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Greg Jones

Investment banker Greg Jones was born on July 1, 1957 in Orangeburg, South Carolina to Freddie Milton Jones and Nazry Davis Jones. He attended Morgan State University in Baltimore, Maryland, where he received his B.S. degree in accounting in 1979. He later received his M.A. degree in public administration from Carnegie Mellon University and his M.B.A. degree in finance as a Cigna Foundation Fellow from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.

In 1994, Jones was hired by JP Morgan in New York City to work as a division vice president. He left JP Morgan in 1997 when he was hired as the vice president of business development for the international joint venture partnership of Bechtel Construction and United Utilities. He served there until 2000, and subsequently joined the Pratt & Whitney division of United Technologies as director of business development. Pratt & Whitney was a subsidiary of United Technologies, primarily manufacturing aircraft and aerospace technologies. Jones directed strategy and value development and handled new investment evaluation and deal executions. He was promoted to division president and general manager of Pratt & Whitney Specialty Materials and Services in 2004, focusing on commercializing new technologies. From 2008 to 2001, Jones served as managing principal at the mergers and acquisitions advisory firm Corporate Development Group/Divesture Partners, where he specialized in strategy development and execution. In 2011, he joined Tyco Fire & Security as director of North American mergers and acquisition in Princeton, New Jersey. He left this role shortly after establishing his nonprofit, The Legacy Foundation of Hartford, Inc., in April of 2012. In April of 2017, Jones left Corporate Development Group/Divesture Partners and was appointed vice president of community health and engagement at Hartford Healthcare, working to build the bridge between healthcare and community members.

Jones serves as chairman of the board for The Legacy Foundation of Hartford, Inc. He has also served on the board of the Travelers Championship PGA Golf Tournament.

Jones and his wife, Lauren Allen-Jones, reside in Avon, Connecticut, and have one adult daughter, Erin Jones Geter.

Greg Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 17, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.093

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/17/2019

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

M.

Schools

Morgan State University

Carnegie Mellon University

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

First Name

Gregory

Birth City, State, Country

Orangeburg

HM ID

JON46

Favorite Season

Summer

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Passion

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Connecticut

Birth Date

7/1/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hartford

Favorite Food

Kale, Chicken, and Oxtail

Short Description

Investment banker Greg Jones (1957- ) served in executive roles for JP Morgan, the partnership of Bechtel Construction and United Utilities, the Pratt & Whitney division of United Technologies, and Tyco Fire & Security before founding The Legacy Foundation of Hartford, Inc. and becoming vice president of community health and engagement at Hartford Healthcare.

Employment

JP Morgan

Bechtel Construction/ United Utilities

United Technologies

Tyco International, Inc.

Corporate Development Group/ Divestiture Partners

The Legacy Foundation of Hartford, Inc.

Hartford HealthCare

Favorite Color

Purple

Linneaus Dorman

Organic chemist and inventor Linneaus C. Dorman was born on June 28, 1935 in Orangeburg, South Carolina to schoolteachers John Albert Dorman, Sr. and Georgia Hammond. Raised in the Jim Crow South, Dorman’s parents sent him to the historically black South Carolina State College laboratory school. The state college afforded him a better education than he would have received otherwise and nurtured his nascent interest in science. As a child, Dorman became fascinated with his friend’s chemistry set and the idea of creating new things. When he entered Wilkinson High School in 1948, his teachers immediately recognized his natural talent in science and encouraged him to take more science courses. This led him to declare chemistry as his undergraduate major after he graduated from high school.

In the fall of 1952, Dorman enrolled at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois. Because his father was a World War I veteran, having served in France, Dorman received a scholarship from the small, private institution and its scholarship program for the children of World War I veterans. After receiving his B.S. degree in chemistry in 1956, Dorman enrolled in the organic chemistry Ph.D. program at Indiana University. During the summers, he traveled back to Peoria, where he gained invaluable research experience as a chemist for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) at the Northern Regional Research Laboratory. In 1961, he earned his Ph.D. degree and took a position as a research chemist at the Dow Chemical Company in Midland, Michigan.

