The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Leonard Burnett, Jr.

Magazine publishing entrepreneur and executive Leonard Burnett was born on April 18, 1964 in Shaker Heights, Ohio. His family was involved in franchising, which sparked his interest in entrepreneurship. After attending the University of Michigan for two years, Burnett went on to Florida A&M University, where he received his B.B.A. degree in business, management and marketing in 1986.

Burnett went into business with his classmate, Keith Clinkscales, to launch his first magazine, Urban Profile, in 1987, to fill a void in the media market. In 1992, Burnett and Clinkscales sold Urban Profile to Career Communications and got involved in the creation of Vibe magazine. From 1993 to 1999, Burnett served as a publisher and advertising director for the magazine. In 1999, he co-founded Vanguarde Media Group with Clinkscales. Burnett served as vice president and group publisher with Vanguarde and helped launch three successful urban magazines: Savoy, Honey, and Heart & Soul. In 2004, Burnett co-founded Uptown Media Group, or Uptown Ventures, publisher of Uptown magazine, where he served as the chief executive. The following year he helped Vibe magazine launch Vibe: Vixen. After Vibe reopened under new ownership in 2009, he served as the group publisher for the magazine until 2012.

In 2010, Burnett co-authored Black is the New Green: Marketing to Affluent African Americans. In 2013, he founded U Brands after re-purchasing Uptown magazine from InterMedia Partners and acquired Worldwide Electronic Publishing, the publisher of Hype Hair magazine. Burnett has successfully expanded the Uptown brand and reached underserved communities. He also has spoken at the ADCOLOR Awards and is considered an expert of African American buying power, brand-building, and marketing to both urban and affluent African American communities.

Burnett lives in New York City and has two children, Lenny Burnett III and Rani Burnett.

Leonard Burnett was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 10, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.148

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/10/2014

Last Name

Burnett

Maker Category
Middle Name

Everett

Schools

Moreland Elementary School

Sterrett Elementary School

The Campus School Of Carlow University

Sacred Heart Elementary School

Shrine Catholic High School

University of Michigan

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Leonard

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

BUR24

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha’s Vineyard and St. Martin

Favorite Quote

If You Have To Say Who You Are, You Ain’t.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/18/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Macaroni and Cheese, Mashed Potatoes

Short Description

Magazine publishing entrepreneur and magazine publishing chief executive Leonard Burnett, Jr. (1964 - ) was the cofounder of Vanguarde Media and cofounder and co-CEO of Uptown Ventures, the publisher of Uptown magazine. He was also author of Black is the New Green: Marketing to Affluent African Americans.

Employment

Baxter Healthcare Corporation

Urban Profile

Vibe Ventures

Vanguarde Media, Inc.

Uptown Media

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:2208,13:3712,72:4088,77:14909,206:17237,240:21602,319:26840,429:28683,493:33145,574:33630,589:37995,685:45998,728:53152,822:53838,835:54524,840:57954,958:80720,1387:95292,1535:95884,1540:139450,2091:143779,2283:149896,2412:157067,2532:166190,2626$0,0:1748,31:4600,73:5704,88:20976,375:38862,546:45774,643:46530,651:47394,660:49554,679:51174,700:53118,726:55494,759:61738,820:62312,829:64280,872:69692,970:70266,981:71660,1025:74202,1084:74612,1090:75678,1113:76170,1121:76498,1126:77072,1136:77482,1142:83714,1294:85272,1326:88962,1417:89454,1424:90848,1472:102779,1581:105093,1638:124565,1945:129980,1996:133115,2175:140905,2294:153060,2378:157920,2479:170823,2696:180654,2942:187325,2988:187750,2994:188770,3009:189875,3027:192520,3060:193510,3098:194038,3112:194302,3122:195952,3177:196282,3183:199450,3276:199912,3284:204136,3408:210024,3447:218625,3540:219189,3549:220458,3585:221586,3599:224810,3607:226420,3633
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Leonard Burnett, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his father's family background and early football career

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his father's entrepreneurial career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers his neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his early interest in sports

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his early career aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his family's frequent moves

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his experiences in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers his early experiences of religion

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his decision to attend the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers transferring to Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his first impressions of Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his growth at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his experiences in Jack and Jill of America, Inc.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the community at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls pledging the the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett reflects upon his formative development in college

