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Perry Howard

Landscape architecture professor and landscape architect Perry Howard was born in Morganza, Louisiana on July 11, 1952 to Ruby and Grover Howard. He graduated from Booker T. Washington High School in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1970. Howard graduated from Louisiana State University with his B.L.A. degree in landscape architecture in 1975. He then graduated from Harvard University with his M.L.A. degree in landscape architecture.

In 1983, Howard was hired at the Edward D. Stone, Jr. and Associates architectural firm in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, where he would become vice president. He was then hired by North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, North Carolina as program coordinator and associate professor for the landscape architecture program in 1989. During his time at North Carolina A&T, Howard has secured research and architecture grants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for $75,000 and $200,000, respectively. Howard also helped to secure the initial accreditation for North Carolina A&T’s landscape architecture program. He has won numerous academic awards and appointments in the field of landscape architecture. Howard was appointed to the North Carolina Board of Landscape Architects by former governor Jim Hunt. He has also served as a keynote speaker for an international landscape architecture conference in Beijing, China and jury chair for a design competition in Shenzhen, China.

Howard received the Teacher of the Year Award from North Carolina A&T in 2003 and was named Harvard Graduate School of Design's Top 100 Distinguished Alumni in 2000. He was also elected secretary to the Council of Fellows for the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) in 2003 and received the President's Award of the ASLA North Carolina Chapter in 1998. Howard was also elected president of the ASLA in 2008. He has served on numerous architectural projects, including site improvements at the Miami International Airport, a revitalization project of the West Palm Beach downtown district, resort development in St Thomas (U.S. Virgin Islands) and facility additions to sites in Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, South America and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Howard and his wife, Bobby Jean, have three adult children, Perry Howard, Jr., Sheri C. Howard and Justin P. Howard.

Perry Howard was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 23, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.038

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/23/2012

Last Name

Howard

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

Harvard University

Louisiana State University

Booker T. Washington High School

Alfred Lawless Elementary School

Derham Junior High School

Alfred Lawless Middle School

University of New Orleans

First Name

Perry

Birth City, State, Country

Morganza

HM ID

HOW03

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

North Carolina

Birth Date

7/11/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Greensboro

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Architecture professor Perry Howard (1952 - ) was a distinguished faculty member at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. He was involved in numerous landscape architecture projects in Florida, North Carolina, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela and South Carolina.

Employment

North Carolina A&T State University

EDSA Inc.

EDSA Inc

Perez Limited

Charles Caplinger Planners

EDSA, Inc.

New Orleans Police Department

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Perry Howard's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Perry Howard lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Perry Howard describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Perry Howard remembers his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Perry Howard talks about his family's migration to New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Perry Howard talks about how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Perry Howard remembers his father's wooden whirligig sculptures

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Perry Howard talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Perry Howard recalls his parents' separation

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Perry Howard remembers the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Perry Howard remembers the impact of Hurricane Betsy, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Perry Howard remembers the impact of Hurricane Betsy, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Perry Howard talks about the infrastructure in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Perry Howard describes the history of New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Perry Howard describes his father's occupation

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Perry Howard remembers his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Perry Howard remembers his interest in art

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Perry Howard recalls his first drafting course

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Perry Howard remembers Booker T. Washington High School in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Perry Howard recalls his decision to study landscape architecture

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Perry Howard recalls his decision to attend Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Perry Howard talks about the racial climate at Louisiana State University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Perry Howard describes his academic experiences at Louisiana State University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Perry Howard recalls his field trips as a landscape architecture student, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Perry Howard recalls his field trips as a landscape architecture student, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Perry Howard remembers receiving the Edward D. Stone Jr. and Associates Minority Scholarship

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Perry Howard describes his experiences of housing discrimination in Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Perry Howard remembers meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Perry Howard remembers his mentor, Edward Durell Stone, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Perry Howard recalls his decision to attend Harvard University

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Perry Howard reflects upon his design strengths

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Perry Howard recalls his aspiration to teach landscape architecture

