Times Mirror Company's hostile takeover by Tribune Media

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers becoming the senior vice president of diversity at Fox Entertainment Group

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls creating the diversity division at Fox Entertainment Group

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about Peter Chernin's support for diversity development

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls developing relationships with the presidents of Fox Entertainment Group

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers creating the diversity advisory board at Fox Entertainment Group

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes the diversity and development staff at Fox Entertainment Group

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her apprenticeship and mentorship programs

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls presenting her accomplishments to Rupert Murdoch

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers receiving the NAACP President's Award

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about her retirement from News Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls the start of her activism in Africa

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers founding ForAfrica

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - H. Mitsy Wilson recalls meeting with African leaders to develop programs for ForAfrica

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes ForAfrica's early leadership development programs

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - H. Mitsy Wilson remembers traveling to Africa with Ramsey Jay, Jr.

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about ForAfrica's international studies program

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about ForAfrica's potential impact on African Americans

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - H. Mitsy Wilson reflects upon her life, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - H. Mitsy Wilson reflects upon her life, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - H. Mitsy Wilson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes her relationship with her second husband

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - H. Mitsy Wilson talks about her second husband's relationship with her daughters

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes the challenges faced by African Americans in Corporate America

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - H. Mitsy Wilson describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - H. Mitsy Wilson narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - H. Mitsy Wilson narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
H. Mitsy Wilson recalls her position at WPIX-TV in New York City
H. Mitsy Wilson remembers becoming the senior vice president of diversity at Fox Entertainment Group
Transcript
I have a note here that you worked at WPIX-TV [New York, New York]?$$Yes (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) In--okay.$$(Laughter) Channel 11. I know, like, I did- didn't even know anything then. I, you know, graduated from school [College of Mount Saint Vincent, Riverdale, New York] and went in this for interview. And there was a woman who was heading up commercials at the time. And she needed an assistant, and they were only taking college grads. And she interviewed me and said, "Fine." The wonderful thing about it is--and who is the African American woman that was on Channel 11? Alma, oh, Alma Johnson, I think it was. She actually had a program on Channel 11 ['Black Pride'], and I had a wonderful opportunity to meet her. She kind of mentored me along the way in terms of understanding TV. But I, you know, I started out typing, you know, being an assistant to the head of commercial insertion. And then one day, I looked at the folks that were working and said, "Look, I can do more than this." So I became a commercial inserter. And that was interesting at that point because everything was done by typewriter. So you'd get a show, and they'd say the show is twenty-three minutes. And you'd have to fill the rest with commercials and public service announcements. So they tell you, "Okay, the show starts at eight o'clock, and the first break is at 8:01, 8:07." So then I'm typing in 8:07:00:00 to eight--and if it's ten seconds, fifteen seconds, it's got to be exact. So, and you're doing this by--manually. You know, you're not, there's no program there to help you do it. And I would sit back--and they were kind enough to give me the daytime programs because you couldn't screw up the evenings. If you screwed up the evenings with commercials, you were in trouble. So I got the daytime programs. And on Channel 11, I did kid programs, 'Howdy Doody' ['The Howdy Doody Show'] and all of that, Captain Joe Bolton and, so it wasn't that bad if you, you know, you were blank in those areas. But I will tell you, I used to sit there and watch, and my heart used to pound. Because if it went to black, it meant you messed up, and you didn't, you didn't allow enough time, or you may--had too much time in there. And the next day you'd just have your ops meeting, and, "What happened?" So I did that for a while. I enjoyed it, but my heart wasn't into it. And again, I didn't know what opportunities they had at TV. Had I known, I would have stayed.$So I got a phone call. Bonnie Hill [Bonnie Guiton Hill], who was corporate vice president of com- community and public affairs for Times Mirror [Times Mirror Company], a ver- a wonderful woman--she worked in the Reagan [President Ronald Wilson Reagan] White House and then came to us--called me on the phone and said, "Mitsy [HistoryMaker H. Mitsy Wilson], I just got a phone call from a headhunter. You know, Fox [Fox Entertainment Group] is looking for a head of diversity for their company. They have just signed an MOU, a memorandum of understanding with the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People]. And I think you'd be perfect for the job." And I said, "Fox, the Fox," (laughter)? That was the only thing I could say. "Rupert Murdoch's Fox," (laughter)? And I said, "(Makes sound)." She said, and she was so good. This is where it helps to have mentors and people who can help you move through your journey. The first thing she said to me is, "I hear what you're saying. But before you sit back and say, 'I don't think so,' I think what you need to do is hear them out. Find out what the company's about, find out, find out what they want they want you do to. I think you'd be great at it, anyway." So I said, "Okay, I'll do that." I met with the headhunter and went through a series of interviews. I then went to Fox and had about eight interviews at Fox--legal, the president of this company, president here--I mean I was, I was meeting everyone. And then I finally got a phone call saying that my--I'm a finalist and that I will now meet with the president of Fox, who was Peter Chernin at the time, and I might also be meeting with Rupert Murdoch. And at that point, they said to me, "And if you're not interested, please let us know now. Because I don't, we don't want to put you up for this and then have you go into, you know, the president and you know, the chairman, and say no." So I spent quite a bit of time to looking at, you know, what's this organization about, you know? What are some of the things they're doing, you know? And I had to separate--at that point, Fox Entertainment was its own stand alone company, and it was not connected to News Corp [News Corporation; News Corp]. So Peter ran Fox Entertainment as their chairman. And then Rupert ran News Corp. Peter was the CEO of News Corp, but they were stand alone units. So I sat back and I said to myself, "If it's Fox, I can do it." You know, and I looked at what the memorandum of understanding was asking for, and it's everything I've done in my career. So I felt comfortable with that. Now it was just a matter of going in and meeting with Peter Chernin and see do we agree? How is this going to work? I went in, met with him, had a wonderful interview, wonderful meeting with him. I was so impressed with him, and I think part of it is because he was a New Yorker (laughter). So you've got to understand, you know, the New York [New York] mentality. But he sold me on the job. Gail Berman, who I reported to when I got there--a go getter, definitely another New Yorker, who saw things outside of the box. You could tell she was committed to diversity in some of the work she'd done before she came to Fox. But Peter was the one that sold me on that, on, on the position. So I took the position as senior vice president of diversity and development.

Marian Johnson-Thompson

Molecular virologist, research director, and professor Marian Cecelia Johnson-Thompson was born in Boston, Massachusetts on December 9, 1946. She grew up in Rivera Beach, Florida. After graduating from high school in 1956, Johnson-Thompson enrolled at Howard University and graduated from there with her B.S. degree in microbiology in 1969 and her M.S. degree in microbiology in 1971. She went on to earn her Ph.D. in molecular virology from Georgetown University Medical School in 1978.

Upon graduation, Johnson-Thompson was hired by the University of the District of Columbia (UDC) where she became a Professor of Biology in 1995. She also served as an adjunct professor of Pharmacology at Georgetown University, and as an adjunct professor in the Department of Botany at Howard University. In addition, Johnson-Thompson held appointments as a visiting scientist at the Lawrence Livermore Radiation Laboratory, and as a molecular virologist at the National Cancer Institute. In 1992, Johnson-Thompson was appointed as the Director of Education and Biomedical Research Development for the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). While there, she developed K-12 STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education programs as well as minority training programs. Her major initiatives include the Bridging Education, Science and Technology (BEST) Program, Advanced Research Cooperation in Environmental Health (ARCH) program. Her publications include over forty-five articles, book chapters and abstracts that focus on training, mentoring, and developing public policy to advance underrepresented groups in STEM fields. In 2004, Johnson-Thompson was named Professor Emerita of Biology and Environmental Sciences at UDC and she began serving as an adjunct professor in the School of Public Health at the University of NC-Chapel Hill.

