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The Honorable Jon R. Gray

Judge Jon R. Gray was born on November 16, 1951 in Little Rock, Arkansas to Mai H. Gray and Reverend C. Jarrett Gray, Sr. After graduating from Paseo High School in Kansas City, Missouri in 1969, Gray received his B.A. degree in American Studies from Grinnell College in 1973. He went on to receive his J.D. degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law in 1976.

After graduating from law school, Gray was appointed assistant Jackson County Counselor and established a solo law practice, before joining the firm of Gray Payne & Roque as a principal and partner. He served as a Democratic Attorney for the Kansas City Board of Election Commissioners from 1981 to 1986 and as a chair of the Liquor Control Board of Review of Kansas City, Missouri. In 1986, Governor John Ashcroft appointed him circuit judge in the Sixteenth Judicial Circuit of Missouri. He served a term as the Administrative Judge of the Family Court of Jackson County and as a special judge of the Missouri Supreme Court. He also taught at the National Institute for Trial Advocacy, Emory University School of Law, and the Missouri Judicial College. In 2007, Gray retired from the circuit court and joined Shook, Hardy & Bacon, LLP as a partner in its Kansas City office, where he served as chair of the firm’s Professional Development Committee.

Gray served on the board of trustees of Southern Methodist University from 1988 until 2000. In 2007, he served a one year term as chair of the Judicial Council of the National Bar Association; and, in 2008, he joined the American Arbitration Association as a member of its panel of commercial arbitrators. Governor Jay Nixon appointed Gray to serve as a member of the Jackson County Sports Complex Authority in 2009, and as a member of the Missouri Citizens’ Commission on Compensation for Elected Officials in 2014. An active member of The United Methodist Church, Gray was elected to serve an eight year term as a member of its Judicial Council, and as a delegate to its General Conferences in 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, and 2004. Judge Gray holds membership in The Missouri Bar, the National Bar Association, the American Bar Association, the Jackson County Bar Association, the Association of Missouri Mediators, and the FINRA panel of arbitrators. He is admitted to practice before the Missouri Supreme Court, the United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri, and the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit.

Gray received the Difference Maker Award from the Urban League of Greater Kansas City in 2002, the Lewis W. Clymer Award from the Jackson County Bar in 2007, and the Spurgeon Smithson Award from the Missouri Bar Association in 2014. In 2018, he was honored with the Missouri Legal Icon Award from Missouri Lawyers Publications and the Raymond Pace Alexander Award from the National Bar Judicial Council.

The Honorable Jon R. Gray was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 6, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.122

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/6/2019

Last Name

Gray

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Reginald

Occupation
Schools

Wendell Phillips Elem. Magnet

Park Elementary School

Northeast Junior High School

Paseo High School

Grinnell College

University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law

Wendell Phillips Elementary Magnet

First Name

Jon

Birth City, State, Country

Little Rock

HM ID

GRA19

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Do All The Good You Can, In All The Ways That You Can, For All The People That You Can, In All The Places That You Can, As Long As Ever You Can - John Wesley

Birth Date

11/16/1951

Birth Place Term
Country

USA

Favorite Food

Desserts, Barbecue, and Vegetables

Short Description

Judge Jon R. Gray (1951- ) served as circuit judge in the Sixteenth Judicial Circuit of Missouri from 1986 to 2007.

Employment

Shook, Hardy & Bacon, LLP

Sixteenth Judicial Circuit of Missouri

Gray Payne & Roque

Favorite Color

Blue

The Honorable Robert L. Wilkins

Judge Robert L. Wilkins was born on October 2, 1963 in Muncie, Indiana to Joyce Hayes Wilkins and John Wilkins. After graduating from Northside High School, Wilkins received his B.S. degree in chemical engineering from the Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in 1986, and his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1989.

