The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

city

Carrie Mae Weems

Photographer and artist Carrie Mae Weems was born on April 20, 1953 in Portland, Oregon to Myrlie and Carrie Weems. Weems graduated from the California Institute of the Arts, Valencia with her B.F.A. degree in 1981, and received her M.F.A. degree in photography from the University of California, San Diego in 1984. From 1984 to 1987, she participated in the graduate program in folklore at the University of California, Berkeley.

In 1984, Weems completed her first collection of photographs, text, and spoken word entitled, Family Pictures and Stories. Her next photographic series, Ain't Jokin', was completed in 1988. She went on to produce American Icons in 1989, and Colored People and the Kitchen Table Series in 1990. Weems then created the Sea Islands Series (1991-92), Slave Coast and Africa Series (1993), From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried (1995-96), Who What When Where (1998), Ritual & Revolution (1998), Jefferson Suite (1999), Hampton Project (2000), May Days Long Forgotten and Dreaming in Cuba (2002), The Louisiana Project (2003), Roaming (2006), and the Museum Series, which she began in 2006. She also produced the video projects Coming Up for Air (2004), Italian Dreams (2006), Constructing History: A Requiem to Mark the Moment (2008), and Afro-Chic (2009), among others.

Weems is represented by the Jack Shainman Gallery in New York City, and has exhibited her art at the Rhona Hoffman Gallery in Chicago, Illinois, and Gallery Paule Anglim in San Francisco, California. She has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions at major national and international museums, including the Museum of Contemporary Art (Los Angeles), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Frist Center for the Visual Arts, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tate Liverpool in England, and the Bilbao Fine Arts Museum in Spain. She is represented in public and private collections around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art (New York), The Museum of Fine Arts (Houston), The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Portland Art Museum. In addition, Weems has taught as an assistant professor or visiting professor at Hampshire College, Hunter College, California College of Arts and Crafts, Williams College, Harvard University, Syracuse University, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Weems has received numerous awards, grants and fellowships including the Joseph H. Hazen Rome Prize Fellowship; a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship; a Smithsonian Fellowship; the Alpert Award for Visual Arts; the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award; and the Anonymous Was a Woman Foundation Award. In 2012, she was presented with one of the first U.S. Department of State’s Medals of Arts in recognition for her commitment to the State Department’s Art in Embassies program. In 2013, Weems received the MacArthur Foundation’s “Genius” Grant, the Gordon Parks Foundation Award and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Carrie Mae Weems was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 10, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.175

Sex

Female

Interview Date

9/10/2014

Last Name

Weems

Maker Category
Middle Name

Mae

Organizations
Schools

California Institute of the Arts

University of California, San Diego

University of California, Berkeley

Harriet Tubman Leadership Academy for Young Women

Sabin K-8 School

Andrew Jackson High School

Boise-Eliot/Humboldt PK-8 School

City College of San Francisco

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Carrie

Birth City, State, Country

Portland

HM ID

WEE01

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Oregon

Favorite Vacation Destination

The World

Favorite Quote

You Prepare To Live, Every Day

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

4/20/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Popcorn

Short Description

Photographer and visual artist Carrie Mae Weems (1953 - ) was an award-winning folkloric artist represented in public and private collections around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and The Art Institute of Chicago.

Employment

Hampshire College

Hunter College

California College of Arts and Crafts

Williams College

Harvard University

Syracuse University

University of Pennsylvania

Kelly Services, Inc.

