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Larry Bailey

Accountant Larry Bailey was born on September 11, 1950 in Sanford, Florida to Richard and Inez Bailey. He graduated with his B.S. degree in accounting from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) in 1972. He went on to enroll at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton Graduate School of Business. In 1976, he graduated with his M.B.A. degree in finance. Bailey is a certified public accountant, and holds memberships with the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the District of Columbia Certified Public Accountants.

From 1972 to 1976, Bailey worked as an Internal Revenue Service agent, and was also a member of the Richmond (Virginia) District Speakers Bureau. When Bailey graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, KPMG Peat Marwick, LLP offered him a position at the firm. As an associate, Bailey work focused on taxes and consulting services. He offered financial advices to foreign and domestic institutions, insurance and investment agencies, energy corporations, real estate brokers, and individuals. In 1976, Bailey joined the multinational firm of PricewaterCoopers, LLP as a junior partner. In this capacity, he specialized in providing due diligence review services for the Resolution Trust Corporation and the Government National Mortgage Corporation. Bailey also provided consultation services to private and public agencies involving tax strategies and contract negotiation.

In 2000, Baily and Keven Joseph Davis negotiated a five-year, $40 million endorsement contract between tennis player Venus Williams and sports apparel company Reebok. It was the largest endorsement contract signed by a female athlete in U.S. sports history. When Williams turned professional, she did not have an endorsement deal. Her father, Richard Williams, in 1995 requested Bailey and Davis to negotiate an early deal with Reebok after several sports management agencies showed interest. Bailey also played a major role in developing the career of Serena Williams. His development efforts at PricewaterCoopers led to well over $100 million of new and recurring business for the Firm, some of which is ongoing. Bailey founded LDB Consulting, Inc. in 2002. As president, he oversees strategic financial and tax consulting services to corporations, small business and private individuals. 

Bailey’s achievements have been recognized by professional and academic institutions. In 1995, he was also inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Black Entertainment Sports Lawyers Association. Bailey was honored with the SIUC Distinguished Service Award by at the 2012 spring commencement ceremony.  He is one of the founders of SIUC’s Blacks Interested in Business (BIB), which currently provides capital to minority owned communications companies, and received the BIB Leadership Award in 2011.  The College of Business inducted him into its Hall of Fame in 1991. Bailey is also a member of the Board of Directors of Broadcast Capital Inc. Baily lives with his wife, Loleta Thomas, in Washington D.C.

Larry D. Bailey was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 13, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.225

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/12/2012

Last Name

Bailey

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

Southern Illinois University

James A. Garfield Elementary School

Seatack Elementary School

Maryland Park Junior High School

Central High School

First Name

Larry

Birth City, State, Country

Sanford

HM ID

BAI09

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

God's Gift To You Are The Talents He Gives To You. Your Gift To Him Is What You Do With Them.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/11/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Short Description

Accountant Larry Bailey (1950 - ) was a licensed CPA and former partner at KMPG and PricewaterhouseCoopers. As a private consultant, he represented tennis players Venus Williams and Serena Wiliams.

Employment

KMPG Peat Marwick

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)

LDB Consulting, LLP

Internal Revenue Service

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Larry Bailey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Larry Bailey lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Larry Bailey describes his maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Larry Bailey describes his mother's upbringing in Sanford, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Larry Bailey recalls his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Larry Bailey describes his paternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Larry Bailey talks about his father's service in the U.S. Navy

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Larry Bailey describes how his parents met and married

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Larry Bailey remembers his home life

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Larry Bailey describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Larry Bailey describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Larry Bailey describes his neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Larry Bailey remembers playing baseball as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Larry Bailey recalls his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Larry Bailey remembers his elementary school teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Larry Bailey describes his school activities

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Larry Bailey recalls his early interests, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Larry Bailey recalls his early interests, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Larry Bailey describes his childhood personality

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Larry Bailey recalls the historic events of the 1960s

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Larry Bailey remembers his parents' money management skills

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Larry Bailey recalls his leadership roles during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Larry Bailey recalls his aspiration to study business

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Larry Bailey recalls his decision to attend Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Larry Bailey remembers changing his major to accounting