In 1989, Wilkins began his career as a law clerk for the Honorable Earl B. Gilliam of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California. Following his clerkship, Wilkins returned to Indiana to practice law and worked briefly for DeFurVoran. In 1990, he joined the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, where he served as a staff attorney in the trial and appellate divisions. In 1996, he was promoted to special litigation chief. From 2002 to 2010, he served as partner of Venable LLP; and, in 2005, he founded the D.C. Access to Justice Commission. Wilkins was appointed U.S. District Judge for the District of Columbia in 2010. In 2014, he was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Wilkins was a member of the American Bar Association, the National Bar Association, and numerous sentencing and juvenile justice related associations. In 2003, Wilkins was a member of the presidential commission that advised President George W. Bush on the establishment of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture; and, in 2016, Wilkins authored Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100 Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

In 2001, Wilkins was named Pro Bono Attorney of the Year by the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, and received the Henry W. Edgerton Civil Liberties Award sponsored by the ACLU Fund of the National Capital Area. In 2008, Wilkins was named one of the 90 Greatest Washington Lawyers of the Last 30 Years by Legal Times Journal. In 2014, Wilkins received an honorary doctorate of engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and the National Bar Association’s Gertrude E. Rush Award. He was also named one of the 40 most successful litigators under 40 by the National Law Journal.

Wilkins was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 15, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.038

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/16/2019

Last Name

Wilkins

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Leon

Occupation
Schools

Garfield Elementary School

Riley Elementary School

Burris Laboratory School

Northside High School

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Harvard Law School

Westwood Elementary School

Gamble-Norris Junior High School

Cowan High School

First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Muncie

HM ID

WIL92

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Whatsoever Things Are True, Whatsoever Things Are Honest, Whatsoever Things Are Just, Whatsoever Things Are Pure, Whatsoever Things Are Lovely, Whatsoever Things Are Of Good Report...Think On These Things. - Philippians 4:8

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

10/2/1963

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Oysters

Short Description

Judge Robert L. Wilkins (1963- ) served as partner of Venable LLP from 2002 to 2010. He was appointed U.S. District Judge for the District of Columbia in 2010, and to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in 2014.

Employment

United States District Court for the Southern District of California

Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia

Venable LLP

U.S. District Court, District of Columbia

U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit

Favorite Color

Blue

The Honorable Terry J. Hatter

Judge Terry J. Hatter, Jr. was born on March 11, 1933 in Chicago, Illinois to Gloria E. Wilson and Terry Hatter, Sr. He graduated from Hyde Park High School in Chicago, Illinois in 1950 and received his B.A. degree in government from Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut in 1954. Hatter then earned his J.D. degree from the University of Chicago Law School in Chicago, Illinois in 1960.

In 1960, he served as an adjudicator for the United States Veterans Administration in Chicago and maintained a private law practice. The following year, Hatter was hired as an assistant public defender in Cook County, Illinois and later became an Assistant United States Attorney of the Northern District of California in 1962. He was then appointed Special Assistant United States Attorney of the Eastern District of California in 1965; and, the following year, Hatter served as the regional legal services director of the Office of Economic Opportunity in San Francisco. In 1970, Hatter served as executive director of the Western Center on Law and Poverty in Los Angeles, and as an associate clinical professor of law at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law. In 1973, Hatter was hired as professor of law at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles. He later served as special assistant to the Mayor of Los Angeles, Tom Bradley, and was director of criminal justice and urban development in Los Angeles. In 1977, Hatter was appointed by California Governor Jerry Brown as a judge of the Superior Court of California in Los Angeles; and, in 1979, he was appointed by President Jimmy Carter to the United States District Court for the Central Division of California. In 1998, Hatter became chief judge, serving until 2001. He assumed senior status in 2005.

Hatter served as a member of the Just-the-Beginning Foundation and on the board of directors for Mexican-American Legal Defense, the American Judicature Society, the National Legal Aid & Defender Association, the NAACP, the Constitutional Rights Project, the National Senior Citizens Law Center, and the National Health Law Program. He also received honorary doctorate of law degrees from the University of San Fernando Valley and Wesleyan University.

Terry J. Hatter, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 7, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.012

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/7/2019

Last Name

Hatter

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

J.

Occupation
Schools

Wesleyan University

University of Chicago Law School

Forrestville Elementary School

Hyde Park Academy High School

First Name

Terry

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

HAT03

Favorite Season

Daylight Savings Time

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

That's Ridiculous!

