The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Ralph Bernard Everett

Lawyer and political advisor Ralph Bernard Everett was born on June 23, 1951 in Orangeburg, South Carolina. He graduated from Morehouse College in 1973 with honors from the Phi Beta Kappa Society and went on to attend Duke Law School, where he received his J.D. degree in 1976 and was an Earl Warren Legal Scholar.

Everett then went to work as a lawyer for the North Carolina Department of Labor in Raleigh, North Carolina. He was appointed as the Democratic staff director and minority chief counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation in 1982, becoming the first African American to lead a Senate committee; he later became Chief Counsel and Staff Director of the full Committee. Everett achieved another “first” when he became the first African American to be named partner at the law firm of Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker in 1989.

Everett has advised several U.S. presidential campaigns, including Democratic candidates Ernest Hollings and Michael Dukakis. His political involvement continued when Everett served as the Senate Liaison to the Clinton-Gore Presidential Campaign in 1992 when Clinton defeated incumbent President George H.W. Bush. A devotee of the Democratic Party, Everett served as parliamentarian for the 1992 Democratic National Convention. With experience in telecommunications and policymaking, Everett served as the U.S. Ambassador for the 1998 International Telecommunication Union’s Plenipotentiary Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In 2007, Everett succeeded Togo D. West, Jr. as President and CEO of the Washington, D.C. based Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.

Everett has served on the boards of numerous community organizations, including the National Urban League, the Center for National Policy, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Cumulus Media, Inc., Shenandoah Life Insurance Company, and his church, Alfred Street Baptist Church, which is the oldest African American congregation in the City of Alexandra, Virginia.

Everett resides in Alexandria with his wife, Dr. Gwendolyn Harris Everett, and they have one adult son, Jason Gordon Everett.

Everett was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 1, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.006

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/1/2008

Last Name

Everett

Middle Name

B.

Schools

Duke University School of Law

Morehouse College

Elloree Training School

Orangeburg-Wilkinson High School

First Name

Ralph

Birth City, State, Country

Orangeburg

HM ID

EVE01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Whatever You Do, Strive To Do It So Well That No Man Living And No Man Dead And No Man Yet To Be Born Could Do It Better.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

6/23/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Fish, Chicken

Short Description

Nonprofit chief executive, administrative lawyer, and presidential advisor Ralph Bernard Everett (1951 - ) was the President and CEO of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C. He served as lead counsel to the U.S. Senate commerce committee, and as a parliamentarian at the 1992 Democratic National Convention in New York City.

Employment

Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC

U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ralph Bernard Everett's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett lists his father's siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Elloree Training School in Elloree, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls the sharecropping community in Elloree, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his father's leadership in the community

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his early education

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his neighborhood in Elloree, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his parents' discipline

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers segregation in South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Orangeburg massacre

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the response to the Orangeburg massacre

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the Civil Rights Movement, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the Civil Rights Movement, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls school integration in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his activities at Wilkinson High School in Orangeburg, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his schools' unequal resources

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his decision to attend Morehouse College

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his start at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the students at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the chapel services at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the election of Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes Morehouse College Presidents Hugh Gloster and Benjamin E. Mays

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the required reading at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls joining the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the Atlanta University Center in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the notable alumni of Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his decision to study law

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the activism at Morehouse College

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his decision to attend the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his time at the Duke University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his time at the Duke University School of Law in Durham, North Carolina, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Watergate scandal

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the political climate at the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his classmates at the Duke University School of Law

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his work at the North Carolina Department of Labor

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls becoming a legislative assistant to U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his arrival in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings' political career

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls the African American staffers under U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about Thurgood Marshall and Thurgood Marshall, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes U.S. Senator Al Gore

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls U.S. Senator Ernest Hollings' presidential campaign

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls serving as chief counsel of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers the Challenger disaster

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers his farewell party at the U.S. Senate

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard recalls meeting with African American congressional staffers

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers joining Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his career at Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls his work on Bill Clinton's presidential campaign in 1992

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls serving as a parliamentarian at the 1992 Democratic National Convention

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls the mentorship of Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his career at Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker LLC, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes his work for President Bill Clinton's administration

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Ralph Bernard Everett remembers meeting Nelson Mandela

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the leadership of the Federal Communications Commission

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls joining the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C., pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ralph Bernard Everett recalls joining the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, D.C., pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Ralph Bernard Everett describes the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about the agenda of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Ralph Bernard Everett shares his advice for young people

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Ralph Bernard Everett talks about his son's accomplishments

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Ralph Bernard Everett reflects upon the importance of family

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Ralph Bernard Everett reflects upon his life and career

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Ralph Bernard Everett narrates his photographs

James H. DeGraffenreidt, Jr.

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of WGL Holdings, Inc. (WGL) and Washington Gas Light, James Henry DeGraffenreidt, Jr. was born on May 8, 1953 in Brooklyn, New York. As an adolescent growing up in New York City, DeGraffenreidt helped his father, an accountant, prepare federal tax returns for his clients. He attended the Brooklyn Preparatory School in Crown Heights where he played on the championship basketball team. DeGraffenreidt went on to attend Yale University where he pursued his B.A. degree in American Studies. After finishing his undergraduate education, in 1974, DeGraffenreidt attended Columbia University where he graduated with his J.D. degree and his M.B.A. in 1978.

