The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Louisiana Hines

Beautician, beauty shop owner, painter, and sculptor Louisiana Hines was born on April 13, 1898, in Luverne, Alabama, to Callie and Ben Summerlin; both of her parents were born into slavery. Hines' father was a sharecropper, south of Montgomery, Alabama, in Crenshaw County, and her mother was a homemaker. Hines was the second of seven children who lived and worked on property where her family were sharecroppers.

Hines married the late Arthur Hines and moved to Avon Park, Florida. During the Great Migration of the 1930s and 1940s, the Hines family moved to Detroit, Michigan to seek better social and economic opportunities. Hines worked on airplanes as a riveter during World War II in 1946, before enrolling in Bee Dew Beauty College and receiving her beauty culture license in 1947. In 1948, Hines opened her own salon called L. Hines Beauty Shop in Detroit. Hines had a natural talent for clothing design and taught herself how to sew at an early age. She was an accomplished, self-trained seamstress, being able to make clothing without using patterns. Hines also found ways to express her creativity through painting and wood carving.

At over 113 years old, Hines maintains memberships in numerous civic and social community service groups, including Amvets Auxiliary, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Order of the Eastern Star Prince Hall Affiliation and the Red Hat Society. Hines is one of two centenarians featured in two chapters of a book entitled "If I Live to be 100: Lessons from the Centenarians (2004)" by Neenah Ellis, which has been published in several languages. Hines resides in Detroit, where she is a member of Hartford Memorial Baptist Church and a member of the April Birth Month, All States Club, Hartford Women United and Mothers’ Board ministries.

Louisiana Hines was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 30, 2007.

Louisiana Hines passed away on February 1, 2013.

Accession Number

A2007.194

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/30/2007

Last Name

Hines

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Schools

Bee Dew Beauty College

First Name

Louisiana

Birth City, State, Country

Luverne

HM ID

HIN03

Favorite Season

None

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Be Obedient To Your Parents

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

4/13/1898

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Detroit

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

2/1/2013

Short Description

Beauty shop owner and beautician Louisiana Hines (1898 - 2013 ) was the owner and operator of the L. Hines Beauty Shop in Detroit and was well known for living a very active public life past the age of 113.

Employment

L. Hines Beauty Shop

Hotel Jacaranda

Favorite Color

None

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Louisiana Hines' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Louisiana Hines lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Louisiana Hines describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Louisiana Hines remembers her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Louisiana Hines describes her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Louisiana Hines talks about her family's farm

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Louisiana Hines describes her childhood home

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Louisiana Hines recalls picking cotton

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Louisiana Hines remembers attending B. Branch School

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Louisiana Hines lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Louisiana Hines remembers her teachers

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Louisiana Hines recalls the lynching of her cousin

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Louisiana Hines talks about moving to Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Louisiana Hines recalls marrying Arthur Hines

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Louisiana Hines describes her job in Avon Park, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Louisiana Hines recalls learning to sew and cook

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Louisiana Hines recalls farming in Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Louisiana Hines describes her husband's occupation in Avon Park, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Louisiana Hines remembers moving to Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Louisiana Hines recalls seeing a car for the first time

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Louisiana Hines remembers opening L. Hines Beauty Shop in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Louisiana Hines describes her neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Louisiana Hines recalls working on planes during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Louisiana Hines remembers joining the Order of the Eastern Star

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Louisiana Hines recalls selling L. Hines Beauty Shop

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Louisiana Hines talks about her hobbies

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Louisiana Hines describes Hartford Memorial Baptist Church

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Louisiana Hines remembers Detroit's three hundredth year anniversary celebration

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Louisiana Hines reflects upon her life

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Louisiana Hines remembers her mother's legacy

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Louisiana Hines shares her advice to future generations

Tape: 2 Story: 16 - Louisiana Hines describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 2 Story: 17 - Louisiana Hines reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Louisiana Hines narrates her photographs

Antonio Anderson

Antonio Darcy Anderson was born in Atlanta, Georgia on January 22, 1965. Anderson’s parents are Linda Johnson, an Atlanta businesswoman, and Bennie Anderson, an original member of the music group, the Drifters. Anderson’s mother raised their family as a single parent until she married Herman Johnson, who had a significant impact on Anderson.