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

3/11/1933

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Ribs, Fried Fish, Chili Con Carne

Short Description

Judge Terry J. Hatter, Jr. (1933 - ) was appointed to the U.S. District Court for the Central Division of California in 1979, later serving as chief judge from 1998 to 2001, and assuming senior status in 2005.

Employment

Veteran's Administration

Cook County Public Defender's Office

United States Attorney's Office, San Francisco

United States Attorney's Office, Sacramento

San Francisco Neighborhood Legal Assistance Foundation

Office of Economic Opportunity

City of Los Angeles

California Superior Court

University of Southern California

Loyola University of Los Angeles

National College of the State Judiciary, Reno

Western Center on Law and Poverty

United States District Court, Central District of California

Favorite Color

N/A

Trudy DunCombe Archer

Judge Trudy DunCombe Archer was born on August 29, 1943 in Detroit, Michigan to Eleanor and James DunCombe, Jr. She attended George A. Custer Elementary School, Roosevelt Elementary School, Durfee Junior High School, and Central High School. In 1964, Archer received her B.S. degree in education from Eastern Michigan University. She went on to receive her M.A. degree in education from Wayne State University in 1971 and her J.D. degree from Detroit College of Law in 1981.

Archer served as an elementary school teacher at Ralph Bunche Elementary School from 1964 to 1969, and at Bellevue Elementary School from 1970 to 1973. In 1983, Archer was appointed assistant corporation counsel for the City of Detroit. Four years later, she joined Detroit College of Law as assistant dean. In 1989, Governor James Blanchard appointed Archer judge of Michigan’s 36th District Court. From 1993 to 2001, Archer served as First Lady while her husband, Dennis W. Archer, served as mayor of Detroit. As First Lady, Archer focused on Detroit’s youth, mentoring and encouraging children and their parents at school sponsored programs and forums. In 2006, she retired from her position as judge on the 36th District Court.

Archer has been a member of the American Bar Association, the National Bar Association, Detroit Metropolitan Bar, the Wolverine Bar, and the Association of Black Judges of Michigan. She belongs to the Fellows of the Michigan State Bar Foundation. She has served on the boards of the Children’s Center, the Community Foundation of Southeastern Michigan, the Children’s Hospital of Michigan/Pediatric Clinical Services, the Junior League of Detroit, the Greening of Detroit, and the African American Parent Magazine. A life member of the NAACP, Archer was also a member of the Millionaires Club of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, the Detroit chapters of Girl Friends, Links, and the International Women’s Forum, Michigan chapter. Archer served as director emeritus for the Detroit Institute of Arts, advisor to the Community Foundation of Southeastern Michigan for the Dennis W. Archer Foundation, and on the advisory committee of the Detroit Auto Dealers Association’s Charitable Foundation Fund.

In 1995, Archer received an honorary doctorate of humane letters from the University Detroit Mercy. In 2011, she received the Women of Excellence Award from the Michigan Chronicle. Archer also received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Wolverine Student Bar Association and the Eleanor Roosevelt Humanities Award. For her work on projects aimed toward children and bettering the community, she has received the Goodfellows Tribute Award, the Distinguished Citizen Award presented by the Detroit Area Council Boy Scouts of America, and the American Heart Association’s Cor Vitae Award for Community Service.

Archer and her husband have two children: Dennis W. Archer, Jr. and Vincent DunCombe Archer, and two grandsons: Dennis W. Archer, III and Chase Alexander Archer.

Trudy DunCombe Archer was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 19, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.079

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/19/2019

Last Name

DunCombe Archer

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

DunCombe

Occupation
Schools

Thurgood Marshall Elementary School

Durfee Elementary School

Central High School

Eastern Michigan University

Wayne State University

Michigan State College of Law

Roosevelt Elementary School

First Name

Trudy

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

ARC14

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring...really the four seasons

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Paris, and Italy

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

8/29/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Detroit

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Lobster and Lamb chops

Short Description

Judge Trudy DunCombe Archer (1943 - ) served as a judge on Michigan’s 36th District Court from 1989 to 2006, and as First Lady to Detroit during the administration of her husband, Detroit Mayor Dennis W. Archer.