After working as a beat reporter for the Associated Press, DeGraffenreidt practiced law at various private law firms including McKenna, Wilkinson and Kittner and Hart Carroll and Chavers. He specialized in telecommunications, public utilities and public finance. Between stints at these law firms, DeGraffenreidt served as Assistant People’s Counsel representing residential and non-commercial utility consumers in Maryland in major federal and state regulatory matters. In 1986, he was hired as the senior managing attorney for the Washington Gas. Five years later, in 1991, DeGraffenreidt was elected as the Vice President of Rates and Regulatory Affairs and was responsible for handling rate cases and other regulatory matters before the commissions that control the Washington Gas’ service territories. In addition, he also oversaw the company’s operating divisions in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

DeGraffenreidt became the president and chief operating officer of Washington Gas in 1994 and later became the company’s CEO in 1998. He has served on the boards of the Harbor Bankshares Corporation, Mass Mutual Financial Group, the American Gas Association and the Alliance to Save Energy. In 2007, DeGraffenreidt was elected to serve as chairman of the American Gas Association’s board of directors. During 2005 and 2006, he served as Industry Co-Chairman of the Alliance to Save Energy.

DeGraffenreidt lives in Baltimore, Maryland with his wife and four children.

DeGraffenreidt was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 31, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.005

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/31/2008 |and| 7/29/2008

Last Name

DeGraffenreidt

Maker Category
Middle Name

H.

Organizations
First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

New York

HM ID

DEG01

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Eric Grant

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

No Favorite Vacation Spot

Favorite Quote

Let's not mistake the effect for the cause.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

5/8/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

No Favorite Food

Short Description

Energy chief executive and administrative lawyer James H. DeGraffenreidt, Jr. (1953 - ) is the chairman, director and chief executive officer of the Washington Gas Light Company, which services the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Favorite Color

Blue

Myra McDaniel

Myra McDaniel was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Eva and Toronto Atwell on December 13, 1932. McDaniel attended the prestigious Philadelphia High School for Girls and went on to receive her B.A degree in English from the University of Pennsylvania in 1954. McDaniel then worked several administrative jobs at Baldwin Wallace College in Ohio and at Indiana University and received her J.D degree from the University of Texas School of Law at Austin in 1975.

McDaniel was hired by the Attorney General’s Office in Texas and worked her way up to chief of the taxation division in 1979. She then worked as counsel for the Railroad Commission. McDaniel then entered private practice in Midland Texas, but Governor Mark White appointed her as General Counsel to the governor. In 1984, she became the first African American in Texas history to serve as the Secretary of State. In this position, McDaniel was also the highest- ranked African American appointee in the history of Texas government. McDaniel then entered private practice in 1987 with Bickerstaff, Heath, Smiley, Pollan, Kever, and McDaniel, L.L.P., becoming the first African American woman to lead a major law firm as managing partner in 1995.

McDaniel has received numerous awards for her outstanding community service. She is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Bishop Quinn Foundation in the Episcopal Diocese of Texas and past senior warden of Saint James Episcopal Church.

McDaniel is married to Dr. Reuben R. McDaniel, Professor of Management Science and Information Systems, at the University of Texas at Austin. McDaniel passed away on February, 25, 2010.

McDaniel was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 6, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.048

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/6/2007

Last Name

McDaniel

Maker Category
Middle Name

Atwell

Schools

Philadelphia High School for Girls

University of Pennsylvania

University of Texas at Austin School of Law

First Name

Myra

Birth City, State, Country

Philadelphia

HM ID

MCD02

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

12/13/1932

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Austin

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chocolate (Dark)

Death Date

2/25/2010

Short Description

Administrative lawyer and state government appointee Myra McDaniel (1932 - 2010 ) was appointed the first African American woman in Texas history to serve as the Secretary of State. In this position, McDaniel was the highest-ranked African American appointee in the history of Texas government, later entering private practice as the first African American woman to lead a major law firm as managing partner.

Employment

Baldwin-Wallace College

Indiana University

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Naval Aviation Supply Office