Anderson graduated from Southwest DeKalb High School in 1983. He immediately began to train as a hairstylist with Frank Arnold at Arnold’s International in Atlanta, Georgia. While attending school and working full-time at ITE, an electrical company, Anderson also apprenticed with David Fields of Daweed’s Hair Design in Lithonia, Georgia. He trained as well at Pivot Point International System of Cosmetology Science and become proficient as a colorist.

After graduating from Arnold’s International, Anderson performed platform work for Pro-Line International, Inc. as one of its youngest instructors. In 1986, with his training, family support and an established clientele, Anderson opened Styles by San Antonio in Decatur, Georgia when he was twenty-one years old. The salon continues to service clients after twenty years.

In 2001, after his third child Gabriel was born, Anderson, with the help of his wife, Raquel, designed the Gabriel Feeding Pad Break-Away to help parents multi-task while bottle feeding their baby. An appearance on the Oprah Winfrey Show landed them a contract with the Babies R Us Company. The Gabriel product line is sold all over the world.

Anderson resides in Conyers, Georgia with his wife and three children.

Anderson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 12, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.163

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/12/2006

Last Name

Anderson

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Southwest DeKalb High School

D. H. Stanton Elementary School

Columbia High School

Arnold International

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Antonio

Birth City, State, Country

Atlanta

HM ID

AND04

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Youth, Teens, Adults. Inventors, New Business, Development

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - $1,000 - $5,000

Favorite Season

Christmas

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Youth, Teens, Adults. Inventors, New Business, Development

State

Georgia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

Think Out Of The Box.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

1/22/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Personal care entrepreneur and hairstylist Antonio Anderson (1965 - ) founded Styles by Antonio, a hair salon in Decatur, Georgia, and invented the Gabriel Feeding Pad Break-Away.

Employment

Daweed's Hair Designs

Styles By San Antonio

Pro-Line

Favorite Color

Orange

Timing Pairs
0,0:2816,21:3168,26:6502,56:12350,133:20090,238:20434,243:20950,250:29864,307:30942,324:32020,389:44524,517:51258,610:52738,692:55032,738:55328,743:67860,894:70380,939:74520,1027:74880,1032:77400,1062:99520,1483:100012,1493:100340,1498:108715,1556:109055,1568:120530,1822:120870,1827:131130,1969:132930,2000:134655,2045:139242,2091:152192,2374:155226,2441:155596,2447:159640,2452$0,0:4697,139:8547,213:10010,247:29700,476:30125,482:31655,515:38795,668:41600,725:48910,855:59482,948:60028,957:60964,968:61510,977:70402,1166:75004,1361:88000,1536:98620,1663:98980,1668:109128,1841:121754,2001:124328,2062:134702,2317:143264,2428:147128,2494:148052,2516:151412,2589:152000,2605:152840,2628:153428,2636:154016,2645:154436,2663:155024,2672:159154,2686:159730,2699:161314,2734:165058,2893:177846,3039:182540,3132
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Antonio Anderson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Antonio Anderson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Antonio Anderson describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Antonio Anderson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Antonio Anderson describes his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Antonio Anderson describes his single parent household

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Antonio Anderson describes his mother's parenting

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Antonio Anderson remembers his mother's spirituality

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Antonio Anderson describes his mother and maternal aunts

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Antonio Anderson describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Antonio Anderson describes his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Antonio Anderson describes his stepfather

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Antonio Anderson describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Antonio Anderson describes holidays with his family

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Antonio Anderson describes Englewood Manor in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Antonio Anderson describes his neighbors in Englewood Manor

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Antonio Anderson describes his childhood pastimes

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Antonio Anderson remembers his first family vacation

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Antonio Anderson remembers the Cub Scouts