Employment

State of Michigan

Detroit College of Law

City of Detroit

Bellevue Elementary School

Ralph Bunche Elementary School

Michigan 36th District Court

Favorite Color

Orange, red, and all warm colors

The Honorable Roderick Ireland

Judge Roderick Ireland was born on December 3, 1944 in Springfield, Massachusetts to Helen Garner and George Lovelace Ireland. He received his B.A. degree in 1966 from Lincoln University, his J.D. degree from Columbia Law School in 1969, his L.L.M. degree from Harvard Law School in 1975, and his Ph.D. degree in Law, Policy, and Society from Northeastern University in 1998.

Ireland began his career as a staff attorney at Neighborhood Legal Services in New York City in 1969. In 1970, he worked as a staff attorney at the Harvard Center for Law and Education. Ireland co-founded the Roxbury Defenders Committee with Wallace Sherwood the following year. In 1973, he worked as a hearing officer at the Massachusetts Civil Service Commission. Ireland joined the offices of Burnham, Stern and Shapiro in Boston in 1975, before being named assistant secretary and chief legal counsel at the Massachusetts Executive Office of Administration and Finance. Additionally, he served as chair of the Massachusetts Board of Appeal on Motor Vehicle Liability, Policies, and Bonds. Nominated to the Boston Juvenile Court by Governor Michael Dukakis in 1977, Ireland began teaching criminology and criminal justice at Northeastern University in 1978. In 1990, he was nominated to the Massachusetts Court of Appeals. Ireland was the first African American appointed to serve on the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in 1997. From 2001 to 2016, Ireland taught in the Appellate Judges Seminar at New York University Law School and worked as an advisor and teacher for the Supreme Judicial Court’s Judicial Youth Corps. Nominated by Governor Deval Patrick, Ireland became the chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in 2010. He also authored, Massachusetts Juvenile Law, (1993, 2007) a two volume treatise published by West Publishing.

Ireland was one of three black men selected for Ten Outstanding Young Men in 1979 by the U.S. Junior Chamber. In 1982, Ireland was awarded the Boston Covenant Peace Prize in recognition of his efforts to promote racial justice. He was also awarded the Haskell Cohn Distinguished Award for Judicial Service by the Boston Bar Association in 1990 and the St. Thomas More Award from Boston College Law School. In 2001, the Massachusetts Bar Association and Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly newspaper awarded Ireland the Judicial Excellence Award. In 2015, Ireland’s childhood street was renamed in his honor and he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association. He has received honorary doctorate of law degrees from several universities and was the recipient of the President’s Award at the 2016 Massachusetts Judges Conference. In 2017, Hampden County Hall of Justice in Springfield, Massachusetts was renamed Roderick L. Ireland Courthouse in his honor.

Ireland and his wife, Alice, have three children: Elizabeth, Michael, and Melanee.

Roderick Ireland was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 12, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.204

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/12/2018

Last Name

Ireland

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Roderick

Birth City, State, Country

Springfield

HM ID

IRE01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

Barbados

Favorite Quote

First things first.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

12/3/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bpston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Seafood and Southern

Short Description

Judge Roderick Ireland (1944 - ) was the first African American to serve on the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in 1997 before being appointed chief justice in 2010.

Favorite Color

Red

The Honorable Ronald Adrine

Judge Ronald B. Adrine was born on April 21, 1947 in Cleveland, Ohio to Russell T. and Ethel Adrine. Adrine graduated from Shaker Heights High School in 1965 and then entered Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio before transferring to Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, where he received his B.A. degree in history in 1969. He obtained his J.D. degree from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in 1973.

Adrine passed the Ohio State Bar in 1973 and went on to work as prosecuting attorney for the Cuyahoga County in the criminal division in 1974. He entered into private practice with his father, the late Russell T. Adrine, in 1976. Adrine was appointed to serve as senior staff counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives Select Committee on Assassinations, in Washington, D.C. in 1978. In 1980, he returned to Cleveland and merged four African American legal organizations into the Norman S. Minor Bar Association in Cleveland. He first ran for a seat on the Cleveland Municipal Court bench in 1981, and was re-elected five times to full six-year terms from 1981 to 2017. He chaired the Ohio Commission on Racial Fairness in 1994. Adrine served as administrative and presiding judge of the Cleveland Municipal Court from 2008 to 2017. Here, he led the effort to create a Family Justice Center in 2014. Adrine received national attention for his ruling in a Cleveland Municipal Court case that involved the actions of two Cleveland police officers that resulted in the death of twelve year old Tamir Rice. Adrine retired from the court after thirty six years of service in 2017. He joined Cleveland State University’s Cleveland-Marshall College of Law as a Leader-in-Residence, serving as its first jurist-in-residence in 2018.

