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William Bradford

Economist William Donald Bradford was born on June 19, 1944, in Gadsden, Alabama. Bradford was born to Ollie Mae Dobbs and George Joel Bradford, the fourth of six children. When Bradford was one year old, his family moved to Cleveland, Ohio. Bradford’s father was a Baptist minister and the owner of a barbershop. Bradford attended Cleveland’s Wooldridge Elementary School, Rawlings Junior High School and East Technical High School where he was enrolled in advanced placement courses.

Prior to attending Howard University in 1963, Bradford earned a living as a barber, saving money for college by cutting hair in his father’s barbershop. At Howard University, Bradford was a member of the football team playing linebacker and joined the Omega Psi Phi fraternity. He graduated with his B.A. degree in economics in 1967. In 1968, Bradford attended Ohio State University and was one of only two African Americans in the school’s M.B.A program. After graduating with his M.B.A degree in finance in 1968, Bradford remained at Ohio State University and earned his Ph.D. in finance in 1971.

From 1972 to 1980, Bradford served as the associate professor of finance at Stanford University’s School of Business. Bradford was also a visiting economist for the Federal Home Loan Bank board and a visiting professor of finance and economics at Yale University’s School of Organization and Management. From 1989 to 1990, Bradford was a visiting professor of finance for New York University, the University of California, Los Angeles and Ohio State University. In 1992, Bradford served as Acting Dean of the University of Maryland’s College of Business and Management. From 1994 to 1999, Bradford then served as dean and professor at the University of Washington’s School of Business Administration, where he was awarded the dean emeritus honor.

Bradford, the author of numerous scholarly articles, is a professor of business and economic development and a professor of finance and business economics at Washington University’s School of Business Administration. His studies include a minority business survey for the State of Washington, a study of minority venture capital firms and a study of black family financial management.

Accession Number

A2007.302

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/25/2007 |and| 6/5/2008

Last Name

Bradford

Organizations
Schools

East Technical High School

Wooldridge Elementary School

Rawlings Junior High School

First Name

William

Birth City, State, Country

Gadsden

HM ID

BRA09

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Keep rolling.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Washington

Birth Date

6/19/1944

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Seattle

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pastries

Short Description

Economist and economics professor William Bradford (1944 - ) served as dean and professor at the University of Washington’s School of Business Administration, where he later became dean emeritus.

Favorite Color

Blue

Annie Lee

Artist Annie Frances Lee was born on March 3, 1935, in Gadsden, Alabama; raised by a single parent, she grew up in Chicago, Illinois, and attended Wendell Phillips High School. Lee began painting at an early age, winning her first art competition at the age of ten. Lee was offered a four year scholarship to attend Northwestern University after high school, but married instead and raised a family.

It was not until age forty that Lee decided to pursue a career as an artist; she enrolled in Loop Junior College and completed her undergraduate work at Mundelein College in Chicago. After eight years of night classes while working at Northwestern Railroad as a clerk in the engineering department, Lee earned her M.A. degree in interdisciplinary arts education from Loyola University. Lee’s railroad job inspired one of her most popular paintings, Blue Monday, which depicts a woman struggling to pull herself out of bed on a Monday morning. Her trademarks are the animated emotion of the personalities in the artwork and the faces which are painted without features. At age fifty, Lee had her first gallery show; she allowed prints to be made of four of her original paintings. Using her unique designs, Lee also developed figurines, high fashion dolls, decorative housewares, and kitchen tiles.

After showing her work in other galleries for a number of years, Lee opened Annie Lee and Friends Gallery where she displayed her works as well as the works of other artists. When several of her paintings appeared on the sets of popular television shows such as The Cosby Show and A Different World, the exposure helped popularize her work. Although she regularly received requests for public appearances, Lee preferred to appear at gallery shows; she also enjoyed visiting schools to encourage and inspire students. She passed away on November 14, 2014, at the age of 79.

Accession Number

A2007.123

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/5/2007

Last Name

Lee

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Wendell Phillips Academy High School

James R. Doolittle, Jr. Elementary School

Harold Washington College

Mundelein College

Columbia College Chicago

Loyola University Chicago

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Annie

Birth City, State, Country

Gadsden

HM ID

LEE03

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere

Favorite Quote

Take Care Of Business.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

3/3/1935

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dallas

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood, Chili

Death Date

11/24/2014

Short Description

Painter Annie Lee (1935 - 2014 ) started painting at the age of forty but still enjoyed a successful painting career. Lee later used her unique designs to develop figurines, high fashion dolls, decorative housewares and kitchen tiles; she also enjoyed visiting schools to encourage and inspire students.