Johnson-Thompson served as chair of the NIEHS Institutional Review Board for the protection of human subjects. At the national level, she served as a member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Subjects Research Advisory Committee and the Trans-NIH Human Microbiome Working Group. Johnson-Thomson is a life member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., and the International Congress of Black Women. In 1978, she was a founding member of the National Network of Minority Women in Science.

Her awards and honors include the Alice C. Evans Award from the American Society for Microbiology in 2004 for her contributions to the advancement and full participation of women in microbiology. Johnson-Thompson was elected as a Fellow in the American Academy of Microbiology in 1998 and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2001.

Marian Johnson-Thompson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 7, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.112

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/7/2013

Last Name

Johnson-Thompson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Cecilia

Schools

Georgetown University

University of Maryland

Howard University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Marian

Birth City, State, Country

Boston

HM ID

JOH43

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

To whom much is given, much is required.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

12/9/1946

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Durham

Country

United States

Favorite Food

All Food

Short Description

Molecular virologist Marian Johnson-Thompson (1946 - ) , Director of Education and Biomedical Research Development for the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, is Professor Emerita of Biology and Environmental Sciences at the University of the District of Columbia.

Employment

National Institute of Health (NIH)

University of the District of Columbia

Pharmacology Dept., Georgetown University

Lab of Bio Chemistry, National Cancer Institute, NIH

Howard University Department of Botany

Space Sciences Div, General Electric

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:470,4:850,10:2275,31:2750,40:18225,245:18615,252:19005,259:22060,333:26980,368:27980,380:31020,413:33100,459:35540,470:36618,488:37080,495:39005,532:41353,544:42973,553:43459,560:43864,566:44998,591:45727,602:46051,607:46699,616:47185,624:47833,634:54210,675:54735,681:57400,706:62520,761:62800,781:66020,860:67070,878:67840,891:68820,912:69450,924:77804,974:78124,980:84210,1027:85762,1047:86150,1052:86829,1060:92802,1161:93146,1166:93748,1175:96338,1216:96586,1221:98074,1265:102574,1338:104988,1362:106878,1413:111288,1441:111792,1448:112296,1455:114410,1476:117091,1518:118968,1541:119298,1547:120882,1570:123279,1604:123849,1617:131788,1697:132508,1714:132868,1730:135028,1780:135532,1789:136108,1800:138556,1852:139132,1861:145058,1905:145642,1914:147912,1947:151775,2009:152150,2015:154250,2065:155000,2077:156575,2103:156950,2109:157400,2116:158525,2131:159425,2144:161900,2150:162280,2157:163572,2180:165548,2212:167810,2247:168614,2261:172100,2312:173822,2341:182144,2439:184394,2454:185014,2466:192610,2606:193170,2615:194690,2646:195170,2654:195810,2663:199650,2701$0,0:1308,14:2228,20:2964,29:6828,75:15155,169:16208,181:18270,190:19103,210:19740,225:23102,261:24134,274:24564,280:25338,291:28262,342:31358,450:31702,455:38325,509:39297,522:40269,536:41079,547:42375,565:43185,577:44076,591:49517,618:50750,629:55580,673:58053,682:69129,827:70407,854:71330,864:71756,871:77830,936:79530,945:80330,958:81290,980:81690,986:82010,991:83210,1007:85806,1021:86358,1026:89045,1045:89505,1050:91680,1060:92344,1069:93423,1075:94336,1093:95996,1127:99688,1150:100072,1158:103208,1227:104232,1254:104488,1259:104872,1267:107958,1279:108456,1286:108788,1291:110282,1324:110697,1330:112772,1364:113104,1369:115096,1400:115511,1406:124170,1503:126291,1538:127402,1550:127806,1555:131994,1577:134505,1639:135900,1656:136830,1669:137667,1680:140550,1731:140922,1736:141573,1744:145324,1767:147235,1772:148816,1822:149374,1829:156694,1903:157318,1912:158254,1926:158566,1931:162856,2017:163324,2024:163870,2035:164806,2050:165118,2055:168150,2060:170620,2088:172710,2150:179862,2245:180454,2255:181046,2265:181638,2271:182156,2279:182526,2285:183858,2313:184450,2323:185412,2337:185930,2345:186226,2350:186522,2355:187262,2366:187780,2374:192842,2411:195194,2442:195782,2451:201174,2537:201795,2558:202071,2563:202554,2572:205176,2638:206418,2662:211116,2694:216662,2764:217047,2770:217509,2779:218279,2792:224750,2896:225362,2909:226382,2934:226722,2940:228354,2973:229238,2990:229986,2999:235645,3052:236880,3065:237450,3077:237830,3082:241440,3103:242105,3111:249220,3177:249628,3184:250036,3191:254226,3246:254636,3252:255374,3262:258654,3307:260622,3347:261360,3357:261852,3365:262590,3377:268567,3486:268955,3491:270022,3504:273662,3540:273934,3545:275575,3551:276335,3560:277475,3574:277855,3579:279090,3591:282370,3615:283618,3712:284866,3730:285958,3748:288500,3758:289095,3767:289775,3776:291748,3788:299063,3851:299647,3860:300450,3875:301837,3891:307604,3979:319265,4075:322100,4131:325099,4146:327578,4206:328449,4225:328717,4230:330660,4268:330928,4273:332880,4279
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marian Johnson-Thompson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marian Johnson-Thompson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her mother's family background - part one

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her mother's family background - part two

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her mother's growing up in Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her father's education and his employment at the USO in Galveston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her father's medical training

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her father's medical practice, his death and the help that she received from his friend

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her siblings, and living with her father in Clewiston, Florida, in the first grade

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about spending her childhood in Boston and Florida, and her parents' complicated relationship

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about starting school in Boston, Massachusetts and Clewiston, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about being aware of her parents' complicated relationship as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her experience in the fourth grade in Miami, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her experience in grade school in Clewiston, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about living with her stepmother, and her father's death in 1961

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her experience in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her father's microscope, and her extracurricular activities in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about applying to Howard University, and her stepmother's denial of her family's inheritance

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her experience at Howard University and talks about her godparents

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her teachers and scholars at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about HistoryMakers LaSalle Leffall, Georgia Dunston and Agnes Day at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about HistoryMaker LaSalle Leffall at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about anthropologist Montague Cobb, the rise of Black Power in America and the civil rights era in the late 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about pledging Delta Sigma Theta sorority, and how it helped her to improve her academic performance at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about the political activism at Howard University in the 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her decision to pursue a master's degree in microbiology at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her master's thesis research on the ultrastructure of the fungus, Neurospora crassa

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about being appointed as an instructor of biology at the University of District of Columbia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her decision to pursue a Ph.D. degree at Georgetown University - part one

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her decision to pursue a Ph.D. degree at Georgetown University - part two

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her doctoral dissertation work on the effect of 5-azacytidine on Simian Virus 40 DNA replication and conformation

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marian Johnson-Thompson discusses the eradication of smallpox in 1979

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about the University of the District of Columbia (UDC) as the place where she advanced scientifically

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about meeting her husband

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her involvement in teaching and administration at the University of the District of Columbia (UDC)

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her involvement with the National Network of Minority Women in Science

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about teaching part-time at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about the etiology of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about becoming a full professor at the University of the District of Columbia and her research and teaching roles

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her appointment as Director of Institutional Diversity at the NIEHS