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes his early sales experiences at the Baxter Healthcare Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers cofounding Urban Profile magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls operating Urban Profile magazine full time

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls joining the Career Communications Group, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers the launch of Vibe magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls selling advertisements for Vibe magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers the early staff of Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the emergence of hip hop culture

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes the initial challenges at Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls the ownership transition period at Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett recalls leaving Vibe magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his attempts to buy XXL and Honey magazines

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his acquisition of Honey magazine

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls acquiring magazines from BET

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the downfall of Vanguarde Media

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the aftermath of Vanguarde Media's bankruptcy

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his inspiration to return to work

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about founding Uptown magazine, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about founding Uptown magazine, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls his return to Vibe magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the changes in the magazine industry in the early 2000s

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the business plan for Uptown magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about Keith Clinkscales' career after the end of Vanguarde Media

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls acquiring Vibe magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the acquisition of Vibe magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. recalls divesting from Vibe to focus on Uptown magazine

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. describes the U Brands company

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about U Brands' projects

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. reflects upon his legacy and career

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about his father's opinion of his career path

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Leonard Burnett, Jr. shares his advice to future generations

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$1

DATitle
Leonard Burnett, Jr. remembers the launch of Vibe magazine
Leonard Burnett, Jr. talks about the emergence of hip hop culture
Transcript
And so doing that and then Keith [HistoryMaker Keith Clinkscales] got a call from Time Inc. They had--well back up. So Time Inc. had launched or did a test issue of this magazine called Vibe. And Vibe in their first little test issue had more ads than we had ever had in any, in all our combined issues. And so, but that sort of empowered us more. You know it was like you know, you know whoever is doing Vibe you know uncle time, you know they, they go had fund (unclear) and you know do this and we're just out here doing our own thing and we will make it happen, you know. We will just keep pushing, we're black owned, we're that. And so Keith got a call from, from Time Inc. from a friend, Lynne McDaniel who is now a friend of ours. And said hey, he said to him, "Hey if you notice Urban Profile--if you guys, what are you guys doing, you know? Are you happy?" Said, "Yeah, yeah," and you know, "Have you seen Vibe?" "Yeah, yeah, we've, we've seen it. It's cute you know." "Well we want to launch it and we were thinking about you and Len [HistoryMaker Leonard Burnett, Jr.] maybe coming up and help launching the magazine." And Keith's response was you know, "We all sort of both felt like okay that's, that's nice you know, but we're entrepreneurs, we're doing our own thing. We have our own autonomy you know, this is what I'm doing." "Okay well we're paying this much money." It was like, "Oh we'll be there tomorrow," (laughter). And so we, Keith went up in let's see, Keith went up in late '92 [1992] and I came down in February of '93 [1993] and just part of the team that launched the--$$And what was your role?$$I was the sales guy, I was account exec. So Keith was the president and CEO. I was account exec. A gentleman by the name of John Rollins you know technically hired, he hired me and I sold music advertising and had all the black agencies 'cause you know I was you know I was the black guy so I got all the black agencies. And, and so we were part of the team that launched Vibe. And you know great environment, met all sorts of people you know that, but, but the big thing was I'm back in New York City [New York, New York]. I cannot believe I'm back in New York. This was not what my life's plan was to be. Keith and I got a little studio apartment in Hell's Kitchen [New York, New York] you know while we were trying to figure out where we were gonna live you know but we were never there, we'd be in the office all the time. And we were you know all working hard trying to make this Vibe thing you know become a real business and a reality. And so that's how we got back.$So I wanna talk about what was going on culturally in America during the time that Vibe began and really had an incredible assent.$$Um-hm.$$What, you know, hip hop was just beginning. What--can you describe what was happening?$$Yeah. So you know hip hop you know it was beginning to become, be put on the map.$$Correct.$$You know 'cause it had, it had been there right, of course. And then the, but, but there was a sense of empowerment that was coming about from not the, the music. The music sort of drove everything, you know, culturally, politically, entrepreneur wise, fashion. Technically, it did, it drove all that and so what was quickly becoming known is, and Vibe really helped propel this, is our influence on American culture. We knew that, that the day was coming you know so we would talk. We would sell the idea hey when you grow up you'll listen to first music we listened to was pop music, you know. There are kids that were birthed around this time. The first music they're gonna listen to and the first radio station was gonna be a hip hop station. Their first athletes they're gonna fall in love with were black athletes basketball player. The, the, you know, the, the you know Serena [Serena Williams], the best black; the best tennis players were, were black. Golf champion [Tiger Woods] was black. And all this stuff was sort of happening. And was sort of turning America sort of upside down. This is it. And so what we knew at that time early on before we knew somehow was happening is that's where it was all going. No matter how much you didn't agree with it or what you didn't want to happen. What was going--what was happening was the browning of America not only from skin, but in terms of its aesthetic. And--$$Uh-huh.$$--and so you need--so the conversation was you can either jump in this conversation now and go for the ride or I'll see you later on down the road and it's gonna be a lot more expensive too, you know. And, and don't, and hope that no one else comes in along the way and jumps over you because they, they embraced it rather than fought it. And so, and so you know, and so everything was going on you know it's in the news. So there, there was a vibrance in a, and again empowerment. There were businesses being started in fashion or record labels being launched. And there were movies and movie companies coming out that were you know producing you know, black producers of movies. So obviously there was Spike Lee, but then you know the Hudlin brothers [HistoryMaker Reginald Hudlin and Warrington Hudlin], and you know, the, the whether it was just movies you know there, there were a plethora of movies were coming out that were about us and our culture and it start off very hip hop but then it grew into more of just our lifestyle, you know. So it wasn't all about gang banging and rap and it was about love. It was about family and all of our stories. And so there was a movement and I think there was a, again because of the music there was a sense of again going back to the idea of entre- being an entrepreneur, people didn't feel that they had to go work for Corporate America. There were other alternatives. There were other things that were going on whether it was going to work for a fashion company that was targeting our audience or whether it was starting your own business. I mean there was just a--there was a sense that you could do anything. And that was an exciting time, you know. And it, you know less to do about I think Vibe sort of told the stories but it's really the hip hop music and the culture that was making it happen.