While Dorman has garnered a reputation for publishing many research articles in premier research journals, he has become most known for creating over twenty inventions and patents in organic chemistry and biomaterials. Many of his earliest patents involve synthesis methods in organic chemistry. In 1985, he invented a chemical compound that functioned as an absorbent that removed formaldehyde from the air. In 1992, Dorman invented a calcium phosphate biomaterial that was used in hard tissue prosthetics such as bone prosthetics in 1992. Between 1992 and 1993, he developed a new process for the controlled release of herbicides, this method became critical to crop rotation.

He joined the American Chemical Society (ACS) in 1957 and served in a number of administrative positions such as secretary, councilor, and director. Named Inventor of the Year by Dow Chemical Company in 1983, Dorman has been credited with over twenty inventions and patents in organic chemistry and biomaterials. He received the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers’ most prestigious award, the Percy C. Julian Award in 1992. Although he retired in 1994, Dorman continues to work in the scientific community as a mentor. He and his wife, Phae, live in Michigan and have two children, Evelyn and John.

Linneaus Dorman was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 24, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.174

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/24/2012

Last Name

Dorman

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

C.

Occupation
Schools

Orangeburg-Wilkinson High School

Bradley University

Indiana University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Linneaus

Birth City, State, Country

Orangeburg

HM ID

DOR06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

I will study and prepare myself, then maybe, my chance will come.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

6/28/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Midland

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Watermelon

Short Description

Chemist Linneaus Dorman (1935 - ) has twenty-six inventions and patents in organic chemistry and biomaterials. He also served as a research chemist at the Dow Chemical Company.

Employment

Dow Chemical Company

Northern Regional Research Laboratory

Comerica Bank

Dow Corning

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Linneaus Dorman's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman talks about his father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman talks about his parents and his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Linneaus Dorman describes the neighborhood where he grew up in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Linneaus Dorman describes the sights and sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman describes growing up in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman describes his elementary school experience at Middle Branch School and Felton Training School

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman shares his childhood memories of World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman describes his introduction to chemistry and his early interest in mathematics

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman talks about the prominent speakers who visited South Carolina State College

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman talks about the first African American chemists

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman describes how his early thoughts about segregation served as a motivating force

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Linneaus Dorman describes his decision to attend Bradley University in 1952

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Linneaus Dorman describes his experience as a busboy at Carter Hotel in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman talks about the founder of Dow Chemical Company

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman describes the differences between the black communities in Orangeburg, South Carolina and in Peoria, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman describes how he met his wife, Thae

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman talks about Robert Lawrence, Jr. at Bradley University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman describes what influenced him to attend graduate school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman talks about Robert Lawrence, Jr.'s death and his legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman describes his extracurricular activities at Bradley University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Linneaus Dorman describes his experience as a doctoral student in the chemistry department at Indiana University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Linneaus Dorman talks about getting married and starting a family while in graduate school

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Linneaus Dorman describes his summer research experience at the Northern Regional Research Laboratory

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Linneaus Dorman describes his work for his Ph.D. dissertation on heterocyclic compounds

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman describes his decision to work at Dow Chemical in Midland, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman describes his experience in Midland, Ohio

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman describes his early work on pharmaceutical compounds

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman describes his work on synthesizing artificial bone material

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman describes thermoplastic elastomers

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman talks about Percy Julian, one of the first African American research chemists

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman talks about his activities in the community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman talks about travel

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Linneaus Dorman describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Linneaus Dorman talks about the importance of documentation and communication at the workplace

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Linneaus Dorman reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Linneaus Dorman talks about his children

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Linneaus Dorman describes how he dealt with the frustrations of science

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Linneaus Dorman describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Linneaus Dorman describes his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$4