Brockman Gallery

Favorite Color

Chartreuse, Yellow, Burnt Orange, Deep Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:5430,96:14266,217:14904,230:15136,235:16822,249:19370,286:22555,324:22919,330:23283,335:28296,369:28851,376:29739,386:30405,393:35844,453:38286,480:47124,533:47880,541:50012,556:50360,563:51056,577:51520,587:51752,592:51984,597:52506,607:56446,653:56908,661:57172,666:57502,672:57766,677:58228,685:59482,706:59746,722:60208,733:60604,740:61396,754:61858,762:62716,780:63244,789:72630,935:75990,981:88586,1144:89808,1161:90748,1173:92722,1201:99960,1323:100618,1332:107520,1376:108080,1385:108480,1391:109200,1402:109680,1409:112666,1420:113706,1426:114710,1443:115698,1458:116002,1463:116306,1468:117294,1483:117674,1489:118358,1503:119042,1521:121550,1565:125280,1590:126012,1597:126866,1605:148740,1890:152890,1965:158111,2004:173770,2281:176325,2334:179537,2409:182822,2450:183406,2459:188170,2467:189845,2499:191855,2565:194468,2646:212846,2873:225018,3040:225370,3045:226602,3076:226954,3081:230122,3139:230650,3146:234492,3156:236463,3182:237120,3194:237412,3199:238069,3211:238580,3220:246558,3280:251328,3318:255870,3382:256186,3387:260056,3429:260434,3437:261028,3452:261460,3461:266530,3506:266902,3514:267274,3521:268204,3558:268576,3654:269630,3696:278930,3833:279488,3844:292550,3966:293040,3974:293600,3983:294720,4009:295210,4018:307040,4408:316526,4496:318182,4526:318974,4546:319334,4552:320270,4581:320558,4586:327100,4662$0,0:612,3:884,8:5441,63:6095,70:7185,90:8384,103:10760,174:20550,264:23177,315:25378,355:26017,365:28928,427:29425,440:29993,449:32052,523:33330,551:34324,569:36241,600:36738,609:38584,651:39081,660:42844,735:49574,759:53078,819:53662,828:54027,834:55341,855:55779,863:56217,871:56582,877:59648,925:64780,949:66540,958:68035,987:68945,1008:69270,1014:71025,1043:71545,1056:72130,1067:72975,1084:73625,1100:74470,1117:74990,1126:81815,1249:82920,1272:83960,1292:84220,1297:84545,1304:85065,1313:86430,1340:87145,1353:98402,1491:108051,1656:108667,1668:109129,1675:110053,1699:124110,1863:124960,1875:125300,1880:125725,1886:126235,1896:127765,1923:131505,1981:132695,1998:133290,2006:143410,2065:144250,2074:144730,2079:149330,2108:149750,2116:150030,2121:152830,2185:158490,2240:159090,2247:159690,2255:160690,2275:161490,2284:173275,2440:174076,2452:177636,2625:179149,2668:180395,2702:183421,2743:183955,2751:184756,2761:185557,2771:198356,2932:201476,2985:202724,3010:209900,3155:210446,3163:219976,3244:220796,3256:221452,3268:223174,3306:223502,3311:223994,3318:227274,3379:227602,3388:247298,3635:248802,3696:251738,3833:252218,3852:256984,3902:257592,3914:257896,3923:264672,4005:265608,4023:266310,4034:266934,4043:271458,4117:272706,4138:273486,4150:274110,4161:277542,4224:278634,4243:279414,4255:299870,4368:300190,4373:307105,4450:309328,4522:314224,4587:329210,4831:329833,4843:331168,4868:336855,4921:337235,4926:337710,4932:342430,4997
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Carrie Mae Weems' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Carrie Mae Weems lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Carrie Mae Weems describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Carrie Mae Weems describes her parents' work as sharecroppers

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Carrie Mae Weems remembers the death of her father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about her family's migration to Portland, Oregon

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Carrie Mae Weems describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Carrie Mae Weems describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Carrie Mae Weems describes the racial demographics of her neighborhood in Portland, Oregon

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Carrie Mae Weems remembers the events of the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls her early work ethic, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls her early work ethic, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Carrie Mae Weems describes the awakening of her individual consciousness

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about her home life

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Carrie Mae Weems remembers her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls her introduction to theater

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Carrie Mae Weems reflects upon her friendship with Catherine Jelski

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls her decision to attend the California Institute of the Arts

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Carrie Mae Weems remembers the birth of her daughter

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Carrie Mae Weems remembers moving to San Francisco, California

