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Leonard Graham

Engineering executive Leonard J. Graham was born on December 12, 1949 in Kansas City, Kansas to Leonard A. and Alma James Graham. He attended Kansas City, Kansas public schools and graduated from Southeast High School in Kansas City, Missouri. In 1974, Graham earned his B.A. degree in liberal arts and sciences from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and his B.S. degree in civil engineering in 1975, from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He went on to obtain his M.A. degree in civil engineering from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1978.

While in college, Graham worked as an application engineer at Fairbanks Morse Pumps, in Kansas City. Following his undergraduate studies, he went to work as an engineer for the regional office of the United States Environmental Protection Agency, in Kansas City, Missouri. In 1976, Graham joined the Kansas City-based consulting engineering firm Schlup Becker & Brennan as an engineer. Named partner in 1984, he worked there for sixteen years. In 1992, Graham joined and purchased the land surveying and civil and structural engineering services firm Taliaferro and Browne, Inc. as co-owner. He has served as president for twenty-seven years, where his role and area of expertise has been general civil engineering and project management including site development, storm water and wastewater engineering, roadway and transportation planning and design.
The firm has been recognized for “engineering excellence” to being “one of the top 25 largest engineering firms in Kansas City”.

From 2001 to 2002, Graham served as Honorary Chairman, Port Authority (now PortKC). In 2004, he received the Missouri Honor Award for Distinguished Service in Engineering, from the University of Missouri-Kansas City College of Engineering. Graham served as a member of the Mid-America Regional Council from 2012 to 2013, and board member for The Main Street Corridor Development Corporation from 2012 to 2018. He was the recipient of the Lucille H. Bluford Special Achievement Award from the Kansas City NAACP.

Graham has held memberships in Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Sigma Pi Phi, Midwesterners and the American Society of Civil Engineers. He was recognized as a member of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Academy of Distinguished Alumni Members at the University of Missouri.

Leonard J. Graham was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 8, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.124

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/8/2019

Last Name

Graham

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

James

Schools

Keiling Elementary School

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Northeast Junior High School

Southeast High School

University of Missouri, Kansas City

University of Missouri

First Name

Leonard

Birth City, State, Country

Kansas City

HM ID

GRA20

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Kansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Europe and Africa

Favorite Quote

None

Speakers Bureau Region State

Missouri

Birth Date

12/12/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Kansas City

Favorite Food

Tacos

Short Description

Engineering executive Leonard J. Graham (1949- ) served as co-owner and president of land surveying and civil and structural engineering services firm Taliaferro and Browne, Inc.

Employment

Fairbanks Morse Pumps

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Schlup Becker and Brennan

Taliaferro and Browne

Favorite Color

Green

Leo Morton

Corporate executive, academic administrator and engineer Leo Morton was born on August 12, 1945 in Birmingham, Alabama to Imogene and Leo C. Morton. After graduating from Ullman High School in 1963, he received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Tuskegee University in 1968. Morton went on to receive his M.S. degree in management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1987.

In 1968, Morton joined General Motors as an engineer designing the turbine section of jet engines. In 1970, he left General Motors and joined Rust Engineering as a designer, a position he held for two years before joining Corning Glass as a manufacturing supervisor. Morton left Corning Glass in 1973 and was hired at Bell Laboratories as an engineer, eventually becoming a director. In 1987, he joined AT&T Microelectronics as an engineering planning director in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey. Morton was promoted to director of division staff in February, 1988, vice president of manufacturing in August, 1988, and vice president of performance management in 1992, in Lee’s Summit, Missouri. In 1993, he moved to Dallas, Texas, to serve as vice president of enhanced distributed power architecture. A year later, he left AT&T Microelectronics to serve as vice president of performance management at UtiliCorp United, Inc in Kansas City, Missouri. He was promoted to senior vice president in 1995, senior vice president of human resources and operations support in 1997, and chief administrative officer in 2000, before the company was renamed Aquila, Inc. in 2002. In 2008, Morton left Aquila, Inc. to serve as chancellor of the University of Missouri – Kansas City. During his tenure, Morton improved community engagement, enrollment, graduation rates and created a strategic plan for diversity and inclusion. He also significantly improved campus facilities and philanthropic support. In 2017, he stepped down as chancellor and joined DeBruce Companies as president and chief operating officer.

