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Dolores Robinson

Entertainment manager Dolores Robinson was born on April 13, 1936 in Penllyn, Pennsylvania. After graduating from Ambler High School in 1954, she earned her B.A. degree from West Chester Teachers’ College in Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1958.

Robinson worked as a public school teacher in Philadelphia before she became a public relations director and on-air personality for WCAU-TV and later served as a publicity director for KYW-TV in Philadelphia. In 1974, Robinson relocated with her family to Los Angeles where she was hired as a receptionist at a talent agency, and was then promoted to agent. In 1976, she founded her own management company, Dolores Robinson Entertainment and her first client was LeVar Burton. She also helped launch the careers of Martin Sheen, Mark Wahlberg, Jada Pinkett Smith, Emilio Estevez, and, her daughter, Holly Robinson Peete. Her other clients included, Wesley Snipes, Linda Fiorentino, Kadeem Hardison, Jason Patric, Randy Quaid, Elisabeth Shue, Powers Booth, John Henton, Rosie Perez and Pierce Brosnan.

In 1996, Robinson served as an executive producer of the television series Matt Waters starring Montel Williams, and a pilot for ABC starring NBA Hall of Famer George Gervin. She also executive produced the Fox/UPN show Between Brothers starring Kadeem Hardison. In 2014, Robinson was hired to represent Little League World Series star Mo’ne Davis. She also managed the music career of her granddaughter, Ryan Peete. In 2016, Robinson appeared in For Peete's Sake, an American reality television series starring her daughter, Holly Robinson Peete, Rodney Peete, and their four children, which ran for two seasons, from 2016 to 2017. In 2018, she served as consulting producer on the Hallmark Channel series Meet The Peetes, also starring her daughter’s family.

Robinson served on the board of directors for the American Civil Liberties Union, and was an original advisory board member for the Hollywood Women's Political Committee. Robinson also served on the board of directors for the Motion Picture & Television Fund and is a supporter of A Place Call Home and Girls, Inc.

Robinson was the recipient of the Judy & Hilary Swank Award for Parenting presented at the Actors Fund 2017 Looking Ahead Awards.

Dolores Robinson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 11, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.224

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/11/2018

Last Name

Robinson

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Dolores

Birth City, State, Country

Penllyn

HM ID

ROB38

Favorite Season

Palm Springs during Winter

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

My Patio With My Plants

Favorite Quote

I Gotta Take Care of Me

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

4/13/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Favorite Food

Arugula

Short Description

Entertainment manager Dolores Robinson (1936- ) founded Dolores Robinson Entertainment, representing LeVar Burton, Martin Sheen, Jada Pinkett Smith and Wesley Snipes.

Favorite Color

Sunflower Yellow

Chaz Ebert

Lawyer and entertainment manager Chaz Ebert was born on October 15, 1952 in Chicago, Illinois to Johnnie Hobbs Hammel and Wiley Hammel, Sr. She attended John M. Smyth Elementary School and Crane Technical High School in Chicago, Illinois and graduated in 1969. Ebert earned her B.A. degree in political science at the University of Dubuque in Dubuque, Iowa in 1972. She then received her M.A. degree in social science at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville in Platteville, Wisconsin. Ebert went on to receive her J.D. degree from DePaul University College of Law in Chicago.

Ebert began her career in 1977 as a litigator for the Region Five office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. After three years, she left the agency to join the litigation department at the Chicago law firm of Bell Boyd and Lloyd LLP, where she focused on mergers and acquisitions and intellectual property. Ebert then began working at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Her work there focused primarily on race and age-based workplace discrimination. In 1989, she became the vice president of Ebert Company Ltd., where she oversaw daily operations and provided legal counsel for the company. In 1992, she married film critic Roger Ebert and continued to play an important role in the company over the following two decades, and often traveled with her husband and his business partner, film critic Gene Siskel. When Siskel passed away in 1999, Ebert encouraged the partnership between her husband and Chicago Sun Times columnist Richard Roeper. In 2002, Ebert launched rogerebert.com, an online magazine of film reviews by Roger Ebert and other critics. After her husband’s death in 2013, Ebert revamped the website under the company Ebert Digital. She also worked on the documentary of her late husband’s life called Life Itself.

Ebert hosted the twelfth annual Roger Ebert’s Film Festival in 2010. She led a team of critics to cover the Cannes Film Festival for rogerebert.com in 2013. Ebert also continued her husband’s legacy through her published contributions on rogerebert.com.

Ebert has two children, Josibiah Smith and Sonia Evans.

Chaz Ebert was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 7, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.121

Sex

Female

Interview Date

08/07/2017

Last Name

Ebert

Marital Status

Widow

Schools

Smyth Magnet School

Richard T. Crane Medical Preparatory High School

University of Dubuque

University of Wisconsin-Platteville

DePaul University College of Law

First Name

Chaz

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

EBE01

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

In a villa with family.

Favorite Quote

Fall Down Seven, Get Up Eight.$

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

10/15/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice cream

Short Description

Lawyer Chaz Ebert (1952 - ) worked as a litigation attorney and served as vice president of the Ebert Company Ltd.