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Perry Howard recalls a group project at Harvard University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Perry Howard describes Edward Durell Stone, Jr.'s philosophy of landscape architecture

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Perry Howard talks about the influence of landscape architecture in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Perry Howard recalls his project for the New York City Parks Department

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Perry Howard reflects upon his philosophy of architecture, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Perry Howard reflects upon his philosophy of architecture, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Perry Howard talks about the black aesthetic in landscape architecture

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Perry Howard describes the inspiration for his designs

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Perry Howard talks about his design process, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Perry Howard talks about his design process, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Perry Howard remembers his role in the design of Atlantis Condominium in Miami, Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Perry Howard talks about the failure of suburban landscape ordinances

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Perry Howard recalls his M.B.A. program

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Perry Howard remembers Charles Allen Fountain

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Perry Howard recalls joining the faculty of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Perry Howard describes the landscape architecture program at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Perry Howard talks about the campus of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Perry Howard describes the career opportunities in landscape architecture

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Perry Howard remembers his work with NASA's Earth Observing System

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Perry Howard describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Perry Howard talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Perry Howard reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Perry Howard talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Perry Howard describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Perry Howard talks about his duties as a professor

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

7$2

DATitle
Perry Howard recalls his first drafting course
Perry Howard recalls a group project at Harvard University
Transcript
So your first drafting course was kind of like--$$In tenth grade.$$Tenth grade?$$Yeah I had a--one of my--my best friend, Abraham McFarland [ph.] I met him when I was in--of course at Derham ele- Derham Junior High School [James Derham Junior High School, New Orleans, Louisiana] and I don't know why we met, but it's good to have somebody that have same taste, same kind of interests you were, and we always found ourselves doing the same kinds of things in school and we were in some of the same classes and somehow it was just one of those persons that you gravitate to. And, and the tenth grade because I had done ninth grade, I didn't do the draft- he came to me I had taken, had all registered for my courses it was like maybe the first week or something of school. And I had, I had already taken chemistry. I think it was in physics and I think it was in art and basic classes and said, "No you need to come over here and you know they need some more people in his class." I say, "What are you talking about?" He said, "Well now this drafting," I said, "What is that?" And I actually, Derham actually, Derham Junior High actually had a drafting room and I used to always go by slowly you know and look at the tall stools and the desks and I was just fascinated and I didn't know what they did and of course you didn't ask you know. So I didn't know what they were, so when I went and came into the room and saw this I was really happy. And, and the teacher, you're talking about a teacher that really--it was Mr. Wheeler [ph.]. Mr. Wheeler was a pretty good draftsperson but Mr. Wheeler would sign- he would have the lists of the exercises that you were supposed to do for the year and have them on the wall. But it was always like double what you can possibly, potentially can do within a year so you always constantly struggling trying to get finished and it wasn't until my senior year that I actually completed the things that he had posted because--well maybe not completing, but taking that year and really until I gotten so good at it I was able to run through it and, and get 'em all done. So that for me was really, really for me it was a personal accomplishment to actually get all of those exercises done. But I probably, I got a love for that because it taught me to see how to build things you know that whole idea of plan view sections and elevations and to see that it's a, it's a tough thing to teach but you know I had three years of that at Booker T. Washington [Booker T. Washington High School, New Orleans, Louisiana] and to be very honest with you I think you know that really helped me to get through LSU [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana], which is a whole 'nother story.$Like you get your projects. It was, you know the projects, it was standard stuff. I mean there was one, one group project that we did where we actually I think we blew our classmates out of the water but it was sort of a new community that we decided to create this urban village versus doing suburbia, we did an urban village and you know because at Harvard [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts] you have these reviewers that they invited in to critique things. There must have been like twenty of them stretched across you know the auditorium where we were presenting this stuff and when we, you know, when the lady got done presenting our group, one of the guys just stood up and said, "This is the best presentation I've ever seen in an academic situation," and you know (laughter) of course, of course that makes, that makes the rest of your classmates really mad at you, real mad. And it was, really it was, and I know what we were doing and I was sort of, I hate to say it but I was sort of the, you know, group leader. And they, you know--because basically I had myself you know that's a two year person the other was three year students. One guy was really good with graphics and in sketching things like that. And the other lady was just conceptually, she was really just bright and the other one was just a smart person. So you get these groups of people together and you know that's when you--talking about team building and getting your teams together and building on people's strengths to really do a project. For me that was really significant.