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Antonio Anderson remembers D.H. Stanton Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Antonio Anderson describes his early activities

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Antonio Anderson remembers his early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Antonio Anderson describes The Move of God Church, Inc. in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Antonio Anderson remembers moving to Decatur, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Antonio Anderson remembers Columbia High School in Decatur, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Antonio Anderson describes his experiences of integrated education

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Antonio Anderson recalls his family's role in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Antonio Anderson recalls the house his family owned in Decatur, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Antonio Anderson remembers his brother's teenage misbehavior

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Antonio Anderson describes his mother's house rules

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Antonio Anderson describes his aspiration to become a hairstylist

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Antonio Anderson describes the history and process of the Jheri curl

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Antonio Anderson remembers the Arnold International School of Cosmetology in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Antonio Anderson describes the Pivot Point International hairstyling method

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Antonio Anderson recalls working for hairstylist David Fields

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Antonio Anderson describes his early clientele

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Antonio Anderson describes how he supported himself during cosmetology school

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Antonio Anderson recalls his first competition at the Bronner Brothers International Beauty Show

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Antonio Anderson recalls founding the Styles by San Antonio salon in Decatur, Georgia

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Antonio Anderson remembers winning the Bronner Brothers International Beauty Show, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Antonio Anderson remembers winning the Bronner Brothers International Beauty Show, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Antonio Anderson describes the impact of winning the Bronner Brothers International Beauty Show

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Antonio Anderson remembers his platform work for Pro-Line International, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Antonio Anderson describes the expansion of the Styles by San Antonio salon

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Antonio Anderson recalls his marriage and first child

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Antonio Anderson describes his idea for a hair care invention

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Antonio Anderson remembers designing a tool to apply relaxer

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Antonio Anderson remembers patenting the Quick Dispensary 2000

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Antonio Anderson describes the responsibilities of a patent attorney

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Antonio Anderson remembers introducing the Quick Dispensary 2000

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Antonio Anderson recalls the high production cost of the Quick Dispensary 2000

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Antonio Anderson reflects upon the Quick Dispensary 2000

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Antonio Anderson remembers inventing a relaxer caddy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Antonio Anderson recalls inventing a trash bag dispenser

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Antonio Anderson describes the grace period to obtain a patent

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Antonio Anderson remembers redesigning the Quick Dispensary 2000

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Antonio Anderson recalls the birth of his third child

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Antonio Anderson remembers his idea for the Gabriel Feeding Pad

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Antonio Anderson recalls the prototypes of his bottle feeding invention

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Antonio Anderson describes his decision to manufacture the Gabriel Feeding Pad

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Antonio Anderson remembers finding a manufacturer for the Gabriel Feeding Pad

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Antonio Anderson remembers soliciting investments for the Gabriel Feeding Pad

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Antonio Anderson remembers the American Baby Faire trade show

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Antonio Anderson remembers designing the Gabriel Feeding Pad Break-Away

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Antonio Anderson remembers marketing his invention to Babies "R" Us

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Antonio Anderson remembers being invited to 'The Oprah Winfrey Show'

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Antonio Anderson describes his appearance on 'The Oprah Winfrey Show'

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Antonio Anderson recalls securing a distribution contract with Babies "R" Us

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Antonio Anderson describes the impact of 'The Oprah Winfrey Show'

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Antonio Anderson recalls being invited to return to 'The Oprah Winfrey Show'

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Antonio Anderson recalls emails asking for advice on inventing and marketing

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Antonio Anderson describes the success of the Gabriel Feeding Pad Break-Away

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Antonio Anderson remembers securing a contract with walmart.com

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Antonio Anderson remembers appearing in People magazine

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Antonio Anderson talks about his book and workshops

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Antonio Anderson describes his plans for the future

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Antonio Anderson describes the role of his faith in his success

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Antonio Anderson describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Antonio Anderson narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