Texas Attorney General's Office

Texas State Governor's Office

Bickerstaff Heath Smiley Pollan Keever and McDaniel

Railroad Commission of Texas

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:2701,54:3285,64:6132,121:7665,148:8687,171:9198,180:12556,245:12921,251:13359,259:13651,264:22982,357:23297,363:23738,371:24305,377:24935,384:25376,392:25880,407:27329,436:27707,443:27959,448:32243,608:38685,666:39135,673:41235,708:41535,713:42285,728:45360,785:48960,891:49485,900:54903,909:55750,917:57565,936:61487,971:62177,983:62522,989:63419,1008:64661,1031:68525,1131:70112,1154:74640,1174:75306,1185:76416,1202:77304,1220:77674,1231:77970,1236:78266,1241:78784,1251:79302,1259:79820,1268:80190,1278:82262,1308:83964,1343:84778,1356:91836,1456:93576,1491:98738,1519:100118,1536:100854,1545:101222,1550:109797,1683:110211,1691:120874,1918:121166,1923:122845,1963:125473,2009:128028,2064:130948,2128:131240,2133:132189,2151:139702,2199:142222,2257:144454,2297:144814,2303:145246,2310:145822,2337:146686,2347:148414,2378:148702,2383:149998,2414:150574,2423:165263,2639:165691,2644:166440,2651:169526,2675:169931,2681:170255,2686:171389,2698:171956,2706:174143,2744:174629,2751:175034,2757:177059,2788:177626,2797:178679,2832:180704,2874:181109,2880:183782,2924:191733,3045:192146,3062:192913,3078:206480,3202:226610,3552$0,0:234,4:1322,19:2886,53:8258,162:8734,171:9482,185:9958,193:11318,230:24835,386:37755,700:38605,712:40475,737:46980,763:49990,817:50936,848:51366,854:56440,948:62890,1061:78376,1338:86503,1428:90479,1505:91544,1519:93248,1553:95946,1610:99425,1724:115735,1981:130122,2190:130596,2198:131070,2206:133993,2273:134309,2278:135257,2291:147200,2430
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Myra McDaniel's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Myra McDaniel lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Myra McDaniel describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Myra McDaniel describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Myra McDaniel describes her mother's ancestry

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Myra McDaniel describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Myra McDaniel describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Myra McDaniel describes her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Myra McDaniel describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Myra McDaniel remembers Jones Tabernacle A.M.E. Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Myra McDaniel describes her childhood in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Myra McDaniel remembers the impact of World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Myra McDaniel remembers the Philadelphia High School for Girls in Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Myra McDaniel recalls her parents' separation

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Myra McDaniel remembers her favorite literature

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Myra McDaniel describes her aspirations in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Myra McDaniel remembers the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Myra McDaniel recalls holiday celebrations

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Myra McDaniel describes her work experiences after college

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Myra McDaniel remembers meeting her husband, Reuben R. McDaniel

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Myra McDaniel remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Myra McDaniel remembers the deaths of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. and President John F. Kennedy

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Myra McDaniel recalls working at Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Myra McDaniel recalls her experiences at Baldwin-Wallace College

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Myra McDaniel recalls civil rights activism at Baldwin-Wallace College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Myra McDaniel describe her husband's 4-F draft status

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Myra McDaniel recalls moving to Bloomington, Indiana

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Myra McDaniel remembers the University of Texas Law School in Austin

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Myra McDaniel recalls the lack of high profile female lawyers

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Myra McDaniel remembers being hired by the Texas attorney general

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Myra McDaniel recalls her work for the tax division of the Texas attorney general's office

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Myra McDaniel describes her cases for the Texas attorney general's office

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Myra McDaniel describes her work as general counsel to corporations in Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Myra McDaniel recalls her appointment as secretary of state in Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Myra McDaniel recalls her work as secretary of state in Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Myra McDaniel recalls meeting United States presidents

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Myra McDaniel describes her travels abroad, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Myra McDaniel describes her travels abroad, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Myra McDaniel recalls her managing partnership of Bickerstaff, Heath, Smiley, Pollan, Keever and McDaniel

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Myra McDaniel remembers defending the City of Austin

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Myra McDaniel describes her non-equity partnership at Bickerstaff, Heath, Smiley, Pollan, Keever and McDaniel

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Myra McDaniel shares her advice to young lawyers, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Myra McDaniel shares her advice to young lawyers, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Myra McDaniel remembers the attacks of September 11, 2001

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Myra McDaniel talks about Hurricane Katrina

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Myra McDaniel describes her children

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Myra McDaniel reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Myra McDaniel describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Myra McDaniel describes her role at St. James Episcopal Church in Austin, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Myra McDaniel narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