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Larry Bailey reflects upon his experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Larry Bailey remembers the campus community in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Larry Bailey recalls the Blacks in Business student organization

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Larry Bailey talks about his political affiliation

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Larry Bailey remembers his summers during college

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Larry Bailey recalls joining the Internal Revenue Service

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Larry Bailey describes his position in the Internal Revenue Service

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Larry Bailey recalls his decision to attend the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Larry Bailey recalls his influences at the Wharton School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Larry Bailey recalls his challenges at the Wharton School

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Larry Bailey remembers obtaining his certified public accountant license

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Larry Bailey recalls his prospects after graduating from business school

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Larry Bailey recalls his position at the Peat, Marwick, and Mitchell accounting firm

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Larry Bailey remembers his involvement with African American organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Larry Bailey remembers becoming a partner at Peat, Marwick, and Mitchell

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Larry Bailey recalls his panel at the National Student Business League

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Larry Bailey describes his role as a partner at Peat, Marwick, and Mitchell

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Larry Bailey recalls joining Coopers and Lybrand

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Larry Bailey remembers his trip to Senegal

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Larry Bailey recalls overseeing the African operations for Coopers and Lybrand

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Larry Bailey describes Cooper and Lybrand's presence in South Africa

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Larry Bailey talks about Africare

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Larry Bailey remembers his friend, Willard W. "Woody" Brittain, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Larry Bailey describes his transition to the financial planning industry

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Larry Bailey talks about Venus Williams and Serena Williams

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Larry Bailey talks about his clients at LBD Consulting, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Larry Bailey reflects upon the growth of technology

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Larry Bailey talks about discrimination in Corporate America

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Larry Bailey talks about his mentorship of young accountants

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Larry Bailey talks about networking in the black business community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Larry Bailey reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Larry Bailey reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Larry Bailey describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Larry Bailey reflects upon his family

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Larry Bailey describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Larry Bailey narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