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls working for the Kelly Services, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about the development of her political consciousness

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls her introduction to photography

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about her photography training

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Carrie Mae Weems shares her philosophy of travel

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about the Studio Museum in Harlem in New York City

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about her photography mentors

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls working for Anthony Barboza and Louis Draper

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls lessons from Anthony Barboza and Louis Draper

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Carrie Mae Weems describes the Kamoinge Workshop

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls organizing the 'Women in Photography' exhibition

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls her role as an art curator

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about her interest in art curating

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Carrie Mae Weems remembers photographing farmworkers in Central California

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about P.H. Polk, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about P.H. Polk, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls her documentary film about black photography

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Carrie Mae Weems describes the influence of Zora Neale Hurston on her work

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Carrie Mae Weems recalls enrolling in the folklore program at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Carrie Mae Weems describes her artistic process

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about 'The Kitchen Table Series, 1990'

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Carrie Mae Weems describes the process of creating 'The Kitchen Table Series, 1990'

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Carrie Mae Weems describes the intentions behind 'The Kitchen Table Series, 1990,' pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Carrie Mae Weems describes the intentions behind 'The Kitchen Table Series, 1990,' pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about the exclusion of African Americans from critical art discourse

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about being the subject of her own photographs

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about her decision to focus on self-portraiture

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Carrie Mae Weems describes her creative process

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Carrie Mae Weems talks about representing the black experience

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Carrie Mae Weems describes the use of artifacts in her work