Jose J. Mapily

Retired architecture professor and artist Jose Julian Mapily was born on August 13, 1941 in Washington, D.C. to Gladys Mines Mapily, a clerk, and William Mapily, a master sheet metal mechanic. Mapily attended and graduated from Howard University in 1965, earning his B.A. degree in architecture. In 1972, Mapily earned his M.A. degree in city and regional planning, also from Howard University.

Mapily started his career at Morgan State University as an associate professor of architecture and city planning on the graduate level program. He then returned to his alma mater, Howard University, in 1980 again serving as associate professor of architecture and city planning. While serving as an educator, Mapily also worked at a local architectural firm, Bryant and Bryant Architects and Planners. He served as the principal architect in charge of designs for some Washington, D.C. building projects including the Charles Hamilton Houston Neighborhood Center, the Mary McLeod Bethune House and the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church. Mapily also completed designs for a $20 million project for the University of the District of Columbia, Van Ness campus.

Mapily has also begun a career as an artist. His artwork can be described as gridlike paintings made out of white dots on a dark ground that resemble schematic drawings of buildings or circuit diagrams for electrical components. In 2002, Mapily’s artwork appeared at the Gala Auction Exhibition at the WPA/Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. In 2004, he participated in the exhibition, Medusa Muse Artists at North Carolina Wesleyan College Gallery in Rocky Mount, North Carolina.

Mapily was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 26, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.165

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/26/2007

Last Name

Mapily

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Julian

Schools

Kelly Miller Ms

Nalle Elementary School

Spingarn STAY High School

Bruce-Monroe Elementary School

Richardson Elementary School

First Name

Jose

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

MAP01

Favorite Season

None

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere New

Favorite Quote

It Is All Leslie's Fault.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/13/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Architect and architecture professor Jose J. Mapily (1941 - ) was an associate professor of architecture at Morgan State University and Howard University. He also served as principal architect in charge of designs for some Washington, D.C. building projects, including the Charles Hamilton Houston Neighborhood Center and the Mary McLeod Bethune House.

Employment

Bryant and Bryant Architects and Planners

Mapily Associates Architects and Planners

Turner Associates

Anthony N. Johns Archtects

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jose J. Mapily's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily talks about the history of slavery in New York

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily describes his mother's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jose J. Mapily describes his paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jose J. Mapily describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jose J. Mapily describes his father's occupation

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily describes how he takes after his parents

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily talks about his experiences as a Boy Scout

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his neighborhood in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his neighbors

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily recalls the technology of his youth

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily remembers repairing his family's television set

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily describes the practical skills he learned as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily describes his elementary schools

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily talks about his dyslexia

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his experiences with dyslexia in school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his early mentors

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily describes the Episcopal Church of the Atonement in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily remembers professional basketball players from his neighborhood

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily recalls running track at Joel Elias Spingarn Senior High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his decision to become an architect

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily lists influential African American architects

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily talks about William H. Moses, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily describes the challenges faced by African American architects

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily describes his experiences with dyslexia as an adult

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his influences at Joel Elias Spingarn Senior High School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily recalls being discouraged by his guidance counselor

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily describes the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily recalls SNCC members at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily recalls the alumni of Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily describes his studies at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily remembers his early career in architecture

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily remembers founding Turner Associates, PC

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily remembers working on the Logan Circle historic district in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily remembers designing mass transit systems

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily describes his challenges as an architect

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily describes the impact of computers on the architecture industry

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jose J. Mapily describes the Charles Houston Community Center in Alexandria, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily remembers building the Charles Houston Community Center