2$2

DATitle
Myra McDaniel recalls civil rights activism at Baldwin-Wallace College
Myra McDaniel recalls her appointment as secretary of state in Texas
Transcript
I'd also not lived in any small towns in the Midwest, which was very interesting indeed. In Philadelphia [Pennsylvania] people thought of me being very moderate, perhaps close to being the stodgy side of the world. I found out when I got to a small town in Ohio that I was kind of exotic (laughter). They thought of me as being very liberal indeed. You asked earlier about things dealing with the Civil Rights Movement. One of the things that happened while we were at Baldwin-Wallace [Baldwin-Wallace College; Baldwin Wallace University, Berea, Ohio] was there was a group of white couples who had got together who wanted to try to better understand the Civil Rights Movement and how African Americans felt about what was going on and all those things, and so they invited us to come, they met--I don't know whether they met every other week or once a month or whatever and they would have you come and discuss various things, so that was--it was very interesting, because you would find yourself, for example, defending the Black Panthers [Black Panther Party] who had just done something that at the moment you thought was pretty far out, on the edge, and trying to explain to someone else how people got to the point that they felt that way, because this was after the Black Panthers had left their beginning roots and gone out. The folks in Los Angeles [California] were just, you know, doing the kind of things that some of us who were African American, felt were kind of on the edge, trying to describe to someone else the feelings that they had as we never told them whether we agreed or disagreed with them. What we did was say, you know, "Well, this is how somebody gets to that point." And eventually, of course, we just held up our hands, said, "Gee, we've had all the fun we can stand, we don't wanna come back anymore," and they're like, "Well, you know, that keeps happening to us, you know, we have couples come in, and they'll come for a couple of months or so." And you think, "You just don't know how intense this gets to be for us. I understand that for you it's just a conversation, but for us to have somebody throwing questions at you for an entire evening is not a very relaxing evening as far as we're concerned." And so that was a very interesting part of the Civil Rights Movement that I don't know that many people know about, but part of what happened, even if you were not actively engaged in the movement in terms of marching and being part of SNCC [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee] and all those good things and down there when Maynard Jackson just raising Cain, wherever you were, you were indeed representing all of the ideas that people were milling about in their minds, and so you were always being questioned by Anglos as to why this was happening, what do you think about that, what's going on there? So you were never really not part of the movement even if you were not actively marching in the streets along with Martin Luther King [Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.], you were still doing your little part out there wherever you happened to be.$$All right. So how long did you stay at the school?$$We were there, I guess, about four years.$$So what year did you get there?$$Sixty-five [1965], 1965. We left in 1969 and went to Bloomington, Indiana, where my husband [HistoryMaker Reuben R. McDaniel] started working on his doctor's degree--$$I asked you about (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) at the university [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana].$$On his doctor's?$$Um-hm.$And that November, Mark White, who had been attorney general when I left the attorney general's office, was elected governor, and he had someone call to ask if I would be willing to be general counsel to the governor. It is very difficult to tell a governor no. You can say, "Well, you know, I'm--" et cetera, et cetera, but, you know, so in any event, I came back, I did that. That started in January of '83 [1983], and by June--and I told him when I did that that I wasn't gonna stay forever, but so I did that, and by June of '84 [1984] Bickerstaff Heath [Bickerstaff Heath Smiley Pollan Keever and McDaniel; Bickerstaff Heath Delgado Acosta LLP, Austin, Texas], the law firm I'm with now, was looking for someone to come at-trial attorney to come and work with them. I had worked with many of the lawyers who were here, it was a relatively small firm, and we had been in attorney general's office together and knew each other well, so they said, "Why don't you come do this?" I said, "Great," I said goodbye to the governor (laughter), got to make the client who had a telephone company. Long-distance type companies were just starting up then. AT&T [American Telephone and Telegraph Company; AT&T Inc.] had broken apart, so there were all kinds of companies down there, and so he went down and we looked at his switch, and he told them he would teach me all these words, dealing with that business, and the governor called and said, "Well, I think you should be secretary of state," and I had heard a rumor that I was on the list, and I had told his appointment secretary, "Dwayne [ph.], you know, just take me off the list, I know a lot of people who want to do this, I don't have any interest in doing this, I just got a new job started." You know, one of the things the people at the law firm said to me, you know, "If you're going to plan do a political career--" you know, then, like, "No, no, I have no further political ambition, I'd be happy to go back to the practice of law, it seems like a good plan." So the governor then called, and we sat and we chatted, and I told him well you know, "I just started, I got a new client," and all that, and he said, "Well, do I need to talk to your partners?" et cetera, et cetera, et cetera, so and eventually once again, I was persuaded that I needed to drop what I was doing and be of service to the community, the larger community, and so I was secretary of state.

Albert Dotson, Jr.

Attorney Albert E. Dotson, Jr. was born on June 9, 1960 in Detroit, Michigan. Dotson is the oldest of four siblings. Values of self pride and community development were instilled in Dotson and his siblings at very early ages. Dotson’s father, Albert E. Dotson, Sr., became the first African American store manager for Sears Roebuck & Company. His position required relocation to several Sears’ stores across the country. Thus, the Dotson family lived in Detroit, Chicago, and Atlanta. The family settled in Miami, Florida where Dotson, Sr. and his family formed personal relationships with various African American community leaders.

In 1978, Dotson, Jr. became the first family member to attend a four-year university. He enrolled in Dartmouth University majoring in economics and history. After his third quarter, Dotson took advantage of the foreign exchange programs at Dartmouth traveling to Morocco and Spain. Dotson graduated from Dartmouth in 1984. He then received a full scholarship to attend Vanderbilt University’s Law School in Nashville, Tennessee. During his academic tenure, Dotson was awarded the Bennett Douglas Bell Memorial Prize for academic achievement and high ethical standards. In 1987, Dotson completed his J.D. degree. He works in private practice as an equity partner with the Miami law firm of Bilzin, Sumberg, Baena, Price & Axelrod, LLP specializing in land use and zoning, and federal and local government procurement contracts and compliance.

In 1993, Dotson was the second African American to be voted on the Orange Bowl. Dotson’s father was the first African American to serve in this capacity. Dotson served as Vice President of 100 Black Men of America in 1996, later becoming Chairman in 2004. In March 2006, Dotson was sworn in to serve as President of The Orange Bowl Committee for the 2006-2007 Orange Bowl Festival and FedEx Orange Bowl Game.