Employment

Environmental Protection Agency

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Bell Boyd and Lloyd, LLP

Ebert Company

Favorite Color

Rainbow

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Chaz Ebert's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Chaz Ebert lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Chaz Ebert describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Chaz Ebert describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Chaz Ebert remembers visiting Thomaston, Georgia as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Chaz Ebert lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Chaz Ebert describes her relationship with her older sisters

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Chaz Ebert talks about her early neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Chaz Ebert describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Chaz Ebert talks about her early neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Chaz Ebert describes her family's first home in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Chaz Ebert remembers her father's proficiency in food preparation

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Chaz Ebert recalls her close relationship with her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Chaz Ebert remembers her family's social activities

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Chaz Ebert describes her early religious experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Chaz Ebert recalls her childhood responsibilities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Chaz Ebert remembers her mother's community involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Chaz Ebert talks about her fortieth high school reunion

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Chaz Ebert remembers influential elementary school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Chaz Ebert recalls her initial interest in the legal profession

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Chaz Ebert describes her club memberships in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Chaz Ebert remembers marching with her father

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Chaz Ebert recalls her experiences with discriminatory teachers and professors

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Chaz Ebert remembers her decision to attend the University of Dubuque in Dubuque, Iowa

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Chaz Ebert remembers the racial demographics of the University of Dubuque

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Chaz Ebert recalls starting her family while attending college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Chaz Ebert talks about her decision to pursue a master's degree

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Chaz Ebert recalls attending the DePaul University College of Law in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Chaz Ebert remembers the start to her legal career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Chaz Ebert describes her pro bono work as a law student

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Chaz Ebert talks about balancing her personal life and law school

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Chaz Ebert recalls discriminatory practices at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Chaz Ebert remembers the executives at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Chaz Ebert remembers working with John McGuire

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Chaz Ebert talks about her positions after leaving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Chaz Ebert recalls leaving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Chaz Ebert remembers her work at Bell Boyd and Lloyd LLP

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Chaz Ebert talks about her work on discrimination cases

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Chaz Ebert describes her employment history

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Chaz Ebert remembers meeting Roger Ebert, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Chaz Ebert remembers meeting Roger Ebert, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Chaz Ebert describes Roger Ebert's personality

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Chaz Ebert remembers her initial bond with Roger Ebert

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Chaz Ebert remembers joining the Ebert Company Ltd.

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Chaz Ebert shares her thoughts on remarrying

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Chaz Ebert talks about the importance of philanthropy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Chaz Ebert remembers her relationship with Roger Ebert's family

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Chaz Ebert remembers her husband's working relationship with Gene Siskel

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Chaz Ebert talks about Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel's careers as film critics

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Chaz Ebert remembers learning about film from Roger Ebert

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Chaz Ebert describes the creation of rogerebert.com

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Chaz Ebert talks about Roger Ebert's television work, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Chaz Ebert talks about Roger Ebert's television work, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Chaz Ebert recalls Roger Ebert's cancer diagnosis

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Chaz Ebert recalls her connection with Roger Ebert after the loss of his voice

Tracey Edmonds

Producer and business executive Tracey E. Edmonds was born on February 18, 1967 in Los Angeles, California to Jacqueline and George McQuarn. Edmonds graduated from Stanford University with her B.A. degree in psychobiology in 1987.

Upon graduation, Edmonds ran a successful mortgage and real estate business. Then, in 1993, she created Edmonds Entertainment Group, Inc., a multi-million dollar enterprise actively involved in all aspects of the entertainment business. Edmonds Entertainment produced the film Soul Food in 1997, which earned five NAACP Image Awards. The success of Edmonds Entertainment set the stage for the independent film production company, e2 Filmworks. Edmonds produced two independent films under this banner: Hav Plenty, which was released in 1998; and 2001’s Punks. In 2004, she executive produced the reality show College Hill, the first African American reality program on BET, which set a network record as BET's highest rated series premiere. Edmonds also produced the series Lil' Kim: Countdown to Lockdown, as well as DMX: Soul of a Man, which both aired on BET in 2006. She has produced a number of other films and television shows, including Light It Up, Soul Food: The Series, Josie and the Pussycats, Maniac Magee, Keyshia Cole: The Way It Is, Good Luck Chuck, Who’s Your Caddy? , New in Town, and Jumping the Broom, which won two NAACP Image Awards.

In 2006, Edmonds was hired as chief operating officer and president of Our Stories Films, where she oversees the development and production of projects for urban audiences. In 2013, she launched ALRIGHT TV, an inspirational, faith-friendly YouTube Premium channel, for which she serves as president and chief executive officer.

Edmonds has served on the boards of the American Film Institute, People for the American Way, Children Uniting Nations, and the Producers Guild of America. She also served as a Global Ambassador for CARE, a leading humanitarian organization that works to fight global poverty. Edmonds has won numerous awards, including Turner Broadcasting System’s Tower of Power Award in 2000; Ebony magazine’s Outstanding Women In Marketing & Communications Entrepreneur Award in 2002; the Girls, Inc. Award in 2004; the National Organization for Women’s Excellence in Media Award in 2005; and The Caucus for Television Producers, Writers and Directors Diversity Award in 2006. She has also received an Honorary Doctorate degree in business from Southern University.

Edmonds resides in Beverly Hills, California with her two sons, Brandon and Dylan.

Tracey Edmonds was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 19, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.313

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/19/2013

Last Name

Edmonds

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

E.

Schools

Braodacres Avenue Elementary School

Progress Elementary School

W.C. Woodbury Middle School

Bishop Gorman High School

Woodrow Wilson Classical High School

Stanford University

First Name

Tracey

Birth City, State, Country

Los Angeles

HM ID

EDM04

Favorite Season

Holiday Season

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Europe

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

2/18/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Mexican Food

Short Description

Film producer and entertainment manager Tracey Edmonds (1967 - ) was the founder and CEO of Edmonds Entertainment Group, which produced numerous films and television shows including Soul Food, Josie and the Pussycats, Good Luck Chuck, Who’s Your Caddy? and Jumping the Broom.