Morton served as chairman of the Economic Development Corporation of Kansas City, the Kansas Area Development Council, Prep-KC and the University of Missouri-Kansas City Board of Trustees. He serves on the board of Union Station, the Marion & Henry Bloch Family Foundation, American Public Square, the Civic Council of Greater Kansas City and the Kansas City Urban Youth Academy.

In 2012, Morton received the Henry W. Bloch Human Relations Award from the Jewish Community Relations Bureau. In 2014, he was inducted into the Greater Kansas City Business Hall of Fame and was named the Kansas Citian of the Year by the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce. Morton received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Economic Development Corporation in 2018. In 2019, was named a Kansas City Legend by Ingram’s 45th Anniversary Edition and named a Hometown Hero by Community Linc.

Morton and his wife, Yvette Morton, have three children: Leo, Keesha, and Karla.

Leo Morton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 4, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.119

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/4/2019

Last Name

Morton

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Center Street Elementary School

Ullman High School

Tuskegee University

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

First Name

Leo

Birth City, State, Country

Birmingham

HM ID

MOR21

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

A Cruise With My Family

Favorite Quote

Bless Me To Be A Blessing To Others

Birth Date

8/12/1945

Birth Place Term
Favorite Food

Apple Pie

Short Description

Academic administrator and engineer Leo Morton (1945- ) served as chancellor of the University of Missouri–Kansas City from 2008 to 2017.

Employment

DeBruce Companies

University of Missouri-Kansas City

Aquila, Inc.

AT&T Microelectronics

Bell Laboratories

Corning Glass

Rust Engineering

General Motors

Favorite Color

Blue

Raye Jean Montague

Engineer Raye Jean Montague was born on January 21, 1935 in Little Rock, Arkansas to Rayford Jordan and Flossie Graves Jordan. Montague graduated from Merrill High School in Pine Bluff, Arkansas in 1952, and enrolled at Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical & Normal College (now called The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff). Initially, Montague aspired to study engineering, but received her B.S. degree in business because the engineering program did not accept African American students.

In 1956, Montague joined the U.S. Navy in Carderock, Maryland, and was stationed at David Taylor Model Basin (now the Naval Surface Warfare Center). Montague worked as a clerk typist for several years, before becoming a digital computer systems operator and a computer systems analyst at the Naval Ship Engineering Center in Washington D.C. Montague was promoted to program director of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) integrated design, manufacturing, and maintenance program; and she also served as the division head of the Navy’s computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing program. In 1971 Montague became the first person to design a naval ship using a computer, producing the first draft for the FFG-7 Frigate in under nineteen hours. Montague was the U.S. Navy’s first female program manager of ships and the first program manager of the information systems improvement program. Over the course of her career, Montague worked on the U.S.S. Dwight D. Eisenhower as well as the Navy’s first landing craft helicopter-assault ship. She retired from the U.S. Navy in 1990.

In 1972, Montague received the U.S. Meritorious Civilian Service Award, and was also nominated for the Federal Woman of the Year Award by the secretary of the Navy. In 1982, Montague became the first female engineer to receive the Society of Manufacturing Engineers Achievement Award. She also received the National Computer Graphics Association Award for Advancement of Computer Graphics in 1988. Montague was the first woman to serve on the board of directors for the Numerical Control Society; and she also held memberships with LifeQuest of Arkansas, The Links Inc., Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, the Arkansas Association of University Women, and the American Contract Bridge League. Montague was inducted into the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame in 2013, and Arkansas Women's Hall of Fame in 2018. In May of 2018, she was conferred an honorary doctor of laws degree from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff.

Montague passed away on October 10, 2018.

Raye Jean Montague was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 20, 2017.

Accession Number

A2018.041

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/12/2018

Last Name

Montague

Maker Category
Middle Name

Jean Jordan

Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Raye

Birth City, State, Country

Little Rock

HM ID

MON12

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Karaca Island

Favorite Quote

The Best Is Yet To Come

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Arkansas

Birth Date

1/21/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Little Rock

Favorite Food

Chili

Death Date

10/10/2018

Short Description

Engineer Raye Jean Montague (1935 - 2018) was the first person to design a naval ship using a computer, and the first female program director in the history of the U.S. Navy.