Accession Number

A2006.020

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/16/2006

Last Name

Dotson

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Schools

Woodward Academy

Winston Churchill School

James Hart School

Mason Elementary School

Dartmouth College

Vanderbilt University

First Name

Albert

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

DOT01

Favorite Season

January in Miami

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere With Family

Favorite Quote

You Make The Difference.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

6/9/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potato Pie

Short Description

Association executive and administrative lawyer Albert Dotson, Jr. (1960 - ) is an equity partner at the Miami law firm of Bilzin, Sumberg, Baena, Price & Axelrod, LLP. Dotson is Chairman of 100 Black Men of America, and was president of the Orange Bowl Committee for the 2006-2007 season.

Employment

Bilzin, Sumberg, Baena, Price & Axelrod, LLP

State of Florida

Fine Jacobson Schwartz Nash Block and England

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:3781,41:4782,59:5874,74:6511,82:9969,130:15247,239:16521,269:30042,427:30802,439:31258,447:33310,487:35894,527:38478,576:39010,584:39466,593:42962,658:43266,663:45242,713:49746,742:52008,786:54114,894:58014,1102:76790,1218:77750,1234:78070,1239:81030,1296:81830,1307:82150,1312:85514,1321:90218,1417:90638,1424:92066,1466:93326,1486:97694,1589:98282,1603:106415,1733:111355,1818:111735,1823:112210,1829:117591,1845:118137,1854:118774,1867:119229,1873:122664,1928:128124,2061:134988,2189:135846,2201:141774,2291:149065,2341:149965,2362:151540,2407:154090,2454:154540,2462:155065,2471:155440,2477:156040,2490:156490,2498:160690,2588:161290,2598:167740,2650:169090,2673:169690,2684:170515,2701:170890,2707:171490,2727:172915,2741:173665,2752:173965,2757:185127,2917:185419,2922:187901,2958:188193,2963:191697,3062:197810,3174:198230,3181:198860,3193:200260,3226:201100,3239:201380,3244:205090,3332:205370,3337:207330,3370:209150,3411:210340,3446:211390,3465:218280,3510:218580,3515:223830,3645:225630,3678:225930,3683:227430,3720:228255,3733:228555,3738:233880,3838:235905,3892:237030,3927:237330,3932:247610,4029:252490,4123:253450,4139:253850,4145:254170,4150:262010,4337:262730,4351:275386,4525:277993,4582:282022,4661:283286,4691:284629,4713:285577,4737:292638,4801:294112,4856:295385,4879:297663,4939:303030,5001:303595,5006:304273,5014:305403,5024:310520,5068$0,0:7296,134:8448,148:9216,157:10272,170:13152,192:13728,213:16032,245:18060,252:20270,289:21120,302:22480,322:22905,328:23500,337:25200,356:26305,370:26985,379:27920,394:31065,452:31745,461:32340,469:35600,482:42725,578:43250,586:49272,640:50644,658:51526,668:56524,761:60048,772:65618,847:70154,943:73430,1010:79630,1047:80620,1086:82240,1114:82600,1119:90790,1248:91330,1255:92320,1268:100378,1331:100808,1337:102614,1360:105882,1410:106484,1418:114912,1549:116202,1586:121537,1629:121952,1635:123460,1641:124395,1652:124820,1658:125840,1671:130855,1769:131620,1779:132640,1806:138760,1883:139440,1896:139865,1902:145223,1930:150364,2005:151819,2031:154470,2039:155940,2068:156220,2073:159260,2118:160076,2143:161640,2180:164564,2242:166468,2288:171379,2336:173080,2362:174700,2418:175672,2434:179074,2506:179641,2514:180046,2523:180694,2539:181747,2581:183124,2606:184744,2649:186850,2730:187417,2738:197435,2890:203259,2988:203714,2994:204260,3001:205170,3012:210547,3053:211637,3068:212945,3086:217340,3120:217880,3128:221446,3184:222070,3198:224020,3236:227530,3316:233548,3387:238062,3490:238358,3495:240060,3522:244500,3615:252302,3679:252890,3687:253730,3704:254150,3717:268682,3988:269900,4003:273119,4046:273902,4057:279392,4112:281980,4124:287867,4202:291694,4258:292495,4275:292940,4281:295254,4313:309138,4502:309434,4517:309952,4525:310248,4530:313996,4562:314352,4567:314708,4572:315331,4584:316755,4605:318624,4631:319069,4637:322095,4701:322718,4710:323341,4718:323964,4726:335361,4843:336747,4868:337143,4873:338133,4887:338529,4892:345770,4988
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Albert Dotson, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his father's career at Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls moving to Chicago, Illinois as a child

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his grade school experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Albert Dotson, Jr. reflects upon his family life during his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls befriending the King and the Abernathy families in Atlanta

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers working as a ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his activities as a teenager in Atlanta and Miami

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes the political atmosphere of Atlanta in the 1970s, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes the political atmosphere of Atlanta in the 1970s, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers moving to Miami, Florida in 1976

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his aspirations during his high school years

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his decision to attend Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his experiences at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his studies at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers studying abroad in Granada, Spain

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes how his legal career began

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. recalls his decision to attend law school at Vanderbilt University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his experiences at Nashville's Vanderbilt University

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his first summer job as a law student

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers beginning his legal career in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his leadership of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes the mission of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his legal career in Miami, Florida

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his specialty in land use and zoning law

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his presidency of the Orange Bowl Committee

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Albert Dotson, Jr. talks about managing multiple priorities in his career