Employment

Edmonds Entertainment

e2 Filmworks

Our Stories Films

ALRIGHT TV

Yab Yum Entertainment

Edmonds Record Group

Edmonds Management

Favorite Color

Beige

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Tracey Edmonds' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Tracey Edmonds lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Tracey Edmonds describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Tracey Edmonds talks about her maternal family's move to Los Angeles, California

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Tracey Edmonds remembers her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Tracey Edmonds talks about her parents' teenage years

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Tracey Edmonds describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Tracey Edmonds describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Tracey Edmonds talks about her father's childhood in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Tracey Edmonds describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Tracey Edmonds talks about her father's coaching career

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Tracey Edmonds describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Tracey Edmonds recalls her early years in Nevada and California

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Tracey Edmonds describes her early childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Tracey Edmonds recalls her elementary school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Tracey Edmonds describes her experiences at Bishop Gorman High School in Las Vegas, Nevada

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Tracey Edmonds talks about the segregation at Woodrow Wilson High School in Long Beach, California

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Tracey Edmonds talks about her extracurricular activities at Woodrow Wilson High School in Long Beach, California

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Tracey Edmonds recalls her experiences with racial discrimination at Woodrow Wilson High School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Tracey Edmonds describes her experiences at Woodrow Wilson High School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Tracey Edmonds recalls her college application process

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Tracey Edmonds describes her experiences at Stanford University in Stanford, California

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Tracey Edmonds remembers studying abroad in Florence, Italy

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Tracey Edmonds recalls her professors at Stanford University in Stanford, California

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Tracey Edmonds talks about her decision to become a real estate broker

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Tracey Edmonds talks about the entertainment of her youth, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Tracey Edmonds recalls the entertainment of her youth, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Tracey Edmonds talks about her mother's real estate company in Newport Beach, California

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Tracey Edmonds remembers meeting her first husband, Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Tracey Edmonds remembers meeting her first husband, Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Tracey Edmonds talks about the formation of Yab Yum Entertainment

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Tracey Edmonds recalls the artist she worked with through Yab Yum Entertainment

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Tracey Edmonds talks about producing the film, 'Soul Food'

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Tracey Edmonds talks about the success of the movie 'Soul Food'

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Tracey Edmonds remembers the creation of 'Soul Food' the television series

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Tracey Edmonds talks about the theatrical release of 'Light It Up'

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Tracey Edmonds describes her acquisition of the film 'Hav Plenty'

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Tracey Edmonds talks about producing the film, 'Punks'

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Tracey Edmonds describes her various entertainment companies

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Tracey Edmonds remembers pitching 'College Hill' to BET

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Tracey Edmonds talks about the filming of 'College Hill'

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Tracey Edmonds talks about the reception of 'College Hill'

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Tracey Edmonds recalls producing 'Jumping the Broom'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Tracey Edmonds talks about Our Stories Films

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Tracey Edmonds reflects upon her career

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Tracey Edmonds talks about mentoring aspiring film producers

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Tracey Edmonds describes the YouTube premium channel Alright TV

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Tracey Edmonds describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Tracey Edmonds reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Tracey Edmonds talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Tracey Edmonds describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