Adrine served as chair of the Ohio Supreme Court’s Interpreter Services Advisory Committee and of the National Board of Directors of Futures Without Violence, and was co-chair of the advisory board of the National Judicial Institute on Domestic Violence. He was also a member of the Supreme Court’s Criminal Sentencing Commission’s Ad Hoc Committee on Bail and Pretrial Services.

He was awarded the Ohio State Bar Association Ohio Bar Medal in 2000. The Cleveland-Marshall Law Alumni Association also recognized Adrine in 2002, and he received the second Elizabeth Hines Domestic Violence Award in 2013. In 2017, he was the recipient of the Association of Municipal/County Court Judges of Ohio President’s Award for Excellent Judicial Service, the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Cleveland Branch of the NAACP, and was an inaugural member inductee of the Cleveland-Marshall Law Hall of Fame. Adrine also received the first-ever Lifetime Achievement Award of the Northeast Ohio Chapter of the American Constitution Society in 2018.

Ronald Adrine was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 28, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.195

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/28/2018

Last Name

Adrine

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Ronald

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

ADR01

Favorite Season

Late Summer, Early Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Saint Croix in the Virgin Islands

Favorite Quote

The Name Of The Game Is To Win Friends And Influence People.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

4/21/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cleveland

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Judge Ronald B. Adrine (1947- ) served thirty-six years on the bench of the Cleveland Municipal Court and, in 1980, founded the Norman S. Minor Bar Association.

Favorite Color

Purple

The Honorable Pamela Dashiell

Municipal court judge Pamela M. Dashiell was born on June 12, 1953 in Chicago, Illinois. She earned her B.A. degree in psychology and early education from Simmons University (formerly Simmons College) in 1975 and her J.D. degree from Northwestern University’s Pritzker School of Law in 1978.

Dashiell briefly worked as an assistant state’s attorney in Cook County, Illinois before moving to Boston, Massachusetts in 1980. There, she served as staff counsel for the Massachusetts State Ethics Commission. In 1984, Dashiell transitioned from the state to the municipal level, accepting a position as assistant corporation counsel for the Boston Law Department. She represented city agencies, officers and employees in all stages of litigation. Dashiell stepped down as chief of municipal administration in 1988 and moved to the private sector as in-house counsel for Digital Equipment Corporation. Dashiell supported a multimillion dollar sales channel as well as manufacturing and logistics organizations. She resumed work in the public sector as general counsel for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs in 1994. Three years later, Dashiell became an assistant attorney general in the Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General. She worked in the Public Protection Bureau for two years before accepting a position as general counsel in the Executive Bureau. Dashiell advised the attorney general and first assistant attorney general on legal and policy matters. She also oversaw the provision of support services to all non-legal operational divisions of the office. In 2006, Dashiell left the Office of the Attorney General to work as director of planning and policy development for the Administrative Office of the Trial Court. She remained there until 2009 when Governor Deval Patrick nominated her to the Dorchester Division of the Boston Municipal Court Department of the Trial Court. Dashiell was sworn in as an associate justice on November 2, 2009.

In 2003, Dashiell served on the inaugural Governor’s Diversity and Equal Opportunity Advisory Council. Her community work includes service as vice president of Codman Square Health Center from 1995 to 2008 and on the board of trustees of Charles Street A.M.E. Church. She served as a member of the following organizations: the Massachusetts Bar Association, the American Bar Association, the Massachusetts Black Lawyers Association, the Massachusetts Black Women Attorneys, the Massachusetts Judges Conference, and the Massachusetts Black Judges Conference.

