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Patricia Ann Lottier

Magazine publisher Patricia Lottier was born on February 18, 1948, to Ruth and Melvin Franklin. Lottier was delivered in Ironton, Ohio, because there were no African American doctors in her hometown of Ashland, Kentucky. One of a few African American students to attend Paul Blazer High School, Lottier excelled in her studies and was granted a full scholarship by Johns Hopkins University in 1966.

While attending Johns Hopkins, Lottier met and married George Lottier. Lottier graduated from nursing school in 1969, then went on to earn her B.S. degree in nursing from Western Connecticut State University in 1980, and her M.S. degree in public health administration from Emory University in 1984. After her family moved to Atlanta, Georgia, Lottier worked with a sickle cell program with the DeKalb County Health Department and became the southeastern operations manager of the home-care division of Baxter International, a national provider of hospital and health supplies.

In 1986, Lottier’s husband helped publish the Atlanta Tribune; after the first two issues, Kermit Thomas relinquished the publication to the Lottiers. Within two years, Pat Lottier was able to triple the number of advertising pages. With her business sense, management skills, and some guidance from her in-laws (the publishers of the Afro American newspaper in Baltimore, Maryland), Lottier was able to turn the Atlanta Tribune into a magazine that has brought a positive light to outstanding African American businesses and their owners for over twenty years.

Lottier was honored in Who’s Who Among African Americans. Lottier was a member of the Coalitions of 100 Black Women, and the Emory University Public Health Advisory. Lottier lived in Roswell, Georgia with her husband George; the couple raised two sons, Christopher and Shawn.

Accession Number

A2007.012

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/16/2007

Last Name

Lottier

Maker Category
Middle Name

Ann

Organizations
Schools

Paul G Blazer High School

Booker T Washington High School

Coles Junior High School

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Western Connecticut State University

Emory University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Patricia

Birth City, State, Country

Ironton

HM ID

LOT01

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

Good Comes Back To Those Who Are Doing Good.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

2/18/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Magazine publishing chief executive Patricia Ann Lottier (1948 - ) was the publisher of the Atlanta Tribune.

Favorite Color

Earth Tones

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Patricia Ann Lottier's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Patricia Ann Lottier lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her mother, Ruth Jennings Franklin

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about her ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about her family's history in Ashland, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her grade school years at Booker T. Washington High School in Ashland, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her childhood community in Ashland, Kentucky

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about her extracurricular activities in grade school and Miss Johnson, an influential music teacher

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Patricia Ann Lottier recalls her experience at Paul G. Blazer High School in Ashland, Kentucky

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Patricia Ann Lottier recalls being recruited by the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Patricia Ann Lottier recalls her time at Coles Junior High School and Paul G. Blazer High School in Ashland, Kentucky

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her memory of President John F. Kennedy's assassination and her family's political engagement

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Patricia Ann Lottier recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her experience at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her nursing jobs after graduating from Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Patricia Ann Lottier recalls life in Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about her studies at Western Connecticut State University in Danbury, Connecticut and moving around for her husband's job

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about her admission to Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about working for the DeKalb County Health Department in Georgia and for Baxter International

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes how she became the publisher of the Atlanta Tribune, pt.1

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes how she became the publisher of the Atlanta Tribune, pt.2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her role as publisher of the Atlanta Tribune, pt.1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her role as publisher of the Atlanta Tribune, pt.2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about her civic involvement in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about her husband's business ventures and how he became executive director of the Georgia Minority Survivor Development Council

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Patricia Ann Lottier continues to describe her civic engagement in the Atlanta, Georgia community

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Patricia Ann Lottier remembers celebrating milestones at the Atlanta Tribune, pt.1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Patricia Ann Lottier remembers celebrating milestones at the Atlanta Tribune, pt.2

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about the future of the Atlanta Tribune, its distribution model, and its advertisers

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about her family

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes how she hopes to positively impact young minorities with the Atlanta Tribune

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Patricia Ann Lottier talks about her art collection

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Patricia Ann Lottier describes the most significant event in her life

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Patricia Ann Lottier shares her advice with future generations

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Patricia Ann Lottier reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Patricia Ann Lottier narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

