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Garth Reeves

Newspaper publishing chief executive Garth C. Reeves, Sr. was born on February 12, 1919 in Nassau, Bahamas. His family moved to Miami, Florida four months after he was born. His father, Harry Ethelbert Sigismund Reeves, was a partner in The Magic Printing Company and founder of the Miami Times; his mother, a homemaker. His daughter, Rachel J. Reeves, became publisher and chief executive officer of the Miami Times in 1994 following the untimely death of her brother, Garth C. Reeves, Jr. After graduating from Booker T. Washington High School in Miami in 1936, Reeves enrolled in Florida A & M University where he earned his B.A. degree in printing in 1940.

Reeves served in the U.S. Army during World War II from 1942 to 1946 in both the European and Pacific theaters. He then returned to Miami to work under his father Harry Ethelbert Sigismund Reeves, who founded the Miami Times newspaper in 1923. In 1970, Reeves was named publisher and chief executive officer of the when his father passed. Reeves went on to become the first African American to serve on the governing boards of the Miami-Dade Community College, Barry University, the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce, and the United Way of Dade County. He also served as organizing chairman of the board for National Industrial Bank, which was the first integrated bank in the State of Florida. During the 1950s, Reeves worked to integrate the local beaches, parks, and golf courses. Reeves served for ten years as president of the Amalgamated Publishers of New York City, which represents over one hundred African American-owned newspapers throughout the United States. He was also elected to serve two terms as president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association.

Reeves is a life member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, Inc., Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., and a founding member of the Episcopal Church of the Incarnation in Miami, Florida. He was awarded Honorary Doctorate Degrees from the University of Miami, Barry University and Florida Memorial University.

Garth C. Reeves, Sr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 5, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.183

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/5/2013

Last Name

Reeves

Maker Category
Middle Name

C.

Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Garth

Birth City, State, Country

Nassau

HM ID

REE08

Favorite Season

All Seasons

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

2/12/1919

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

North Miami

Country

Bahamas

Favorite Food

All Food

Short Description

Newspaper publishing chief executive Garth Reeves (1919 - ) former president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, served as publisher and chief executive officer of the Miami Times for over twenty years.

Employment

Miami Times

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:32835,302:57574,476:80220,619:80958,630:84672,659:85260,668:86520,685:92455,732:93130,743:93730,752:95455,779:105838,851:107278,888:111963,917:116875,959:120572,1027:120868,1032:132750,1125:135710,1186:136030,1191:139870,1268:145240,1321:145897,1332:148452,1365:154800,1411:155535,1419:157950,1450:158475,1456:171832,1734:189435,1910:207874,2057:208498,2066:209044,2075:210994,2114:212554,2145:212944,2151:213412,2159:227630,2269:228062,2276:235106,2333:237610,2343$0,0:1206,40:34449,515:68926,902:163936,2018:189508,2333:218218,2641:218514,2646:299940,3565
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Garth Reeves' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Garth Reeves lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Garth Reeves describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Garth Reeves describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Garth Reeves talks about his father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Garth Reeves remembers working on his father's paper during childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Garth Reeves describes the history of Overtown, Miami, Florida, where he grew up

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Garth Reeves talks about racial tensions in his childhood community

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Garth Reeves discusses tourism in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Garth Reeves discusses D. A. Dorsey and the history of African Americans in Miami, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Garth Reeves discusses D. A. Dorsey and the history of African Americans in Miami, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Garth Reeves describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Garth Reeves describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Garth Reeves talks about what he liked to read as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Garth Reeves talks about his childhood in Overtown, Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Garth Reeves remembers the discrimination faced by his father in Miami, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Garth Reeves talks about the entertainers who came to Miami during the winter

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Garth Reeves describes the segregation in Miami theaters

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Garth Reeves talks about working for his father's newspaper as a boy

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Garth Reeves talks about 'The Miami Times' coverage of lynchings and Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Garth Reeves talks about his entrepreneurial activities in high school, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Garth Reeves talks about his entrepreneurial activities in high school, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Garth Reeves talks about how his father motivated him to make good grades in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Garth Reeves remembers the 1936 Summer Olympics

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Garth Reeves recalls meeting Joe Louis while reporting for 'The Miami Times'

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Garth Reeves remembers when Jackie Robinson first took the field in baseball

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Garth Reeves talks about his mentor, J.L. Langhorn at Florida A&M University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Garth Reeves recounts his entry into military service

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Garth Reeves talks about his experience in boot camp

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Garth Reeves describes his time in the military

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Garth Reeves remembers being homesick during his military service

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Garth Reeves talks about what he liked and disliked about the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Garth Reeves talks about his mother's advice for him after serving in the U.S. Army

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Garth Reeves describes working with his father at the Miami Times

