The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon

Search Results

Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

city

Ray A. Shepard

Educational publisher Ray A. Shepard was born on June 26, 1940 in Sedalia, Missouri to Cornelius “Boots” Shepard and Loretha Mae Jackson Shepard. He graduated from Lincoln High School in Lincoln, Nebraska and served in the United States Army during “The Cold War,” based in Germany at the time of the construction of the Berlin Wall and the Cuban Missile Crises. After he completed his tour of duty, Shepard earned his B.S. degree from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln in Lincoln, Nebraska in 1967. He received a Martin Luther King, Jr. Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation to attend Harvard University and earned his M.A. degree in teaching from Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1971.

While at Harvard, Shepard wrote, “Warball,” which received the first prize in a contest held by the Council on Interracial Books for Children. He also published the article, “Adventures in Blackland with Keats and Steptoe,” which was featured in the Interracial Books for Children Bulletin. In 1973, he published his children’s book Sneakers and Conjure Tales, which was a retelling of short stories originally by Charles Waddell Chestnut. Shepard joined Scholastic, Inc. as an editor. From 1983 to 1987, Shepard worked for Houghton, Mifflin and Company, and then joined Simon & Schuster from 1987 to 1991. In 1991, Shepard returned to Houghton, Mifflin and Company as corporation vice president and editor-in-chief for elementary textbook publishing and served until 2003. Shepard entered the world of private consulting when he became the vice president for educational services at the Consortium of Reading Excellence in 2005. Then, he joined Gibson, Hasbrouck & Associates as the company’s chief operating officer. From 2010 to 2012, he returned to the Consortium of Reading Excellence as vice president and chief academic officer. Shepard then founded IQ History in 2012, publisher of teaching and learning resources for history teachers. In 2017, Shepard authored, Now or Never! 54th Massachusetts Infantry’s War to End Slavery, which follows the paths of two black journalists during the American Civil War. Now or Never! was named a Carter G. Woodson Honor Book by the National Council of Social Studies.

Shepard was a board member for the Highlights Foundation, as well as the Biographers International Group, during his career. He also taught at Phillips Andover Academy and Brandeis University.

Ray A. Shepard was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 16, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.149

Sex

Male

Interview Date

08/16/2017

Last Name

Shepard

Maker Category
Middle Name

Anthony

Organizations
First Name

Ray

Birth City, State, Country

Sedalia

HM ID

SHE05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Western Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

This too will end.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

6/26/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Pineapple upside down cake

Short Description

Educational publisher Ray A. Shepard (1940 - ) worked at Simon & Schuster, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, and Gibson, Hashbrouck & Associates as chief operating officer before serving as founding director of IQ History.

Favorite Color

Blue

David Richards

Military officer David Richards was born on March 19, 1929 in Sedalia, Missouri to Christina Diggs Richards and David Richards. He attended Lincoln School and C.C. Hubbard High School in Sedalia. Richards then studied at the College of Mortuary Science in St. Louis, Missouri, graduating in 1951. Years later, Richards received his B.A. degree in business administration from Park College in Parkville, Missouri in 1975. Three years later, he earned his M.A. degree in human resources from Pepperdine University.

Upon graduating from high school, Richards joined the United States Army in 1946. He was stationed at Camp Stoneman in California, and deployed overseas to the Pacific Theater. Richards became a member of the U.S. Army band, and rose to head of the reed section. After completing U.S. Army service in 1948, Richards worked briefly as an apprentice mortician, and returned to the Army in 1954. He completed airborne training at Fort Benning, Georgia and attended rigger school at Fort Lee, Virginia. He served ten years in the 612th Quartermaster Aerial Supply Company, and then transferred to the Artic Test Center in Fort Greenly, Alaska, where he tested airdrop equipment. Then, Richards was sent to the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center in Massachusetts, where he helped develop expendable parachutes for the Vietnam War. In 1968, Richards became the Army’s first African American warrant officer, and remained the sole African American in that rank until his retirement in 1983. After his Army career, Richards worked at the Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department in staffing, and later as a crime prevention analyst. He continued teaching as an adjunct professor at Saint Leo University until 2000.