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Albert Dotson, Jr. reflects upon his life

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

2$5

DATitle
Albert Dotson, Jr. remembers working as a ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks
Albert Dotson, Jr. describes his leadership of 100 Black Men of America, Inc.
Transcript
We also got to meet Walt Bellamy, who at that time was the center for the Atlanta Hawks. And we met Walt Bellamy because he knew people who lived in Homewood, Illinois. And when he got traded to Atlanta, I forget what team he got traded from, he didn't know a lot of people. He talked to his friend in Homewood, Illinois, said, why don't you call my father [Albert Dotson, Sr.], he lives there. So he got to know me and my parents and just so happened it was his turn on the Atlanta Hawks to select or recommend someone to ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks. And not knowing anybody else, he recommended me. My parents, and again, there are certain things that happen in your life that you remember like it was yesterday. I come home from school and I was playing basketball at that time in Atlanta for Woodward Academy [College Park, Georgia]. I can't tell you I was all that good, but--$$Were you about as tall now? I mean then as you are now?$$I was tall for my age, but I was a little shorter than I am today. The--I came home. My parents said, "Albert [HistoryMaker Albert Dotson, Jr.], we have some good news for you." And I said, "Well what is it?" They said that Walt Bellamy called and they made all this drama, and said that he's recommended you to be ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks. At that moment I think, least I remember it, as a pregnant pause 'cause all I'm thinking is he's recommended me, what a great honor. Didn't think I was gonna be selected. And then they said, "And you've been selected." Now I've lost it. I've lost it as a child. I just completely lost it. And then my mother [Earlene Puryear Dotson] tells me, and they're gonna pay you. I said, "Wait a minute. They're gonna pay me to go downtown to be ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks, okay this is clearly a joke." Well a long story short, I did do that for three years, three seasons, ball boy for the Atlanta Hawks. It taught me that I did not wanna be a professional basketball player the rest of my life.$$Now, what did you see when you were there?$$Well as a child, what you see on television is just when they play the game. As a person who is behind the scenes, you learn and see the business of basketball. And you learn how difficult it is. As a ball boy, I remember Lou Hudson for example, getting a shot in his knee because of an injury. And you see them going through that. You see people get traded. And how that disrupts their lives and some of them are angry about it and some of them are not. You see the interaction between the inner--the private interaction between coach and player. And sort of how that works. I mean it was great. I met a lot of people. I remember my very first game, interestingly enough, was a exhibition game between the Atlanta Hawks and the Detroit Pistons. Excuse me, Atlanta Hawks and the, the New York Knicks. And the reason I say Detroit was because it was the very first and maybe the only rain--only game that was not played because of rain. And the reason it wasn't played because of rain, Atlanta had just built the Omni [Omni Coliseum, Atlanta, Georgia]. And the Omni had a leak in the roof. And the water was coming down on the court, and the game could not be played. And what happened, because no one--it had not been experienced before, they were determining how they were going to handle this. Were they gone try to fix it, were they gonna play with it, play around it. The players sat in the locker room. So I got to spend time--'cause when you're a ball boy for a team, you're a ball boy for both the visiting team and the home team. And I got a chance to just sit and talk to Dave DeBusschere who was from Detroit. And that's how we made the connection. Bill Bradley, Walt Frazier--$$Senator.$$Senator Bill Bradley. That's right, presidential candidate Bill Bradley. Willis Reed. These are the people I'm just talking to, and they were just the most gracious people. And I really, I mean Walt Frazier, he--every time they came in town, I started collecting shoes, and had them all sign it 'cause if a shoe didn't fit right or--and this was back before the major shoe contracts. But I started--they would throw them away and I'd get them to sign it. My mother was like, "Would you stop bringing these stinky shoes home?" And you know there was--it was before people were really into memorabilia. But--$$Tell me she didn't throw them all out.$$No, I still have them. I still have them to this day. Most of them, anyway. But Walt Frazier used to always bring me stuff signed. And he was just a great human being. And I started developing those same types of relationships with teams that would come in because if you're the ball boy, you're on the bench. For the most part, you get to meet those who don't play much 'cause they're on the bench too. And you're just talking and they wanna talk to you and it's a lot easier for them to converse with people they know and you know, have a relationship with. But that made an indelible mark in me, as well, having that experience.$I wanna jump in here. Can you give a little background on the history of 100 Black Men [100 Black Men of America, Inc.]?$$Okay. 100 Black Men was actually started as a entity in 1963 in New York [New York]. It grew out of naturally the civil rights struggle and movement. But the real focus of the group at that time, which were one hundred men in New York, was the criminal system and the injustice that African Americans were experiencing in the criminal justice system. And there was a desire to focus too on economic equality amongst persons of African descent and the general population. The concept of the one hundred grew as a member moved to a different locale. The second chapter was in New Jersey. And primarily out of the Newark [New Jersey] area. And that person who helped start that chapter then moved to California, to Los Angeles [California] and started a chapter there. A chapter sprung up in Atlanta [Georgia] and Indianapolis [Indiana] and Alton, Illinois, in Suffolk County, New York, and another chapter started in California in the Oakland [California] area. But we ended up with nine organizations, all 100 Black Men of the geographic region. And eventually decided that they should come together, approximately twenty years ago in October of 1996 [sic.], to form 100 Black Men of America. And those chapters then were the beginning of what we know now as 100 Black Men of America that is now as of today 105 chapters and a global organization, having chapters in the African continent, the Caribbean basin, and Europe and in the continental United States.$$Now let's see, you were born just three years before the first organization began.$$That's correct.$$So, but today you are the chairman.$$That's correct.$$Of this nation, or worldwide organization. Now how did that come to be?$$I wasn't in the room when they voted. When we started 100 Black Men of South Florida, I was the founding president. And we did not initially decide whether--that we were going to join the 100 Black Men of America because at that time the New York chapter, the New York organization was not a part of 100 Black Men of America. The--all the organizations except New York joined. New York eventually joined. But the reason I became aware of it, I have a--have a college friend who was a member of the New York organization. I spoke to Roscoe Brown [HistoryMaker Roscoe C. Brown], a--at that time he was the president of the New York chapter, he's a Tuskegee Airman. And we were talking about us starting and he said, "Look, you don't have to follow our model. You know we were around before there was a 100 Black Men of America." And we had people like David Dinkins [HistoryMaker David N. Dinkins], Charlie Rangel [HistoryMaker Charles B. Rangel], you know these were all founders of the 100 Black Men, the New York group. And they said, "You gotta make the decision for yourself whether you wanna join or not." So after we formed, I then traveled to the first annual conference that I attended, I believe it was in New Jersey at that time. And got to meet what I thought were an--they were an amazing group of men. They came, they were about doing business. It wasn't about egos. They were talking about how they were helping kids in their community. And really focused on the business of the 100. And these were men who were very accomplished in their communities. And you know, I was sort of in awe as a, as the young buck in the room, as to what they were doing. And so as the president of our chapter, I then went to the next conference. And I started volunteering to help do things. And eventually there was an election and I was elected secretary of 100 Black Men of America. This was in 1994, in Nashville, Tennessee of all places. In Opryland [Opryland Hotel; Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, Nashville, Tennessee], that's where we had the--Opryland Hotel.$$There at Opryland.$$At that time Opryland hadn't moved to its larger current location. And we were--a group of us were elected to office in 1994. And I stayed in that position for two years. And then in--where were we--in 1996, here in Miami [Florida]. Had the convention here in Miami. I convinced them to have the convention here, it was our tenth anniversary of 100 Black Men of America. And I think I said earlier that we started in 1996, if the tape may prove me wrong, but it was 1986.$$Okay.$$That we were formed, in October 1986. In 1996, we had the convention here and I was elected vice president of 100 Black Men. It just hard work in the organization. And I stayed vice president for eight years, or vice chairman, we changed the title to chairman. And then was elected without opposition to chairman of the board of the 100 two years ago.$$And how long does your tenure last?$$It lasts for two years. Well we have two year terms, but no term limits.$$Okay, so you could, you could be reelected.$$No--I guess theoretically that's possible.