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes the NIEHS Advanced Research Collaboration for Environmental Health (ARCH) Program

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about the Environmental Justice Program, and the importance of standard guidelines for research on human subjects

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about research on the Epstein-Barr virus in Uganda

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about the awards and recognition received for her career's work

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Marian Johnson-Thompson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about microbiologist William Hinton and the controversy surrounding his will - part one

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about microbiologist William Hinton and the controversy surrounding his will - part two

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Marian Johnson-Thompson reflects upon her life's choices

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about Henrietta Lacks, HeLa cells, and author, Rebecca Skloot

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her family

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her involvement with mentoring

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
Marian Johnson-Thompson describes her decision to pursue a master's degree in microbiology at Howard University
Marian Johnson-Thompson talks about her involvement with the National Network of Minority Women in Science
Transcript
So, well, back to--now, in the world of microbiology. Now, were you poised to go to graduate school when you were a senior [at Howard University, Washington, District of Columbia]?$$No, I was not, at all. Sad to say, I was like the rest of my fellow female students at the time. I was going to get married. That was all that was important. And of course, several friends had already identified their wedding dates. And I was going to be in a wedding in July. So, this guy, the law school graduate who was graduating from law school, you know, he really cared about me. And I kind of forced him into agreeing that we would get married. But he kept telling me that he would probably be drafted, and which he was. And so, we got engaged. He bought me a ring before I left, before he left. But I wanted to get married right then, you know. I couldn't understand why we couldn't get married, and then he would go to Vietnam. And so, I was probably very, very upset about that, that I couldn't get married. And he was trying to, he was a very logical person, you know. "We'll get married, we'll come back." So I said, "What am I supposed to do, just stay here and wait?" He said, "No, you can go out and have friends." I said, "I can go out with other people?" Well, he was kind of stupid, too, because he said, "Yes." So, that's what I did. And when I did that, I realized I was not ready to get married. And so, being the honest person that I was, I had to write and tell him. Of course, he was in Vietnam. So, I got my phone call to say, "Just put that ring back on, and forget you ever told me this." So, anyway he came home, and so it was a real big breakup. No--but, so when he decided, when he--when I realized I wasn't going to get married and he was going to Vietnam, I decided I was going to stay at Howard and work on a master's degree. So, that's how I ended up going to graduate school.$$Okay. So did they, was cost a factor? Were you, did you get a scholarship?$$I got a small scholarship. But, and I should say--I had, I had several job offers. I often tell the young people today, being a microbiology major with a B.S. degree--I had two government job offers--Food and Drug [Administration, FDA], [U.S.] Department of Agriculture [DOA]. I had a job offer with Bristol Laboratories.$$This was just with a B.S.?$$Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. They had actually flown me and my girlfriend up there for an interview. My girlfriend, Brenda, the one who has Alzheimers, she was a microbiology major, too. We did the same thing. We were really close friends. She ended up going to work for Food and Drug. And I went to graduate school.$$Okay.$$To work on a master's.$Well, tell us about Minority Women in Science. And what--now, when was it founded and who--$$So, it was founded in, I think it was 1978. And it really came out of the work of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, AAAS. The Directorate for Education in Human Resources, which was and is still headed--Do you know Shirley Malcolm [also a HistoryMaker; science education advocate]? Did you do Shirley--$$Yes.$$Okay, okay. So, at that time it was headed by Shirley Malcolm. And Shirley's division was interested in increasing opportunities for minorities, women and the disabled. And so, she put together a group of women--she and Yolanda George--put together women to look at the participation of minority women. She, she wrote 'Double Bind.' I don't know if you, do you remember that? She wrote 'The Double Bind', okay.$$Just, just tell anyone watching. What is the "Double Bind?"$$So, the Double Bind was a document that Shirley Malcolm put together, along with some assistance from AAAS, to talk about the barriers that prevented minority women from excelling in science. And so, that it was not just the gender issue, being a female, but it was also--well, it's--works both ways. It's not just being a minority, but it's also being a woman. And before that time it was like well, you know, women have these issues, and minorities have these issues. And so, for the first time, it was really focused on the fact that minority women are in a double bind. They have the race and the gender issue. And an interesting side note to that, is that working with Shirley and being president of Minority Women in Science, I got a chance to go around the country and talk a lot. In fact, that's how I met Mary Frances Berry. We were on the same panel here, at UNC [University of North Carolina] Chapel Hill. And I know at that time--well, she hasn't seen me since, but I was probably identified by Mary Frances Berry--because you know how she is--as just a lame brain in terms of what was really going on. Because at the same time that we were there for that panel, the students at UNC [University of North Carolina] had erected these shanty towns--these, they called them shanty towns. And they were living in the middle of campus in these housing units that resembled, I guess the houses in South Africa, because they were protesting against apartheid. So, Mary--so, the people that told us about it--because that was going on--and so Mary Berry said, "Well, let's go over there." And of course, at the time I really didn't know what was going on, because I was a bit a naive. And I sort of paved along behind her, and she was doing all the talking. And I'm sure she just thought I was just a, you know, just not--very ignorant about issues. That was one reason why I said I wanted to send her a note and tell her thank you for that book. She probably won't remember the time that we were on the panel together. But in any event--So, that's how I got involved with Minority Women in Science. And we started--the first that I know of--at that time in 1979, we had science discovery days on a Saturday, on Saturdays, for district resident middle school students. And we brought them in and had them attend these workshops where various scientists engaged in hands-on activities. Of course, the idea was to introduce them to what we now call STEM [science, technology, engineering and mathematics] careers, at a very early age. But this was the very beginning of this whole--what we do now--when we talk about engaging students at a very early age. Because with this focus that we had at UDC [University of the District of Columbia, Washington, District of Columbia] on engaging minority students, it then became an issue of engaging women at an early age. And so now, I mean that's the buzz word, you know, engaging students.$$And this was in the early '80s [1980s]? This is--$$It was, this was 1979--$$1979, okay.$$--when we had our first Science Discovery Day.$$Okay, okay.$$Now the organization is not as active. I think they still have the Science Discovery Days, but it's not as active. In my estimation, it doesn't make the same impact as it did then, because there's so many different organizations now doing the same thing.

Vernon Morris

Atmospheric scientist Vernon R. Morris Vernon was born on [month day, year?] in [city, state?]. Morris graduated from Morehouse College in 1985 with his B.A. degree in chemistry and mathematics. Following graduation, he enrolled at Georgia Institute of Technology. Morris received the Regent’s Scholarship and the NASA Graduate Student Research Fellowship to pursue his theoretical and experimental studies of inorganic peroxides in the Earth’s stratosphere. After graduating with his Ph.D. degree in earth and atmospheric sciences from Georgia Institute of Technology in 1991, Morris was awarded a Ford Foundation Fellowship at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship where he worked on the chemical dynamics of free radical systems important in comets and the interstellar medium.

Morris served as a part-time instructor at Spelman College while striding for his Ph.D. degree. Later, he joined Howard University’s Chemistry Department as an assistant professor. In 1996, he became the deputy director of the Howard University Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres (CSTEA). From 2001 to 2004, Morris served as the director of the Howard University Graduate Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS) and was instrumental in developing atmospheric sciences as a major focus of the university’s research portfolio. Morris was then named director of the Howard University Component of the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center. Morris also served as director of the NOAA Center in Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) as well as the co-director of the Laboratory for Molecular Computations and Bioinformatics at the National Institutes of Health Research Center for Minority Institutions. He was a visiting scientist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Branch and served briefly as chair of the chemistry department at Howard University.

