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Carol Randolph-Jasmine

Television anchor, journalist and literary agent Carol Randolph-Jasmine received her B.A. degree in biology from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, and her M.A. degree in science education from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. She went on to earn her J.D. degree from the Columbus School of Law at Catholic University in Washington, D.C.

Randolph-Jasmine entered television broadcasting in the early 1980s as the co-host of the morning talk show, “Harambee,” which aired on WDVM-TV, a CBS affiliate in Washington, D.C. While there, she also worked as an anchorwoman and interviewed politicians and celebrities such as Senator Ted Kennedy, comedian Richard Pryor, former first ladies Roselyn Carter and Nancy Reagan, and musician Stevie Wonder. Randolph-Jasmine then joined Court TV, where she served as an anchorwoman, and as the host and moderator of the show, “Your Turn,” until 1986.

In 1987, Randolph-Jasmine joined the literary firm of Goldfarb, Signer & Ross (now Goldfarb, Kaufman & O’Toole), where she specialized in representing authors and clients in television from 1988 to 1991, and, during that time, she also wrote a bi-weekly column, “Metropolitan Life,” for the Washington Times. She then served as general counsel for New African Visions, Inc., the non-profit organization responsible for editing the book, Songs of My People (1992). She is the co-founder of Akin & Randolph Agency, LLC, a firm that represents authors, artists and athletes. Randolph-Jasmine was later appointed as the vice president of strategic communications for Miller & Long Concrete Construction, and was then named senior vice president of legal affairs for Walls Communications, Inc., a minority-owned public relations firm in Washington, D.C.

Randolph-Jasmine is a member of the Pennsylvania Bar Association, the District of Columbia Bar Association, and The Links, Inc., where she served as chair of the Hurricane Katrina Relief Committee. In 2005, she launched a “Construction Academy” at Cardoza Senior High School in Washington, D.C. for students interested in the construction business. Randolph-Jasmine is also a member of the board of directors for the Center for Dispute Resolution.

As co-host of “Harambee” in the 1980s, Randolph-Jasmine won several awards including an Emmy Award and the George Foster Peabody Award for “Outstanding Local Programming.”

Carol Randolph-Jasmine was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 5, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.335

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/5/2013

Last Name

Randolph-Jasmine

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Catholic University of America

Washington University in St Louis

Fisk University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Carol

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

RAN11

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

Better To Wear Out Than To Rust Out.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

2/10/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Broccoli

Short Description

Television anchor, newspaper columnist, and book publisher Carol Randolph-Jasmine (1941 - ) , co-founder of Akin & Randolph Agency, LLC, is the former co-host of the morning talk show, “Harambee,” which aired on WUSA-TV, a CBS affiliate in Washington D.C. She received an Emmy Award and the George Foster Peabody Award for “Outstanding Local Programming."

Employment

Miller & Long Concrete Construction

New African Visions, Inc.

Walls Communications

Akin & Randolph Agency

Court TV

Washington Times

Goldfarb, Kaufman & O' Toole

WDVM TV

Favorite Color

Yellow

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carol Randolph-Jasmine's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her maternal grandfather's education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the neighborhood where her parents grew up

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her grandfathers

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her similarities to her parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her childhood neighborhood in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers learning to read and beginning kindergarten at age four

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers learning about black history at Riddick Elementary School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine remembers a social science project in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her early desire to become a psychologist and her high school biology class

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about St. Louis, Missouri's black entertainment scene during her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her high school activities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her childhood career ambitions

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about her decision to attend Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her experience at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her experience at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee as a married woman

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about various professions as well as her professors at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes experiencing racial discrimination as a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes experiencing racial discrimination as a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes going to the 1963 March on Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about teaching at McKinley High School in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about life in Washington, D.C. and working for the United Planning Organization

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the 1968 riots in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about auditioning for the television show 'Harambee' in 1969

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recalls her early days on 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes a black history segment on 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the African American community of Washington, D.C. during the early years of 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the impact of producer Beverly Price on the show 'Harambee'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes the organization Blacks in Broadcasting group

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about how 'Harambee' evolved as a television show and a special segment on Eubie Blake

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes 'Harambee's AIDS segment

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about earning her law degree and taking the bar exam

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recalls traveling to Israel to cover the First Intifada

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about working at Goldfarb, Kaufman, & O'Toole

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her role in the publication of "Songs of My People"

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine explains how she was hired at Court TV

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes covering the O.J. Simpson Trial for Court TV

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine analyzes the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine explains how she came to work with Miller and Long Concrete Construction

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her civic engagement

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine reflects on her hopes and what she would do differently

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about the portrayal of black people in the media

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about the importance of teaching black history

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine recounts a memorable experience from her time as a teacher

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes her family and second husband