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

3$4

DATitle
Carrie Mae Weems recalls working for Anthony Barboza and Louis Draper
Carrie Mae Weems describes the influence of Zora Neale Hurston on her work
Transcript
You're studying under great photographers [at the Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, New York], great black photographers, how--how did that inform the artist who you were becoming?$$Well, DeCarava [Roy DeCarava] was probably the most important. I thought that it was Anthony Barboza, because DeCarava, DeCarava's style is very, very subtle. And he's a, you know, he just a master, a master printer, and I was a little intimidated by him also. I was afraid of him, and but one night, not one night--you know, again I was a fairly intense person. I was taking classes I was trying to make some decisions about how I was going to move forward. And I decided that there were several photographers in New York [New York] that I was really interested in working with. One was the Japanese photographer Hiro [Yasuhiro Wakabayashi]. The other one was Lou Draper [Louis Draper], and the third was Anthony Barboza. So I stayed up, I had their prints on my wall in my ap- my, my 84th Street (speaks French) appartement. I had their prints on my wall you know clippings from magazines and publications. And I stayed up for like forty-eight hours like looking and writing and thinking 'cause that's what happens when you're hungry, you know. You can, you know, you can live on adrenaline for a while and I decided that I was going to work with one of these men. And that I was going to start calling on Monday morning at eight o'clock. So I'd stayed up, I'd made this decision I had their names written down, I had their telephone numbers written down, I had their addresses written down. Monday morning comes along I pick up the phone, and I start calling these numbers, one after the other, one after the other, all morning until somebody picked up the phone. So finally somebody picks up, it's his studio, and I said, "Hello is Lou Draper there?" "No, Lou's out in the, in the, in the dark room." "Okay, can you ask him, when, when can--," "Well, you can call back in five minutes?" Call the other number (makes sound), "Is Anthony Barboza there?" "Anthony's out in the studio right now, but you know, you can call back in ten minutes." "Oh, okay." Picked up the phone (makes sound), "Mr. Hiro is not here right now, you must call back next week." (Laughter) This, I mean just this sort of crazy thing. And finally I realize that two of the numbers were virtually the same except for one digit. And that Anthony Barboza and Lou Draper were actually working together. And that, when I was calling, one would be in the studio and the other would be in the dark room. Or one would be in the--right the--the, you know. They were sort of doing this thing and finally Anthony got on the phone. Tony Barboza got on the phone, and I said, "Hello, this is [HistoryMaker] Carrie Mae Weems calling. You have absolutely no idea who I am, but I know who you are and I've decided that I'm coming to work for you." And he said, "Who is this? Shirley? Is this Shirley?" And I said, "No, this is Carrie Mae Weems, and I have been up for a long time, and I've been looking at your photographs for a long time. And I just can't think of a better person to work with, so I'd like to come by and talk with you to find out when I could start." And he said, "Well can you come by on Wednesday?" And that's how I started working with Anthony Barboza. And then I worked with him for a long time and Lou was there, so I was suddenly working with two of my favorite photographers in one fell swoop. And it was really, really wonderful and then you know, that he didn't hang up on me was like a miracle. But I was so impassioned that I was just--it's like I have to do this. You know, and you know, like there's no other way of doing it, than other--you know than, than being direct. I've gotta do this, and I gotta work with you, I'm looking at these photograph's that you can teach me what I need to know. And so, I work with him, and I would then work with him on special projects because then I'm flipping back and forth. I know California, I know New York, I know how to drive, I--you know, I'm like you know. So you know, so he--if he needed to go to San Francisco [California] he would call me up, and I would pick him up and I would take care of everything. If he needed to go to L.A. [Los Angeles, California], I would pick him up I would drive I would take care of everything. So I was really a good little assistant you know, and I'd stay out of your way. So it was pretty, pretty wonderful and they were great teachers, they were great friends they were, you know, very kind to me they were very kind to me. And I learned a great deal from them.$So your first collection of photographs, photographs, text and spoken word. Your 'Family Pictures and Stories' ['Family Pictures and Stories, 1981-1982,' Carrie Mae Weems], that you created I guess was it the following year, 1983?$$Well I started the photographs earlier, I started making photographs of my family earlier. And, it was really through my encounter with Zora Neale Hurston that I really began to understand the power of the personal narrative. You know the--even though my father [Myrlie Weems] had been a storyteller I didn't really think of him as a storyteller, he just told good stories, right. I began to understand that he was really a storyteller that he was really the bearer of narrative. Not all of us are that; not all of us are that, right. And so Zora sort of introduced me to a way of thinking about possibilities of the ways of which I could work with photography. And use photography and language, and narrative together even though she wasn't using photographs. It was still kind of what she represented that sort of fostered a whole new set of ideas. I am so grateful, I'm so grateful that she, she lived. I'm so grateful that she did what she did, that she el- she freed me. She freed me; she gave me the right and the, and the authority to do the work that I actually went on to do with 'Family Pictures and Stories.' It was a very important work for me.$$So when you say that Zora freed you, how, how did this occur, what, what happen?$$By, by example. You know that there was--she charted the path. So she'd allowed--she gave me space. You know, I mean that's the thing I think is so wonderful about what people do. Really when you are the--what, what you being the trailblazer means that you have really opened the path for others to follow. So she, she was that, she was that for me and for a whole hoard of people that came along with me. That suddenly there was an articulated voice positioned in a certain kind of cadence that described a certain kind of life that was not urban. That was not urban right that was very important right. I supposed that in some ways Hughes, Langston Hughes is the same way right, this way of describing that was not urban. You know, that was, was always sort of like you know, like waltzing with the blues, so to speak, right. And I think that there's something really valuable, it was certainly valuable for me and--$$So, so at--where were you, were you in school [at the University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California] when you learned about Zora Neale Hurston (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yeah in school, I was in school. I was in, you know, I was in that place where I didn't know what my voice was. You know, that I was--I knew lots of people, I looked at lots of things. I was making photographs, and I'm actually a very good--can be, sometimes a good photographer. So you know, so I was doing what I do but I was still not--I hadn't yet found my own articulation it just was not, it was not clear what that was. What my direction needed to be how it needed to be. And so I went to San Francisco [California] to visit a friend for the weekend because I was so despondent, I was so depressed. I was struggling, that sort of struggle to find my way through. And on the way out the door that Monday morning, I looked down, and there was this, this book 'Their Eyes Are Watching God' [sic. 'Their Eyes Were Watching God,' Zora Neale Hurston]. And I remember somebody told me that I reminded them of Zora Neale Hurston, but I didn't know who Zora Neale Hurston was. So it was like, oh that's that woman somebody said that I reminded them of, and so I asked my friend if I could take the book. Her son had just finished reading it for class. I got on the bus, I decide I was going to take the long way back to San Diego [California] because I didn't wanna get there too fast. And I read 'Their Eyes Are Watching God' all the way from San Francisco to San Diego. And I got off the bus reading the book, pulling my suitcase behind me. And I got into a taxi reading the book. And then I got to my apartment, and I was reading the book and I unlock my door and I was reading the book. And I walk into my bedroom, and I was reading the book and I sat in my bed and I finished it. I said, "Oh, oh, okay, okay I got it, I got it, thank you." It was just such a powerful example; I was so grateful. Got up the next day went to the library, checked out everything they had on Zora Neale Hurston, ordered everything else they didn't have. Bought everything else that I possibly could and finished up my degree and then decided I was going to be a folklorist. And went off to UC Berkeley [University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California] to study, to study there, you know, it was like you know the, the lights, the lights were just sort of turned on bright. How amazing is that, you know you just never know who you're going to touch by doing what you do. Phenomenal.