As the first African American warrant officer, Richards was inducted into the Parachute Rigger Warrant Officer’s Hall of Fame upon his retirement in 1983. Richards was also inducted into the Distinguished Order of Saint Martin within the Quartermaster Corps in the United States Army. He was a three time recipient of the Omega Man of the Year Award and the Superior Service Award. Georgia Legislative Black Caucus, Inc. also honored Richards with the Salute to Veterans Award.

Richards was a member of St. Philip A.M.E. Church in Savannah, Georgia. He also served as an advisor to the director of the West Board Street YMCA, as president for the Mental Health Association of the Coastal Empire, as vice chair of human services for Chatham County and as chairperson of the superintendent advisory council for the Chatham County Board of Education. Richards was a board member for the Frank Callen Boys and Girls Club, JHS of Savannah, the Meditation Center Board, the Martin Luther King Day Observance Committee and the Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum.

Richards and his wife, Swannie Moore Richards have three children: David Richards III, Yvette Richards, and Bonnye Richards Anthony.

Richards passed away on February 5, 2019.

David Richards was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 9, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.044

Sex

Male

Interview Date

02/10/2017

Last Name

Richards

Maker Category
Schools

Pepperdine University

Park University

C.C. Hubbard High School

Lincoln School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

David

Birth City, State, Country

Sedalia

HM ID

RIC20

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Quote

Success Awaits At Labor's Gates.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/19/1929

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Savannah

Country

USA

Death Date

2/5/2019

Short Description

Military officer David Richards, Jr. (1929 - 2019) conducted over 11,000 parachute operations on behalf of the U.S. Army, and was inducted into the Parachute Rigger Warrant Officer’s Hall of Fame.

Employment

US Army

Saint Leo University

Savannah Tribune

Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department

Favorite Color

Purple

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of David Richards' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - David Richards lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - David Richards describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - David Richards describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - David Richards talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - David Richards describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - David Richards remembers his community in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - David Richards describes his parents' occupations

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - David Richards remembers the Lincoln School in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - David Richards remembers the Great Depression

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - David Richards recalls his childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - David Richards remembers the faculty of the Lincoln School in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - David Richards remembers his activities at C.C. Hubbard High School in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - David Richards recalls the Taylor Chapel Methodist Church in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - David Richards remembers his prom

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - David Richards describes his family vacations

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - David Richards remembers the businesses in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - David Richards recalls joining the U.S. Army

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - David Richards recalls the aftermath of World War II in the western Pacific

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - David Richards remembers joining a U.S. Army band, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - David Richards remembers joining a U.S. Army band, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - David Richards talks about his military promotions

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - David Richards recalls his training as a mortician

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - David Richards remembers his decision to return to the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - David Richards remembers his paratrooper training

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - David Richards recalls attending parachute rigger school

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - David Richards remembers conducting parachute field tests

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - David Richards describes his work at the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - David Richards remembers being denied a promotion

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - David Richards remembers his promotion to warrant officer

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - David Richards describes his duties as a warrant officer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - David Richards remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - David Richards talks about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - David Richards remembers his retirement from the U.S. military

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - David Richards recalls his career at the Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - David Richards describes his college education

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - David Richards remembers his career as a professor

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - David Richards describes his organizational activities, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - David Richards describes his organizational activities, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - David Richards shares a message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - David Richards reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - David Richards describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - David Richards recalls serving as parade marshal for the Veteran's Council

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - David Richards remembers his students

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - David Richards narrates his photographs

Cornelius "Boots" Shepard

Railroad chef Boots (Cornelius Orville) Shepard was born on July 11, 1915, in Sedalia, Missouri to Mabel Smith Shepard and Raymond Shepard. Shepard has traced his ancestors back to slavery and many of his relatives attended the now forgotten George R. Smith College, which was a popular Methodist institution named for Sedalia Missouri’s founder and the college’s benefactor. The school was a magnet for black people for miles around. Shepard was a very strong willed child; he received the nickname “Boots” when he refused to take off a pair of his new boots before going to bed. Shepard attended Franklin Elementary School and graduated from Lincoln High School in 1935.