Employment

Supreme Life Insurance Company of America

Chicago and North Western Railway

U.S. Government

5th Army Headquarters

Annie Lee and Friends Art Galler

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:546,11:2457,34:4914,112:17209,310:23213,430:25820,472:32693,802:49980,975:51597,1041:62155,1187:71932,1315:80978,1444:82669,1483:118908,2163:124154,2268:130124,2336:134854,2439:155449,2686:175450,3036:186415,3181:187390,3199:190380,3235:193490,3264:209550,3496:212120,3506:212589,3522:214985,3554:217640,3623$0,0:3547,49:4142,55:5588,78:6500,101:10705,166:15353,343:25728,572:54040,1008:62946,1158:68140,1222:68780,1232:70620,1279:71820,1319:74060,1372:80460,1492:113140,1936:128750,2295:130730,2355:139512,2431:152265,2778:159902,2839:161466,2868:163122,2897:164226,2932:171163,2989:172390,2998:178444,3127:226062,4084:226898,4105:238108,4230:238626,4249:238922,4254:242580,4314
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Annie Lee's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Annie Lee lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Annie Lee describes her family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Annie Lee describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Annie Lee remembers her neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Annie Lee describes her neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Annie Lee describes her early education in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Annie Lee describes her marriages

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Annie Lee remembers Wendell Phillips High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Annie Lee describes her career at Chicago and North Western Railway

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Annie Lee remembers her neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Annie Lee recalls her early activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Annie Lee describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Annie Lee describes her neighbors in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Annie Lee recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Annie Lee describes her secretarial career in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Annie Lee recalls her marriage and divorce from her second husband

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Annie Lee describes her experiences of domestic abuse

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Annie Lee remembers how she became an artist

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Annie Lee describes her secondary education in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Annie Lee describes her introduction to home show art companies

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Annie Lee describes her role as chief clerk at Chicago and North Western Railway

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Annie Lee remembers her early paintings

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Annie Lee talks about the inspiration for her artwork

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Annie Lee recalls her first gallery show in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Annie Lee describes her decision to open a gallery

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Annie Lee reflects upon her decision not to depict faces in her paintings

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Annie Lee describes her creative process

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Annie Lee shares her advice about collecting art

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Annie Lee describes her coloring book illustrations

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Annie Lee talks about licensing her artwork

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Annie Lee describes her plans for the future, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Annie Lee reflects upon her religious involvement

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Annie Lee talks about the artists with whom she collaborated

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Annie Lee reflects upon the experiences of African American female artists

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Annie Lee describes her reasons for opening her gallery

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Annie Lee talks about her art collection

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Annie Lee reflects upon her customer base

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Annie Lee recalls the appearances of her artwork on television

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Annie Lee talks about her children and grandchildren

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Annie Lee describes her plans for the future, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Annie Lee reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Annie Lee describes her advice to aspiring artists

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Annie Lee describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Annie Lee reflects upon the lack of recognition for artists

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Annie Lee narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