DAStory

1$3

DATitle
Linneaus Dorman describes his decision to work at Dow Chemical in Midland, Ohio
Linneaus Dorman describes his early work on pharmaceutical compounds
Transcript
All right, also in our outline, it mentions here that you considered at one time teaching for a historically black college?$$Yes. But I, something told me I didn't wanna teach because that's what so many of my friends and relatives had done, not because they wanted to, but that was the only job open to them. So I wanted to do something other than teach.$$Now, did you believe that Dow [Chemical Company] would hire you?$$At the time?$$Um-hum.$$I didn't think Dow would hire me because some of my friends in graduate school had told me that Dow would not hire me, because they, some of them who had gone, who worked at Dow, (unclear) come back to Indiana University [in Bloomington, Indiana] to do further study, they told me that Dow would not hire me. But I went up to, to the Dow interview because I had a Dow fellowship. And I felt out of respect for the department [of chemistry], I should at least go up for the interview. Well, it turns out that Dow was desperately trying to get a black person, preferably one who had a Ph.D. who could come to work and be standing on your foot, on your feet alone, somebody who was strong enough, educated enough to not just be a laboratory worker, but to be an independent laboratory worker. So I discovered the chairman who was eager to hire, to talk to me and try to get me interested in Dow, much to my surprise. And I still didn't think it would happen, and I also got an offer from Ex-, it wasn't Exxon. It was Esso at the time out in Linden, New Jersey. And I thought that was a real possibility because Dow wouldn't, you know, because of the fact that this was an all-white town, Dow wouldn't probably hire me. And I'll never forget, my wife said to me, "Ah, I'll bet you get the job at Dow and not at Exxon." And that, I went out to Exxon and I followed all the people who were, with their heads in the clouds, who were not very sympathetic to a graduating black person. And sure enough, they didn't offer me a job. But Dow, I came out to Dow, and they were all very nice to me, and encouraging to me and recognized that Dow was trying to get blacks to come to work there. And it was encouraging enough that we had to make up our minds whether we were gonna take a chance on living in an all-white community. And we took a chance, made up our minds to do that and not stay a while and go someplace else because I could have done that after staying around. My telephone rang for a period of time, almost every six months, some other company wanting me to come, stop Dow and come work for them. They were offering me all kind of incentives. So I got to a point, I asked them what can you do for my retirement? They could never do anything to--I would be giving up those years working for, towards retirement. So that was always a no-no, and I had a feeling that they were trying to hire people just like Dow was trying to hire people. So I said, no, no, no. So I stayed here, and that, we decided to retire and live here. And we're happy with that decision.$Okay, all right. Now, during the course of your career, your research changed focus at different times. In the '60s [1960s] and '70s [1970s], you were focused on, from what I understand, peptides, right?$$Pharmaceutical compounds.$$Okay, and--$$And later to, when I got here, one of the things that Dow [Chemical Company] did was to become involved in the pharma--in some pharmaceutical business, thought it was a good venture because the return on pharmaceuticals is like 20 percent, which chemicals are around 10 percent. So Dow was gonna, Dow was very, always into agricultural compounds, and its agricultural compounds were tested for medicinal chemistry by somebody else. We had something called a K-List which every compound we made, you sent a sample of it, and it got a number, a K-number. And those are, one of the things the K-List did was to check it for various, for biological activities. But that was all agricultural until we got into the chemistry, to the drug business. And I was, just so happened to be in position at that time to also become a part of the drug business by synthesizing compounds here in Midland [Ohio]. We had a pharmaceutical group here in Midland. And, well, they later asked me to get into peptide chemistry because that, that was--peptides are like small proteins, and they were becoming more, more prominent because there's a guy by the name of Muirfield who devised a way to make peptides using a solid phase that would cut out a lot of the steps involved in make a peptide. Peptides are made from about twenty-five amino acids in different combinations, but to make a simple peptide, di-peptide, it's many steps, [to] make a tri-peptide, many more steps. So I became involved in the solid phase peptides chemistry, which I made some contributions to the field when I was doing that. And later on, the pharmaceutical business, we had the group here in town which was a part of the pharmaceutical effort, moved down to Indianapolis [Indiana]. And I didn't move with them, so I started something else. And that was diagnostic, latex diagnostic gauges.$$About what year is this?$$How's that?$$About what year is this when you start with the latex diagnostic gauges?$$Oh, ghez, I don't, '74 [1974]--$$Is this in the '70s [1970s] or--$$It's in the '70s [1970s], yeah.$$Okay, that's good enough.$$And we worked on developing a pregnancy test, and I worked in, in that area for a while. And from there we went to control, control release technologies. And from that to plastics.

Ralph Bernard Everett

Lawyer and political advisor Ralph Bernard Everett was born on June 23, 1951 in Orangeburg, South Carolina. He graduated from Morehouse College in 1973 with honors from the Phi Beta Kappa Society and went on to attend Duke Law School, where he received his J.D. degree in 1976 and was an Earl Warren Legal Scholar.