9$11

DATitle
Larry Bailey recalls his aspiration to study business
Larry Bailey talks about Venus Williams and Serena Williams
Transcript
All right, so in, in high school [at Central High School, Capitol Heights, Maryland] now did you have any--were, were, were you a good mathematician?$$I was okay in math, yeah. And you know it's really funny, people think that you know they look at you, you're a CPA [certified public accountant], you're good at math. And I just laugh at them. I think you have to have good analytical skills, particularly today's environment because you know everybody uses a computer or a calculator. But you know I've always had very good analytical skills and that's what I think it takes to be a good accountant or a good financial advisor, not math.$$Okay. So young people watching this if they're--they don't have--they're not natural mathematicians, that's not a hindrance?$$No, no. I mean if you're a mathematician, maybe you're going to be in physics or engineering or something like that. But you know in, to be in business you have to have good analytical skills. You have to have good--you know. And, and one of the things that troubles me now is, is that I don't think you know and even mine are slipping now with the--because of the way you write on your iPads and your BlackBerries. And your good--the writing skills just aren't what they used to be. And, but I think you have to have good oral communication skills and, and I think that you know the math skills yeah, I mean you know it's mostly the computer and I think if you have good analytical skills you can find your way around the computer.$$Okay. Now in terms of just thinking about this now, reflecting back on it, what influenced you in terms of you know developing an interest or some kind of a grounding in business when you were a teenager? I mean what did you see around you? Who did you--$$Oh, well--$$I mean you worked at McDonald's, that has to be some--$$Well that was good, but I--be--after my freshman year in college [at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois] I worked for my uncle up in Rochester, New York, my Uncle James [James Smith, Sr.] and my Aunt Emma Smith [ph.], they had a grocery store. It was called J-E Grocery [J-E Grocery, Inc.] in Rochester, New York. And I went up and worked for a summer there for them in their store. My uncle was one of these people that you know both of them believed in hard work. They started out buying a little store and lived in the back room and they kept building and building it. And the first year I came up there I was mopping the floors, stocking the shelves and it was a good sized grocery store and worked the cash register a little bit. The second year I came up I was working the cash register and, and in the office a little bit. And then the last year I came up which was the year before my senior year I actually ran the store. I was in the office making deposits. I think it was the first time they ever took a vacation during the summer. They went away and left me in charge. So that was my really first exposure to, to the business world. The true business world, you know.$$All right.$$Yeah, other than in school and academically but it was the first--and, and it was the first time I ever really knew what it was like and I tell my students this and my staff this, that you know if you finish something, step back and look at it and see, does it make sense? That way you know if it's right or wrong 'cause I'll never forget, I was filling out a payroll tax report for my uncle or some type of tax report and I looked at the way it was worded and the percentage to me meant a certain number the way to do it. And so I--and I brought it in to my uncle to look at it was, it was a big number. And he said, "Larry [HistoryMaker Larry Bailey], but just think about it, if the number was that big, I would be out of business." And so I had interpreted it wrong and it's, it's something that stuck with me. And I tell young people you know when they would bring something to me you know and you know when I, when I--as I went--worked my way up through the firm [Peat, Marwick, and Mitchell; KMPG] and I was reviewing other people's work. And I would say if you would stop and look at this, you would see it makes no sense. It's wrong. I learned that from that one experience with my uncle and I've never forgotten it.$$Okay. So you had to think in terms of proportions and what's appropriate--$$Yeah, what, what makes sense, does this make sense, okay? And when you look at it you know--I, I--just recently I was looking at something and a client is selling an asset and he wanted a proof of funds and what they sent us, I just looked at them. I said, "This, this deal is never going to close. I mean this number makes no sense. It makes no sense." And it didn't make any sense and the transaction never closed. So, but I learned that from my uncle just step back and look at it, you know. You know sometimes you can get caught up with trying to get something to, to close and be done that you kind of lose sight of reality. But you know if you step back and look at it, I think it, it really will, will save you a lot of time, a lot of frustration.$And so I think she was nine and Venus [Venus Williams] was sh- several weeks short of her tenth birthday.$$And there is a photo that shows Serena was ve- very short. She wasn't--$$She was nine years old. She could barely see over the net. I thinks that's the photo that--I have that photo at home I think but I think the one that you're referring to was the one that Bill Rhoden [William C. Rhoden] did when Keven [Keven Davis] died. There was a story he did in The New York Times right after Christmas last year. And was when the two of us were together with them when they were little girls. And so I've still been in, you know involved but you know while I'm their financial advisor I'm as part of the family. I mean I've watched them grow up. As I tell people, I'm more proud of the two fine young ladies that they have become as just opposed to their tennis I mean academically and what they're trying to do with their careers off the court. And Keven and I were very, very involved within their early days before they got their management companies. And you know it was really funny that I think someone in The New York Times did a story once and said that their father [Richard Williams] wasn't as crazy as people thought he was. He went out and hired a CPA [certified public accountant] and a partner in the largest accounting firm in the world at that time. And Keven was bar review at Berkeley [University of California Berkeley School of Law, Berkeley, California] and a partner in one of the largest law firms in Seattle [Washington] at that time. And so we were there and did a lot of their early deals before they got their management companies involved and you know he was a great friend and he was a great mentor to the girls. And as a matter of fact when Serena [Serena Williams] won the U.S. Open [U.S. Open Tennis Championships] just last week I--she--went up and gave her the biggest hug and I said, "This was for Keven." And she said, "Larry [HistoryMaker Larry Bailey], I miss him so much." And he was a, just a great guy. Great guy.

W. George Allen

Civil rights activist and lawyer W. George Allen was born on March 3, 1936 in Sanford, Florida to Lessie Mae Williams and Fletcher Allen. Allen was raised by his mother and stepfather, Bruce Brown. Allen grew up in a segregated community in Sanford, Florida; attended Midway Elementary and Junior High Schools; and graduated from Crooms High School in 1964. Allen went on to Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida where initially, he wanted to be a physician. He however played the role of a lawyer in a school play, which made his career plans change. In 1958, he earned his B.S. degree in political science and minored in economics. Then, in 1962, Allen earned his J.D. degree from the University of Florida Law School. He was the first African American to do so.