2$4

DATitle
Annie Lee describes her introduction to home show art companies
Annie Lee remembers her early paintings
Transcript
So now you were beginning to tell about--$$I (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) how you started working for the home show.$$Yeah, I was--always wanted to go to New Orleans [Louisiana] to see the artists all around the square. I've always saw pictures of artists, man I said I'd just love to go down there see, just see the artists and be a part of that. And I remember taking this bus ride to New Orleans, and I had my little art portfolio that I'd done, 'cause I went to American Academy of Art [Chicago, Illinois] too off and on and took classes and the Art Institute [Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois]. You name it, I've been there, okay; any, any school in Chicago [Illinois], I've been to. So I had my portfolio, and I was looking through it. And there was lady standing there, and she said, "Who did those paintings?" And I said, "I did." She said, "You're kidding." She said, "When you get back to Chicago you should contact my boss. I work for a home show company [Color Your World (ph.)], and we sell art, and, and we're always looking for artists." And I said, "Oh, you're kidding." So anyway, I called when I got back. And the guy came out, and he said, "We, we've never, ever sold any African American art at all, but let's try it." So this had to be around in the '70s [1970s], '79 [1979].$$Seventy- okay, all right.$$About '79 [1979]. And he said let's try it and see how it works. So I remember doing five little jazz musicians. And he said you know--what, what I would do is paint an original on a little eight by ten [inch] canvas. He said, "Let's do ten of each, and we're gonna try to sell them in Minnesota--in Wisconsin--and see how it goes." So he called me. He said, "Annie [HistoryMaker Annie Lee], do me twenty of each. We sold those right away." And I'm like, "Really?" And he said, "Do twenty of each." So I did twenty of each, and he called back. He said, "I can't believe it." He said, "These things are going like hotcakes. Do fifty of each." And I did fifty, and he came back and he said, "Just paint until you get tired." He said, "We're not gonna--we don't pay you much money per piece, but we'll buy volume from you, plus it'll help your name get known around the country." He said, "We start in Wisconsin. We sell in ten different states." He said, "And we'll just start selling these all around all the states so your name will get out there." (Laughter) I'd come in from work and I'd paint from seven in the--I'd get in maybe about 5:30 from the railroad [Chicago and North Western Railway; CNW Corporation], and I'd start painting at maybe 6:00. And I'd paint 'til 3:00 in the morning every day, all day. I was--it got so until I hired people to erase the eraser off, you know, the, pencil off the painting. I had somebody--it was, I had kids on the neighborhood to help me. And I loved every minute of it. And (laughter) I, I always remember my neighbor came over one day and she said, "Annie, stop, stop, stop; you've got to stop." She said, "You're gonna paint yourself into a coma, stop it." I had an operation on my wrist 'cause I got acute tendonitis from painting. And I went up to Mayo Clinic [Rochester, Minnesota], and I remember painting with the cast on coming back. I was making two or three thousand dollars a month. I was like, ho, besides the railroad. And, and I said me, I can do whatever I wanted. I remember opening my son [Howard Lee, Jr.] a fish market. And then he got killed while, during that time.$$Okay.$$And with the, with the, with that added income I was able to, you know, just do most of the things I wanted to do and help my kids and stuff.$Tell me about your artwork. Do you remember your first piece?$$I remember the first piece that I did that I paid to have produced. Okay, I re- yes, I do remember the first print. My friend Dan [ph.], who grew up with me, who owned the art gallery, he came by my house--well I'm doing the home show companies, okay.$$Right.$$And Dan came by my house, said, he said--I had a painting of some trees that I'd done, and he said, "Who did that?" And I said, "I did." And he said, "I didn't know you could paint." I said, "Yeah, I painted all my life." He said, "Can, may I take that piece to the gallery and see if I could sell it?" I said, "Sure (laughter)." He called me the next week and said, "Annie [HistoryMaker Annie Lee], guess what. I got a check for you." I said, "A check for what?" He said, "I sold the painting." I'm thinking oh, you got to be kidding. And so he, he, he said look, come on. May--not--the home show company and Dan are two different things. Dan said, "Annie, do you think you could do some paintings? And maybe we'll give you a one woman's art exhibit." I said, "Yeah, but I don't have any paintings." He said, "Well, we'll just start working on it, and we'll wait 'til you get enough." So, it took about two years to get enough paintings for me to have a show. Meanwhile, I'm doing these little musicians and things for the rail- for the home show company. So it was two different things. I tried to keep them separate. And so Dan, one day he said, "Annie, may I take three of your paintings and make prints out of them," like this (gestures off camera). And I said, "Yeah." And it was one that I liked myself, and I said man, I should make a print out of that, but I can't afford it 'cause it costs about three thousand dollars at the time. And you know, that's a lot of money to be spending on hoping it'll sell, but it was 'Blue Monday' [Annie Lee]. And I went on and did it anyway, and today that's still my best seller.$$What was the inspiration for 'Blue Monday'?$$The railroad [Chicago and North Western Railway; CNW Corporation]. That's the way I looked every morning going, getting up going to that railroad. And I, and one day I said, "I know somebody's got to feel bad like, too. I hate, I hate that job, and I know I'm not the only one going to work on a job that they hate." I hated the prejudice. I, I, I mean it was just awful. So, that was 'Blue Monday.' That's the way I looked.$$So it was that, sort of like a, a (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I sketched it.$$--of yourself (laughter).$$Yeah, yeah, it was me.$$Okay.$$It was me. I sketched the picture on the way to work, and came home, and painted it in a, in a half an hour. And usually, it takes a while to paint a picture. I painted, and then I went and made the prints. And it's still the best seller today.$$Now, the, the artwork that you were giving to the home show people, what was the name of that company?$$It was called Color Your World [ph.].$$Now--$$And another company was called Artistic Impressions [Artistic Impressions, Inc.]. So I ended up work, working for two or three of them.$$Now, would that be original art that you were giving to them?$$(Nod head).$$And what size was it?$$Eight by tens [inches].$$Eight by ten. And how much were they sell, selling for?$$They might would sell them for fifty or sixty dollars. And at first they started giving me like five dollars apiece, and then they gave me ten dollars apiece. And then they'd sell, and then they went up; I was getting twenty-five dollars apiece. You know, it really, it moved up.$$Okay, so Dan is the one who paid for--$$No.$$--'Blue Monday'?$$No, I paid for 'Blue Monday.'$$Oh, you paid for 'Blue Monday.'$$Dan did 'Six No Uptown' [Annie Lee], the women playing cards. And he did a little boy playing ball called 'Full Count One and Two' [sic. 'Full Count Three and Two,' Annie Lee], and he did one called 'Stretch One, Two' ['Stretch 1&2,' Annie Lee], women doing aerobics. And Dan said, "Okay, Annie, I'm gonna take a chance on you." He said, "I just think this is gonna sell." So he ran an ad in Essence magazine. And it was just a little fourth of a page 'cause it cost a mint to run an ad in Essence. And he ran this little ad, and that was it. He said, "This is the best thing I ever did," he said. And it just took off like crazy.