Keith Clinkscales

Media executive and magazine publishing entrepreneur Keith T. Clinkscales was born on January 7, 1964 in Bridgeport, Connecticut. He received his B.S. degree in accounting and finance from Florida A&M University in 1986, and his M.B.A. degree from Harvard Business School in 1990.

In 1988, Clinkscales co-founded Urban Profile magazine and served as publisher and editor-in-chief until 1992, when he sold the publication to Career Communications Group. He then helped Quincy Jones establish Vibe magazine in 1993 and was named president and chief executive officer. He also founded the publication's digital counterpart, Vibe.com, in 1994, and helped launch Vibe’s Blaze magazine in 1998. From 1999 to 2003, Clinkscales co-founded and served as chairman and chief executive officer of Vanguarde Media, publisher of Honey, Heart & Soul and Savoy magazines.

In 2005, Clinkscales was hired to work for ESPN as senior vice president and general manager of ESPN Publishing. In 2007, he was named ESPN’s senior vice president of content development and enterprises, where he served as executive producer for ESPN Films’ documentaries, and scripted and unscripted projects including the 2011 launched Year of the Quarter Back; the acclaimed and Emmy-nominated 30 for 30 documentary series, Black Magic; Ali Rap; Kobe Doin’ Work; Renee; Catching Hell; A Race Story: Wendell Scott; The Tribeca Sports Film Festival; Elite 24; and the highest rated documentary in ESPN’s history, The Fab Five. Clinkscales was co-creator of ESPN’s award-winning TV magazine show E:60, the Homecoming with Rick Reilly show, and the adapted SportsNation show. He also oversaw the ESPN Classic network, ESPN Books, the ESPYs, and the X Games.

In 2011, Clinkscales founded and became chief executive officer of Shadow League Digital, a multi-platform sports news organization in partnership with ESPN. Under Shadow League Digital, he developed Shadow League Films and co-produced the 2012 Muhammad Ali 70 Special which aired on ESPN, as well as executive produced the ESPN documentary Benji. In 2013, Clinkscales was named chief executive officer of Sean “Diddy” Combs’ REVOLT Media.