Warren Morton Washington

Distinguished scientist Warren M. Washington was born on August 28, 1936, in Portland, Oregon. As a high school student, Washington had a keen interest in science; after graduation he went on to earn his B.A. degree in physics and his M.A. degree in meteorology from Oregon State University. After completing his Ph.D. in meteorology at Pennsylvania State University, Washington became a research scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in 1963. While serving in the position of senior scientist at NCAR in 1975, Washington developed one of the first atmospheric computer models of the earth’s climate; soon after, he became the head of the organization’s Climate Change Research Section in the Climate and Global Dynamics Division.

As an expert in atmospheric science, climate research, and computer modeling of the earth’s climate, Washington received several presidential appointments. From 1978 to 1984, Washington served on the President’s National Advisory Committee on Oceans and Atmosphere; in 1990, he began serving on the Secretary of Energy’s Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee; and in 1996, he assumed the chair of the Subcommittee on Global Change. Washington also served on the Modernization Transition Committee and the National Centers for Environment Prediction Advisory Committee of the United States National Weather Service. In April 2000, the United States Secretary of Energy appointed Washington to the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee. Washington was also appointed to the National Science Board and elected chair of the organization in 2002 and 2004.

Among his many awards and honors, Washington received both the Le Vernier Medal of the Societe Meterologique de France, and the Biological and Environmental Research Program Exceptional Service Award for atmospheric science. Washington's induction into the National Academy of Sciences Portrait Collection of African Americans in Science, Engineering, and Medicine, was announced in 1997. Washington also received the Celebrating Twentieth Century Pioneers in Atmospheric Sciences Award at Howard University, and Reed College in Portland, Oregon, awarded him the Vollum Award for Distinguished Accomplishment in Science and Technology. Washington held memberships in the National Academy of Engineering and the American Philosophical Society.

In addition to his professional activities, Washington served as a mentor and avid supporter of scholarly programs and outreach organizations that encouraged students to enter the profession of atmospheric sciences.

Accession Number

A2006.080

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/20/2006

Last Name

Washington

Maker Category
Middle Name

Morton

Schools

Jefferson High School

Oregon State University

Pennsylvania State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Warren

Birth City, State, Country

Portland

HM ID

WAS03

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Oregon

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France, Italy

Favorite Quote

Nobody loves me.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Colorado

Birth Date

8/28/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Denver

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Atmospheric scientist Warren Morton Washington (1936 - ) developed one of the first atmospheric computer models of the earth's climate, and was elected chairman of the National Science Board in 2002 and 2004.