4$8

DATitle
Tracey Edmonds remembers meeting her first husband, Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds, pt. 2
Tracey Edmonds talks about the filming of 'College Hill'
Transcript
So, that was February of 1990, by May is when I made the decision to move up to L.A. [Los Angeles, California]. And so, the weekend of our move we're unpacking and I'm in sweats and a ponytail and we decide to take a food break from moving and we go to KFC [Kentucky Fried Chicken] to go get some food and stuff and we're coming back to our new office and stuff and, you know, there's a lot of traffic on Santa Monica Boulevard, my mom [Jacqueline Moten McQuarn] detours and goes on a side street and there's a, some kind of studio on this side street and so out, you know, comes Kenny "Babyface" Edmonds [Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds] walking out of this studio and we're driving, you know, and she's like, "Isn't that that guy Babyface you were supposed to do the video with?" And I said, "Yeah," I said, "I think that's him." She goes, "Well, you should go say hi to him." I go, "Mom, I don't look good, you know, like I'm dirty, no." And so, she was like, "Well, I don't care what you say, I'm driving." So, she pulls into the parking lot or whatever and rolls down the window and, you know, Kenny is dressed in a nice suit and, and everything and so my mom is like, "Hey, are you Babyface?" And he's like, "Yeah." And she's like, "You know, my daughter, Tracey [HistoryMaker Tracey Edmonds], was supposed to be in this video with you but she got chickenpox. There's Tracey," and he's like, "Oh, yeah," you know, and I'm just like (laughter). And so, he's like, "Yeah, you know, we were wondering what happened to you." And I was like, "Yeah, I got sick," you know. And she's like, "Well, she just moved up here and she doesn't know anyone, so, here's her card," you know. And he's like, "Oh, okay." She's like, "You guys should get together," you know. And so, he's like, "Okay." And I was like, you know, we drove off. And I was like, "Mom," I was like, "that is so embarrassing." I'm like, "Why did you do that?" And so, but sure enough like, you know, he got the card and I think I got a phone call (laughter) in the next hour or so, where he called me and invited me to, to dinner. And so, so, we had dinner at The Cheesecake Factory in Marina del Rey [California] and, you know, the rest is history. And so, we just, you know, we dated for, I think a year and a half and then got engaged and, you know, got married a couple of years later.$$Okay. Okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) And then my, my life changed.$$Yeah, and apparently his did--$$(Laughter).$$--too because, you know, he wrote that you really pushed him, I mean, you know, in terms of what, what his ambitions were and what he was trying to do you, you were, you give him a, a push.$$Oh, I never knew he said that. That--$$Yeah, that's, we got a quote in here.$$(Laughter).$$I don't wanna read it but, but there, yeah, he actually said, he said this to--anyway.$$Is that from a interview he did for something or--$$Yeah, yeah.$$Oh.$$Yeah.$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$Yeah.$$So, yeah, he said, "She, she pushed me in ways I needed to be pushed. She encouraged me to try new things, things I had never done before."$$Oh, wow. That's, I mean, that's really sweet. We, Kenny and I are still to this day, we're very close friends. And so, I have a lot of beautiful, beautiful memories with him. And, you know, when we talk about how my mom, I always told my mom how she was blessed to be young and to have had that real young love and, you know, and, and, getting your first house together and having kids together and all that kind of stuff, I had that with Kenny which was beautiful. You know, and so, he was like my first young love and we, I mean, we had an amazing time, we grew together. And so, we did the house, buying our house and fixing up, and finding furniture, and fixing rooms, and having, you know, our babies together. And, and then I always, you know, I had this travel bug and he--in me and he knows that's just my character so I'm always, you know, I was the person to take him to Europe for the first time and so I was like, you know, always the one kind of planning these experiences and these memories that I wanted us to have together. And so, so we did our first Europe trip together, we saw China together, we saw Japan together, we climbed through pyramids of Egypt together, Thailand, Australia, we went all over the world together, you know, as we got older and experienced life and, and stuff together. And so, you know, and he was, you know, both of us, I think, you know, he really supported me in my ambitions and I did whatever I could to, to support him too behind the scenes too. And--yeah.$$Now, he grew up in Indianapolis [Indiana] right?$$Um-hm.$$That's, yeah, 'cause (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah. Yeah, he--yeah, he grew up in Indianapolis. But we did, you know, we did a lot of things together. Like when I decided that I wanted to go into film, you know, and become a producer and stuff and created Edmonds Entertainment [Edmonds Entertainment Group, Inc., Los Angeles, California], he supported me and I found the 'Soul Food' movie and I said, "Hey, well, let's do this together," you know. So, I produced the movie and then he did all the music. So, it was, it was fun 'cause, you know, we flew out to Chicago [Illinois], I had just had Brandon [Brandon Edmonds]. And we're staying in this, you know, hotel, I think it was like the Four Seasons Hotel [Four Seasons Hotel Chicago] or something, I'm on the set every day producing the movie, he's got a little studio set up inside the hotel room and he's writing all the songs as we're shooting the scenes and stuff. And so, so, we did that a few times on movies together and stuff and then we created a management company [Edmonds Management Group] and stuff. And so, I really, you know, I was inspired by--like I read this Donald Trump [President Donald John Trump] book when I was in, in college [Stanford University, Stanford, California] and it was kind of, you know, about the art of branding yourself, you know. And then we saw how Trump branded himself and put Trump all over the hotels and all that kind of stuff. And so, when Kenny and I got married I was like, "Okay, let's be like, you know, one of those big families and let's brand ourselves and stuff," and, you know, and I said, "And let's do Edmonds Entertainment," and, you know, and then we bought a, a, a building together and so I put a big E at the top (laughter), at the top of the building for Edmonds and--$$Well it--$$--you know (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) I, I think that all that worked.$So, Stephen Hill and BET [Black Entertainment Television] they said, "Okay, the, this 'College Hill' thing that you just pitched sounds really interesting. We only have this amount of money." And I was like, "Are you serious?" And they're like, "Yeah, and we need thirteen episodes. Can you do it?" And so, for me, you know, I've done a lot of things, as I'm sure you see, that's not always about making money. It's just about like taking things to another level for African American entertainment or opening a door or proving a point. And so, so, I said, "Okay, all right. I have this amount of money, you need thirteen episodes. Okay, I'll do it." And so, so, again, me being really hands on with everything, so I went out, I found a university that let us do it, Southern University [Southern University and Agricultural and Mechanical College], Baton Rouge, Louisiana. And, and I grabbed Chris Cherot [Christopher Scott Cherot] who I had done 'Hav Plenty' with because I knew Chris knew how to make stuff for no money (laughter). So, I'm like, "Chris, I have X number of dollars, we need to do thirteen episodes, okay. Can we get our guerilla reality making going and lets me and you go out to Southern University and shoot this reality show, and can you direct it and help me put it together?" So, he was like, "Okay, let's do it." So, so, we went out and shot our first season of 'College Hill.' Now, so sad compared to how all these shows are properly done. I mean, the only location we had were the kids' college dorms themselves. And so, nowadays, and in our subsequent seasons we got to put them in more, you know, better locations, a real house, and all this kind of stuff. First season we were actually just inside the dormitories having to shoot in these little tiny rooms and, you know, we had no story producers, nothing, so it was just me and Chris and it was all about casting. So, it was all about finding eight kids with really strong personalities that--$$Really different personalities.$$Yeah, really different personalities.$$I, I know one, Jabari Roberts from Chicago [Illinois].$$Oh, yes, yeah, yeah.$$He is exactly the way he is in (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, yeah.$$--on TV and--$$Yeah.$$--and people probably think that he's acting or doing something.$$No.$$He, he's exactly like that.$$No.$$He was the nerdiest kid in the--$$Absolutely.$$That's him.$$And we were really the realest reality show out there. We never scripted anything, we never pushed the kids to do anything, you know, it was all about strong personalities and, and the right casting and stuff. So, so, we did the show at Southern, they put it on the air and it broke all their ratings, you know, history. You know, like we, you know, we were the, had the highest ratings in the history of, of BET. And so, everybody went crazy, you know, over this little show, you know, or whatever and so I was like okay, cool, cool, yay, okay, well, we showed that there's an audience out there. So then, so then, we got picked up, you know, for another season. And then slowly, the second season they gave us, they increased our budget a little more, and then finally BET got bought out by Viacom [Viacom Inc.]. So, once that Viacom money came in they were really able to give us a proper budget, so that we were able to look like, you know, the competing shows, we were able to look like a, you know, a MTV show [Music Television; MTV], you know, or whatever. And so, so, we had six seasons always, you know, the number one top, top, top show. And it was really interesting because, you know, early on that first season like nobody knew what our budget was and everybody was like, "Well, how come your show, I love it, but how come it don't look like, you know, the other shows on, you know, why it gotta look like that?" I'm like, if you only knew (laughter) how much money, you know, we had to, you know, to shoot with, you know, it was, you know, pennies. So, so, yeah, so, we did six seasons and, you know, we were their number one rated show and then unfortunately we were put on pause because the regime changed and so to this day I've been trying to get them to unpause us and let us continue on, you know, with the show. And I get a million tweets 'cause it's on Netflix and, you know, everybody is like, "Oh, my god, Tracey [HistoryMaker Tracey Edmonds], when are you bringing back 'College Hill'?" You know, "What's going on with that?" And so, still talking to the network about it.