His honors include two National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) Excellence in Journalism Awards, two Peabody Awards, the National Magazine Award, and an Emmy nomination. In 2008, he was named one of Diversity MBA Magazine’s “Top 100 under 50 Diverse Corporate Executives.” In 2007 and 2009, Clinkscales was listed among the “Top 50 Minorities in Cable” by Cableworld Magazine; in 2014, he appeared on the CableFax Magazine “Top 100 Executives in Cable” list. Clinkscales has served as treasurer of the Apollo Theater Foundation Board of Trustees, as a member of PepsiCo’s Multicultural Advisory Board, and a member of the Advisory Board at UrbanWorld Media, Inc. Since 2012, he has served on the Board of Directors for Florida A&M University (FAMU) Foundation and the Board of Visitors for Howard University’s School of Communications.

Keith Clinkscales was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 18, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.150

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/18/2014

Last Name

Clinkscales

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Terrence

Schools

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Harvard Business School

Hillcrest Middle School

Center School

St Joseph High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Keith

Birth City, State, Country

Bridgeport

HM ID

CLI05

State

Connecticut

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

1/7/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Magazine publishing entrepreneur and media executive Keith Clinkscales (1964 - ) , CEO of REVOLT Media & TV and Shadow League Digital, co-founded Urban Profile magazine in 1988 and Vanguarde Media, publisher of Honey, Heart & Soul and Savoy magazines, in 1999. He also helped establish Vibe magazine, serving as president and CEO of Vibe Ventures from 1993 to 1999.

Employment

Urban Profile

Vibe Magazine

KTC Ventures

Vanguarde Media, Inc.

ESPN, Inc.

The Shadow League

Revolt TV

Rodney Reynolds

Magazine publisher Rodney J. Reynolds was born in Cleveland, Ohio. He attended the University of Cincinnati where he studied graphic design and advertising. Reynolds undertook his first publishing venture with a national, general purpose publication targeted towards African American men, Spectrum Magazine.

In 1992, Reynolds and Corporate Cleveland Magazine developed Minority Business, a quarterly publication where he served as publisher and editor. He went on to publish New Visions and Renaissance Magazine. He also developed Today, a magazine that focused on African American families. Reynolds founded RJR Communications, Inc. in 1992. In 1995, Reynolds, along with Forbes, Inc., began publishingAmerican Legacy Magazine, which centered on African American history and culture. In February of 2001, RJR Communications and New Millennium Studios, founded by entertainer Timothy Reid, launched American Legacy Television, a nationally syndicated television program. Reynolds has served on the board of directors for the Mount Vernon Public Library, the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) of Central & Northern Westchester, the Harriett Tubman Home, and the Rye Country Day School. He was appointed as the diversity chairperson for the New York Blood Center - Westchester Region. In addition, Reynolds is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

In 1998, Reynolds received the “Forty Under 40 Award” from The Network Journal. In addition, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. honored his work with the Lillian Award. He received the Percy E. Sutton Award from the Harlem Business Alliance; the Visionary Award from the African American Men of Westchester; the National Business Leader of the Year Award from the African American Chamber of Commerce of Westchester & Rockland County; and the 2002 Triangle of Service Award from the Southeast Regional African American Preservation Alliance. In 2004, Reynolds received the inaugural Earl G. Graves Entrepreneurial Award; and, in 2005 he was the recipient of the W.O. Walker Community Excellence Award.

Rodney J. Reynolds was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 13, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.203

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/13/2013

Last Name

Reynolds

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Jerome

Schools

University of Cincinnati

Dartmouth College

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Rodney

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

REY03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

Hang In There.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

9/9/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Magazine publishing entrepreneur Rodney Reynolds (1958 - ) , founder and publisher of American Legacy Magazine, serves as president of RJR Communications, Inc. and executive producer of American Legacy Television.

Employment

RJR Communications, Inc.

Reynolds Publishing Co.

Wesley & Associates

Favorite Color

Blue

Rosetta Miller-Perry

Multi-talented Tennessee Tribune publisher and civil rights activist, Rosetta Miller-Perry was born Rosetta Irvin on July 7, 1934 in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania. The steel mills attracted her parents, Anderson Irvin and Mary Hall Irvin to Coraopolis from New Orleans, Louisiana. Miller-Perry grew up near the Allegheny River where she spent her first four years on her aunt’s house boat. She attended McKinley Elementary School and Coraopolis Junior High School. A good student, who read the Pittsburgh Courier and played the organ for her church, Miller-Perry graduated from Coraopolis Senior High School in 1952. Accepted by Howard University, Miller-Perry was disappointed when a close relative spent her tuition money. Moving to Chicago, she attended Herzl Community College and Cortes Peters Typing School while working for Spiegel’s. Perry joined the United States Navy in 1954, where she worked for Adam Bush in the Pentagon and for the Adjutant General’s Office in Germany.