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Garth Reeves talks about how the Miami Times hit its stride during the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Garth Reeves talks about joining the Civil Rights movement

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Garth Reeves talks about his role in desegregating Miami's beaches, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Garth Reeves talks about his role in desegregating Miami's beaches, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Garth Reeves discusses Thurgood Marshall's influence on non-violent direct action in Miami, Florida

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$5

DAStory

8$1

DATitle
Garth Reeves talks about racial tensions in his childhood community
Garth Reeves describes working with his father at the Miami Times
Transcript
So, I've heard this story before from Birmingham, Alabama and other places in the South, where the Klan would take a couple of days, a day or during the year and just ride through, or parade through the black community?$$That's true.$$And would they be armed? Were they armed when they did that?$$Oh, they were armed. Oh, yes, they were armed.$$Okay.$$And we didn't, couldn't see them, but then (unclear) they came out. Everybody knew they were in charge. I've only heard about one group that challenged the Klan once. And I never did find out who it was, but I think the word around town was it was, I think they called him Texas Slim. But anyhow, the Klan was getting ready to parade on 11th Street. And they were starting across the railroad tracks which was the white section. And while they were gathering, Texas Slim had gotten his boys together, and they brought out their artillery. And they started firing as soon as the Klan started in our direction. And the Klan retreated that night. They did not parade that night because it was a little too much fire power there.$$Now, these were dangerous times in terms of lynchings all over the South and--$$Oh, yes.$$--and race riots when white people would burn the black community down and that sort of thing?$$Well, lynching was prevalent in those days. That's one thing my mother always warned me about because lynching was, was--oh, it was a popular thing among the whites to show their control in the South.$$And in the North actually. I mean there were plenty in the North too as far--$$Yes, there were, yes, there was.$$--as far North as Minnesota and, you know, Indiana and Ohio.$$It was not as prevalent in the North as it was in the South, yeah, just put it that way.$$Right, I just wanted--I didn't wanna leave that out so in case somebody watching this thought it was just in the South (laughter).$$(Laughter).$$But it's not. But, okay, but Overtown was--$$Yeah, Overtown was a thriving community. And there was--rich people from the North used to come down to Miami Beach and downtown Miami to spend money during the winter. And we called it, the "season." They would come in after Thanksgiving and stay until up in the year, after--until the weather got better up North. And we had a pretty solid community, pretty solid, a well-knit, closely-knit community.$And so what was the state of the "Miami Times" then? What was your circulation and what was your impact on the community in those days?$$Well, it was doing pretty good. Of course, I was a, although I went to work at the "Miami Times", I--we were not making the money. But my dad also had a job printing establishment on the side. He was running like two things, the newspaper and the job printing.$$Now, did he have like a gas station too or something 'cause you mentioned like going to get gas and did he have some other businesses too other than just the printing and the newspaper?$$No, just the newspaper and job printing?$$Okay.$$So we printed everything, but in the town, you know, envelopes, books, invitations, programs, funeral programs, you know, everything. My dad's motto was, "We print anything from a card to a newspaper." And we did. We used to do the school newspaper too, print that too. So we had a thing going, and so I went over to the job printing place department. And I found out that I had to do some restructuring on the prices 'cause my dad had, you know, how you--old people, they set one price and prices change, and they think they should just stay right there. But things would go by, you know, so they--(simultaneous)--$$Paper's going up and the ink's going up.$$Right. So there was a catalog I discovered in reading that told you how to price. And my dad had never seen this catalog before. He just did it on his own. He would figure out what the paper cost and what the ink cost and what the labor cost and add 'em up, and maybe add on 15 percent, you know. Well, I learned better after I read this catalog. And the catalog, they wouldn't sell it to you. They'll rent it to you because you had--they changed, every time they changed prices or something, they'd let you know. And I restructured the pricing for dad, and I was making a ton of money, man. It was, we had a good business. But dad was doing good in what he was doing, but he just did not understand the right pricing. He didn't keep up with what was happening in the, you know. And I got that going, and so we subsidized the newspaper. The newspaper was getting, was getting along, but it wasn't making any money. But the job printing office was making the money, and so we didn't worry about that. Whatever they were short over there, we'd pick it up. And things went quite well there. I got, the new machinery was working well. And we bought a new press, a bigger press and--$$And so you bought a linotype machine too, right, is that--$$Yeah, bought the linotype.$$Now, was that your idea to get that?$$Huh?$$Was it your idea to--$$No, no, my dad bought this on his own. Yeah, I was (unclear)--$$And that's the time that you were sent to New York to learn to operate it--$$Yeah.$$--when you saw Jackie Robinson play his first game?$$So we were doing quite well. And one hand was washing the other one, and one time I was telling my dad, I says, you know, I said, you're wasting your time with that newspaper (laughter). I said, you--there's a lot of money to be made over here in this job printing. People in this town need a lot of printing. So he said, nah, I'm a stick with it, said, you subsidize me a little bit now. He said, but one day this newspaper is gonna, it's gonna make more money than that job printing. I said, nah, you gotta be kidding (laughter). And sure enough, when the newspaper hit its stride, I closed the job printing department, shut it down, closed it down, yes, I did. And I said, the old man was right.