2$4

DATitle
Patricia Ann Lottier describes how she became the publisher of the Atlanta Tribune, pt.2
Patricia Ann Lottier describes how she hopes to positively impact young minorities with the Atlanta Tribune
Transcript
And within, I don't know, two, three years--even Atlanta Journal Constitution came out to my little office, which is here in Roswell, and had interviews there. How can this person who knew nothing about newspapers, came from the North--'cause I'm not an Atlantan person--cover black people in Atlanta [Georgia]? It, it worked, you know. I had an editor who made sure nothing was misspelled, we made sure the pictures were clean and clear and pretty, and that the magazine was in places where people could see it. I can remember, back then, going non-stop, morning breakfast at Paschal's to meet people and give 'em copies of the Tribune, going to a lunch at the Hyatt giving out copies of the Atlanta Tribune, then that evening going to an Atlanta business meeting giving out copies of the magazine. And people said, "This is great; nobody else is doing this." The Atlanta Journal Constitution and the Atlanta--what was the evening paper; well, they were--one was Constitution, one was the Journal. They rarely put information in the newspapers about positive things that black businesspeople were doing; they had stuff, of course--you know, Maynard Jackson was the mayor, so they would put his stuff in every now and then, but the other businesspeople who were making a difference, they didn't cover it. TV stations only wanted to cover if someone were shooting somebody else; the positive things or the positive stories that black Atlantans were doing, nobody was thinking about putting it in print. We did; we became--and then there were--now, I must say, there were other newspapers in Atlanta at the same time; the Atlanta Daily World, I think it's almost what seventy-six, seventy-eight years old; it's always been around. They had--their, their--Alexis' [Alexis Scott, HM] father [W.A. Scott III] was very much into, let me do it my way, and it was a new day. People didn't understand about typesetting; I mean it was okay if lines went crooked or pictures were too dark, they accepted it; we didn't. We had some of the newest typesetting equipment, and it was really just on a computer at that time, to make sure lines were straight, photos were clear. I can remember calling the printer when I thought he made some of the pictures a little too dark. And he said to me, "Well, girlie, it's black people and their skin tones are different." I said, "If you want to keep our business, you will look at every page to make sure the picture we give you stays that color," and they did after I fussed and would scream over the phone--they did. So, we had good staff; we still have a good staff. So, that's what happened; that's how I inherited, quote, the Atlanta Tribune fell in my lap because Kermit Thomas said, "Huh, I give up; I'm going off to something else, another venture."$I had a call once--we did a piece on Vicki Palmer with Coca-Cola Enterprises, and the story talked about, she started in Tennessee, some things she did, how she made it, and three, four months later, I get an email from someone I hadn't heard from in, since I lived in Danbury, Connecticut, but somehow his daughter got a copy of the magazine in Tennessee and said, "Wow, if this young lady who came from my state can make it to be a senior vice president at Coca-Cola Enterprises, hey, I can do it, too. I don't have to settle for being just a teacher or a nurse." 'Cause when I came through the educational system, the choices for a black female; wear a white dress and white shoes and a white cap--to be a nurse; to say, "Yes, doctor, I'll do this, doctor." "Thank you, yes." Sit down, stand up when he comes in. Or to be a teacher, and there's nothing wrong with being a teacher, but those were the two options, you know; you couldn't be a principal, you couldn't talk about going to the moon, you couldn't talk about being president of a university. So now, everyone has these options and that's, I think, is what the Atlanta Tribune is also trying to tell young minority students, do what you do well, and don't set your sights very low. Your parents may have worked in somebody's kitchen--that's what my mother [Ruth Jennings Franklin] did. My father [Melvin Franklin], I think they said he finished only the eighth grade and just stopped; and his father, I said had all these eight houses; I don't know how they got the houses, but--now he did day labor, you know, go to the houses and, you know--no education, probably couldn't read a blueprint; probably couldn't, I'm sure he couldn't. Couldn't use a calculator, and--but if you say, "That's where they are, but if I do just a little bit more, I can get higher." As we grow as black people, our children keep moving up, and you just never know who you're touching, so I mean I kind of saved that email for a long time. And I also saved a voice message that Maynard Jackson left for me one day about how well one of my writers had interviewed him--saved it and saved it, and boy I said I should never delete it, but the phone system went down one day, and I lost it--I should of recorded it. But I think that's what we're trying to do to make a difference for our young people.