The Honorable Paul Webber

Senior judge in the District of Columbia Superior Court, Paul Rainey Webber, III was born on January 24, 1934 in Gadsden, South Carolina to Paul Rainey Webber, Jr. and Clemmie Embley Webber. His parents, both educators, met at South Carolina State University. Webber’s mother is the author of My Treadwell Street Saga and The College Soda Shop – An Education for Life, chronicling the business. Webber attended Felton Elementary School, the South Carolina State College Lab School and graduated from Wilkinson High School in 1951. He earned his B.A. degree in political science in 1955 from South Carolina State College and his J.D. degree from South Carolina State College’s School of Law in 1957.

Webber practiced law in Columbia, South Carolina for nineteen months and taught at Allen University. He was married in 1958 before leaving for UCLA where he was employed as assistant law librarian in 1959. In 1960, he joined Golden State Mutual Insurance Company as associate legal counsel. Webber was appointed trial attorney for the Antitrust Division of the United States Justice Department in 1964. In 1967, he becomes managing attorney for the Neighborhood Legal Services Program, serving during the 1968 riots. Webber became a partner with Thompson Evans Dolphin and Webber in 1969, which later became Dolphin Branton Stafford and Webber. In Washington, Webber taught at Howard University School of Communications and later at George Washington University School of Law. Webber was appointed Washington, D.C. Superior Court Judge in 1977. In 1985, he was named “Outstanding Trial Judge of the Year” and was rated “One of the Best Trial Justices in the Washington Metropolitan Area” by Washington Magazine in 1996. Webber ascended to Senior Judge of the D.C. Superior Court in 1998 and was inducted into the National Bar Association Hall of Fame that same year.

Webber is a member of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Think Tank, the Council for Court Excellence, and the Guardsmen. He serves as board member and general counsel for the Boule, Sigma Pi Phi and is also the author of Enjoy the Journey, One Lawyer’s Memoir.

Webber is married to Fay DeShields Webber and has three grown children.

Webber was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 6, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.049

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/6/2007

Last Name

Webber

Maker Category
Schools

Orangeburg-Wilkinson High School

Felton Laboratory Charter School

South Carolina State University Lab School

First Name

Paul

Birth City, State, Country

Gadsden

HM ID

WEB05

Favorite Season

Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Ocean Pines, Maryland

Favorite Quote

Always Do The Best You Can

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/24/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti

Short Description

Superior court judge The Honorable Paul Webber (1934 - ) was a senior judge of the Washington, D.C. Superior Court.

Employment

Allen University

University of California Los Angeles School of Law

Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company

District of Columbia Superior Court

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:10902,394:45222,764:57906,1116:59061,1137:63142,1176:72586,1285:72882,1290:75694,1344:81170,1443:81614,1450:82206,1459:92510,1658:99240,1744:101702,1800:102086,1811:114288,1922:117954,1965:125442,2042:131106,2132:131471,2138:133971,2155:136204,2204:136589,2210:137590,2254:139515,2293:142903,2357:143750,2380:144597,2392:153008,2473:153980,2487$0,0:8366,135:12908,194:14964,212:16276,240:28800,446:29190,452:31296,506:31686,512:52202,810:63320,1002
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of the Honorable Paul Webber's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - The Honorable Paul Webber lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his mother's childhood in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his father's semi-professional baseball career

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his siblings and how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his childhood in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his personality and how he takes after his father

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his early education

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls the influence of Benjamin Mays