Larry Dingle

Larry Dingle was born in rural Dillon, South Carolina, on June 26, 1949. Dingle was an agent of change in his hometown of Dillon, South Carolina; he desegregated the high school closest to his home. From there, Dingle attended Morehouse College to pursue his undergraduate education; he transferred to Georgia State University, where he was awarded his B.A. degree in 1974, and his J.D. degree in 1987, enabling him to practice law.

Dingle was a police officer for the City of Atlanta and then worked for the City of Atlanta from 1969 to 1990 as a department head and Clerk of Council. It is in this capacity that Dingle gained the confidence and support of then Mayors Maynard Jackson and Andrew Young as a civil servant of considerable talent. From 1990 to 1997, Dingle worked as a partner at the law firm of Peterson, Dillard, Young, Asselin and Powell. Dingle later became a partner at Wilson, Brock, and Irby, L.L.C., where he earned great prestige through his representation of clients such as Sax Fifth Avenue.

Dingle served on the Board of Directors of Southeast Energy; the Bank of North Georgia; Central Fulton Senior Services; and Georgia State University’s Board of Visitors. Dingle was a member of the Georgia Bar Association for twenty years. In 1990, Dingle co-authored Major Land Use Laws in Georgia, which was published by the National Business Institute, Inc. Dingle earned distinction in the City of Atlanta as a civil servant and attorney and was recognized nationally for contributions to the practice of law.

Accession Number

A2005.178

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/1/2005

Last Name

Dingle

Marital Status

Married

Schools

Latta Elementary School

Morehouse College

Georgia State University

First Name

Larry

Birth City, State, Country

Dillon

HM ID

DIN03

Favorite Season

Fall

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

Casa De Campo

Favorite Quote

I'm Doing Okay For A Farm Boy From South Carolina.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

6/26/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Calamari

Short Description

City government administrator and administrative lawyer Larry Dingle (1949 - ) served as Clerk of Council for the City of Atlanta, and became nationally known for his activities as a civil servant and attorney.

Employment

City of Atlanta

Wilson Brock & Irby, L.L.C.