Employment

National Center for Atmospheric Research

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Warren Washington interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Warren Washington recalls his mother's family and her life history

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Warren Washington discusses the lives of his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Warren Washington recounts his maternal grandparents' move from Texas to Oregon

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Warren Washington recalls the history of his great-grandparents and the origin of his last name

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Warren Washington describes his father's background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Warren Washington discusses his father's family history

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Warren Washington discusses his father's employment and the hospital where he was born

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Warren Washington recalls his maternal lineage

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Warren Washington shares his earliest memories of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Warren Washington recalls his experiences growing up in a mixed neighborhood and the racial tensions in Oregon during the 1940s and 1950s

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Warren Washington remembers how he would spend the summers of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Warren Washington recalls his time in elementary school and high school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Warren Washington recalls his fondness of public libraries while he was growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Warren Washington remembers teachers who inspired him

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Warren Washington describes his job during college and his first car

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Warren Washington recalls the Civil Rights Movement and his involvement with the NAACP

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Warren Washington describes racial attitudes in Oregon during the 1940s and 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Warren Washington recalls the impact of World War II on his family

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Warren Washington recalls his feelings of discouragement during high school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Warren Washington shares his impressions of entering college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Warren Washington discusses his determination to attend college

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Warren Washington describes some of his experiences during college

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Warren Washington recalls having segregated fraternities and sororities on campus

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Warren Washington stresses the importance of diversity in higher education organizations

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Warren Washington discusses the importance of diversity in science

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Warren Washington recalls his fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Warren Washington discusses his career path after graduating from college

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Warren Washington talks about his work with early computers

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Warren Washington talks about starting his graduate work

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Warren Washington explains the background of his graduate thesis

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Warren Washington discusses how he became an adjunct associate professor

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Warren Washington recalls the racial tensions on a college campus during the late 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Warren Washington recalls his experience first working for the National Center for Atmospheric Research

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Warren Washington discusses African American scientific communities

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Warren Washington describes his work under several presidencies

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Warren Washington recalls his first experiences as a scientific advisor

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Warren Washington talks about connecting science to greater societal issues

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Warren Washington talks about explaining his work to his parents and the publication of his book

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Warren Washington recounts a few of his presidential appointments

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Warren Washington recalls his experiences working with the president's chief of staff

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Warren Washington shares how he responds to a special request from the president's chief of staff

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Warren Washington describes the process of building more complex computer models for climate prediction

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Warren Washington relates the importance of creating better weather prediction models

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Warren Washington discusses his beliefs on the social impacts of global warming

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Warren Washington shares his thoughts on Hurricane Katrina

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Warren Washington describes an incident in which he provides testimony before Congress

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Warren Washington describes working under different presidents

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Warren Washington discusses his thoughts on global warming and meeting Vice President Gore

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Warren Washington recounts his experiences as a mentor and role model

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Warren Washington describes the awards he has received

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Warren Washington describes his most rewarding professional achievement

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Warren Washington considers his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Warren Washington comments on the importance of young people to consider a career in science

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Introduction to Warren Washington's interview

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Warren Washington describes his family background and educational history

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Overview of Warren Washington's family's migration to Portland, their early life there and his interest in science

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Warren Washington talks about his early interest in science and his decision to pursue science in college

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Warren Washington describes his involvement in the youth chapter of the NAACP

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Warren Washington describes his experience at Oregon State University

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Warren Washington talks about studying physics at Oregon State University, and his introduction to the mathematical modeling

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Warren Washington describes his experience at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Warren Washington talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Warren Washington describes his decision to join the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Warren Washington describes his experience in Boulder, Colorado in the 1960s, and his encounter with journalist, Dan Rather, in 1968

Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Warren Washington describes his service on the National Science Board

Tape: 7 Story: 13 - Warren Washington talks about working with President George H.W. Bush's administration

Tape: 7 Story: 14 - Warren Washington talks about the evolution of computer processing capabilities, and his work on climate models at NCAR

Tape: 7 Story: 15 - Warren Washington shares his perspective on the debate on climate change and global warming

Tape: 7 Story: 16 - Overview of Warren Washington's awards and achievements

Tape: 7 Story: 17 - Warren Washington discusses the significance of climate change

Tape: 7 Story: 18 - Warren Washington reflects upon his legacy and how he wants to be remembered