Miller-Perry completed her B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Memphis in 1956 and her D.M.S. from the John A. Gumpton School of Mortuary Science in 1957. In 1958, she attended Tennessee State University and then Meharry Medical College for nurses training as she worked for Southern Funeral Home. Actively involved in the civil rights struggle, Miller-Perry worked closely with Z. Alexander Looby, Curley McGruder, Reverend Kelly Miller Smith and other leaders. When Looby’s home was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan in 1960, Miller-Perry moved to Memphis. She worked closely with SCLC and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. She was brought into the United States Civil Rights Commission (USCRC) in 1960 as a clerk typist, then as a field representative. Assigned to cover the Memphis Garbage Strike in 1968, Miller-Perry witnessed the suspicious activities of the FBI, “The Invaders” and the chaos after the murder of Dr. King. Assigned to the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in 1975, Perry became Nashville Area Director of the EEOC. She retired from government service in 1990.

Miller-Perry founded Perry and Perry Associates in 1990 and published Contempora, a Tennessee-focused African American magazine. In 1992, Perry founded the community-oriented Tennessee Tribune in order to focus on issues like health, education, and voter registration. She established the Greater Nashville Black Chamber of Commerce (GNBCC) in 1998. That same year, Miller-Perry created the Anthony J. Cebrun Journalism Center in partnership with Dell Computers to prepare young people for careers in journalism. In 2006, she published the names of registered voters in the predominantly black districts, who did not vote and increased voter turnout from 35% to 65%. A civic dynamo, Miller-Perry serves on numerous boards. The Rosetta I. Miller Scholarship at Memphis State University was created in her honor and the annual $1,000 Rosetta Miller-Perry Award for Best Film by a Black Filmmaker is presented at the Nashville Film Festival.

Miller-Perry was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 18, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.096

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/18/2007

Last Name

Miller-Perry

Maker Category
Schools

Coraopolis High School

McKinley Elementary School

Coraopolis Junior High School

Tennessee State University

Meharry Medical College

John A. Gumpton School of Mortuary Science

University of Memphis

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Rosetta

Birth City, State, Country

Coraopolis

HM ID

MIL05

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

Things Get Better With Time.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Tennessee

Birth Date

7/7/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Nashville

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken

Short Description

Civil rights activist, magazine publishing entrepreneur, and newspaper publishing chief executive Rosetta Miller-Perry (1934 - ) served as a clerk typist, then as a field representative for the U.S. Civil Rights Commission. She was also Nashville Director of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She went on to become publisher of the Tennessee Tribune.

Employment

U.S. Commission on Civil Rights

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:474,56:4582,70:21560,230:23912,251:24619,259:35206,474:35646,480:36086,486:39540,501:40404,519:41700,543:42060,549:44220,597:45372,626:47820,684:48396,694:54010,756:55290,797:56490,836:60330,911:60650,916:77744,1103:81530,1211$0,0:14012,217:17980,243:31480,449:31960,456:37214,528:45740,636:46524,647:47014,653:47602,660:54250,709:55600,737:57790,747:68346,933:73860,953:76308,1011:76988,1033:77260,1044:77600,1050:85148,1262:98222,1518:103634,1571:104372,1582:104782,1588:106176,1607:106586,1613:114099,1703:116050,1719:117514,1752:119050,1778
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Rosetta Miller-Perry's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Rosetta Miller-Perry lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her father's first wife and remarriage

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her parents' move to Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her father and her likeness to him

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Rosetta Miller-Perry lists some of her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers living with her maternal aunt

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her childhood pastimes

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls working as a domestic for her white peer's family

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers Coraopolis High School in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers the draft during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the sights and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her father's career

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers the newspapers in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls her activities at Coraopolis High School in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers Mount Olive Baptist Church in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls being prevented from attending Howard University

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers moving to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers working at the Pentagon

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her ex-husband's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers her time in Germany