Veronica Claypool

General manager Veronica Claypool was born in Indianapolis, Indiana to Margie and Leander Warner. Claypool attended Shortridge Public High School in Indianapolis, where she graduated in 1966, and moved to New York City in 1970, where she attended Hunter College.

In 1973, Claypool worked on the production team for the tour and live broadcast of the Jackson 5 from Senegal, West Africa. One year later, Claypool became an associate producer for Metromedia Television in New York City, producing such programs as Midday Live, a daily talk show, Wonderama, a live children’s show and People of Paradise, a documentary filmed in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Claypool joined McCann and Nugent Productions in 1977, working as company manager for over twenty Broadway productions, which included Mass Appeal, Dracula and The Gin Game, as well as the original 1976 Houston Grand Opera European tour of Porgy and Bess. In 1981, Claypool left McCann and Nugent when she was employed as manager for the Broadway and national tours of Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music, including a live broadcast of the performance from the Nederlander Theatre on Broadway. In 1983 and 1984, Claypool was general manager for the Las Vegas national and international tours of the show, Sophisticated Ladies. Upon completion of this tour, Claypool worked as general manager, for The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe, starring Lily Tomlin. 1988 marked Claypool’s move to Los Angeles where she worked as general manager for the Center Theatre Group/ Ahmanson and Doolittle Theatres, working on such performances as Les Liaisons Dangereuses, Phantom of the Opera, Into the Woods, and August Wilson’s The Piano Lesson. In 1990, Claypool worked as assistant production auditor for the Columbia-Tri Star release The Fisher King. The next year, Claypool moved to Blanki & Bodi Productions, working on such pieces Tube Test Two for ABC Productions and Silent Killer: Women and Heart Disease for the American Heart Association. For the next two years, Claypool was the general manager for OBA OBA, a Brazilian production that toured both nationally and internationally.

Claypool managed the Houston Grand Opera tour of Porgy and Bess. After managing this tour, she served as general manager of the Jackie Mason show, Love Thy Neighbor. In 1997, she became managing director of Theatre Development Fund, the country’s largest nonprofit theatrical service organization. In 2005, Claypool married John Gordon Butler in Kona, Hawaii.

Accession Number

A2007.287

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/12/2007

Last Name

Claypool

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Shortridge High School

Hunter College

First Name

Veronica

Birth City, State, Country

Indianapolis

HM ID

CLA14

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Indiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Let's Just Get It Done.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/17/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Entertainment manager Veronica Claypool (1948 - ) became the managing director of the Theatre Development Fund, the United States' largest not-for-profit theatrical service organization in 1998. She has served as company manager for several staged shows, including the 1994 national tour of "Porgy and Bess."

Employment

Theatre Development Fund

Jackie Mason Show

Houston Grand Opera

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:6603,144:7029,151:7526,159:15407,295:25090,385:36940,581:41917,730:53999,870:67397,1108:76670,1191:79220,1243:87395,1411:99384,1592:102231,1641:102961,1655:113911,1881:127370,2012:128932,2044:137381,2209:142422,2441:162030,2619:163110,2657:169670,2711$0,0:136610,2010
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Veronica Claypool's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Veronica Claypool lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Veronica Claypool describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Veronica Claypool describes her maternal and paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Veronica Claypool talks about her family background, how her parents met and about moving to New York City

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Veronica Claypool describes growing up in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Veronica Claypool remembers her childhood home in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Veronica Claypool talks about her religious upbringing and her childhood in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Veronica Claypool recalls her grade school years at P.S. 41 and at Shortridge Public High School in Indianapolis, Indiana

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Veronica Claypool recounts her decision to leave Indianapolis, Indiana and move to New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Veronica Claypool talks about moving to New York City in 1970 and applying for a position at CBS

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Veronica Claypool describes working as an audience developer at CBS and attending Hunter College in New York City at night

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Veronica Claypool talks about working for HistoryMaker Earl Graves' Black Enterprise magazine and for Metromedia Television

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Veronica Claypool describes touring Senegal with the Jackson Five

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Veronica Claypool describes producing 'Midday Live' for Metromedia Television

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Veronica Claypool talks about her start in Broadway productions

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Veronica Claypool talks about producing Lena Horne's show 'The Lady and Her Music'

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Veronica Claypool reflects upon her theater production career in the 1970s and 1980s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Veronica Claypool talks about producing HistoryMaker Vy Higginsen's 'Mama, I Want to Sing,' and about meeting Lily Tomlin

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Veronica Claypool describes the business and challenges of commercial theater production

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Veronica Claypool talks about black theater audiences, and Lily Tomlin's one-woman show 'The Search for Intelligent Life in the Universe'

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Veronica Claypool describes working in theater production in Los Angeles, California and Houston, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Veronica Claypool describes working with Jackie Mason and with the Theatre Development Fund in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Veronica Claypool explains the Theatre Development Fund's educational programs in New York City public schools

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Veronica Claypool talks about working as the Theatre Development Fund's Chief Operations Officer

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Veronica Claypool describes working as a nominator for the Tony Awards and the Lucille Lortel Awards.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Veronica Claypool describes working for the Lucille Lortel Awards and with the Open Doors theater education program

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Veronica Claypool talks about HistoryMakers Woodie King and Stephanie Hughley, and other role models in the theater business

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Veronica Claypool talks about the Alliance of New York State Arts Organizations and the League of Professional Theatre Women

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Veronica Claypool describes her husband, Jack Butler

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Veronica Claypool reflects upon her career and her legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Veronica Claypool showcases the work of opera singer Kenn Hicks, who has worked with HistoryMaker Herbie Hancock and bassist Marcus Miller

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Veronica Claypool narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Veronica Claypool narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