Everett then went to work as a lawyer for the North Carolina Department of Labor in Raleigh, North Carolina. He was appointed as the Democratic staff director and minority chief counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation in 1982, becoming the first African American to lead a Senate committee; he later became Chief Counsel and Staff Director of the full Committee. Everett achieved another “first” when he became the first African American to be named partner at the law firm of Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker in 1989.

Everett has advised several U.S. presidential campaigns, including Democratic candidates Ernest Hollings and Michael Dukakis. His political involvement continued when Everett served as the Senate Liaison to the Clinton-Gore Presidential Campaign in 1992 when Clinton defeated incumbent President George H.W. Bush. A devotee of the Democratic Party, Everett served as parliamentarian for the 1992 Democratic National Convention. With experience in telecommunications and policymaking, Everett served as the U.S. Ambassador for the 1998 International Telecommunication Union’s Plenipotentiary Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In 2007, Everett succeeded Togo D. West, Jr. as President and CEO of the Washington, D.C. based Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.

Everett has served on the boards of numerous community organizations, including the National Urban League, the Center for National Policy, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Cumulus Media, Inc., Shenandoah Life Insurance Company, and his church, Alfred Street Baptist Church, which is the oldest African American congregation in the City of Alexandra, Virginia.

Everett resides in Alexandria with his wife, Dr. Gwendolyn Harris Everett, and they have one adult son, Jason Gordon Everett.

Everett was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 1, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.006

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/1/2008

Last Name

Everett

Middle Name

B.

Schools

Duke University School of Law

Morehouse College

Elloree Training School

Orangeburg-Wilkinson High School

First Name

Ralph

Birth City, State, Country

Orangeburg

HM ID

EVE01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Whatever You Do, Strive To Do It So Well That No Man Living And No Man Dead And No Man Yet To Be Born Could Do It Better.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/23/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Fish, Chicken

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive, administrative lawyer, and presidential advisor Ralph Bernard Everett (1951 - ) was the President and CEO of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C. He served as lead counsel to the U.S. Senate commerce committee, and as a parliamentarian at the 1992 Democratic National Convention in New York City.

Employment

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC

U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ralph Bernard Everett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett lists his father's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Elloree Training School in Elloree, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls the sharecropping community in Elloree, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his father's leadership in the community

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his early education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his neighborhood in Elloree, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his parents' discipline

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers segregation in South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Orangeburg massacre

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the response to the Orangeburg massacre

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the Civil Rights Movement, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the Civil Rights Movement, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls school integration in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his activities at Wilkinson High School in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his schools' unequal resources

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his decision to attend Morehouse College

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his start at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the students at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the chapel services at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the election of Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes Morehouse College Presidents Hugh Gloster and Benjamin E. Mays

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the required reading at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls joining the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the Atlanta University Center in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the notable alumni of Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his decision to study law

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the activism at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his decision to attend the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his time at the Duke University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his time at the Duke University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Watergate scandal

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the political climate at the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his classmates at the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his work at the North Carolina Department of Labor

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls becoming a legislative assistant to U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his arrival in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings' political career

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls the African American staffers under U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about Thurgood Marshall and Thurgood Marshall, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes U.S. Senator Al Gore

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings' presidential campaign

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls serving as chief counsel of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Challenger disaster

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his farewell party at the U.S. Senate

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard recalls meeting with African American congressional staffers

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers joining Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his career at Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his work on Bill Clinton's presidential campaign in 1992

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls serving as a parliamentarian at the 1992 Democratic National Convention

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls the mentorship of Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his career at Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his work for President Bill Clinton's administration

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers meeting Nelson Mandela

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the leadership of the Federal Communications Commission

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls joining the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C., pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls joining the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C., pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the agenda of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett shares his advice for young people

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his son's accomplishments

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett reflects upon the importance of family

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett reflects upon his life and career

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett narrates his photographs

Etu Evans

Fashion designer and entrepeneur Etu Evans was born on February 2, 1969 in Orangeburg, South Carolina though he spent much of his youth with his family in Harlem and Queens, New York. His mother Rosa was an educator, who helped Evans overcome a learning disability and eventually excel in school. Evans started his first business, in flower arranging, at the age of six. By the time he was thirteen, he began showing interest in fashion and interior design. Evans attended South Carolina State University, where he graduated cum laude with a degree in social work in 1992.