Morris is a member of several scientific boards and professional organizations. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC) and the Advisory Board of the Benjamin Banneker Institute for Science and Technology. Morris is also a member of the American Meteorological Society, the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, the American Geophysical Union, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Advanced Study Institute.

His combined concentration on academic research and focus on atmospheric sciences has garnered for him recognition from professional and academic associations. Morris is a recipient of the University Merit Award, the Howard University Faculty Merit Award and Howard University’s Most Productive Faculty Researcher in Natural Sciences award. Morris received the prestigious NSF Career Award from the Geosciences Directorate for his research on the photochemistry of carbonaceous aerosols.

Vernon R. Morris was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 29, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.083

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/29/2013

Last Name

Morris

Maker Category
Middle Name

R.

Schools

Morehouse College

Georgia Institute of Technology

NATO Advanced Study Institute

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Vernon

Birth City, State, Country

San Antonio

HM ID

MOR13

Favorite Season

None

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/23/1963

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Atmospheric scientist Vernon Morris (1963 - ) is the director of the Howard University Component of the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, director of the NOAA Center in Atmospheric Sciences, and co-director of the Laboratory for Molecular Computations and Bioinformatics at the National Institutes of Health Research Center for Minority Institutions.

Employment

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

University of California

Howard University

Center for the Study Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center

NOAA Center in Atmospheric Sciences

National Institute of Health (NIH) Research Center for Minority Institutions

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:490,6:4214,127:7056,202:7546,208:8526,224:9604,237:15952,288:16979,311:21166,458:32138,570:32410,575:33022,587:33566,597:37260,642:38470,656:38910,661:47858,778:48596,785:49744,806:50072,811:51384,828:52286,841:53516,867:56350,878:68260,1029:78519,1144:82371,1164:83504,1189:90248,1274:91968,1311:95484,1342:95946,1351:99230,1380:100010,1405:100465,1413:102415,1452:102675,1457:103000,1463:105610,1477:106050,1483:116416,1591:116800,1596:117568,1604:121440,1620:122952,1650:123384,1657:124608,1689:132481,1794:141390,1961:141750,1967:151970,2171:153038,2190:155886,2223:156420,2230:156776,2235:168140,2363:169190,2375:173040,2397:173661,2407:175179,2438:188716,2605:189540,2614:190570,2627:197710,2663:200080,2675:200850,2687:201550,2699:202530,2776:217389,3067:219759,3105:220075,3111:247557,3455:267840,3614:268290,3620:269010,3633:269640,3642:273139,3670:273991,3682:274275,3687:274843,3698:275624,3715:275908,3722:277186,3748:277754,3758:280901,3768:287644,3831:288828,3847:289124,3852:291122,3908:302906,4054:303686,4069:308600,4150:315030,4226$0,0:2214,33:4230,61:4734,69:5526,88:15310,234:21660,424:24220,465:27340,511:28140,523:29020,542:30220,560:33796,596:34204,605:34612,615:34969,623:38686,685:39342,695:41638,737:41966,742:42294,747:42622,752:43114,760:44016,777:44426,783:48362,897:57397,979:59666,1006:60050,1016:60242,1021:66358,1053:66826,1060:67684,1077:69910,1098:71076,1113:71818,1125:74040,1156:81956,1245:82940,1258:83596,1267:84826,1284:92047,1392:92371,1397:92776,1403:93181,1410:93586,1417:94153,1425:94801,1444:95287,1451:95611,1458:98851,1507:100066,1527:104064,1551:106416,1596:106836,1603:107508,1628:114654,1737:115046,1742:130980,1945:131488,1982:134765,2009:135733,2018:145100,2096:146300,2136:147560,2166:148160,2177:148400,2182:150865,2190:151157,2195:151668,2211:154077,2308:157581,2348:161544,2362:162164,2373:162412,2378:163814,2388:164507,2399:165431,2415:166432,2430:172260,2508:172592,2513:173173,2521:173754,2530:174750,2545:175331,2554:175663,2559:178226,2578:178698,2583:181049,2627:181317,2632:181786,2640:182054,2646:183193,2670:183662,2678:185136,2708:188686,2730:189178,2738:190326,2756:191310,2775:192212,2788:192786,2797:193114,2802:202284,2869:202776,2876:205890,2894:206502,2904:207250,2918:207794,2927:210718,2996:210990,3001:211262,3006:211942,3017:212622,3030:214730,3085:215274,3101:215614,3107:216566,3130:217314,3149:217722,3169:217994,3174:224980,3246:227868,3311:228172,3316:237900,3494:238550,3507:238810,3512:241470,3529:245952,3577:247488,3599:248256,3610:249312,3622:250176,3636:254680,3678:255517,3690:255982,3696:256447,3702:256819,3707:257284,3714:258679,3736:267035,3820:267580,3826:268016,3833:268452,3838:279574,3884:280384,3894:281275,3906:281599,3911:282571,3925:283543,3940:285325,3967:285811,3975:286783,3990:287917,4008:293310,4040:293990,4052:294534,4061:295078,4071:296030,4093:296982,4110:297458,4118:298206,4132:298682,4141:299226,4153:304711,4204:311221,4245:311569,4250:312787,4261:313222,4268:314005,4279:314788,4290:315832,4307:317920,4339:338460,4557:338820,4562:339990,4572:340350,4577:340890,4585:341790,4596:343320,4622:350750,4686:352290,4711:353900,4736:354530,4748:355090,4757:355650,4766:355930,4771:356420,4780:357050,4791:357820,4803:360300,4814:363700,4839:364652,4848:370340,4876
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Vernon Morris' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Vernon Morris lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Vernon Morris describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Vernon Morris talks about his maternal great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Vernon Morris talks about his maternal grandmother, and his mother's growing up in Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Vernon Morris describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Vernon Morris talks about his father's growing up in Arkansas City, Kansas, and his career in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Vernon Morris talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Vernon Morris talks about his likeness to his father, and lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Vernon Morris talks about his mother's personality and her career as an educator

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Vernon Morris describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Vernon Morris talks about his family's frequent relocations while his father was enlisted in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Vernon Morris describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up - part one

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Vernon Morris describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up - part two

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Vernon Morris talks about going to school in Japan

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Vernon Morris talks about continuing his schooling in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Vernon Morris talks about attending school in Spokane, Washington, and going to Expo 74, The Spokane World's Fair

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Vernon Morris talks about his interest in the outdoors, and his middle school science project

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Vernon Morris talks about his interest in TV shows and books about exploration

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Vernon Morris talks about his experience in the Cub Scouts and his interest in tinkering with gadgets

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Vernon Morris talks about his experience in school in Washington State

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Vernon Morris talks about the African American community in Spokane, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Vernon Morris talks his interest in reading, stamp collecting, music, and in electronics and programming

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Vernon Morris talks about his interest in space exploration and airplanes

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Vernon Morris talks about his involvement in sports in high school and being a member of the choir at Bethel AME Church in Spokane, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Vernon Morris talks about his academics and social life in high school in Spokane, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Vernon Morris talks about his father and a the network of African American college students who influenced him to go to college - part one

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Vernon Morris talks about his father and a the network of African American college students who influenced him to go to college - part two

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Vernon Morris talks about his academics in high school and graduating from high school in 1981

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Vernon Morris talks about taking the bus from Spokane, Washington to Atlanta, Georgia to attend Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Vernon Morris describes his first encounter with chemistry professor, Henry McBay, and his experience in his classroom

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Vernon Morris talks about his professors at Morehouse College and his formative education there - part one

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Vernon Morris talks about his professors at Morehouse College and his formative education there - part two