6$10

DATitle
Antonio Anderson describes his aspiration to become a hairstylist
Antonio Anderson remembers his idea for the Gabriel Feeding Pad
Transcript
So, Southwest DeKalb High School [Decatur, Georgia], at this point is there--what is some of, what are some of the influences at the school? Are there teachers, counselors? Are you thinking about college? What's going on in your later high school years?$$Well, during that time I--when I was a senior in school, I pretty much knew what I wanted to do. And letting people know that you want to be a hairstylist--you just didn't go around, you know, letting the guys know that you wanted to be a hair designer, and things of that nature. It just didn't sound good, you know. And so, I really didn't need a teacher to tell me what--you know, say, this particular teacher inspired me to do this, or that particular principal--because I knew what I really wanted to do. And my [maternal] grandmother [Mable Avery] was, to a certain degree, she would do hair in the home and for the different people around the neighborhood. And so, she would use the Marcel irons, and I watched her use the irons a little bit. And, but for some reason I knew that--you know, going to see my mother [Linda Johnson] when she was able to get her hair done, and when I went--during that time I was getting my hair done. And I just knew for some reason that's what I wanted to do. I wanted to do something in that line, in the hair care business. I wanted to do hair. I had the knack for just doing hair, naturally. And so I didn't have to, it didn't take a lot of training for me. And so, as a senior in high school, I pretty much knew that's what I wanted to do. I knew that's what I wanted to do, but I didn't share it with a lot of people, because it just didn't sound good, you know (laughter).$$What do you mean it didn't sound good? I mean, because it's a stereotype?$$Yeah, it's very, it's stereotyped really bad, as far as most guys who do hair--that they're, that they're gay. And it's, and when I went into--when I got into--we're not there yet. But once I got into school for hair, it really was just the opposite. It wasn't--you know, you have some of the guys that was in that, going that way. But the bottom line was, you know, they were good people. You know, they were, you know, I treated them nice. And a couple of them, you know, I was great friends with. I mean, I actually was great friends with them. You know, they respected me as far as, you know, my position, and I respected them as their position, and we, we had a great time.$And so, going back to the building program, I was--during that time I was just, we were just so happy and everything that we were going to have a healthy baby and everything. And I just, the Lord just laid on my heart to--we were trying to raise money to rebuild the roof and things of that nature. So I began to--I told her, "I guess I want to sow this seed." I went up and sowed a seed, and from there--in August, Christian [Christian Anderson] was born in 2000. Two or three weeks later the Lord gave me the idea of the Gabriel Feeding Pad. And we decided to name it, I decided to name it after him. And the product is on the market, we have it on the market today, and it's called the Gabriel Feeding Pad. And his first name is, his middle name is Gabriel. And that's when the idea came to me. And I- I'm convinced that as long as this world exists, it's going to be seed time and harvests.$$Tell me, how did it come to you? What was going on that would make you think that you needed this Gabriel Feeding Pad? I mean how did you come up with the idea?$$Well, a funny thing happened. I was sitting actually right here in this living room. And I was watching, it was about five minutes to one. And I'm a big football fan of the Atlanta Falcons. And Raquel [Raquel Lett-Anderson] had said she was going to bed, she was going to take a nap, and that she was going to leave all the kids with me, and gave me Christian. And he was about three weeks old. And I was like, "What in the world?" So, I began to feed him and have a good time with him. And then I noticed, I said, "Oh, my God, the Falcon game is getting ready to come on." And so at that time I had my, I, I was trying, I was bottle feeding him, and I wanted to continue to bottle feed him; I didn't want to pour the bottle out. And so I wanted to continue to bottle feed him, and you know, caress him and have a good time with him. But I was trying to reach the remote control at the same time. And I was getting all excited and nervous, because I was trying to grab the remote control. And I wanted to turn the football game on, and I couldn't. And so I ended up putting the bottle under my chin, and I finally got the remote control on. And once I got it on and started watching the game, Raquel came through. And she began to look at me, and I was looking at her, and I said, "I have another idea." And she was like, "Oh, Lord." And I told her, I said, "I can't believe that--how you manage to do the things that you do." Because she was still, at that time she was at home. She was doing some things from the house, a little bit of working from the house and working with the children, and teaching the children and educating them at the house, and homeschooling my youngest daughter [Blaire Anderson], my young daughter, my only daughter. And we could not figure out, I could not figure out she could multitask with all the kids. I mean, how did she do all that and still be able to work with the other kids, bottle feed, eat, and this and that? And I just couldn't, it just didn't, I said it's got to be something better than that.