While attending high school in the 1930s, Shepard met his future wife, Loreatha Mae. The couple raised eleven children and emphasized the values of family and hard work. In 1935 Shepard moved to Lincoln, Nebraska where he found a job as a cook on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad (CB&Q). He worked for thirty-five years on the railroad and was the youngest chef at CB&Q Railroad during his tenure. This was a great accomplishment because African Americans were rarely promoted to the position of head chef on the railroads. As a chef, Shepard also traveled to Chicago where he worked on the California Zephyr. As a resident of Lincoln, Shepard joined the Newman Methodist Church and became an active member for seventy years.

Cornelius Orville Shepard died on November 17, 2007 at the age of 92.

Cornelius Orville Shepard was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 4, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.278

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/4/2007

Last Name

Shepard

Maker Category
Middle Name

Orville

Occupation
Schools

C.C. Hubbard High School

Nebraska Wesleyan University

First Name

Cornelius

Birth City, State, Country

Sedalia

HM ID

SHE03

Sponsor

Ray Shepard

State

Missouri

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Nebraska

Interview Description
Birth Date

7/11/1915

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Lincoln

Country

USA

Death Date

11/17/2007

Short Description

Railroad chef Cornelius "Boots" Shepard (1915 - 2007 ) worked for the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad.

Employment

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company.

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Brown, Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:810,18:1944,40:17270,286:17870,292:22240,322:26552,402:27434,419:30338,499:39603,710:43163,833:55756,1025:77818,1302:83522,1410:89840,1526:94571,1629:96148,1644:102788,1741:103120,1746:109060,1802:111300,1837:118340,2068:119700,2125:134420,2271:136184,2305:172920,2743:182706,2932:203176,3131:208012,3344:224368,3509:229268,3636:245444,3760:260331,3890:299927,4248:304180,4272:312882,4411:320830,4522$0,0:999,12:12321,318:31192,482:31864,513:34888,609:37128,705:48100,857:55240,958:57970,978:59125,1117:61960,1377:75927,1557:116673,2061:134266,2194:181656,2568:182072,2573:195882,2707:208972,2926:212062,3090:228370,3514:279110,3904:279560,3910:299742,4200:300202,4206:328313,4712:330007,4726:333178,4751:335962,4795:358181,5063:363831,5127:367000,5166
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Cornelius "Boots" Shepard's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes his maternal grandparents and great-grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes his neighborhood in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes his parents' education

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard talks about his parents' marriage

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls his early work experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes his community in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls the racial discrimination in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard remembers his education in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls his involvement in sports

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard remembers playing high school football

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes the Lincoln School in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls his parents' influence

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard remembers moving to Lincoln, Nebraska

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard remembers Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln, Nebraska

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls being hired as a railroad cook

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes working on the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes his duties as a railroad cook

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard talks about his marriage

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls bringing his wife to Lincoln, Nebraska

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard remembers raising his family in Lincoln, Nebraska

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard talks about the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes his support for his wife's family

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard talks about his railroad career

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls cooking for special events on the railroad

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls cooking for private parties in Sedalia, Missouri

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard remembers World War II

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls the creation of the Burlington Northern Railroad

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes the racial discrimination in the railroad industry

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard remembers filing a lawsuit against the railroad

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes the decision of his lawsuit against the railroad

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls instances of train hopping

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls the death of his grandchild, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls the death of his grandchild, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls suing a photographer for racial discrimination

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard reflects upon his career

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Cornelius "Boots" Shepard describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