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Vernon Morris describes his social and extracurricular activities at Morehouse College

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Vernon Morris describes his involvement with the Frederick Douglass Tutorial Institute while at Morehouse College

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Vernon Morris talks about his experience in Henry McBay's chemistry classes at Morehouse College

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Vernon Morris talks about his experience as a student in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Vernon Morris describes his experience as an undergraduate researcher with HistoryMaker, John Hall, Jr., at Morehouse College

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Vernon Morris describes his undergraduate work on matrix isolation of short-lived chemical intermediates that influence atmospheric chemistry

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Vernon Morris talks about the technological advancements in computers and lasers in the 1980s

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Vernon Morris describes his decision to pursue his doctoral studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech)

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Vernon Morris describes his experience as a doctoral student at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech)

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Vernon Morris describes his Ph.D. dissertation on the investigation of short-lived organic compounds of stratospheric significance

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Vernon Morris describes the chemical destruction of the ozone layer, and the implications of the depletion of the ozone layer

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Vernon Morris shares his perspectives on global warming and its implications

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Vernon Morris reflects upon being the first African American to earn a Ph.D. in geophysical sciences at Georgia Tech

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Vernon Morris describes his note-taking strategies as a graduate student at Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech)

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Vernon Morris talks about those that influenced his scientific career

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Vernon Morris talks about graduating from Georgia Tech, and his postdoctoral experience at the NATO Advanced Study Institute in Italy

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Vernon Morris describes his experience as a postdoctoral researcher at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Vernon Morris describes his experience as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Davis

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Vernon Morris talks about joining the faculty at Howard University in 1994

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Vernon Morris talks about the establishment of the Howard University Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS)

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Vernon Morris talks about his early days as a faculty member at Howard University's department of chemistry

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Vernon Morris talks about receiving the National Science Foundation (NSF) Career Award in 1997

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Vernon Morris talks about his experience with the NASA Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres and HUPAS

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Vernon Morris talks about his experience at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Vernon Morris talks about competing for a NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences position at Howard University

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Vernon Morris describes his work with the AEROSE (Aerosol and Oceanographic Science Expeditions) project - part one

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Vernon Morris describes his work with the AEROSE (Aerosol and Oceanographic Science Expeditions) project - part two

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Vernon Morris describes the findings from the AEROSE project, and using the data to study the throughput of biological mass between continents

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Vernon Morris talks about student participation on the AEROSE cruises, and the land-based measurement sites in Africa

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Vernon Morris talks about the parallels between the AEROSE expeditions and historic passages along the same route

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Vernon Morris talks about the NOAA Center in Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) Weather Camp

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Vernon Morris reflects upon improving the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences' visibility on Howard University's campus

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Vernon Morris talks about collaborating with the Department of African Studies at Howard University on NCAS's work in Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Vernon Morris talks about his career goals for the future

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Vernon Morris discusses the Howard University NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences' work in Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Vernon Morris reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Vernon Morris describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community today

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Vernon Morris talks about his family

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Vernon Morris talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

1$7

DATitle
Vernon Morris talks about his professors at Morehouse College and his formative education there - part one
Vernon Morris talks about his experience with the NASA Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres and HUPAS
Transcript
So we were just talking about Henry McBay [chemist and teacher at Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia] and his--$$Yeah.$$--the legend of Henry McBay--$$Yeah.$$--amongst all the black chemists.$$Yeah, I think he's definitely influenced a generation of African American chemists, certainly through Morehouse, but also through Clark Atlanta [University, Atlanta, Georgia]. And I wouldn't have made it in chemistry and math had it hadn't been for him. I would have been on a completely different track, there's no doubt. I used to go to him, I went to him throughout the four years I was there. I never did research with him. I actually did research with John Hall, Jr. [chemist; also a HistoryMaker], and really it was those two guys who--you know, that department changed my course significantly.$$Now, what made Henry McBay special, you know? You talk about his ability to deliver all this information--$$Oh yeah.$$--but what actually made him special?$$You can tell he loved what he was doing. I mean there's the, the joy that he had in figuring out a chemistry problem, or relaying knowledge was just, it was tangible. And for me, not having particularly influential teachers--or teachers who could hold my attention, to sit in a lecture--and you know, my mouth is open the whole time. And I'm seeing things that I never saw in the same way before. And then, you could talk to him. He was the easiest person, ever, to talk to. I mean, and talk about anything, you know, from girls to, you know, mathematical organic chemistry. And you know, that's, you know, you need a person like that, I think at an age where you can be influenced. You're looking for guidance, you know, which way should I go? And I was like, you know, that's a guy I'd like to, you know--he's relaxed, he's comfortable, he's doing what he loves. And that's a job I'd like to do. And I saw a similar thing in John Hall. I mean, he really did the things, he appeared to be doing things the way he wanted to do them, on his terms. He had a joint appointment between Morehouse and Georgia Tech [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia] at the time, you know. Dr. McBay was known all over the world. And he said, okay, I can master this area. And I love math, and chemistry is okay, I can deal with chemistry. And the physics department there--Carlisle Moore was another big influence of mine, an extremely difficult professor. Very few people got As. Henry Gore was my math professor. So I was really fortunate to go to Morehouse at that time, when you really had these sort of giants of education in physical sciences and mathematics. Just some outstanding people, and outstanding teachers as well. They really knew the material, but they really knew how to convey the material and challenge you. There was no, no slacking off in those classes.$$Now, was Benjamin Mays [minister, educator, scholar, social activist; president of Morehouse College from 1940 to 1967; mentor to Dr. Martin Luther King] president at that time?$$Now, Bennie Mays was not. He had retired, maybe a year or two before I left, because I went to his memorial service while I was Morehouse. Gloster, Hugh Gloster, was the president.$$Okay.$$And then Gloster left, and it was, I forgot his name. It'll come to me. But it was Hugh Gloster, it wasn't--$$Was it a Luther White, not Luther White--$$No, it was, he was a businessman, a business background.$$Well, don't worry about it. We'll just--$$Yeah, it'll come to me.$$Okay.$$But yeah, I believe I was fortunate. You know, J.K. Haynes [biologist; also a HistoryMaker], J.K. is still there. I go back and visit. You know, Morehouse replaced my high school, in terms of a place that I would go back to and say, that's my formative development. You know, Dr. Gore left, Henry Gore left. But I think Dr. Moore just retired, but I go back and visit Dr. Moore, who was the chairman. I majored in chemistry and math, minored in physics. So once I got started there, you know, it was a great set of guys I was studying with, and just fantastic and motivating teachers.$$Okay.$$So, if I could have triple majored in four years, I'd have done that. You know, I loved the courses I was taking.$Okay, so how was your time spent basically, proportionately, between teaching and doing research and administration [at Howard University, Washington, District of Columbia]?$$It was probably equally split. Administration wise, I had responsibilities in the NASA [National Aeronautics and Space Administration] Center [Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres] as deputy director. And so, I was responsible for the day to day work--the reporting, you know, development of strategic mission and goals and business spokesman for the center. And I also ran some of the outreach programs, writing proposals to help supplement some of our other programs. And early on, teaching. The teaching load was probably more than most people, because I had to teach both in chemistry--in order to earn tenure in that department--but I also had to teach in atmospheric sciences so that we could spin up that program. And then research, you just have to do. You have to, you gotta publish papers to stay solvent. And so it was, it was really taxing. But the early, you know, the first probably five or six years was a lot of nose to the grindstone. But, you know, looks like it's paid off.$$Okay, alright. Alright. So, the program, the graduate program actually starts up in '98 [1998]?$$Right, '98 [1998], it got approved by the Board of Trustees.$$Okay.$$So, that was four years which, again, looking back, it's kind of record time. It's the only inter-disciplinary degree granting program here at the university. And we put together and had it approved within the four years, which is actually pretty remarkable.$$Now, how big was your staff, I mean in terms of your, I mean the faculty of the department?$$At that time?$$Yeah.$$We probably had in '94 [1994], I think, I mean '98 [1998], was we probably had three people--(simultaneous)$$(simultaneous)$$--three or four people. It's Sonya [Smith], Everette [Joseph], Greg [Jenkins, also a HistoryMaker], myself.$$Okay, four.$$Yep, three or four.$$Alright.$$And, and that's when we spun up, yeah.$$Okay. Now--$$But we also had, so we had a good relationship with NASA. So we had adjunct professors from NASA at that time. We had a couple of adjunct professors from NASA, probably two. I think it was Rich and Walls. Actually Rich, Walls and Dean Duffy. So, it was three adjunct professors from NASA. It turned out that one of the professors who taught me at Georgia Tech [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia] left Georgia Tech and became the lab chief at NASA Goddard. In fact, NASA Goddard [Maryland] recruited pretty heavily from Georgia Tech, because the atmospheric science program there had pretty high prestige, and did the type of modeling and data assimilation, data integration, that was very germane to NASA's earth science program. So, it was, we had a per chance meeting. I had a technical review of the research center at NASA that called over to Goddard. And so we're sitting at this long conference table in his office. He's sitting at one end and I sit down at the other end. And we're talking, and I see him looking at me, you know, kind of, do I know this guy? But I didn't say anything until the end of the meeting and I walked up and I said, "You know, you taught me fluid dynamics in grad school." And he was like, "I knew I knew who you are." (laughter). Franco Einaudi, who was probably one of my favorite professors there. Actually, even though he's not, didn't teach in the area that I performed research in or emphasis, but Franco was the lab chief for the lab of, used to be atmospheric chemistry and dynamics at Goddard. And we sat down and talked, and after that, he's been a huge supporter of our program here.$$How do you spell his last name? It's Franco--$$Franco, F-R-A-N-C-O, first name. Last name, E-I-N-A-U-D-I.$$Okay.$$And you know, he basically allowed for NASA scientists to become adjunct professors. He encouraged them to become adjunct professors in our program. You know, allowed our faculty and students access to facilities there. My first lab, I had trouble finding a lab space on campus. My first lab was at NASA Goddard. He provided me lab space to do experiments over there. So, he's definitely been a mentor and friend and colleague. He's retired now, but we're still in touch.$$Okay. So, Howard has this ongoing partnership with NASA Goddard-$$Yeah.$$And now what is, now is this in Beltsville [Maryland], or--$$No, Beltsville is different. So the Beltsville facility is in--Howard has some land, had some land in Beltsville since the '60s [1960s] or late '60s [1960s], early '70s [1970s]. And basically we saw an opportunity out there to develop an observational facility, a research facility that would be focused on atmospheric sciences. Because I left Howard to work for NASA in 19--, in about 1998.