7$1

DATitle
Veronica Claypool talks about her start in Broadway productions
Veronica Claypool talks about producing HistoryMaker Vy Higginsen's 'Mama, I Want to Sing,' and about meeting Lily Tomlin
Transcript
What shows were you going to and what was the atmosphere in Broadway like then? Did lots of people go? Was it similar to TV where people were really excited about going to see shows?$$I think so but I felt that there were two--there was a sort of a dichotomy in the--the audiences. There was black theatre and there was Broadway. I didn't understand that but I walked right out of television into Broadway so it was a very different time but, you know, you had 'Raisin In The Sun,' you had--there were a lot of shows that had set the precedent, you know.$$And were those shows that were on Broadway?$$On Broadway, uh-hum.$$The black shows?$$Uh-hum.$$And then--$$'The Wiz,' you had, you know, there was--there was a lot of, at that time, there was a lot happening.$$And then what, on Broadway, what kinds of shows were popular? Probably the same?$$The same.$$But--$$Because they would be moved the same way they are today. They would start Off-Broadway and then be moved to Broadway. You know, 'Serafina,' you know, there was--there were just a whole host of expressions at the time.$$So what was your first job in Broadway?$$My first job on Broadway was 'Barnum,' I think was my--and otherwise we were doing--I was working in an office that did a spate of shows and so we had a--Pilobolus dance company, a dance theatre. We had 'Barnum' which was a musical. We were managing them at the time. But the first one that we produced was 'Dracula' with Frank Langella and that was very exciting because it was a very groundbreaking time and then we did a lot of plays, mostly plays.$$And where were your shows?$$On Broadway.$$In various places?$$They were on Broadway.$$Various theatres?$$Uh-hum.$$And did you also do a tour of 'Porgy and Bess'?$$Yes, that came at the end of my apprenticeship. You have to do a three-year apprenticeship which was very much like going to law school. We called it the "bar" because you had to do three years of an apprenticeship, then you had to take a--a six-hour written test and then a three-hour oral because as a manager, the only person who can go to jail who has a position of responsibility in terms of money, is the manager, and that's what I was pursuing.$$So this is all Broadway managers?$$That's correct.$$Now and then?$$Absolutely, it's a union position. Everything on Broadway is a union position but that's what it takes to get into the union.$$I see. So, how long did you take--make that an initial stint on Broadway where you were--you're working with McCann and Nugent Productions?$$McCann and Nugent. I did, yes, and I did my apprenticeship, that was three years.$$Okay.$$Then I--I was admitted into the union.$$Okay.$$And then I just never stopped.$How did you meet Lily Tomlin?$$Well, that was--that was a great story. I was--after the Lena Horne show closed, and after 'Sophisticated Ladies' was done, I actually took a tour of [HM] Vy Higginsen's show, 'Mama, I Want To Sing' out on the road. So, we were out in Detroit [Michigan] and I got a phone call that Lily Tomlin was bringing her one-woman show to New York [New York City, New York] and she wanted to meet me and I thought, I wonder why, you know. But I had sort of developed this reputation as someone who--who dealt with star personalities and one-person shows. So, I flew in, met with her and it was a great interview and flew back and she's--I got a call the next day saying, you know, can you--when can you start? So I, you know, told Vy I was going to go do this show and 'Mama' kept touring and I came back to New York and the process with Lily's show was that it was being developed. Now when I walked into Lena Horne, it was already an entity, it was--the show was done, it was, you know, existed and it was already up and running.$$So in an instance like that, what's--what do you then need to do?$$What is my job?$$Yes.$$My job is--it's like starting a small business every time you open a show. So my job is to, you know, create--negotiate the contract with the theatre, create the timeline for when we start selling, work with the box office but in the Lily Tomlin case, because the show was being developed, it was, you know, Jane [Wagner] and Lily were actually in the creative process, so there was a lot involved in terms of technicians and special effects and negotiating all of that and understanding what that was going to be in terms of the cost of the show. Because she was a one-woman show that she was producing and in a sense directing, I mean, it was--it was--it had to be a really tight unit and it takes--that's a twenty-four seven involvement when it's a one-woman show like that. And so it's, it's based on personality so she has to feel comfortable with you.

Michael Mauldin

Music and entertainment executive Michael Mauldin was born in Murphy, North Carolina in 1953. Mauldin began his musical career in the late 1960s and early 1970s when he started as a musician playing with the racially integrated band, the Other Side. After briefly attending DeVry Institute of Technology, Mauldin moved to Atlanta, Georgia where he married and had a son, Jermaine.

In 1975, Mauldin received his first break in the music industry when the funk band, Brick, needed a van to haul their equipment to a gig in North Atlanta. After helping Brick with his van, Mauldin was hired by them as their stage manager and later he became their production manager. In the mid-1970s, he began working tours which involved many R&B and Funk band acts such as: the Bar Kays, LTD and others. Through this work, Mauldin decided to start the touring company, MTM Roadwork’s (Making Tours Move) that provided staff and crews for groups such as: Sister Sledge, Cameo and the SOS Band.

In 1984, 1985 and 1986, Mauldin produced the New York City Fresh Festival where his son, Jermaine Dupri was the opening act. The Festival featured rap pioneers: Whodini, Kurtis Blow, Run DMC and the Fat Boys, and in the late 1980s, he honed his production and tour management skills with R&B artists: Cameo, Luther Vandross and Anita Baker and formed an artists management group. Through the management group, Mauldin helped spearhead the musical careers of: Arrested Development, Kris Kross, Da Brat and Xscape. In 1995, Mauldin served as the President of Columbia Records Black Music Division while simultaneously holding the position of Senior Vice President of Columbia Records Group which included joint venture deals with Ruffhouse Records, So So Def Records and Trackmasters.

In 1999, Mauldin left Columbia Records and moved back to Atlanta to work with his son at So So Def Recordings, and he founded the Artistic Control Group. The Artistic Control Group is a small Atlanta based entertainment firm which includes the Mauldin Brand Agency. The firm also has a music publishing component and a tour management division. In 2002, Mauldin was the executive producer for the film, Like Mike starring rapper Bow Wow. Mauldin is currently working with NASCAR to help penetrate the urban market place and has a deal to produce a motorsports inspired apparel line aimed at the crossover market which he refers to as, “the Fast Life.” Mauldin also runs a non-profit organization called Hip Hop 4 Humanity (HH4H), which he founded after the 9/11 attacks.