Evans established the design company Etu Evans, LLC in 1993, focusing on jewelry and hats. However, he continued a career outside of fashion and in 1996, earned his M.S. degree in applied behavioral science from Columbia University, graduating with a 4.0 GPA. Evans moved to Europe, where he worked in Italy and France as a behavioral therapist. In a chance meeting on the streets of Paris, Evans met the publicist for Gucci, and decided to leave his job in order to focus on design.

The scope of Etu Evans, LLC has broadened to include accessories and, especially, shoes. Evans became known for his fashion forward footwear designs, which have been worn by celebrities including Tyra Banks, Halle Berry, Erykah Badu, Queen Latifah, Beyoncé Knowles, Danny Glover and Chris Tucker. His work has been featured at New York’s Fashion Week and covered in a broad range of international fashion magazines.

In 1998, Evans founded the Solesville Foundation. This organization collects, repairs, and redistributes new and used shoes and is frequently cited for the effectiveness it had during the Hurricane Katrina disaster in New Orleans, Louisiana. Solesville also coordinated a youth AIDS walk and a shoe repair apprenticeship program for underprivileged youth. Evans’s philanthropic efforts have earned him the Burger King Everyday Heroes National Campaign Honor and the “Citizen of the Year” award from his fraternity, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., and the National Association of Social Workers. Etu was also chosen by Ebony magazine as one of its “30 Leaders of the Future.”

Etu Evans was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 30, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.243

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/30/2007

Last Name

Evans

Maker Category
Marital Status

Single

Occupation
Schools

Marshall Elementary School

Brookdale Elem

Orangeburg-Wilkinson High School

South Carolina State University

Columbia University

Fashion Institute of Technology

Parsons School of Design

First Name

Etu

Birth City, State, Country

Orangeburg

HM ID

EVA03

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Since Greatness Is Achievable, Then Excellence Is Not An Option.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

2/2/1969

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Broccoli

Short Description

Fashion designer Etu Evans (1969 - ) designed shoes for celebrities including Erykah Badu, Halle Berry and Beyonce Knowles. He was also the founder of Solesville: Etu Evans Foundation.

Employment

Columbia University

Delete

Institute of Youth Entrepreneurship

Etu Evans, LLC.

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Etu Evans' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Etu Evans lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Etu Evans describes his mother's family background and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Etu Evans describes his father's personality and profession

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Etu Evans talks about his paternal grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Etu Evans remembers his paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Etu Evans describes his early fashion influences

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Etu Evans talks about the significance of footwear in the African American community

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Etu Evans talks about his early memories and entrepreneurship

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Etu Evans remembers celebrating the holidays

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Etu Evans lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Etu Evans describes his community in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Etu Evans describes the sights and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Etu Evans talks about his learning disability

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Etu Evans remembers Brookdale Middle School in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Etu Evans remembers his parents' divorce

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Etu Evans talks about his early business ventures

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Etu Evans recalls developing his taste for luxury fashions

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Etu Evans talks about his interest in interior design

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Etu Evans remembers visiting his relatives in New York City

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Etu Evans remembers South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Etu Evans recalls his introduction to social work

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Etu Evans describes his religious influences

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Etu Evans talks about mental health in the African American community

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Etu Evans talks about the history of footwear

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Etu Evans talks about the process of making shoes

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Etu Evans remembers establishing Etu Evans, LLC

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Etu Evans recalls opening Sole Kitchen in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Etu Evans remembers his admission to Columbia University in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Etu Evans describes his graduate studies at Columbia University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Etu Evans remembers the Parsons School of Design in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Etu Evans recalls transferring to the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Etu Evans describes his work as a behavioral therapist

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Etu Evans describes his start in the footwear design industry

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Etu Evans talks about his celebrity clientele

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Etu Evans describes his coursework at the Fashion Institute of Technology

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Etu Evans recalls his peers at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Etu Evans recalls working with the Institute for Youth Entrepreneurship

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Etu Evans talks about the Solesville: Etu Evans Foundation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Etu Evans talks about the value of quality footwear

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Etu Evans shares two of his shoe designs