Favorite Color

Blue

Cardinal Warde

Engineer and engineering professor Cardinal Warde was born on July 14, 1945 in Christ Church, Barbados to Rosetta Irene Ward. After graduating from high school, Warde moved to the United States and enrolled in the Stevens Institute of Technology. There he played for the institute’s varsity soccer team, and received his B.A. degree in science in 1969. He continued to study physics in graduate school at Yale University. In 1971, Warde earned his M.Phil. degree, and in 1974 he earned his Ph.D. degree in physics. As a doctoral student, he invented a new inferometer with the ability of operating at absolute zero temperature. The device measured the refractive index and thickness of solid oxygen films used for his dissertation research.

In 1974, Ward joined the faculty in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an associate professor. At MIT, Warde's interest shifted toward the engineering applications of optics. He became involved with other members of the faculty in the development of devices for enhancing the performance of optical atmospheric (wireless) communication systems to improve communication performance in inclement weather, and on the development of photorefractive materials for real-time holography and optical computing. To date, he has published over one hundred technical papers on optical materials, devices and systems. Warde is also an entrepreneur. In 1982, he founded Optron Systems, Inc., an incubator company dedicated to developing novel electro-optic and MEMS displays, and light shutters and modulators for optical signal processing systems. Then, in 1999, he co-founded Radiant Images, Inc., a company engaged in the manufacture of transparent liquid-crystal VLSI microdisplays for digital camera and camcorder viewfinders, portable telecommunications devices, and display eyeglasses.

Warde is an inventor on twelve patents, and has published three book chapters in addition to over one-hundred-fifty technical papers on optical materials, devices and systems. Warde is former associate editor of the The Journal of Display Technology and fellow of the Optical Society of America. He has been recognized with a number of awards and honors for his work, including the Renaissance Science and Engineering Award from Stevens Institute of Technology in 1996, the Companion of Honour Award (the second highest honor awarded by the Government of Barbados) in 2003.He received honorary doctorate degrees in science from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and the University of the West Indies.

Cardinal Warde was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 11, 2012

Accession Number

A2012.220

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/11/2012 |and| 4/28/2013

Last Name

Warde

Organizations
Schools

St. Christopher's Primary

Christ Church Foundation School

Harrison College

Stevens Institute of Technology

Yale University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Cardinal

Birth City, State, Country

Hopewell

HM ID

WAR15

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

I Believe The Next Google Can Be Developed In The Caribbean.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

7/14/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

Barbados

Favorite Food

Peas, Rice

Short Description

Engineer and engineering professor Cardinal Warde (1945 - ) was the co-founder of Radiant Images, Inc., a company engaged in the manufacture of transparent liquid-crystal VLSI microdisplays for digital camera and camcorder viewfinders, portable telecommunications devices, and display eyeglasses.

Employment

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Optron Systems, Inc.

Radiant Images, Inc.

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Cardinal Warde's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Cardinal Warde lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Cardinal Warde describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Cardinal Warde talks about his mother's growing up in Barbados

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Cardinal Warde describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Cardinal Warde talks about Barbados

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Cardinal Warde talks about his father and how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Cardinal Warde talks about his parents' personality and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Cardinal Warde talks about his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Cardinal Warde describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Cardinal Warde describes the sights and sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Cardinal Warde talks about getting radio, running water and electricity in his village

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Cardinal Warde discusses the history of Barbados

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Cardinal Warde discusses the history of Barbados

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Cardinal Warde talks about his early education

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Cardinal Warde describes his experience in elementary school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Cardinal Warde describes his experience in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Cardinal Warde talks about conducting chemistry and rocketry experiments with friends

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Cardinal Warde talks about deficiencies in his high school education

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Cardinal Warde describes his mentors and their influence on his choice of college

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Cardinal Warde talks about Stevens Institute of Technology

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Cardinal Warde discusses the cultural differences between American blacks and Caribbean blacks

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Cardinal Warde talks about living in Hoboken, New Jersey

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Cardinal Warde talks about math and physics at Stevens Institute of Technology

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Cardinal Warde talks about playing varsity soccer at Stevens Institute of Technology

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Cardinal Warde talks about reactions to Dr. Martin Luther King's assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Cardinal Warde talks about his jobs and interests while at Stevens Institute of Technology

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Cardinal Warde describes his experience at Yale University

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Cardinal Warde discusses his research in low temperature physics and the properties of solid oxygen

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Cardinal Warde describes his decision to work at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Cardinal Warde's interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Cardinal Warde recalls being hired at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Cardinal Warde remembers changing the focus of his research

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Cardinal Warde describes the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Cardinal Warde talks about the field of electrical engineering