Between 1958 and 1960, Allen served in the U.S. Army as a special agent in the Counter Intelligence Corps. He attained the rank of first lieutenant when he was honorably discharged. While in law school, Allen got involved with social activism when he organized lunch counter sit-ins in and around Gainesville, Florida. After receiving his law degree, Allen filed a suit that led to the integration of Broward County’s public accommodations and public school system. In 1963, Allen and his family moved to Fort Lauderdale after he passed the bar exam and was admitted to the Florida Bar Association. Allen was hired at the law firm of Orr & Kaplan. After six months there, Allen started his own law practice where he has practiced for forty-two years. Allen specializes in trial work, probate, personal injury, insurance defense and wrongful death.

Allen is a member of several organizations, boards and associations including the Urban League of Broward County, the NAACP, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., the University of Florida Foundation, the Florida Bar Association, and serving as Broward County Bar Association’s president. Allen has also received numerous awards for his achievements including the University of Florida Distinguished Alumnus Award in May, 2000 and the National Conference for Community and Justice Silver Medallion Award in 2001. In July of 2003, he was inducted into the National Bar Association’s Hall of Fame. In February of 2005, Allen was appointed by Governor Jeb Bush to the Florida A&M University’s Board of Trustees.

Allen was married to Enid Allen, and they lived in Florida.

Allen passed away on November 8, 2019.

W. George Allen was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 17, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.023

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/17/2006

Last Name

Allen

Maker Category
Middle Name

George

Organizations
Schools

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Midway Elementary School

Midway Junior High School

Crooms Academy of Information Technology

University of Florida

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Depends on Schedule

First Name

W.

Birth City, State, Country

Sanford

HM ID

ALL03

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Any

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

Yes - Negotiable

Favorite Season

Summer

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Any

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/3/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Fort Lauderdale

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fish

Death Date

11/8/2019

Short Description

Civil rights activist and lawyer W. George Allen (1936 - 2019) has run his own law practice for over forty years. During the Civil Rights Movement, he organized lunch counter sit-ins and filed lawsuits for integration in Florida's Alachua and Broward counties.

Employment

U.S. Counter Intelligence Corps

P.M. Construction, Inc.

W. George Allen Law Office

Timing Pairs
120,0:750,9:1830,29:2640,40:7860,116:8400,123:9120,128:14079,216:14909,228:17980,273:19889,304:22379,341:22711,353:24952,393:30347,500:39980,606:50860,791:51260,797:71670,1013:72070,1019:76390,1067:76710,1072:77110,1078:84027,1154:86081,1191:111034,1554:112048,1572:112672,1588:113764,1608:125480,1703:125800,1708:127240,1733:144630,2003:149280,2156:149580,2164:153555,2269:155205,2312:158280,2396:164880,2409:165295,2416:169777,2505:178726,2716:179562,2729:181842,2767:193580,2938:195686,2975:197324,3163:212015,3290:220340,3418$0,0:1691,35:2047,40:10591,193:11036,200:12905,296:20205,371:20620,377:21450,392:22031,401:26347,565:31908,664:33485,685:45298,891:62166,1115:64194,1168:65598,1195:77581,1428:78067,1435:78391,1440:82980,1502:83380,1507:84580,1524:87580,1597:122019,2158:124107,2198:130528,2269:130852,2274:131824,2286:136596,2360:160566,2887:172595,3007:173428,3015:177117,3139:181171,3237:187000,3323:201798,3613:206874,3706:212810,3720:214810,3743:218210,3797:219110,3808:220210,3824:220910,3839:221610,3848:227714,3890:228590,3938:232897,4030:234065,4052:238372,4153:246621,4312:253720,4352:258600,4512
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of W. George Allen's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - W. George Allen lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - W. George Allen describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - W. George Allen describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - W. George Allen describes his father's and stepfather's backgrounds

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - W. George Allen recalls the popularity of tobacco snuff among Sanford's women

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - W. George Allen describes his childhood community and church activities

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - W. George Allen describes the Sanford, Florida area

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - W. George Allen describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - W. George Allen remembers his childhood friends

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - W. George Allen describes his cousin, Willie Allen, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - W. George Allen recalls being held back in the third grade

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - W. George Allen remembers attending school during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - W. George Allen remembers Florida elections

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - W. George Allen compares the cultures of South Florida and North Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - W. George Allen describes his favorite teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - W. George Allen describes his high school, Crooms Academy in Sanford, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - W. Allen describes his high school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - W. George Allen describes his high school principal, Roy A. Allen