Dashiell lives in Dorchester, Massachusetts with her husband, Frederick E. Dashiell. They have two children, Frederick E. Dashiell, Jr. and Lindsey M. Dashiell.

The Honorable Pamela M. Dashiell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 24, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.168

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/24/2018

Last Name

Dashiell

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

M.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Pamela

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

DAS03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Nothing Hurts A Duck But Its Bill.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

6/12/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Pasta

Short Description

Judge The Honorable Pamela Dashiell (1953 - )

Favorite Color

Pink, Peach

The Honorable Edward R. Redd

Judge The Honorable Edward R. Redd was born on August 11, 1948, in New York City, to Frances and Everett Redd. He attended the William Lloyd Garrison School and graduated from Boston Technical High school in Boston, Massachusetts. Redd went on to receive his B.A. degree in psychology and sociology in 1971, from Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, and his J.D. degree from the Boston College Law School in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts in 1974.

In 1971, while attending law school, Redd worked as the assistant director of the Harvard Upward Bound Program in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The next year, he served as a legal intern at the Boston College Legal Assistant Program, and as a research aide to the Massachusetts Black Legislative Caucus. In 1974, Redd became the executive secretary of the Boston NAACP, where he was involved with the desegregation of Boston Public Schools. He then went on to become a consultant at the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare under two presidents – President Gerald Ford and President Jimmy Carter. In 1977, Redd opened his own private law firm and real estate development company. Then, in 1979, he became the assistant general counsel for the Massachusetts Port Authority. During the administration of President Ronald Reagan, Redd served as a presidential appointee to the Commission on Presidential Scholars. In 1984, Redd left his private practice and joined the law firm of Brown and Prince in Boston. He then went on to become the chairman of the Massachusetts Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission in 1991. Two years later, Redd was nominated by Governor William Weld to serve on the Trial Court of the Commonwealth as an associate justice. Within the court’s Roxbury Division, Redd was promoted to acting presiding justice, associate justice and finally presiding justice in 2005. In 2010, he moved to the Central Division of the court as the associate justice where he presided until his retirement in 2012.

Redd served on the advisory task force of the Dudley Square Vision Project; as a committee member on the search committee for a new Commissioner of Probation for Massachusetts; and as the ambassador of the Polar Bears on Martha’s Vineyard. He was also a member of the United Way of Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley.

Redd and his wife, Shirley Johnson Redd, lived in Boston, Massachusetts. They have three children, Ivy Redd Couch, Sara Redd and Rachel Redd.

Redd was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 16, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.156

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/16/2018

Last Name

Redd

Maker Category
Middle Name

R.

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Edward

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

RED01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

It's A Vineyard Thing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

8/11/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Vineyard Haven

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Chinese

Short Description

Judge The Honorable Edward R. Redd (1948- ) was the executive secretary of the Boston NAACP and served on the bench of the Trial Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Favorite Color

Yellow, Blue

The Honorable Laura Taylor Swain

Judge Laura Taylor Swain was born in 1958 in Brooklyn, New York to Madeline and Justus Taylor. She graduated from Hunter College High School in New York City in 1975; and earned her B.A. degree in government from Harvard-Radcliffe College in 1979, and her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1982.

Upon graduating from law school, Swain clerked for Chief Judge Constance Baker Motley on the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York from 1982 to 1983. Swain then worked as an associate and, later, counsel with New York office of the international law firm Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, where she focused on ERISA, employee benefits, executive compensation and employment law. In 1996, Swain was appointed as a judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of New York. In 1998, she became a founding board member of the Coalition for Consumer Bankruptcy Debtor Education, a non-profit organization. Swain was appointed by President Bill Clinton to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York as a U.S. District Judge in 2000. In this role, Swain has presided over numerous high-profile matters, including authorship cases such as Hoover v. Boncompagni in 2008 and Lapine v. Seinfeld in 2011, and U.S. v. O’Hara, the criminal prosecution of several former employees of Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities. Swain became an adjunct professor at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in 2011. In 2017, Chief Justice John Roberts appointed Swain under the Puerto Rico Oversight, Management and Economic Stability Act (PROMESA) to oversee the debt restructuring cases in the Puerto Rican government-debt crisis.