Larkin Arnold

Entertainment lawyer, music executive and talent management chief executive Larkin Arnold, Jr. was born on September 3, 1942, in Kansas City, Missouri to Larkin and Annie Arnold. When Arnold was in elementary school, the family moved to Phoenix, Arizona, for his mother's health. In Kansas City and Phoenix, Arnold attended Catholic schools. He received his B.S. degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. in 1966, and graduated from Howard University Law School in 1969.

In 1970, Arnold became one of the first African Americans to be hired as an attorney by a major record label when he joined Capital Records. Four years later, he was promoted to vice president of Capitol Records, creating and heading the company's Black Music Division. In 1975, Arnold signed Natalie Cole to Capitol Records and, in 1977, he served as the executive producer for Caldera’s record Sky Island. That same year, he signed Maze featuring Frankie Beverly, the former backup band for Marvin Gaye. In 1978, Arnold left Capitol Records for Arista Records. As senior vice president, Arnold ran the West Coast office and was in charge of bringing in new artists and products. Arnold held this position until he was hired in 1980 by CBS/SONY Music as senior vice president. There, he spearheaded the marketing and promotion of Michael Jackson’s Thriller album that sold over twenty-five million units worldwide. Arnold also represented Teena Marie, Luther Vandross, Surface, Peabo Bryson and The Reflections. In 1988, Arnold founded Arnold & Associates, one of the few wholly integrated legal and management teams in the record industry.

Arnold co-founded the Black Entertainment and Sports Lawyers Association, serving as its chairman for eight years. He has served on the boards of the Los Angeles Board of Governors of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, the Executive Committee of XI Boule Fraternity, the United Negro College Fund Ladders of Hope Program, and the Los Angeles Zoo Commission. Arnold has received numerous honors and awards including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Executive of the Year Award, Outstanding Graduate Award of Howard University School of Law, the Distinguished Graduate Award of Howard University, the Congressional Black Caucus Outstanding Citizen Award, the Langston Bar Association Lawyer of the Year Award, the NATRA Award for Record Executive of the Year, Pollstar Award for R&B Manager of the Year, the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Award for Outstanding Community Leadership and a 100 Black Men Honor.

Arnold is married to Cynthia Arnold and is the father of two children.

Larkin Arnold was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 10, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.202

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/10/2007

Last Name

Arnold

Marital Status

Married

Schools

St. Monica's Catholic School

St. Mary's Catholic High School

American University

Howard University School of Law

Howard University

First Name

Larkin

Birth City, State, Country

Kansas City

HM ID

ARN02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii, Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Life Is Tough, But I Am Tougher.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

9/3/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Talent management chief executive, entertainment lawyer, and music executive Larkin Arnold (1942 - ) started his own legal and management firm, Arnold & Associates. He was senior vice president for Arista Records and CBS/Sony Music, where he marketed and promoted Michael Jackson's album, "Thriller."

Employment

Capitol Records, Inc.

Arista Law

CBS

Arnold & Associates

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Larkin Arnold's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Larkin Arnold lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Larkin Arnold describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Larkin Arnold describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Larkin Arnold describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Larkin Arnold talks about his family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Larkin Arnold describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Larkin Arnold remembers his community in Kansas City, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Larkin Arnold recalls his community in Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Larkin Arnold talks about his move to Phoenix, Arizona

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Larkin Arnold remembers his mother's illness

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Larkin Arnold describes his early personality

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Larkin Arnold recalls his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Larkin Arnold recalls his early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Larkin Arnold remembers studying math and physics

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Larkin Arnold recalls his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Larkin Arnold recalls the mentorship of Percy Lavon Julian

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Larkin Arnold remembers his decision to attend Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Larkin Arnold recalls his first impressions of Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Larkin Arnold recalls his civil rights activism at Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Larkin Arnold recalls his involvement in SNCC

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Larkin Arnold remembers losing his scholarship to Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Larkin Arnold recalls being hired by Senator Stuart Symington

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Larkin Arnold remembers working on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Larkin Arnold recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Larkin Arnold recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Larkin Arnold describes his experiences as a U.S. Capitol Police officer

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Larkin Arnold recalls attending the American University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Larkin Arnold recalls his challenges as a U.S. Capitol Police officer

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Larkin Arnold recalls his decision to pursue a law career

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Larkin Arnold remembers his mother's death

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Larkin Arnold recalls his admission to the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Larkin Arnold remembers the Howard University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Larkin Arnold recalls his decision to become an entertainment lawyer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Larkin Arnold recalls his struggle to find work in the entertainment industry