1$2

DATitle
Cornelius "Boots" Shepard recalls his early work experiences
Cornelius "Boots" Shepard remembers moving to Lincoln, Nebraska
Transcript
Can you tell that story again about the bottles? Now, you said that you used to collect whiskey bottles (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Well, my father [Ray Shepard] worked for the white bootleggers and the gamblers, and upstairs they had the gambling and downstairs they had a front, cigar store. It'd be about four or five feet wide and a (unclear) going across in the back door over here it'll go back, all in the back, that's where the whiskey and everything was. And my father would be back there cleaning the whiskey bottles and filling 'em up. Well, when I'd go in they'd say, "Go on back there, take 'em back there to him, Boots [HistoryMaker Cornelius "Boots" Shepard], your dad's back there. Go back there." And my father would take 'em, and he'd count 'em and tell--and give me a paper, I had ten or twenty. I'd go back out there and give it to the guy at behind the--on the cash register, and he'd reach over and give me--he'd count my money out to me, nickel a bottle. I'd go down the street, turn, come back up the alley, pick my whiskey bottles up, take 'em about two blocks over to the white bootlegger--I mean, black bootlegger and sell it to him and he'd pay me three cents for 'em. So I got eight cents for one bottle. All the rest of the black kids didn't know where they were, where to go and everything. And I wouldn't tell 'em. And I'd be getting eight cents for bottles and they were getting three cents.$$Now, put it in perspective now. How, I mean, eight cents per bottle in those days, that wasn't too bad, was it? I mean, that's like getting what now (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) No, that was good, that was good. I don't know what they get for 'em now that's 'cause I don't guess they sell 'em like that no more.$$No, but it would be like--it wouldn't be like eight cents now, it'd be like fifty cents, a dollar, or something?$$No, it wouldn't be that much.$$It wouldn't be that much? You don't think?$$Might give you a nickel for 'em or ten cents for 'em maybe.$$No, I'm saying what eight cents was worth then, what is that worth now?$$Eight cents is worth about a quarter of what it is now.$$Oh, okay, all right. So it'd be like a quarter apiece then?$$Yeah, it'd be like a quarter. Yeah, eight cents was a whole lot. Three cents was a whole lot.$$And what could you get with--how much did a bottle of milk cost then?$$Bottle of milk? Ten or fifteen cents. Ten cents, twelve cents.$$And now it's like--$$Eggs (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) It's over a dollar now for--$$Yeah, you go, go buy eggs, and mother tells you--before they started raising chickens--you go to the store, give you a nickel or a dime, tell you go get me two eggs, go get me one egg. Whatever you have.$$Okay. So that money went pretty far in those days?$$Oh, yeah, yeah. You never know--didn't know what it was--on a Saturday I'd go uptown at the shining parlor. It was owned by the fellow that had that had the bowling alley, and it was (unclear) shining stand. And he would hire--he had two or three boys that worked in there regular. And, if you got in with him, you could go in there and set around with him and you shine shoes and you'd make--your tip was yours. 'Cause everybody got a shoeshine, it was a dime, bet he's gonna tip a nickel or a dime. You could bet on that. And everybody--on Saturday that shining stand would be full of--would be sometimes we'd have three, three guys going--you'd be going down shining three pair of shoes at a time. See. You get that rag and then you learn to pop it, and put it on its heel and then jerk it out and pop it. Then you know it--when you did that, you know you got a tip coming. Then if you could go long toward two like its pop, pop, pop, you got folks--if you're good enough to do that, you bet you gonna make some money on Saturday. Stop by Clover's store [ph.] and Sunday, you bet we gonna have meatloaf and spaghetti. And get that, get a quarter worth of sugar, quarter worth of hamburger and sausage mix, that's for the meatloaf, and a pack of spaghetti and can of tomatoes. You carry that home, you got Sunday dinner made for mama. And that was, that was all right. You didn't buy no ten pounds of sugar, quarter's worth of sugar. Quarter's worth of this, dime for this. You knew it the whole time you had over a dollar in your pocket, when you done been up there hustling at the shining stand and made some money. And (unclear) all the rest of you have a dime or fifteen cents in your pocket, hell, you was rich.$So when you were getting ready to graduate from high school [Lincoln School; C.C. Hubbard High School, Sedalia, Missouri]--$$Uh-huh.$$What did you think you were gonna do? Did you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I wanted to be a cabinetmaker--$$Okay.