Mauldin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 12, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.257

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/12/2007 |and| 2/29/2008

Last Name

Mauldin

Organizations
Schools

Murphy Elementary School

Murphy High School

First Name

Michael

Birth City, State, Country

Murphy

HM ID

MAU01

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

North Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Murphy, North Carolina

Favorite Quote

The World Is A Ghetto.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

10/30/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sushi, Italian, Soul Food

Short Description

Entertainment manager and record executive Michael Mauldin (1953 - ) became the first African American president of the black music division for Columbia Records in 1995. He is owner of his own entertainment firm called Artistic Control Group which includes includes Mauldin Brand Films and the Mauldin Brand Agency.

Employment

Road Manager for Brick

Taurus Productions

MTM Roadworks, Inc.

Rock Label

Favorite Color

Black, White

Timing Pairs
0,0:1358,15:2037,24:5238,65:7178,96:8148,107:10088,138:23785,309:24355,316:27490,400:31860,448:34710,507:46019,588:48066,626:57360,822:57780,833:58550,847:59110,856:59740,870:62050,930:66390,1043:66670,1048:70940,1153:71220,1158:71570,1165:72970,1182:73320,1188:80058,1255:80722,1274:81220,1279:81718,1286:98380,1500:98680,1505:105430,1631:106705,1674:107530,1720:108430,1739:114080,1772:125940,1959:129620,2049:135909,2089:136717,2098:137525,2109:142878,2192:147870,2270:151160,2341:153400,2412:159360,2509$0,0:4785,79:21415,295:21898,300:22312,307:22933,319:23278,325:23968,340:27004,414:29488,481:31282,530:33214,634:36940,700:38113,813:38596,917:43081,999:73205,1435:83430,1581:86150,1633:86630,1641:94575,1736:103404,1906:105044,1954:114830,2097:120374,2236:121094,2250:121382,2303:121886,2316:133305,2491:133905,2502:137355,2603:149115,2829:152948,2872:157400,2945:157824,2950:159520,2964:170507,3093:173965,3174:176149,3209:181988,3320:182456,3328:183470,3360:190412,3502:190958,3510:196829,3588:204710,3755:208331,3821:213940,3989:224244,4111:224628,4120:230924,4215:239660,4369:240164,4376:241172,4400:242180,4424:242516,4429:253628,4560:254285,4568:259833,4721:265162,4832:268374,4923:284342,5076:284710,5108:285394,5122:286100,5135
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Michael Mauldin's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Michael Mauldin lists his favorites, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Michael Mauldin lists his favorites, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Michael Mauldin describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Michael Mauldin remembers his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Michael Mauldin describes his maternal family's Native American ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Michael Mauldin describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Michael Mauldin talks about his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Michael Mauldin describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Michael Mauldin describes the Texana section of Murphy, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Michael Mauldin talks about segregation in Murphy, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Michael Mauldin describes the poverty in Murphy, North Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Michael Mauldin describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Michael Mauldin lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Michael Mauldin remembers Christmas celebrations

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Michael Mauldin talks about his Catholic upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Michael Mauldin remembers Marie de Porres Cress

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Michael Mauldin describes his father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Michael Mauldin talks about race relations in Murphy, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Michael Mauldin remembers Principal Ella B. Ragsdale

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Michael Mauldin recalls his childhood asthma

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Michael Mauldin remembers his bicycle accident

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Michael Mauldin recalls a murder in Murphy, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Michael Mauldin remembers the residents of the Texana community in Murphy, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Michael Mauldin describes his home in Murphy, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Michael Mauldin recalls his family's television and telephone

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Michael Mauldin describes the Texana School in Murphy, North Carolina

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Michael Mauldin remembers his involvement with the Cub Scouts

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Michael Mauldin recalls his experiences at summer camp

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Michael Mauldin describes his father's involvement with car racing

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Slating of Michael Mauldin's interview, session 2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Michael Mauldin describes his high school band, Other Side

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Michael Mauldin recalls his decision to attend the DeVry Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Michael Mauldin describes his first impression of Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Michael Mauldin remembers the shooting of a friend from college

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Michael Mauldin describes his experiences at the DeVry Institute of Technology

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Michael Mauldin recalls his first marriage

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Michael Mauldin talks about the origin of his son's name

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Michael Mauldin recalls his early work experiences

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Michael Mauldin recalls his return to Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Michael Mauldin talks about his musical experiences in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Michael Mauldin remembers meeting the band Brick

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Michael Mauldin recalls touring with Brick

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Michael Mauldin recalls founding MTM Roadworks, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Michael Mauldin recalls his collaborations with Bunnie Jackson-Ransom

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Michael Mauldin describes his reasons for starting a business

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Michael Mauldin recalls managing the arcades at the William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Michael Mauldin talks about his early experiences in the music industry

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Michael Mauldin recalls cofounding the New York City Fresh Festival

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Michael Mauldin recalls working with Diana Ross

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Michael Mauldin talks about the emergence of hip hop music in the South

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Michael Mauldin describes the culture of hip hop music

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Michael Mauldin recalls the artists involved with the Fresh Festival

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Michael Mauldin remembers founding the Rock Label

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Michael Mauldin describes the role of a music producer

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Michael Mauldin talks about managing Silk Tymes Leather and Annie G.