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls the start of her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers her experiences of segregation

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers learning about nonviolent direct action

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Rosetta Miller-Perry talks about the civil rights marches

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the residents of Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls the John A. Gupton School of Mortuary Science in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers working at the Southern Funeral Home in Memphis, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers Memphis State University in Memphis, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the Rosetta I. Miller Award Fund

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her civil rights activities in Memphis, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls the leadership of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls her early civil rights activities in Memphis, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers joining the U.S. Civil Rights Commission

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers being targeted in a federal investigation

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls staying at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Rosetta Miller-Perry talks about the Invaders

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls the rumors about Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls an incident with N.J. Ford

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes Civil Rights Movement leaders' illicit activities

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Rosetta Miller-Perry talks about the tactics of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers the Poor People's Campaign

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the impact of civil rights groups on black newspapers

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls working at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes changes in the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers Clarence Thomas

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls founding Contempora magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers founding The Tennessee Tribune

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls her newspaper's impact on voter turnout

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls the criticisms of her newspaper

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes The Tennessee Tribune newspaper

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Rosetta Miller-Perry remembers Anthony J. Cebrun

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the racial tensions in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her publishing philosophy

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Rosetta Miller-Perry talks about megachurches

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the challenges facing The Tennessee Tribune

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the staff of The Tennessee Tribune

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her advertisers' partners

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the leadership of The Tennessee Tribune

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the mission of The Tennessee Tribune

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the Rosetta Miller-Perry Award for Best Black Filmmaker

Tape: 6 Story: 14 - Rosetta Miller-Perry reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Rosetta Miller-Perry talks about the media's portrayal of the black community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes the influence of Christianity in the South

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Rosetta Miller-Perry reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her family

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Rosetta Miller-Perry describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Rosetta Miller-Perry narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

2$4

DATitle
Rosetta Miller-Perry recalls her early civil rights activities in Memphis, Tennessee
Rosetta Miller-Perry describes her publishing philosophy
Transcript
So how did you get involved in civil rights?$$Well, you know, at that time I didn't do bridge, I didn't only--I was in the sorority, and Memphis [Tennessee] was hot, you know. And when they started marching, I just got involved, started marching and getting angry. And you go to the movement. I mean, you went to, to, to all the meetings and you get stirred up. And then I lived in Lakeview Gardens [sic. Lakeview Garden, Memphis, Tennessee] and well, they were talking about other people, we are consumers, we are spending our money with other people. And then we had this Chinese store out there and the people weren't nice to us, but we spent our money there. So, it started making me angry and I just got involved 'cause I want--I used to put my kids in front of that store and marched, just the four of us (laughter) telling people not to shop there. So you just keep getting yourself involved, one more thing and then the bigger thing and so forth. I talked my sorority into participating in the marches, you know. They didn't wanna do it, but we, you know, eventually everybody in town, basically.$$So what sorority were, were you in?$$Alpha Kappa Alpha [Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority].$$Okay, AKA.$We were noticing the layout of the paper [The Tennessee Tribune], you have a lot of nice big pictures in the newspaper. Do you have a philosophy about how newspapers should be laid out, the visual side of it?$$Well, personally I feel like my people won't pick up a newspaper if they don't see a picture. You know, they don't wanna read all that, whatever it is. But what--and people have told me this, tha- when they get my paper, they go to the social section and they read, 'cause they see the pictures. And then, they're relaxed they read the news, you know. But basically in black papers, you know, our news is old news, so we have to do other things like say who's who in business or you know, what things are happening in the community because we're weekly, you know.$$Yeah, a weekly paper, I guess any weekly paper now would not be news oriented, because you--everything is already over with by then?$$But we do a lot of national black news that these folks would never see. And that's what people like about my paper. They would never even know what's happening in New York [New York] or Chicago [Illinois] unless they read my paper, because they're not gonna read it in the white paper.$$Yeah, I just was reading an extensive article on the res- resignation of the director of the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] just now that I didn't know anything about. That happened on Ma- March the 4th and it's the first I've read about it.$$Right. So those are the types of things, you know, the people need to know. And then people are doing creative things in other communities. And pe- excuse me, people can get ideas from what's somebody's doing in New York, you know, instead of us doing the same old thing over and over again.