$$--'cause I was good in math and manual training. I was good at that. I could--I used a lathe, I've got--when I left home I had went out in the country and got a piece of wood, a log of wood, of walnut and come back home after school, made lamps out of 'em, made a pair of lamps out of 'em. My mother [Mabel Smith Shepard], when I left home, I left all that stuff there when I was a kid. My brother [Willard Shepard] and I both, we made stuff like that all the time. When they bought the lathe, I learn how to run a lathe and take a stick of wood, take and put it on the--had the band saw. Learned that saw and turn a--take a stick wood, cut it, get it squared up. You'd square it up and put it on that lathe and take that thing little closer and take your little compass and see how round you got it and how many (unclear) you wanna put in it and all like that. You draw it out on paper and then put it up in front of you and you do the lathe. Yeah.$$Okay, but you ended up going to college, right?$$Huh?$$You ended up going to college and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, I ended up going to college.$$Now, where did you go and how did you get there?$$Right here, right here at Nebraska Wesleyan [Nebraska Wesleyan University, Lincoln, Nebraska].$$Nebraska Wesleyan, okay. Now, how did that happen, what happened?$$Well, the--when I went to school--went to--come to Lincoln [Nebraska] back to Lincoln that--in September, I was been up here in '34 [1934] in the summer for my dad [Ray Shepard], and when I came back to Lincoln I went to church and the minister there was raised up with--and his wife was raised with my own mother and father. And they, of course, from the same church my grandfather [William H. Smith] preached at and everything. But he didn't preach here, and one of 'em, when church was out he asked me, said, asked me did I play football. I said, "Yeah." He said, "What are you gonna do tomorrow?" I said, "I don't know, nothing. I just came up here, thought maybe I'd find a job." Well, I said, "I can get a better job here than I can in Sedalia [Missouri]." And I came up here, and so he said, "Well, where will you be?" I said, "I'll be at home." And that Monday about noon he called and my auntie answered the telephone and he asked me, said, "What'd you got to do this afternoon?" I said, "Nothing." Said, "You know where Wesleyan University is?" I said, "Yeah, not too far," 'cause I'm living right over on 30th [Street] and Apple [Street]. And I'd go right up there to Overland [Trail] and walk out to the school. And he said, "Well, you be out there at three o'clock this afternoon and go right to the locker room where the coaches are." Said, "Go out there and they want to--he wants to talk to you." I said, okay. I went out there, I didn't have the least idea of going to school. School'd been going on a week or two weeks before I got there. And I went out there and he said--something's missing. Said, "Can you kick a football?" "Yes." "Can you thow a football?" "Yes." He said, "What position did you play?" I said, "Quarterback." He just stood there a while. He said, "What formation did you run?" I said, "Run the T formation." He said, "Well, that's good, that's what we run." That was it. And told me to go over there to the locker room, and they threw me a pair of shoes, socks, pants, athletic sweater, everything. Say, we had to give parties to raise stuff in high school. White kids got theirs free. We had to give parties to raise money to buy ours. So, he sent me there and then when I got my uniform and everything, told me to put it on.$$Now, this is a white school, right?$$Yeah, yeah. Right up at the top of the hill there.$$This is a white coach?$$Yeah. And went out there and got out there and had the center to come out, told the center to center the ball. He said, "Let me see you kick." And I centered the ball and I kicked, and I kicked about three times. He said, "You're kicking good but you're holding the ball wrong." I said, "What'd you mean, holding the ball wrong. Ain't no other way to hold it." He didn't know I was left-footed. And when he woke up and saw I was left-footed, he said, "No wonder I'm thinking you're wrong, you're left-footed aren't you." I said, "Yeah. I kick with my left foot, I don't kick with the right foot." So he says, "Well, that's all right." Said, "Well, you kick it all right." And then he had me take several plays from the center, and the center kicked the ball, and he had me throw several passes, did that. Said, "Okay." He said, "Go over there and they'll give you a slip to go down to the bookstore and get your books." So, I went over there and they give me a slip, went on down to bookstore, got my books.$$Okay. (Laughter) It was just like that, huh? Well you--you were (simultaneous)--$$Yeah, just like that. And got fifteen dollars a month.