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

6$5

DATitle
Carol Randolph-Jasmine talks about how 'Harambee' evolved as a television show and a special segment on Eubie Blake
Carol Randolph-Jasmine describes covering the O.J. Simpson Trial for Court TV
Transcript
Okay, okay. So now 'Harambee' lasted until?$$I don't remember when it went off the air.$$Okay. But it morphed?$$Yeah, it did. I morphed into "Everywoman" was (unclear) the show that followed and it had Rene Carpenter as the hostess and she at one time had another person hosting with her, I think it was JC Hayward. Well I came over and replaced JC, so I would get off the set of Harambee and then go over and walk across the studio and get on the set for "Everywoman". And then they put that together and it became "Nine In The Morning". They added a male host. It was 90 minutes that we did and Doug Llewelyn was the male host. Then they cut it back to an hour again for "Morning Break" and I did that by myself. And then I did the Carol Randolph Show by myself.$$Okay. Did the format change?$$It was still very much like you see today. You know, we had--sometimes we would--we'd have, sometimes a theme, dependent upon what the topic was, segments, musical, phone-in. I remember doing a show, and I don't know why this sticks in my mind, but we were talking about homosexuality and there was a tendency for the members of the panel that was up there to be condescending to some of the questions that were coming in, cause some of them could be really rather ridiculous and show a definite lack of knowledge. And I remember saying that if you hear it from one person then you know there's many more behind him that believes this. You need to give them an answer. And the guy on the program said she's absolutely right. And then he went around and answered that question. Now stands out in my mind simply because it was an open phone question. One of the best fun shows I ever did was with Billy Eckstine and Joe Williams. That was--cause as a teenager I had a crush on Billy Eckstine. And who didn't love Joe Williams with that deep voice of his and they performed. So it was a great show that I'm so sorry that we don't have. And we did a special with Eubie Blake. Claude Matthews was the co-host at that time. And we did a--that was just before Eubie actually died and he played. It was a wonderful, wonderful experience.$$Now he's a pioneer black (unclear). How old was he when he died?$$Was he in his nineties or something like that when he died, I think he was. His fingers could still move up and down the piano, you know, so. Yeah, I think they did this show. What was the Broadway show did in his--$$Oh, "Scott Joplin." Oh no, "Ragtime." Was that what you were talking about. Oh, no, not "Ragtime".$$--It was a Eubie Blake show and he was on '60 Minutes.'$$Yes. Uh-huh, but we were before them. And I don't know how we happened to get him before them, but we did, you know, and we did a special with him that aired at night time. Now I remember doing a show, who was the co-host of that one. I don't even remember now, but we did a late night show cause somebody had decided that there was an audience for late night, and we were talking about sex and a whole bunch of things on that one. That was an interesting show. That was a fun show.$$So it lasted for a few years, or--$$That was only for a pilot. We just did it just to see if there was an audience out there. There was. I don't remember now why they didn't decide to go on and, in fact, just sitting here talking to you about it has brought that back to me, you know, to my mind. But I had forgotten about it, yeah.$So did you have to move out to L.A. [Los Angeles, California] for that?$$No. They had a reporter out there. Actually, I was on the air when they had just gone into making the decision, cause you know these views about what was gonna happen and so forth. And I always felt that the prosecution had not done a very good job in terms of laying out their case. They'd over done it in terms of the DNA evidence, etc. And I remember one of my professors in law school said, "If you gonna go out to shoot a king, you better have a kings-sized rifle." I didn't think they had it and especially with that bit about with the glove, you know, if it doesn't fit, you must have acquit which is the way it was presented in the closing arguments.$$Yeah, by Johnnie Cochran?$$By Johnnie Cochran. And I thought--I remember when O.J. Simpson put on those gloves, I think he was just as surprised as anybody that the things didn't fit. 'Cause you know, I had done domestic law, not a lot of it when I was in Washington [D.C.], and the one thing I always thought, when a woman--when a man finally understands that a woman may really, one who has been abused, is really leaving you, she's in the most danger at that point. Because they don't see whatever, the beating up or any of these other things that they've done as being criminal because she deserved it, I'm entitled, that kind of thing. And so when the first story broke that she was dead and he was arrested, I thought he had done it. I just didn't think the prosecution ever proved it. So I was on the air talking to Ricky Clemmon [ph.], she was out in California, and all of a sudden they said, oh, oh, we got a verdict. But they didn't know what it was 'cause they had to bring in all the people, but it was very quick. So everybody thought it was gonna be a guilty verdict. And Steve Brill [ph.] had sent around this notice to saying there would be no outburst, you know, if you did that, you would be fired. But that was Steve Brill, you know, he would give you these extreme kind of you know notifications. And then when it came in, it was a not guilty thing. It was like most amazing to a lot of people. But it really wasn't to me because I think Marcia Clark thought she could handle that kind of a jury. I understand black people, I understand black women, whatever. Well, I have been, since, on a jury here and I can't tell you I can understand black people because we don't march in the same way. You know, you can say, you know, black people are gonna do this that and the other as she thought she could identify with and what they did was, you know, they were waiting for some kind of a hook, and Johnnie Cochran gave it to them with this, "If it doesn't fit, you must acquit." And there you have it. But it was on the air, and then O.J. Simpson called in and I was on the air one time. I didn't recognize his voice. I don't remember now exactly what it was he wanted to talk about-$$Did he call incognito or did he-$$--He even--no, he said this is--I was on the air and somebody came flying into the studio and said, O.J. Simpson is on the air. And he was trying to explain, I think, this was when his--the second trial was up, you know about the civil trial. I don't remember his question, but he and I got into a discussion about that, so those are things that stand out in my mind about Court TV.