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Larkin Arnold recalls being hired by Capitol Records, LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Larkin Arnold describes his position at Capitol Records, LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Larkin Arnold recalls his start at Capitol Records, LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Larkin Arnold describes his work at Capitol Records, LLC

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Larkin Arnold recalls his advocacy for black artists

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Larkin Arnold recalls being offered a position at Motown Records

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Larkin Arnold recalls conducting market research for Capitol Records, LLC, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Larkin Arnold recalls conducting market research for Capitol Records, LLC, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Larkin Arnold recalls his transition to management at Capitol Records, LLC

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Larkin Arnold remembers signing artists to Capitol Records, LLC

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Larkin Arnold recalls signing Natalie Cole to Capitol Records, LLC

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Larkin Arnold recalls the success of his marketing initiative

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Larkin Arnold remembers the black artists at Capitol Records, LLC

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Larkin Arnold talks about his marriage

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Larkin Arnold recalls his decision to leave Capitol Records, LLC

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Larkin Arnold recalls his experience at Arista Records

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Larkin Arnold remembers his decision to leave Arista Records

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Larkin Arnold describes his role as senior vice president of CBS/Sony Records Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Larkin Arnold talks about the Columbia Records and Epic Records labels

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Larkin Arnold talks about the jazz division of Columbia Records

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Larkin Arnold talks about the racial discrimination in the music industry

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Larkin Arnold remembers signing Michael Jackson

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Larkin Arnold describes his career at CBS/Sony Records Inc., pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Larkin Arnold describes his career at CBS/Sony Records Inc., pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Larkin Arnold recalls Michael Jackson's 'Thriller' album

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Larkin Arnold reflects upon his success at CBS/Sony Records Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Larkin Arnold recalls founding the law firm of Arnold and Associates

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Larkin Arnold describes his organizational involvement

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Larkin Arnold describes his hopes and concerns for the African American music industry

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Larkin Arnold describes his advice for young business executives

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Larkin Arnold describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Larkin Arnold reflects upon his family

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Larkin Arnold reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Larkin Arnold narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

6$6

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
Larkin Arnold describes his career at CBS/Sony Records Inc., pt. 2
Larkin Arnold recalls Michael Jackson's 'Thriller' album
Transcript
So you got Michael [Michael Jackson] and you have, you have Marvin [Marvin Gaye] now.$$Right.$$Okay.$$And Luther [Luther Vandross], right (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) And Luther, you, you got three black male artists--$$Um-hm.$$--all different.$$Right.$$So what's your next plan of action?$$Well you know I mean my, my main (laughter) problem was basically you know Quincy [HistoryMaker Quincy Jones] and, and Michael basically took care of the whole recording process on that. I, I, you know I had little and no involvement you know just to go by and see that you know progress was being made you know. And that the bills were being paid and you know and everything was done, but you know I didn't have to really do anything. Quincy bas-, basically shepherded that whole project from beginning to end so.$$Now, how about Luther and Marvin (laughter).$$Well Luther you know Luther, I'm, I'm, I'm going over his material I'm picking you know the songs out of his repertoire you know. And, and I'm, I'm overseeing that, that that whole project. Marvin, and but, but Luther is pretty dependable you know, we go in we; you know he comes in he plays me some, some demos you know. I pick the ones that I want, you know, he goes in the studio and records it you know and, and now I just oversee the marketing promotion of that you know. Marvin in the meanwhile, is like I don't know you know, progress is not being made. And you know money is being spent you know, he, he's not you know recording you know 'cause he's you know having marital difficulties you know. So you know I'm flying back over to Belgium and we have a number of little conflicts. I'm saying, "Marvin you know you got to get this done, my ass is on the line you know," I had a battle, so you know. So that's just, and then Natalie [Natalie Cole] comes over you know and she, she's, she's disenchanted with Capitol [Capitol Records], so she comes and so I'm dealing with that. Not to mention all the other acts that I was you know dealing with that were already on the, Earth, Wind and Fire and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) [HistoryMaker] Dianne Reeves was she coming over--$$No, not when I was there, no.$$Okay.$$You know, Deniece [Deniece Williams], you know.$$Um-hm.$$The Emotions, you know, all the other acts that were, that I kept you know trying to get them to go and, and keep it moving you know.$$Teena Marie, was she ever there?$$Not yet, you know (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Okay.$So Michael [Michael Jackson] and Quincy [HistoryMaker Quincy Jones] bring you 'Thriller'?$$Right.$$And you listen to it?$$Right.$$"Billie Jean" is on there--$$Right.$$"Billie Jean" is on there, "Thriller" is on there.$$Right, "Beat It" is on there (unclear) (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) "Beat It" is on there, what do you think?$$Huh?$$Yeah he had "P.Y.T." ["P.Y.T. (Pretty Young Thing)"] (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Right.$$So what do you think about this when you hear this music for the first time?$$Well first time I heard it, it wasn't mixed properly so I was like you know little dis, disappointed. But I been there enough during the recording sessions to know but, but I, I had violated one of the company's [CBS/Sony Records Inc.] rules. That is that you don't release a single until you have the completely finished product and in hand. But in order to make the, the time schedule 'cause Christmas release, I had to take a chance and go ahead and, and release it you know. And I had an argument with you know, well not argument, discussion with their managers to which, which record should come out first you know. They wanted "Beat It" you know, I, I definitely wanted "Billie Jean," you know, so I was in position. So I was able to get "Billie Jean," 'cause you know I, I'd listen to some of the other material that that Michael had done and that The Jacksons had done. And they didn't seem like they, the company or the people had released the right singles you know. Like on that 'Triumph,' the song, you know, I think that song "Heartbreak Hotel" ["This Place Hotel"] was, was, was the classic song. But they wouldn't release it as a single, so.$$Right.$$So anyway I persuaded the management to allow me to make that as the second single, the first single we went out was "The Girl is Mine."$$Um-hm.$$You know because you know, by this time you still had all this you know musical and political and racial unrest you know with taken place you know in the country. The white pop, the pop stations, the white stations stopped playing black music, stop playing disco music you know. Remember they had the, the burning of the records, disco records?$$Oh right.$$In Chicago [Illinois], Comiskey field [Comiskey Park, Chicago, Illinois] and running them over with you know 'cause you know they were concerned about you know women and the whites coming you know. And blacks and so the male disc jockeys sort of rebelled.$$So there's a lot of tension.$$Yeah exactly you know busing was going on you know with the, you know.$$The Reagan [President Ronald Wilson Reagan] years (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, exactly.$$We're going into.$$Right, exactly.$$So, so--$$So they released "The Girl Is Mine," 'cause it has Paul McCartney you know to get on the pop play you know and so you know. That works to, to a degree to get some situation. But 'cause to show you that the, the problem that we have you know, when I finally did get Michael, I mean Marvin's [Marvin Gaye] album released you know, and you know we released "Sexual Healing" they, the company you know wouldn't cross the record over to the pop stations you know. They, they refused to take it to pop stations, they said the record was too black you know, it's too dirty or whatever you know. So I, you know we, I had lot of disagreements with, with some of the other management in the pop side you know with regards to Marvin. But, but the record was so strong, they couldn't stop the record.$$Right.$$I mean it's just you know, it crossed over by itself you know, people calling, banning the record and everything so.$$So you got it rolling now, you got Marvin's out, he finally got the record to you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Right.$$'Thriller's' out and it's taken off.$$Right.$$It, it's, it's (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And Luther's [Luther Vandross] becoming the male balladeer of all time.