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Cardinal Warde remembers his early mentors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Cardinal Warde describes the development of the microchannel spatial light modulator

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Cardinal Warde remembers the start of his company, Optron Systems, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Cardinal Warde recalls the work in image display technology at Optron Systems, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Cardinal Warde talks about the acquisition of Radiant Images, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Cardinal Warde talks about his work in optical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Cardinal Warde describes his current research in optoelectronics, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Cardinal Warde describes his current research in optoelectronics, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Cardinal Warde talks about the developments in artificial intelligence

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Cardinal Warde talks about the prospects for the machine learning field

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Cardinal Warde talks about the fields of electrical engineering and neuroscience

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Cardinal Warde talks about the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies initiative

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Cardinal Warde talks about the capabilities of computer systems

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Cardinal Warde describes his teaching methodology

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Cardinal Warde talks about his electrical engineering students

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Cardinal Warde describes the Minority Introduction to Engineering and Science program

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Cardinal Warde talks about the importance of mathematics

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Cardinal Warde talks about the STEM fields

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Cardinal Warde talks about the Student Program for Innovation in Science and Engineering

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Cardinal Warde talks about the Caribbean Diaspora for Science, Technology and Innovation

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Cardinal Warde recalls the individuals involved with the Student Program for Innovation in Science and Engineering

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Cardinal Warde talks about the programs of the Caribbean Science Foundation

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Cardinal Warde describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Cardinal Warde reflects upon his career

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Cardinal Warde reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Cardinal Warde describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

4$10

DATitle
Cardinal Warde talks about math and physics at Stevens Institute of Technology
Cardinal Warde describes his decision to work at Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Transcript
Alright. Now, how did your studies go? Were you prepared for Stevenson?$$Well, it turns out that from my high school, Harrison College, I had a good preparation in mathematics and physics. And enough chemistry that during the first year--first semester--I didn't have to work very hard. So, so from that perspective, I was well prepared. From the perspective of literature and so on, I was not as well prepared. I hadn't read as much as some of my other colleagues had read, and I found it easier to do the sciences than to do the literature. It was partly because of interest. Excuse me. So, so I looked--like I was a young, black, smart kid, you know, 'cause when all the other guys were struggling with calculus and all that, that was second nature to me. And so I was helping people after a while with homework, so I made some friends, you know. And after the first year, I realized that things weren't as bad as I had imagined and that yeah, I could survive here, and you just have to pick your friends carefully and you feel people out first, see where they stand before you say too much or do too much and I was--I try to use some common sense in all my inter-personal relationships. I always waited to see if I was gonna be accepted before I, you know, opened up, so to speak.$$Okay. So, you had good grades I take it. (Simultaneous)--$$--(Simultaneous) I was on the Dean's List. Yeah, yeah.$$Okay. What area of physics did--were you drawn to?$$At that early age we didn't--I mean, it's too early to specialize. In physics, normally one starts off with mechanics, and under the British system, applied mathematics looked a lot like physics, like mechanics. So I had no trouble with that kind of physics. And then we moved on to electricity and magnetism. I have a little bit of it at Harrison College. (Unclear) --and that kind of thing (unclear). So, but I didn't have it--it was not calculus-based physics at the time. So then, introducing the calculus into physics was new to me. But it was a piece of cake because I really like calculus. So the physics was what I would call general physics. It was mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and then later on it was waves (ph.). And I still didn't have a specialty in physics, so when I graduated with a bachelor's degree in physics, I had taken a whole bunch of basic physics courses in different disciplines, but I wasn't a specialist in any of them. So I sampled around, I took some special relativity, I took thermodynamics, electricity magnetism, advance mechanics, and I took one astronomy course--astrophysics course. But I didn't specialize. Only after I got to graduate school did I start to specialize.$So this is--this is--now did you--was there--now you're at Yale [University, New Haven, Connecticut] during this time and you were hired almost, from what I understand, almost immediately by MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts]--$$Right, so--$$--after you got your Ph.D.?$$--after I got my Ph.D., I decided I really wanted to stay in science and--(simultaneous) I was not a citizen.$$Yeah. Okay.$$I still wasn't a citizen. And I needed to find a job where my employer would have let me apply for at least permanent residence. So I applied at big companies. I applied to IBM [International Business Machines Corportation]. I don't know which other ones I applied to. And I applied to a whole bunch of universities 'cause I knew universities would do that. I picked all the ivy leagues [ivy league universities]. And IBM called me first and says they'd like to interview me. And I told them also I didn't want to do solid oxygen. In fact, I didn't want to do solid state physics, I wanted to do optics because it was the optical thing that really got me out of the hot water when I was trying to do my research. I said, "this optical field, I like this stuff." The laser had just been invented also, and people were talking about fiber optics and integrated optics and all kinds of stuff like that. I thought it was fascinating, and that's when I said to myself, "I also want to be an engineer now. I'm ready to be an engineer." No longer theoretical, you know. No longer doing physics, or science for the sake of science. So I applied to IBM in Fishkill, New York and they invited me for an interview. I was up there two days interviewing. I also applied to MIT and Harvard [University, Cambridge, Massachusetts]and Princeton [University, Princeton, New Jersey], Yale, you name it. And MIT was the only school that called me for an interview. And IBM had not yet made its decision, so I came here, I gave a job talk, they liked it, and a couple of days later they said "we're interested in hiring you." So I called up IBM. I says "I have a job. I'm gonna take it." So, IBM actually never made an offer formally. And I came here, and I've been here ever since.