Swain has received numerous awards throughout her legal career, including the Trailblazer Award from the Metropolitan Black Bar Association in 2000, the Servant of Justice Award from the Guild of St. Ives of the Episcopal Diocese of New York in 2008, and the Cecelia H. Goetz Award from the New York Institute of Credit in 2016. She also served as the Donahue Lecturer at Suffolk University Law School in 2003. Swain served on the New York State Board of Law Examiners from 1986 to 1996, making her the first woman, and the first person of color, to serve in that capacity. She chaired the Advisory Committee of the Judicial Conference of the United States on the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure between 2007 and 2010. She received an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Suffolk University in Boston, Massachusetts, in 2008. Her article, “Liberty in the Balance: The Role of the Third Branch in a Time of Insecurity” was published in the Suffolk University Law Review in 2004.

Judge Laura Taylor Swain was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 28, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.085

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/28/2018

4/28/2018 |and| 4/12/2019

Last Name

Swain

Maker Category
Middle Name

Taylor

Occupation
Schools

Hunter College High School

Radcliffe College

Harvard Law School

First Name

Laura

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

SWA03

Favorite Season

Spring and Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

11/21/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Savory Foods

Short Description

Judge Laura Taylor Swain (1958 - ) served as a U.S. District Court Judge for the Southern District of New York, beginning in 2000. She was also the first woman, and first person of color, to serve on the New York State Board of Law Examiners.

Employment

Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law

U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York

U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Eastern District of New York

New York State Board of Law Examiners

Debevoise & Plimpton

Favorite Color

Green

The Honorable Jerome Kearney

Judge Jerome Kearney was born on May 30, 1956 in Gould, Arkansas to Thomas James Kearney and Ethel Curry Kearney. Kearney has eighteen siblings, including presidential appointee Janis F. Kearney. He graduated from Western Reserve Academy, a private college preparatory school in Hudson, Ohio, in 1974. He then received his B.A. degree in political science from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee in 1978, where he was founding member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Kearney earned his J.D. degree from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1981.

While in law school, Kearney completed internships in the Tennessee Attorney General’s office and the Davidson County Public Defender Office. Upon graduating, he began his legal career working in private practice with his older siblings in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. He then worked as a trial attorney in the Pulaski County public defender’s office from 1982 to 1985. In 1985, Kearney was hired as a trial lawyer in the Arkansas Attorney General office, where he worked in the criminal appeals and litigation sections. From 1987 to 1990, Kearney worked as a trial attorney for the U.S. Department of Labor/Solicitors office in Dallas, Texas, handling cases in Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. He then joined the federal public defender’s office in Oklahoma City, where he served as an assistant federal defender. In 1995, Kearney began working as a senior litigator in the U.S. Federal Public Defenders’ office in Little Rock under Jennifer Horan, who promoted him to first assistant in 2002. Kearney was the first African American to assume the role. In 2010, Kearney was appointed United States Magistrate Judge for the Eastern District of Arkansas and continued to serve in that role.

In 2006, Kearney received the National Outstanding Assistant Defender Award from the National Federal Defender Conference. Kearney served as a member and/or chairman of the Federal Practice Committee between 1997 and 2008, and was a member of the Henry Woods Inn of Courts legal practice society from 2003 to 2007.

Kearney is married to Nellie Faye Mays Kearney. He has four children: Bertrand, Sparkell, Jerome Jr., and Dylan.

Judge Jerome Kearney was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 13, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.043

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/13/2018

Last Name

Kearney

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Gould High School

Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt University Law School

First Name

Jerome

Birth City, State, Country

Gould

HM ID

KEA02

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Alaska

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Arkansas

Birth Date

5/30/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Little Rock

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Vanilla Ice Cream

Short Description

Judge Jerome Kearney (1956 - ) was the first African American to serve as an assistant federal public defender in the Arkansas Federal Public Defender Office. He went on to serve as a magistrate judge for the Eastern District of Arkansas from 2010 to 2018.

Employment

Federal Public Defender's Office, Arkansas

Federal Public Defender, Oklahoma

U.S. Department of Labor

Arkansas Attorney General's Office

Pulaski County Public Defender's Office

Favorite Color

Green