Andrew Ingraham

Entrepreneur Andrew Ingraham was born on August 20, 1954, in Nassau, Bahamas, where his family owned several businesses, including one in the travel industry. After completing his education, he moved to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, where he began his career in the travel and tourism industry.

In 1999, Ingraham became the president/CEO of the National Association of Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers, Incorporated, an organization created to empower African American in the hospitality industry. Ingraham is also the president of Horizons Marketing Group International, which focuses on African American and multicultural tourism.

As an appointee to the White House Conference on Tourism, Ingraham founded the International Multicultural Tourism and Hotel Ownership Conference. Ingraham was also appointed to the National Tourism Advisory Committee for the NAACP. Ingraham has lectured at the American Hotel & Motel Association, National Coalition of Black Meeting Planners, Congressional Black Caucus, and National Association of Black McDonald’s Owners Association. He is a member of the National Coalition of Black Meeting Planners, National Black Hospitality Professionals, African American Travel & Tourism Association, and the National Black Hospitality Professionals.

Ingraham lives in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with his family.

Accession Number

A2006.033

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/2/2006

Last Name

Ingraham

Maker Category
Schools

Miami Dade College

Florida International University

Florida Atlantic University Schools

Northern Caribbean University

First Name

Andrew

Birth City, State, Country

Nassau

HM ID

ING02

Favorite Season

Christmas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anguilla

Favorite Quote

We Can Do It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

8/20/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Fort Lauderdale

Country

Bahamas

Favorite Food

Fish

Short Description

Association chief executive Andrew Ingraham (1954 - ) is the president and co-founder for the National Association of Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers; and is president of Horizons Marketing Group International. He has served on the White House Conference on Tourism and the National Tourism Advisory Committee for the NAACP.

Employment

National Association of Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:1782,33:2376,41:3168,51:3861,60:4455,67:5544,84:7425,114:14518,172:15134,181:15574,187:19540,214:20204,223:21698,238:22777,254:29152,305:30124,313:35179,363:35676,372:36386,384:36670,389:37664,409:45565,506:45940,529:47740,549:48190,559:55478,638:60566,707:66722,880:68990,921:74905,964:75710,973:78217,984:78987,995:79295,1000:79680,1007:80450,1019:82800,1044:83480,1056:84772,1086:85656,1113:95862,1187:97028,1198:97558,1204:98194,1211:111040,1387:111790,1398:117960,1450:119688,1484:121032,1516:121416,1523:121800,1531:122248,1539:126870,1580:127750,1590:130403,1603:131501,1627:131867,1764:132294,1773:132599,1778:134978,1834:135283,1840:135527,1845:135832,1851:139160,1894$0,0:800,11:1760,24:2320,33:2720,39:4240,61:6000,87:8400,121:9680,139:13920,205:14240,210:20726,272:21314,280:30092,383:31124,398:32090,417:32594,425:33890,449:34394,457:34898,465:35186,470:36122,492:36482,498:36770,503:37274,511:38066,524:38786,537:40370,557:42098,582:44690,702:46058,726:46418,733:46706,739:46994,744:50950,750:62254,942:66049,1019:66532,1028:68188,1054:70396,1099:71362,1112:72052,1131:72535,1139:77674,1187:78170,1197:78480,1203:78790,1209:79844,1229:81480,1243
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Andrew Ingraham's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Andrew Ingraham lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Andrew Ingraham describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Andrew Ingraham talks about slavery in the Bahamas

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Andrew Ingraham describes his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Andrew Ingraham describes his grandfather's farm

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Andrew Ingraham recalls spending summers with family in Eleuthera, Bahamas

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Andrew Ingraham lists his siblings, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Andrew Ingraham describes his family's Bahamian Connection restaurants

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Andrew Ingraham lists his siblings, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Andrew Ingraham remembers his childhood in the Bahamas

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Andrew Ingraham describes his childhood impressions of the United States

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Andrew Ingraham describes Junkanoo, the Bahamian Christmas festival

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Andrew Ingraham describes Junkanoo and its history

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Andrew Ingraham describes his Catholic upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Andrew Ingraham recalls perceptions of racism during his childhood in the Bahamas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Andrew Ingraham describes the Bahamian independence movement

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Andrew Ingraham recalls his childhood education