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Michael Mauldin recalls his work with The Reddings

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Michael Mauldin talks about the music industry in the South

DASession

2$2

DATape

4$5

DAStory

8$3

DATitle
Michael Mauldin talks about the origin of his son's name
Michael Mauldin recalls touring with Brick
Transcript
And your child that was born, son or daughter?$$Son. My son was born, and I was really into my music. So when I realized he was born on September 23, 1972, and when I realized--for some reason I want to say that was either Friday or Saturday, but I kind of get the days mixed up. We had never really--we'd talked about it, Tina [Mauldin's first wife, Cecilia Mosley] and I, about the name, but we never really talked about it much. And I guess just, you know, the guy in me or whatever, my influence in music, I named Jermaine [Jermaine Dupri]. And, you know, I was into music. And quite honestly--you know, my name was Michael [HistoryMaker Michael Mauldin], and I did what I did. So, I named him Jermaine. One of my favorite groups at the time was obviously The Jackson Five. I'm like--even though for whatever reason, it just was--and Jermaine Jackson was a great, or I thought was a really good bass player. I'll say great bass player, but a really good bass player. And he could sing, and so that's kind of what it was. It was just like, you know, it was a kid--in a way, it was a kid thing. But then one of the greatest artists of all time that I really loved was Donny Hathaway. And I listened, I used to listen to his records all the time. And the guy that played bass for him--well, Willie Weeks played bass. But there was a guy that played guitar named Cornell Dupree on Donny Hathaway 'Live,' Cornell Dupree. And I'm just--so one day I'm riding in the car listening to the song called "Ghetto" ["The Ghetto"] with Donny Hathaway, and he had Cornell Dupree on guitar. And I'm like, "Wow, Jermaine Dupri, that would be a great name." And the only difference is that I spell it different. And because I was into cars, there used to be a car out called the Capri. And the Capri was spelled P-R-I, like, you know, instead of P-R-E, or like Grand Prix, P-R-I-X. But it was -pri. So I said, okay, you know--again, that's kind of the black thing in me I guess. I just had to make it a little different (laughter). So it's like, okay, it's going to be D-U-P-R-I, Jermaine Dupri, not like Cornell Dupree, which is P-R-E-E. I went and, you know, I told Tina, and she agreed. And I don't remember us ever really talking about it a lot, which is probably not good. I don't mean to be chauvinistic or anything, but I just told her that's what I wanted to name my son. And she went along with it, next thing I know that was on his birth certificate. So, it was Jermaine Dupri Mauldin.$So what happens next with, with Brick? How do you continue the relationship?$$Really, coincidentally--obviously they knew me. I had, again, the ghetto super van. And my--they were playing shows. They started getting more and more popular. They had a song called 'Music Matic' in '75 [1975] that really took off in south Georgia and in Florida; it really started working in Florida. And they asked me to--one night one of their cars broke down, because they were carrying all their equipment in different cars and stuff like that. And I think Reggie [Reginald J. Hargis] or one of the guys--anyway they called me up to see if I would help them get their equipment. I believe it was in Athens, from Athens, Georgia back to Atlanta [Georgia], because they went and did a gig. So I said, yeah, you know. So that Saturday morning, you know, they bought me some gas, ten dollars or five dollars or something like that, and I went up and loaded it. So when I got there, they were all, they were there with the cars that they had. And we started just loading up my van, and lo and behold, we were able to put all their equipment in my van. So, I was able to drive the van, and drove the stuff to Atlanta. When I got to Atlanta, we didn't even unload it. When I got to Atlanta, they said, "Man, Mike [HistoryMaker Michael Mauldin], we got a gig down in Savannah, Georgia tomorrow. Would you, you want to carry our stuff down to Savannah? We'll give you fifteen dollars, or twenty dollars. You can just be there." I'm like, "Yeah, yeah, no problem, cool." And that's what started it. I ended up going--and when I went with them to Savannah, that was a big show. A group called Hot Chocolate--I say a big show. It was in the auditorium, and Brick was just one of the bills. And a group called Hot Chocolate and some other--and I remember Hot Chocolate. There were probably a lot of other more well known names, but I remember that group for some reason. And at that point, I was just carrying their equipment. But now, I'm on a big stage. So I helped them put the equipment on the stage, and I started helping them set stuff up. And it just kind of became a natural thing to me. And I really just worked myself into a position with them without even saying that's what I was doing, or without them even knowing that's what I was doing. And so then when they got off stage and got through performing, obviously they were sweaty and everything. They get off stage, so they have to go back. And they had one guy, but they would go back and try to get their equipment together. I just started getting the stuff off stage for them, and helping them. And the next thing you know, they felt like they had a road crew between me and the guy that was helping them. And that's kind of the way it kicked off. So, I became a roadie at that point.$$Okay. And this is, now how long do you work with Brick?$$For a long time. I say a long time, because this was 1975. And Brick started really, really hitting, and they were doing, they did something called the Kool Jazz Festival, which was in '75 [1975]. And then that really gave me the bug, because the Kool Jazz Festival was at the, it was a stadium event. It was at the old Atlanta Stadium [Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, Atlanta, Georgia], and I was able to take the ghetto super van. Now that van, oh, god, I don't have it today, it's a shame. But that van meant a lot to me. I was able to take that van and really drive on the Atlanta Braves field. And you know, they had the plywood and you had to follow it so that you didn't--but because I had the equipment in there, I drove--and I never will forget. I felt like I was--I'm driving out on the field with my van. And it was like such a, I'm like man, I'm on this, I'm on the Atlanta Braves baseball field. Mama [Grace Bowman Mauldin], you should see me now (laughter). You know, but I was doing it to unload the equipment, and obviously there was a lot of groups, you know, from Earth, Wind and Fire--. I mean there were just groups, prominent bands. And I'm like, okay, I've made it, this is kind of it. And again, that was '75 [1975], and things started really taking off. So from there, I became the stage manager for Brick. And things took off so good for them. They ended up doing a song, recording a song called 'Dazz,' and really that rolled us--by that time we were going into more like '76 [1976], I think. And 'Dazz' really came out in '76 [1976]. But it took off like huge for them. And then the management company bought a bigger truck, and said, "Oh, Michael do you want to drive the truck?" So now, I'm driving a bigger truck, a big red and yellow truck. And you know, I became, like I said, the stage manager extraordinaire. We started putting crews together, and it just happened really fast. The next thing I know, I'm flying all over the place. So, I worked with them--to answer your question, I worked with them up consistently probably through 1978, in and out. But in '77 [1977], I was able to start my own business [MTM Roadworks, Inc.], just from the idea of that.