Dillard, Westmoreland and Wilson

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2119,35:2443,40:4630,90:24648,381:25240,469:36984,611:37552,619:40543,677:43240,731:43588,736:45415,768:46024,776:46459,782:47503,796:52075,838:69230,1112:82615,1263:83140,1272:94067,1428:99739,1484:100307,1493:100662,1499:101017,1505:106058,1611:120400,1791$0,0:108700,1529
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Larry Dingle's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Larry Dingle lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Larry Dingle talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Larry Dingle talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Larry Dingle describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Larry Dingle describes Carolina S, one of his ancestors

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Larry Dingle recalls his earliest memories of growing up in Dillon County, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Larry Dingle recalls childhood summers in Dillon County, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Larry Dingle lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Larry Dingle recalls his childhood street in South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Larry Dingle describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood in Dillon County, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Larry Dingle recalls desegregating Latta High School in Latta, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Larry Dingle recalls his childhood mentor

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Larry Dingle recalls seeing Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on TV

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Larry Dingle describes integrating his high school and struggling with reading

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Larry Dingle describes his childhood church

Tape: 1 Story: 17 - Larry Dingle recalls an exchange with a high school teacher

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Larry Dingle talks about playing basketball at Latta High School in Latta, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Larry Dingle talks about his extracurricular activities as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Larry Dingle describes aspiring to become a lawyer

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Larry Dingle talks about his decision to attend Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Larry Dingle talks about his initial impressions of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Larry Dingle talks about leaving Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia and becoming a police officer

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Larry Dingle talks about negotiating with Mayor Maynard Jackson as an Atlanta police officer

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Larry Dingle talks about attending Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia for undergraduate and law school

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Larry Dingle talks about his exit strategy after finishing law school

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Larry Dingle talks about his family and offers advice on parenting

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Larry Dingle talks about law connections he made over the years

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Larry Dingle reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Larry Dingle talks about memorable court cases

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Larry Dingle talks about voting rights

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Larry Dingle reflects on rights and the importance of voting

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Larry Dingle talks about his passion for elderly and youth issues

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Larry Dingle reflects upon his life

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Larry Dingle offers advice for those interested in pursuing law careers

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Larry Dingle talks about his hopes for the future

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Larry Dingle reflects on what he would do differently

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Larry Dingle describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Larry Dingle talks about rap music

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Larry Dingle reflects upon his values

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Larry Dingle reflects on lessons for his children and the importance of history

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Larry Dingle describes his role as Clerk of Council in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Larry Dingle recalls memories of former Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$2

DAStory

3$7

DATitle
Larry Dingle describes aspiring to become a lawyer
Larry Dingle talks about negotiating with Mayor Maynard Jackson as an Atlanta police officer
Transcript
So let's say that junior [year] of high school, at that point, were you beginning to know what you wanted to be? Did you have any particular ambitions?$$I had always professed starting at the age of fourteen or fifteen that I was going to be a lawyer. And the interesting reason or the interesting thing about what motivates you, I can't remember the, the man's name, but he had attended Howard University [Washington, D.C.] from Dillon County [South Carolina]. And Howard at that time, and I still think today, is an extraordinary institution, but then, that was about the only place that I knew of that an African American could get a law degree. And this fella had been accepted into How--into Howard's law school. And the talk around the tobacco barn for the several weeks preceding his acceptance at Howard was just phenomenal, that people spoke of him as almost, almost as if he were god-like. You would've thought he were Apollo, you know, and so I just thought, well gee whiz, if being a lawyer is that some--is a type of thing that causes these women around this tobacco barn to be so filled with that much adoration, it's gotta be something I gotta do. And I hung--that idea hung with me for a long time, that it was just a concept of creating a sense of academic self that would be worthy of adoration. And coming off to Atlanta [Georgia], as we mentioned earlier, I met some extraordinary people who were in that profession, The Honorable Clarence Cooper, federal district court judge here, one of those who encouraged that, [HM] Marvin Arrington, [HM] Carl Ware, a host of other people who encouraged that--the pursuit of that goal. But, you know, back then it was just the idea of having my grandmomma [Charity Dingle] and the folks around the barn think highly of me.$And that was definitely a, a very vital moment in Atlanta's [Georgia] history. Mayor [Maynard] Jackson definitely was a trailblazer. What were your experiences or your interactions with him like?$$Well, the first time I met him was in 1968 when he was running for [U.S.] Senate, he came onto Morehouse College [Atlanta, Georgia] campus, very handsome, very eloquent, very bright man. And the second time I was able to meet him was as a police officer; this was I think around 1970. He had been elected vice mayor of the city and we were engaged in I guess combat, if you will, with the police administration about the absence of fair testing in the police department, the absence of the advancement of African Americans within the Atlanta core. And a group of us got together. I can't remember all of the people, but the two leaders of the group or one of the leaders of the group, well two I'd say, were Floyd Reeves and C.C. Mitchell [ph.], the late C.C. Mitchell. And we decided we'd go to Maynard's home at two o'clock in the morning. He lived on 2nd Avenue or off 2nd Avenue in southeast Atlanta, not exactly the greatest time to knock on somebody's door to make a--an impression, but we knocked on his door at two in the morning. He answered it. He talked to us for an hour and a half, made promises to us, every one of which he kept, and to this day is one of my, I think, a hero to a lot of people because he just believed in doing what was right and causing to be done what was right under those circumstances.