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Etu Evans talks about teaching at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Etu Evans talks about his reputation as a shoe designer

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Etu Evans talks about the invention of the shoe lasting machine

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Etu Evans lists his awards and honors

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Etu Evans describes his public speaking career

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Etu Evans talks about his perspective on religion

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Etu Evans talks about the next generation of shoe designers

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Etu Evans describes his plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Etu Evans reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Etu Evans narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

7$5

DATitle
Etu Evans describes his early fashion influences
Etu Evans shares two of his shoe designs
Transcript
And then, your father [Frederick Evans, Jr.], how would you describe your father if you had to describe him (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Gregarious, very outgoing, very talented printer, everyone comes to him for his printing services. And when I look at all of his pictures, very sophisticated dresser for his--for the times.$$What, what kind of elements were included in your father's style?$$He had a--I remember a picture of him in high school with a white dinner jacket on, some really nicely tailored black slacks, a great black bowtie, kind of sleek European in its silhouette, and a red carnation. Great mock neck sweaters, he just had impeccable taste.$$And what about your mother [Rosa Johnson Evans]. Was she fashionable?$$My mother is (laughter) fashionable and anything that has color in it, it has her name on it. I had to actually a few years ago pull her back from the metallic. I said, "Mom, we're not doing--that's no longer the trend, need to let that go," and I gave her some neutral pointier shoes. But she loves fashion$$And then, of course, your grandmother [Queen Esther Evans] you said is still wearing stilettos--$$Yes (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) can you just describe her fashion for us a bit?$$Yes, well, my mom borrows my grandmother's shoes still to date. She's very fashion forward when it comes to shoes, very pointy, very feminine. And she would sit me on her canopy bed--first of all her room is the ultimate jewelry chest.$$This is your grandmother?$$Yes. It's a treasure chest, it's congested but it's certainly purposeful (laughter). The shoeboxes connected like trains around the top of the ceiling, there are beads of every color cascading off of the dresser, and in another corner there is a, a some archtectrical high-rise of hats, so she loves fashion. Everywhere you move you see something to wear.$$And so did you get an opportunity to observe your grandmother dressing and--$$That's how I got into shoes (simultaneous).$$--(simultaneous) do you think that influenced your--$$Absolutely, she would sit me in her emporium of fashion and she would say, "Etu [HistoryMaker Etu Evans], what shoes should I wear?" And then I would always select the shoes that she should wear to church. And then I began--that's probably why I'm in behaviorism, 'cause I believe kids become who they are before they're age seven, that's just my personal philosophy, based on what they are exposed to. So, she would sit me on that, on that canopy bed and then I noticed that her body would change, so then I moved from you should wear that shoe or I like that toe or I like this bow to what's making your body change. And I realized the magic of shoes, and ever since then I was smitten, I began tearing my grandfather's shoes apart, running around through the house wearing his shoes. And I discovered how to take his dress shoe and, if I took the sole off of it, it became a driving shoe so that's really what--$$So (simultaneous)--$$--(Simultaneous) sparked my interest.$We were just talking about how a shoe is made and how it makes you feel, can you show us a couple of shoes and talk about the construction (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Absolutely. Impeccable construction, well made last, Italian last, and then this shoe, actually, this is one of the samples that I started working on. I wanted to kind of like when you're saying does she--she loves me, she loves me not, that's where this is inspired from the petals when you pull them apart. And I've discovered that once I completed this shoe design that she would love me. We've gotten a lot of love for this design, so this is one of the designs that I've been playing with in the factory, and just playing with different heels. We've done it without this, in patent leather in the back and metal. And this one, the feminine fanfare continues, you know, with grosgrain ribbon over suede and a lattice of bows, which I think is very sexy and sophisticated, a wider heel.$$And are you doing anything for the person who needs extreme arch support or for people who need a wider shoe, or support in the heel? Some of your common--$$I would say what we are doing is that with what I've found rather is that many women come to us to have their boots spliced because they have trouble particularly in the Latino and the African American community with the calves. So what I've decided to do in my line is I'm creating what I call equity girls, who are larger in size. So you can have the special ordered boot in particular where you have the calf you won't have those problems (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) So the shoe can come up high.$$Yes, that seems to be a major problem. We haven't had many problems with shoes not fitting.$$So people are quite comfortable.