Charlene Jordan

Charlene Jordan, proprietor of Charlene's House of Beauty, operates one of the oldest African American-owned businesses in Denver, Colorado's Five Points district. She was born on July 2, 1924 in the country near Nashville, Arkansas. Life was hard for young Charlene and her family. Her father, Miles Jordan, lost the family land to unscrupulous white officials while her mother, Curlie Hill Jordan, struggled to make ends meet. Jordan had to work long hours in hot cotton fields for ten cents an hour. Her nephew was attacked by a mob and disappeared within earshot of her house.

After graduating from high school in 1943, Jordan joined Roosevelt's National Youth Administration and left Arkansas. Recruited to work for Boeing Aircraft Company in Seattle, Washington with other youth, Jordan also served as a "tank scaler" in Vancouver, British Columbia. She returned to Arkansas in 1948 and attended the Velvatex College of Cosmetology in Little Rock. She then moved to Denver, Colorado. Jordan took a refresher course at Duncan Beauty School, enhancing her hot comb pressing technique before opening her own "House of Beauty." She joined the Colorado Hair Dressers and Cosmetologists Association and the Success Club of America, becoming a member of the Incomparable 75. Later she purchased storefronts on Welton Street, now better known as "Jordan's Corner."

Denver's rich and poor alike have sought Jordan's services, including some of the top entertainers and celebrities that appeared at the Rassonian Hotel and other historic Five Point venues. Over the years, Charlene Jordan has become a pillar and anchor of Five Points. Of her many accomplishments, she is most proud of her daughter.

Accession Number

A2002.115

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/21/2002

Last Name

Jordan

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widowed

First Name

Charlene

Birth City, State, Country

Nashville

HM ID

JOR01

Favorite Season

None

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Atlanta, Georgia

Favorite Quote

If You Give A Person A Fish, He Can Eat For A Day, But If You Teach A Person To Fish, He Can Eat Forever.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Colorado

Birth Date

7/2/1924

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Denver

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cornbread, Greens

Short Description

Salon owner and hairdresser Charlene Jordan (1924 - ) was the founder of Charlene's House of Beauty, the oldest continuous business in Denver's Five Points neighborhood.

Employment

Charlene's House of Beauty

Boeing Company

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:2819,51:4502,79:43250,567:67816,847:91558,1156:96682,1254:97102,1260:139395,1740:140975,1782:146730,1810$0,0:32250,421:47350,595
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Charlene Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Charlene Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Slating of Charlene Jordan's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Charlene Jordan lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Charlene Jordan describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Charlene Jordan describes why her mother married her father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Charlene Jordan describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Charlene Jordan describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Charlene Jordan describes when her family lost their farm

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Charlene Jordan talks about working for the National Youth Administration and attending cosmetology school

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Charlene Jordan talks about her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Charlene Jordan talks about her grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Charlene Jordan describes her experiences attending Childress High School, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Charlene Jordan talks about her childhood interests and activities

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Charlene Jordan describes her experiences attending Childress High School, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Charlene Jordan shares memories of her childhood church

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Charlene Jordan describes why she was determined to move away from Nashville, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Charlene Jordan describes race relations in Nashville, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Charlene Jordan describes the challenges of becoming a cosmetologist in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Charlene Jordan talks about entertainment and Denver, Colorado's Five Points neighborhood in the 1940s

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Charlene talks about some of her famous male clients

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Charlene talks about Dinah Washington in Denver, Colorado

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Charlene talks about opening Charlene's House of Beauty

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Charlene Jordan talks about Madame C.J. Walker and A'Lelia Walker