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers music from his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his early interest in politics

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls the Civil Rights Movement in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his parents' political involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his decision to attend South Carolina State College

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his mentors at South Carolina State College

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers learning about African American history

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls joining Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his activities at South Carolina State College

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers meeting Negro League baseball players

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers South Carolina State College School of Law

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his studies at South Carolina State College School of Law

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about the Orangeburg massacre

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about public school integration

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his early law career

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls being hired at Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls meeting attorney Leo Branton, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his work at Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his work at the U.S. Department of Justice

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls managing the Neighborhood Legal Services Program in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes the casework of the Neighborhood Legal Services Program

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls joining the law firm of Thompson, Evans and Dolphin

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers Thurgood Marshall, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - The Honorable Paul Webber remembers Thurgood Marshall, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his former law partners

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his appointment to the District of Columbia Superior Court

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes the highlights of his career as a judge

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his judicial philosophy

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about trying juveniles as adults

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - The Honorable Paul Weber recalls the impact of drugs on crime in the 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - The Honorable Paul Webber talks about media representations of the judicial system

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his hopes for the criminal justice system

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes his organizational involvement

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - The Honorable Paul Webber reflects upon his life

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - The Honorable Paul Webber reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - The Honorable Paul Webber describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - The Honorable Paul Webber narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

8$2

DATitle
The Honorable Paul Webber recalls his father's semi-professional baseball career
The Honorable Paul Webber recalls meeting attorney Leo Branton, Jr.
Transcript
He [Webber's father, Paul Webber, Jr.] was involved in athletics for a long time, I guess, we just looked at the pictures before we started?$$Yes. He was assistant football coach [at the Colored Normal Industrial Agricultural and Mechanical College of South Carolina; South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, South Carolina] for a number of years, he was, he formed a baseball, a semi-pro baseball team called the Orangeburg Tigers, right after the war and they played teams in North [North Carolina], South Carolina in Virginia, Florida and they played a lot of the negro major league [Negro Leauges] teams when they were barnstorming throughout the South, they would come to Orangeburg [South Carolina] and the Tigers had a pretty good record against teams like the Homestead Grays, the Birmingham Black Barons, the Atlanta Black Crackers, one of my favorite names, and the New York Black Yankees (laughter).$$So they had a good record against these, I mean they, they had a--$$Yeah--$$--they could hold their own against this, they could play (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) They could, they could. I think because they had two colleges there, and neither college at that time had a baseball team, a lot of talented young men went out for the semi-pro team and so I think the fact that they had so much talent there was attractive not only to the teams that they barnstormed against but to the fans. So they drew a lot of fans until Jackie Robinson signed with the Dodgers [Brooklyn Dodgers; Los Angeles Dodgers] and then when they cou- when fans could see Jackie on TV or hear the games, the Dodgers games on radio, the interest in semi-pro teams started to drain, and dwindle and the team disbanded about 1954, I think they started about 1946.$$Okay, okay. So, was, was that an exciting time to be around when the teams?$$It really was, it really was. I was batboy and traveled with the team, they had a bus that they painted orange and back with big tigers on each side and little towns throughout the South where the bus went through, the kids would always run up and cheer and anytime we had a team, that bus was a major attraction. And just sitting on the bus and listening to stories being told by some of the players, not all of the players were college age, some of them were World War II [WWII] veterans, guys who had been around the world and had a lot of interesting tales to tell. So, for a kid my age, around twelve to fourteen or so, it was an exciting time.$At some time thereafter I met Leo Branton [HistoryMaker Leo Branton, Jr.] who had, one of those years when I was out there was the Los Angeles [California] layer of the year, as I recalled, his total verdicts in trials in that year was the highest of any lawyer in Los Angeles County [California]. And so he was named lawyer of the year and it was a banquet or something for Leo and I went and that's where I met him.$$Okay. All right, had you heard about him before--well I guess you hadn't.$$I had not heard about Leo until I moved to Los Angeles.$$Okay.$$Um-hm.$$And I heard he handled quite a few high profile black clients.$$That's right. He was at one time the lawyer for Nat Cole [Nat King Cole], Dorothy Dandridge, Jimi Hendrix, [HistoryMaker] Angela Davis, among others.$$Okay.$$Um-hm.$$So this is like 1959 maybe or?$$No, no. This was around 1962, at that point.$$Sixty-two [1962]? Okay, all right.$$Um-hm.$$So you had been there a while?$$Yes.$$Okay.$$Um-hm.$$Nineteen sixty-two [1962].