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Andrew Ingraham recalls attending West Indies College in Jamaica

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Andrew Ingraham describes his activities while attending West Indies College

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Andrew Ingraham compares the Catholic and Seventh-Day Adventist churches

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Andrew Ingraham recalls running track at Florida's Miami-Dade Junior College

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Andrew Ingraham describes the sights, sounds and smells that remind him of childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Andrew Ingraham recalls studying at Miami-Dade Junior College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Andrew Ingraham remembers discrimination at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Andrew Ingraham describes attending Florida International University

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Andrew Ingraham describes his jobs during college

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Andrew Ingraham describes his first business venture

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Andrew Ingraham remembers how travel agencies overlooked African Americans

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Andrew Ingraham recalls creating travel programs for African Americans

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Andrew Ingraham remembers the effect of the 1993 Miami tourism boycott

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Andrew Ingraham recalls how the 1993 boycott integrated Miami's tourism industry

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Andrew Ingraham describes the first black-owned hotel in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Andrew Ingraham describes how he cultivated Miami's black-owned tourism industry

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Andrew Ingraham recalls partnering with corporations in Miami

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Andrew Ingraham remembers bringing the Black Film Festival to Miami

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Andrew Ingraham describes the atmosphere of Miami for African Americans

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Andrew Ingraham describes the FUBU Y2G event in St. Maarten

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Andrew Ingraham describes the National Association of Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Andrew Ingraham talks about the business of hotel ownership

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Andrew Ingraham talks about Sheila C. Johnson

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Andrew Ingraham describes the increase in black hotel ownership

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Andrew Ingraham recalls working with the Asian American Hotel Owners Association

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Andrew Ingraham describes Hilton Worldwide's work with minority hotel owners

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Andrew Ingraham describes the scholarship he created with H.T. Smith

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Andrew Ingraham describes the effect of politics on his work in tourism

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Andrew Ingraham remembers the White House Conference on Travel and Tourism

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Andrew Ingraham reflects upon the National Association of Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Andrew Ingraham describes the next steps in African American hotel ownership

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Andrew Ingraham describes his organization memberships

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Andrew Ingraham describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Andrew Ingraham considers the possibility of an African American hotel brand

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Andrew Ingraham reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

8$2

DATitle
Andrew Ingraham remembers how travel agencies overlooked African Americans
Andrew Ingraham recalls working with the Asian American Hotel Owners Association
Transcript
And then of course as I began to look at travel, I began to notice that there was a huge market. And, again, the bulk of Bahamians coming here were black Bahamians, and I began to think about a market here called minority markets, black markets, and so forth. And what started off as a, as a--trying to build a company to, to take in Bahamian travelers here, I began to look at the U.S. marketplace, and at that time, I was living in Fort Lauderdale [Florida] in Hollywood [Florida] maybe. But began to think about, gee, what about getting black people to come to Florida?$$The United States black people to come to Florida? Or?$$The United States black people to come to Florida. Because--$$Was--were black people not visiting Florida at a (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, remember--$$--great rate?$$--in the '80s [1980s] and '90s [1990s], there were no efforts to go after the sort of expenditure that black people were doing in traveling. And so we began to look at--I discovered that when I created the program for the Bahamas, that it had some limitations, X amount of people traveling, a lot of people travel. And so as an extension, I started doing other--looking at developing small travel programs here in the U.S. And I'm trying to remember how I became--because even during--was I doing that part-time? I think in the beginning I started doing it part-time and eventually struck out on my own. But, let me just make sure. Because once I started the travel program, started looking at the market from an African American perspective traveling, and then trying to convince the convention and visitors bureau [Broward County Convention and Visitors Bureau; Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention and Visitors Bureau, Fort Lauderdale, Florida] first in Fort Lauderdale that you ought to look at to see how you can bring more black people to Broward County, Fort Lauderdale--$I formed a relationship with the Asian American Hotel Owners Association. The largest minority owners of hotels in this country are Asian Americans or Indian owners. They own out of the 48,000 hotels in this country, they own roughly about 20,000 hotels. They employ a million people. They--their value of those hotels are roughly about $40 billion. And they own roughly 32, 33 percent of the industry. When we started looking at ownership, I started working with them, partnering with those guys because they had the experience. That experience has transposed itself into a relationship with our organization [National Association of Black Hotel Owners, Operators and Developers, Inc.] and our members that, today, we have a very, very close relationship in that they are now investing with African Americans, they're selling hotels to African Americans, they're partnering with African Americans, they're financing hotels. And then recently, I encouraged the Hispanics to get into the hotel business, and I'm happy to report as of today, a new association called the Hispanic Hotel Owners Association, again, who we will partner with in--at our summit in Atlanta [Georgia]--we bring all these folks together to look at opportunities.