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - W. George Allen recalls applying to Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - W. George Allen recalls attending Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - W. George Allen recalls the reaction to Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - W. George Allen recounts the history of Florida's law schools

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - W. George Allen explains why he became an activist in college

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - W. George Allen recalls going to the white library in Sanford, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - W. George Allen describes his favorite professors

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - W. George Allen recalls his childhood aspiration to become a lawyer

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - W. George Allen recalls being commissioned by the U.S. Counter Intelligence Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - W. George Allen recalls his experiences as a U.S. Counter Intelligence Corps special agent

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - W. George Allen recalls marrying his wife, Enid Meadows Allen

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - W. George Allen recalls his decision to attend the University of Florida College of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - W. George Allen recalls meeting Lester Hale as an orderly at Alachua General Hospital

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - W. George Allen recounts his experiences moving to Gainesville, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - W. George Allen recalls how he dealt with racism during law school

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - W. George Allen explains why he attended law school at the University of Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - W. George Allen recalls spending time with his children while in law school

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - W. George Allen describes his first job as a lawyer

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - W. George Allen recalls his first client in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - W. George Allen describes his activism at the University of Florida

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - W. George Allen recalls leaving his position at P.M. Construction, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - W. George Allen recalls opening a private law practice with Alcee Hastings

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - W. George Allen describes the breadth of his law cases

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - W. George Allen describes his friendship with Willie. E. Gary

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - W. George Allen reflects upon his family and his community work

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - W. George Allen reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - W. George Allen talks about the importance of historically black colleges

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - W. George Allen talks about issues of race in the law profession

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - W. George Allen describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