James Collier, Jr.

Elementary school teacher and engineer James Collier was born on October 18, 1924 in Jackson, Tennessee to Lucille and James Collier, Sr. Collier’s grandmother ran a boarding house for Pullman porters, and his maternal great grandmother lived to be 111 years old. A retired quality control engineer for Monsanto, Collier was the inventor of the process by which Monsanto sliced and coated silicon chips for electronic information storage. Growing up in Jackson, Tennessee, he attended South Jackson Elementary School in an integrated neighborhood. At segregated Merry High School in Jackson, Collier was an outstanding musician. He sang and played the violin and trombone. Before graduation in 1942, Collier and the members of the choir refused to entertain the white state school superintendent. They let the elaborate intro music play and stood mute.

Drafted into World War II in 1943, Collier was discharged in 1946. He graduated from Jackson’s Lane College with his B.S. degree in social science and music in 1949. Collier also took graduate courses at Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri.

Collier started working for the St. Louis Board of Education in 1950 as a substitute teacher, then as a sixth grade teacher. Also working after hours as a musician and band leader, he played trombone with his group, Jim Collier and the Rhythmaires and promoted acts like Chuck Berry, Eddie Kendall, Archie Burnside, Nancy Wilson, Otis Hightower, Art Blakely, Ernie Wilkins, Jimmy Forrest and Jimmy Smith.

In 1980, Collier invented and patented a silicon slicing process for today’s silicon chips. Monsanto Electronics established a plant to produce the chips in 1963, where Collier experimented and developed the slicing process.

Collier was the founder of Operation Family and works with youth, mentoring and teaching them voice and stage presence. For many years, he produced his own cable television show. The broad range of subjects covered by Collier include the works of Tyler Perry, black land distribution after the Civil War, St. Louis gang culture and an award winning Black History Month program. Collier also published a book of his poetry and was developing his talent as a painter.

Collier passed away on June 1, 2011 at the age of 86.

Accession Number

A2007.293

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/17/2007

Last Name

Collier

Middle Name

Alexander

Organizations
Schools

South Jackson Elementary School

Jackson Central-Merry Academy of Medical Technology

South Elementary School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Jackson

HM ID

COL16

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Tennessee

Favorite Vacation Destination

Europe

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Missouri

Birth Date

10/18/1924

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

St. Louis

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beef Steak

Death Date

6/1/2011

Short Description

Elementary school teacher and engineer James Collier, Jr. (1924 - 2011 ) invented and patented the silicon splicing process for today’s silicon chips.

Employment

United States Army

Jim Collier and the Rhythmaires

St, Louis Board of Education

Monsanto Company

Silicon Technology Corporation

Delete

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Collier's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Collier shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Collier talks about his grandparents on his mother's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Collier talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Collier talks about his father's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Collier talks about his childhood in South Jackson, Tennessee

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Collier talks about his high school teachers and administrators

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Collier shares a story of civil disobedience in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Collier recalls his high school graduation and involvement in music and arts

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Collier talks about his experience in the Army Cryptology Unit and Army Service Force Band

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Collier describes his first marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Collier talks about his academic experience at Lane College

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Collier talks about his music group, Jim Collier and the Rhythmaires

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Collier talks about income during his early career

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Collier describes his move to St. Louis and Monsanto

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Collier describes the silicon project at Monsanto, part 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Collier describes the silicon project at Monsanto, part 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Collier discusses his contributions to silicon splicing

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Collier describes the process of preparing silicon chips

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Collier gives advice to future inventors

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Collier talks about his post-retirement musical endeavors

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Collier talks about producing the television show 'Street Level' and other documentaries

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Collier discusses his poetry and volunteer activities

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Collier discusses his hopes and concerns for the black community

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Collier reflects on his life and talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Collier describes his photographs

Alfred Brothers, Jr.