The Honorable Marie Johns

State representative, telecommunications chief executive and the deputy administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), Hon. Marie Annette Collins Johns was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on August 19, 1951. Johns grew up with her parents, Freida Delight Casey Collins and Richard D. Collins, a retired police lieutenant, in an urban Indianapolis African American community. She attended Grandview Elementary School. Upon entry into North Central High School, and in order to be afforded more competitive and challenging educational opportunities, the family relocated to the suburbs. Johns excelled in high school, and went on to attend Indiana University. She earned a B.S. degree in urban studies and public policy analysis in 1979 and an M.S. degree in management, public policy analysis & budgeting at Indiana University. She also attended post-graduate courses at Harvard University and the University of Virginia, studying federal regulatory policy and financial management respectively.

Johns began her career as a fiscal analyst in the Indiana Legislative Services Agency. From there, she was hired as the staff supervisor for Bell Atlantic Network Services in Arlington, Virginia. She then became FCC Director at Bell Atlantic Corporation articulating and defending Bell Atlantic's interests with telecommunications industry organizations. She continued working in assignments showing increased skills and responsibility with C & P Telephone Co. and Bell Atlantic. In April of 1998, she was named president and CEO of Bell Atlantic and then served as president of Verizon, Washington, D.C. until February 2004.

Johns has participated in a wide range of organizations that support education and youth. During her tenure as president, she was instrumental in the effort to obtain a $10 million grant for the D.C. Public Schools. She assisted with the development of DC Reads, a literacy coalition that provides support to programs that offer leadership, training and development. In addition, she spearheaded a Verizon-sponsored program called SEEDS, that trained out-of-school youth for jobs in the information technology industry. Johns was the Director for a non-profit that provided funding for every public school and library in Washington, D.C. for high-speed connections and local area networks. Johns provided leadership in the formation of the Washington D.C. Technology Council and the Georgia Avenue Business Resource Center. She was a mayoral appointee to the National Capital Revitalization Corporation. Johns is seated on many boards, including a trustee of Howard University. Johns has been the recipient of over 100 awards for her business and civic leadership. She was named by the Washingtonian Magazine as one of the 100 Most Powerful Women in 1999 and 2001, and as one of the Twenty-five Most Influential Black Women in Business by the Network Journal in April, 2003. She and her husband, Wendell, have a son, Richard.

Hon. Marie Annette Collins Johns was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 3, 2004.

Accession Number

A2004.012

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

3/3/2004

Last Name

Johns

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Grandview Elementary School

North Central High School

Indiana University

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Marie

Birth City, State, Country

Indianapolis

HM ID

JOH18

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

I Can Do All Things Through Christ that Strengthens Me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/19/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Popcorn, Chocolate

Short Description

Community leader The Honorable Marie Johns (1951 - ) was a former deputy administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), and served as the president of Verizon, Washington, DC.

Employment

Indiana Legislative Services Agency

Bell Atlantic Corporation

Verizon

United States Small Business Administration

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of The Honorable Marie Johns' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Marie Johns lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes her maternal family background and her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about her paternal grandparents and her father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes Indianapolis, Indiana in the 1950s

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about family trips to Chicago, Illinois and Cincinnati, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Marie Johns addresses her lack of knowledge about her family history

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about the history of segregation in the public schools in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Marie Johns explains how economic segregation affects the social cohesion of the African American community

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Marie Johns lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about her childhood homes in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Marie Johns remembers field trips to an Indiana state park in junior high school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about attending church as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about her experience at North Central High School in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes feeling excluded from extracurricular activities at North Central High School in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about the early years of her marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Marie Johns outlines her early career path

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about her decision to marry young, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes the culture of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana during the late 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Marie Johns explains the decision to move to Bethesda, Maryland in 1984

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about her decision to marry young, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes the origins of her interest in public sector work

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about her work at Indiana Bell

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Marie Johns shares her views on mentorship

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes an experience of workplace discrimination at Bell Atlantic, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes an experience of workplace discrimination at Bell Atlantic, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Marie Johns defines "glass ceiling"

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes her strategy for professional advancement

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about working for the General Services Administration in 1987

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes her familial role models

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes her professional role models

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes her relationships with friends and her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Marie Johns shares her advice for future businesswomen

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes education and economic development initiatives she pioneered as president/CEO of Verizon Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Marie Johns talks about her plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Marie Johns considers how the Civil Rights Movement created professional opportunities for African Americans in business

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Marie Johns describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Marie Johns explains the importance of history for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Marie Johns reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - The Honorable Marie Johns narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

3$9

DATitle
The Honorable Marie Johns talks about her work at Indiana Bell
The Honorable Marie Johns talks about working for the General Services Administration in 1987
Transcript
When I left there [Legislative Services Agency, Indiana General Assembly] and went to Indiana Bell [subsidiary, AT&T, Inc.] and started my career in telecommunications, well this was after graduate school, I had already gotten a master's [degree] in public administration, kind of had gotten away from the whole public sector involvement except for the fact that in--once I started working for Indiana Bell after I did more of a financial analysis position, I moved into an area, the regulatory area of the company which is the area of telecommunications which is a nexus actually between public policy and the company's business interests because the company at that time and still is even though less so was very highly regulated. The actions of the company were controlled by a regulatory body, a public service commission on a local level and then the Federal Communications Commission [FCC] for interstate services, and actually that's why I--I think why I was viewed as a good candidate for the position that I was hired to do, in that most people in the company at that time had a background either in business or engineering. I had a background in public administration, but what that allowed me to do was to understand better what the regulators were thinking so that we could then conform what we were trying to get done from the company's side of things to--could formulate a way that could pass muster from the regulatory side to allow us to be successful. I think it was helpful that I had some understanding of public sector workings and regulatory processes--that was an important element to bring to the company to, and to help me advance.$$And also at this point you also had quite a background in financial analysis.$$Right.$$So see you're forming yourself, you're defining yourself in quite a scope.$$Well that was my intent, I'm not sure that I recognized it at the time but I did strongly feel that the company needed people with different perspectives and different skill sets than strictly business or the engineering backgrounds that tended to be so prevalent--$Now how did you recognize--how did others seem to recognize what you were doing and suddenly there's a little light in that door, can you describe that how--what was happening at that point?$$Well one first indication that I had that people were noticing was I had been at Bell Atlantic [later, Verizon Communications, Inc.] for two years and I was asked to put my hat in the ring for a special opportunity. At that time the company had an annual experience where they gave a person the opportunity to go on loan to the federal government for a year, and it was a highly competitive process but they--you would work in the federal government for a year and then come back to the company, and I was asked to put my hat in the ring for that and thank God I got that opportunity in 1987. I was part of a group--I worked at the [U.S.] General Services Administration for the GSA administrator for a year. I did things that are totally unrelated to telecom [telecommunications] cause you couldn't work on things related to your business so I wrote regulations for when government employees relocate, how relocation should be handled. I did a study of some properties in the federal government that were under GSA's jurisdiction and how those properties could be managed more effectively, very special projects of that nature, just whatever they gave me to do and had a wonderful experience, and again similar to Mr. Vansickle [ph.] taking me to camp back in seventh grade, this was another one of those points in my life because there was an international experience as part of this exchange. I went to Moscow [Soviet Union, later, Russia], I went to Warsaw, Poland, went to Finland, places I had never been, never dreamed I would go and that was another one of those seminal experiences in my life that told me wow, you're standing here in Red Square in Moscow, you have some things in store, just stay on the course. There are other things that you're going to see and do because who would have ever thought you would be here at this moment in time?