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Charlene Jordan talks about her connection to businesswoman Marjorie Stewart Joyner

Tape: 2 Story: 16 - Charlene Jordan talks about the Five Points Black Business Association fashion show

Tape: 2 Story: 17 - Charlene Jordan talks about businesses in the Five Points Black Business Association

Tape: 2 Story: 18 - Charlene Jordan talks about goal-setting

Tape: 2 Story: 19 - Charlene Jordan describes her hairstyling techniques and customer service philosophy

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Charlene Jordan describes how her success has allowed her to purchase what she wants

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Charlene Jordan describes the process of styling hair

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Charlene Jordan talks about beauty shop gossip

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Charlene Jordan talks about helping others and being helped

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Charlene Jordan talks about styling mishaps

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Charlene Jordan describes her involvement with the Colorado Hair Dressers and Cosmetologists Association

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Charlene Jordan talks about Rose Morgan

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Charlene Jordan talks about being a successful businesswoman

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Charlene Jordan describes how hairstyles have evolved since the 1940s

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Charlene Jordan compares styling of white and black hair

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Charlene Jordan talks about styling wigs

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Charlene Jordan comments on what makes hair healthy

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Charlene Jordan describes how Denver, Colorado has changed

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Charlene Jordan describes how the changes in Denver, Colorado have affected the black community

Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Charlene Jordan talks about the Juneteenth celebration in Denver, Colorado's Five Points neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 16 - Charlene Jordan describes how the Five Points Business Association was divided

Tape: 3 Story: 17 - Charlene Jordan shares her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 3 Story: 18 - Charlene Jordan shares advice for aspiring cosmetologists and business owners

Tape: 3 Story: 19 - Charlene Jordan shares her favorite sayings

Tape: 3 Story: 20 - Charlene Jordan talks about helping others

Tape: 3 Story: 21 - Charlene Jordan talks about her family and how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$2

DAStory

9$12

DATitle
Charlene Jordan describes when her family lost their farm
Charlene talks about Dinah Washington Denver, Colorado
Transcript
So, did you have to work on a farm when you were a little girl?$$Yes, I had to work on the farm and at the time we was born pretty wealthy, but my mother's baby sister and my father's baby sister had a fight and my father's baby sister came out to help her mother fight and they had a little girl and she came out to help her mother fight, so she got cut up in the fight. So, after she got cut up in the fight, then they gonna send my daddy's baby sister to prison for cutting up this little girl. So, my daddy [Miles Hill] had to mortgage everything thing we had, this beautiful home and land and we had cattle and everything. Mortgaged it and they mortgaged it $1,000 and they had to pay $100 a month, and a $1,000 was a lot of money back in those days, so he mortgaged it to keep his sister from going to prison and they let us pay back all that money, let us pay it back $100 a month 'till the last two payments and then they would not accept the last two payments and they came out and took everything that we had. I can hear my daddy bending over crying right now when he, they would take our cows out and the cultivators and everything. He was like crying, but he was grown. He was bent over. I was a little bitty girl, but I can him and I could hear him crying right now and that's why we got to--back down real poor again.$$That's pretty sad, that's sad, yeah.$$Yeah, that's--(unclear)--$$So, so he lost everything?$$We lost everything and our money too.$$Now, did the sister stay out of jail?$$Yeah, she stayed out, they kept her out of jail.$$Do, do you know what the fight was about?$$I heard it was about one of those men down there, but at my age you didn't ask too many questions when you was a little kid about stuff like that, but you couldn't help but hear what the people were saying.$Who else--were, were there any--were any of the women clients of yours?$$I don't remember doing the women. I remember the women being in Denver. I remember Dinah Washington came here, and she got in a quarrel with a man and this man put all of her shoes and all of clothes in a bathtub and put boiling hot water on 'em and her shoes look like little doll shoes when they took them out of that boiling hot water. And I remember Leo Green, singing about Release Me And Let Me Go. I remember Etta James, I think Etta James is coming, she's coming to Denver real soon, if she's not already here.