Engineer and airplane pilot Alfred Brothers was born on December 14, 1942 in Boston, Massachusetts to Alfred S. Brothers, Senior and Edith Irene Yates. His father served as a combat engineer in the black 366th Infantry Regiment during World War II while his mother stayed home to care for the family. Brothers graduated from Boston Latin School in 1960 and enrolled in Boston University's College of Engineering. While at Boston University, Brothers became a cadet in the Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps. After graduating in 1964 with a B.S. degree in engineering and the rank of second lieutenant, Brothers joined the United States Air Force, where he served for the next twenty-two years. Brothers began his Air Force career flying B-52 planes in the Vietnam War and became one of the youngest aircraft commanders in the strategic air command.

In 1972, Brothers used his engineering education and served in the foreign technology division of the Air Force at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. Brothers was then assigned as a detachment commander to a new ROTC program at Wright State University in Dayton. Brothers focused on encouraging the development of African American engineering students and pilot candidates. During his tenure, the graduation and commission rates for students in the Air Force ROTC increased by 90%. After retiring from the Air Force in 1986, Brothers moved to Fort Wayne, Indiana to work as an engineer for Magnavox, now the Raytheon Company. Brothers was promoted from engineer to program manager where he was responsible for the technical direction and management of a program. He was in charge of attaining financial and schedule goals for particular government programs. Always interested in continuing his education, Brothers obtained his Ph.D. degree in business administration at age sixty from Century University.

In addition to his professional activities, Brothers was an active volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America and became president of the Boy Scouts Council, the first African American to be council president. The council involved eleven counties and about 14,000 kids and 4,000 adults. Brothers sat on numerous boards including the board of the African/African American Museum and Historical Society in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
Alfred S. Brothers, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 30, 2002.

Accession Number

A2002.130

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/30/2002

Last Name

Brothers

Maker Category
Schools

Martin Luther King, Jr. K-8 Inclusion School

Boston Latin School

Boston University

Century University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Alfred

Birth City, State, Country

Boston

HM ID

BRO06

Favorite Season

Spring

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Massachusetts

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Nothing Is impossible.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Indiana

Birth Date

12/14/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Fort Wayne

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Steak

Short Description

Engineer and airplane pilot Alfred Brothers, Jr. (1942 - ) was an officer in the United States Air Force for twenty-two years, serving as a pilot and wing commander in the Air Force ROTC, before working as an engineer program manager for Magnavox.

Employment

United States Air Force

United States Air Force Communications Satellite Group

United States Air Force Ballistic Missile Facility Branch

Wright State University

Magnavox / Raytheon Company

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Air Force Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Alfred Brothers' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Alfred Brothers names his parents and shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Alfred Brothers talks about his family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Alfred Brothers talks about his parents' first meeting and their occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Alfred Brothers talks about his childhood neighborhood in Boston

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Alfred Brothers talks about his childhood interests and high school teachers

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Alfred Brothers talks about his mentors and his father's involvement in politics

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Alfred Brothers talks about the artificial language, Esperanto

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Alfred Brothers talks about his involvement with the Boy Scouts

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Alfred Brothers remembers staging a peaceful protest in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Alfred Brothers talks about sports, church and socializing during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Alfred Brothers talks about meeting his wife at a school party in Boston

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Alfred Brothers talks about his experience with the Air Force ROTC

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Alfred Brothers talks about his experience flying planes

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Alfred Brothers remembers his life in Ohio as an Air Force pilot

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Alfred Brothers recaps the dates of his Air Force career and talks about his retirement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Alfred Brothers talks about his leadership position in the Boy Scouts of Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Alfred Brothers talks about his interest in genealogy and other post retirement activities

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Alfred Brothers talks about the possibility of flying cars

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Alfred Brothers discusses technology and the importance of continued schooling

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Alfred Brothers discusses the need to promote science in the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Alfred Brothers reflects on his career and talks about his legacy