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his designs for the University of the District of Columbia, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his designs for the University of the District of Columbia, pt.2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily describes the courses he taught at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily reflects upon his teaching experiences

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily describes his concerns for his students

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily describes his concerns about the educational system

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily talks about his architectural style

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily describes his architectural style

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily talks about his painting career

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily recalls his partnership with Leslie King-Hammond

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Jose J. Mapily talks about 'The Magic Birdhouse'

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Jose J. Mapily describes his other collaborations with Leslie King-Hammond

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Jose J. Mapily describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Jose J. Mapily reflects upon his life

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Jose J. Mapily reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Jose J. Mapily describes his son

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Jose J. Mapily describes his concerns for the architecture industry

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Jose J. Mapily describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Jose J. Mapily narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Jose J. Mapily recalls his decision to become an architect
Jose J. Mapily remembers building the Charles Houston Community Center
Transcript
What was your concentration in high school [Joel Elias Spingarn Senior High School, Washington, D.C.]? Did you--$$In, in high school, in the ninth grade was the year that the Russians launched Sputnik [Sputnik 1] and was the first time I heard the term aeronautical engineer. So, myself and one other friend, the one other Eagle Scout, Otis Young, he was, Otis is three years older than I am so he was already in high school and wanted to pursue aeronautical engineering so I asked him what do I need to take, you know, when I get to high school. So, his, one of the courses he said was drafting and I started drafting, my drafting course the first semester in high school and it was taught by an architect who happened to be a classmate of my parents from high school. Dave Brown, as soon as he saw the last name, he said, "I know you, Billy [William Mapily] and Gladys' [Gladys Mines Mapily] son," I said, "Yep." Well, he gave me permission to come over to his office and that's when I changed from deciding to pursue aeronautical engineering to becoming an architect and from the tenth grade, I knew what I wanted to be.$$Okay.$$Okay.$$Now was the, I just wondered, was the, was the National Organization of Minority Architects (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) No, not yet.$$No, yeah.$$It was around, I didn't know about it.$We were, I think the first African American firm that they hired and one of the reasons they hired us because it was in the African American community. The community needed this facility [Charles Houston Community Center; Charles Houston Recreation Center, Alexandria, Virginia], however, it was one extremely tight budget and the individual that I had as a project manager, actually had, (laughter) had less experience than I did, okay. He was a younger guy than I was and when I finished designing the building and we were submitting it for what we call, bids, that means that you're about to give the drawings and the written documents to a bunch of contractors to determine, you know, what they would build the facility for. Well, this particular person looked at the square footage that we had and he went into a cost estimating book and looked at what was the average cost and came to me and said, "Jose [HistoryMaker Jose J. Mapily], your building is going to cost, you know, it's going to be over budget." I said, "No it's not." I said, "I've never designed anything over budget." He said, "It's going to be over budget based on my calculations." I said, "Well, my estimator says that here's what it's going to cost and it's below budget." He didn't want to believe me and was going to hold up our pay request, said, you have too much square footage. So, you know, being a problem solving kind of individual, you know, I'm looking at, I got, I have about twenty folks that are going to be looking for their paychecks soon and this guy's going to hold it up 'cause he doesn't want to believe me. On the way back to the office [of Turner Associates, PC], I said, I know how to solve this. I've got to get the square footage down. So, there were certain build--certain parts of the building along the perimeter that, I said, okay, if I cut off one foot by the length of this element, I can get it down to the square footage. I went back to the office and told my draftsman, "Look, change this dimension down by one foot, this one down by one foot." "Why?" I told him what happened. I said, "And then run a fresh set of prints and that tomorrow I want you to take these drawings, along with these calculations, over to this guy and turn 'em in." We did, I got my payment and then a couple of weeks later when the bids came out, it was forty thousand dollars below what my estimator said it was going to be. So, you know, you asked me my favorite, favorite is a nice great little building done for a community that badly needed this kind of facility and I was able to prove, you know, my point that, you know, no, I'm right, this is under the budget. That's one favorite.