9$8

DATitle
W. George Allen describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood
W. George Allen recalls his experiences as a U.S. Counter Intelligence Corps special agent
Transcript
What are some of the sights, sounds and smells that you recall from your childhood?$$Well, in Sanford [Florida], we didn't have electricity. So we had an icebox. And my father [Allen's stepfather, Bruce Brown], in addition to working in the fields, was--he butchered and killed cows and hogs for other people; and goats and whatever. And most of the people he butchered for that were white would give him the hog head and there were chitterlings and the feet. So he would bring all of this fresh meat home. And we, my [maternal] grandmother [Mary Williams] would make chitterlings and make, she would make hog head cheese, and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Hog head cheese? Wait what is in hog head cheese?$$Hog head cheese, it's like a souse with all the ears and the feet and all these parts, and you cook it all up. And then after it would cool, it would congeal. And then you could cut it like, you know, like it's a lunchmeat. But if you ate it hot it was, you know, it was like a soup. But she would make all these things with the parts of the hog that these people didn't want.$$Wow.$$And the liver we would get. And so--and what we couldn't eat, my dad would give away because we hadn't an icebox, and so we couldn't store anything.$$Right.$$So we had fresh meat maybe once a week. The rest of the times we ate bacon and sausage and things that did not require a lot of refrigeration. But growing up there, the neighbors would help each other. And if you had a garden, you would share the produce. And when we go to the fields, especially in the summer when the farmers would plant beans and peas in order to enrich the soil, they gave the beans and peas away. So we'd go out with baskets and pick what we needed and come home. My mother [Lessie Williams Brown] would can some and we'd eat a lot fresh. And I'd go to, down to the river and fish, and I'd come home with a lot of fish, and my dad would make me clean them and cook them, because I was an only child. And so I started selling them on the way home.$$So you wouldn't have to clean them and cook?$$Yes. So I wouldn't have to clean them or cook them. And so I would stop at some of these little old ladies with a lot of kids and say, you know, "Give me a dollar and take all you want." If they took all of them, I had no problem (laughter). I'd go home empty handed.$$But you had a dollar.$$Yeah, with a dollar. And when I became, I guess, nine or ten years old, the bus started coming through Sanford [Florida] going into--Midway [Sanford, Florida] to go to Sanford, and it was ten cent to ride it. And there was a theater downtown called the Ritz Theater [Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, Sanford, Florida] that was upstairs and downstairs. And the upstairs was for black folk and downstairs for white people. And it was ten cent to go in the Ritz Theater, and you could buy a bag of popcorn for a nickel. So, you know, to sell all my fish for a dollar, it gave me enough money to have a ball (laughter).$$(Laughter) All the penny candy and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah. Oh, yeah. So it was great.$$Well, I can--I feel like I'm sitting right there with you there, eating my five cent popcorn.$$Yeah. Oh, yeah.$$Don't you wish popcorn cost five cents?$$Yeah. Now it's what, three bucks [dollars] or five bucks.$$Five.$$Yes. It's awful now. And it's not as good.$$No. It's totally fakey.$$Yeah, yeah.$I suppose the things you worked on were classified, but can you talk a little bit about what you had to do (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) We did espionage kind of stuff. We followed people. When I graduated [from U.S. Army Intelligence School, Fort Holabird, Baltimore, Maryland], I asked the major, I said, "Where should I request a job assignment?" And he says, "I don't think you'd go over too well in the South (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) (Laughter) And following people.$$--walking around with a snub nose gun following people and everything. You'd stand out." He says, "Why don't you apply for New York or California?" And all the guys laughed, because they thought everybody wants to go to California, and I'd never been to California. So I applied for California, and they gave me Oakland, California.$$Oh right. Where you trained (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And that was in 1950--I was sent out there in December of '58 [1958]. I got there early January of '59 [1959], and Berkeley, California, then was kind of a hotbed, and they were having antiwar protests. And so we did a lot of spying on those students, you know. They'd sign the petitions and send them to Washington [D.C.], and they'd send the list to us and (laughter) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Really?$$--we would, you know, start checking them out, checking all of them, watching them and--$$Interesting.$$But we had, you know, people that were alleged Communists that we were trying to ferret out and make sure they didn't contaminate our youth.$$Now did you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And people that were against the war [Vietnam War], we checked on them; and espionage, sabotage. We, there was a Winter Olympics in Reno, Nevada [sic. 1960 Winter Olympics, Squaw Valley, California], that, I guess, in that, that year. I think it was '59 [1959], and so we send a detachment up to watch the Russians and stuff (laughter).$$(Laughter) Those darn athletes.$$Yeah.$$Oh. Really, and what's interesting, especially now, here we are in another war and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah.$$--people are complaining about being activists.$$They think that there is a great fear, so I went. Those who are worried now, they have cause to be. At least there were some constraints then. There are none now.$$This is true.$$Yep.$$Well, did you like doing that or did you just do it because you had to (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yeah. I enjoyed it. I enjoyed it. It was empowering. And I scared a lot of white folk, you know; it was a black guy with a gun and a badge turned loose (laughter).$$Let loose (laughter).$$Yes. And I enjoyed it. I enjoyed it.$$It was definitely something--a very different experience than you could have imagine.$$Yes. It was. Coming from the South, yeah.$$That's right, because you get to spy on white people.$$Yes.$$That's right.$$Yes. So that scared the hell out of a lot of them.$$And so, now you (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I'd walk in and says, "I'm Special Agent Allen [HistoryMaker W. George Allen]." (Laughter) And they would say, "What?" And I'd say, "Yes. I am." And I had this badge that I'd pull out. I mean, you know, a black guy with a gun and a badge. I mean, you know, that's dangerous. Heresy (laughter).$$Okay (laughter).$$"You have the right to arrest me and question me?"$$Yeah. That's, I was going to say so, there were no constraints on you in terms of dealing with whites (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) None. No. No.$$That's facts. Like you can't arrest the white man.$$No.$$Now, you did this for just two years?$$Two years.$$What happened? Did you transfer (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, you had to commit to two years active duty; two years active reserve; and two years inactive reserve, unless you signed up to go regular [U.S.] Army and make it a career. The higher ups at Army Intelligence [U.S. Military Intelligence Corps] headquarters tried to encourage me to go regular Army, and they said, "You've never been to Europe," and they--we would have these affairs every now and then where our wives would come, and they'd try to talk to my wife [Enid Meadows Allen]. My wife's from Alabama, Birmingham.$$Okay.$$And so they would tell her, you know, "You guys have never been to Europe? If you get your husband to sign up, I'll make sure your first assignment's Europe." And she was, you know, "Let's go to Europe." And I says, "No, no. no. I gotta do my two years, get out and go to law school."