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Candace Bond McKeever

Marketing executive Candace Bond McKeever was born on June 27, 1965 in St. Louis, Missouri to Anita Lyons Bond and Dr. Leslie F. Bond, Sr. After graduating from Villa Duchesne and Oak Hill School in Frontenac, Missouri in 1983, she received her B.A. degree in government from Harvard University in 1987, and her M.B.A. degree from Harvard Business School in 1992. In 2016, Bond McKeever also graduated from the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business in the Ross Program in Real Estate and Real Estate Development.

In 1992, Bond McKeever became vice president of special markets and catalog development for Motown Records, where she was responsible for initiating formal catalog development efforts. Bond McKeever left Motown in 1997, and later served as vice president and general manager of entertainment for Essence magazine, where she oversaw the development of all branded business and marketing initiatives in the areas of film, television, DVD, music, radio and live entertainment. In this capacity, she also served as executive producer of the Essence Music Festival and the executive in charge of production of the Essence Awards. In 2003, Bond McKeever left Essence and became managing partner of Infusion Media Partners LLC. In 2010, she served as president of Initiative Consulting Group, Inc., which was acquired the following year by AESA Inc. and she was named chief executive officer. In 2011, she became chief executive officer of Strategic Solutions Group, Inc.

Bond McKeever served as co-chair of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Diversity Committee and as trustee for the Presidential Inaugural Committee for Obama for America. In 2010, she was appointed by President Barack Obama to serve on the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Bond McKeever is also a member of the board of trustees for The Ford Theater, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital, and the Children’s Institute, Inc. She served on the board of the Los Angeles County Office of Education, the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science and as vice chair and secretary of the Martin Luther King Health and Wellness Community Development Corporation.

Candace Bond McKeever was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 6, 2019.

Accession Number

A2019.010

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/6/2019

Last Name

McKeever

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Bond

Occupation
Schools

Villa Duchesne and Oak Hill School

Harvard University

Harvard Business School

University of Southern California Marshall School of Business

First Name

Candace

Birth City, State, Country

St. Louis

HM ID

MCK17

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Missouri

Favorite Vacation Destination

Amalfi Coast, Italy

Favorite Quote

Pray as if everything in life depends on God, but work as if it depends on you.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

6/27/1965

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Favorite Food

White Castle Cheeseburgers

Short Description

Marketing executive Candace Bond McKeever (1965 - ) served as named vice president and general manager of entertainment for Essence magazine and became chief executive officer of AESA Inc. and, in 2011, chief executive officer of Strategic Solutions Group, Inc.

Employment

Motown Record Corporation

Essence Magazine

Infusion Media Partners

Initiative Consulting Group, Inc.

AESA, Inc.

Strategic Solutions Group, Inc.

Favorite Color

Maroon

Karen Thomas

Education administrator and marketing executive Karen Thomas was born on August 19, 1955 in Newark, New Jersey to Howard and Ruth Young. After graduating from Abraham Clark High School in 1973, Thomas received her B.S. degree in communications from Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts in 1977, and her M.S. degree in sports and special events marketing from New York University in 1989. Thomas went on to receive both her M.A. degree in educational administration in 2008 and her Ed.D. degree in urban education in 2012 from Kean University in Union, New Jersey.

Upon graduating from Simmons College, Thomas worked as a copywriter in the public relations and marketing departments at Chemical Bank in New York from 1978 to 1980. She joined McGraw-Hill Publishing Company as a copywriter and worked in the book club direct marketing sales group from 1980 to 1982. From 1982 to 2000, Thomas served as marketing director at Essence magazine in New York City. During this time, Thomas created and produced The Essence Awards, an Emmy-award winning prime-time television special, The Essence Music Festival, and Essence television program. In 1999, Thomas founded Marion P. Thomas Charter School; and, a year later, she became its chief executive officer. In 2011, Thomas joined Kean University as adjunct professor for the graduate school of education where she taught organizational theory, supervision and leadership, and curriculum development. In 2019, she also served as an adjunct professor at Simmons University, where she taught a course on digital culture before retiring from academia later that year.

In 1998, she received the NAACP Image Award for Excellence in Television Production, and an Emmy Award for the Essence Awards Prime Time TV Special, Patti Labelle tribute. Thomas received the Alumnae Achievement Award from Simmons College in 2000. She was also the recipient of the 2015 Profiles in Diversity Journal Company and Executive Women Worth Watching Award for her contributions to education. In 2017, she received the Education Innovator of the Year Award from New Jersey Charter School Association.

Thomas resides in Paris, France, where she studies art history.

Karen Thomas was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on October 26, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.202

Sex

Female

Interview Date

10/26/2018

Last Name

Thomas

Maker Category
Organizations
First Name

Karen

Birth City, State, Country

Newark

HM ID

THO30

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris

Favorite Quote

To Whom Much Is Given, Much Is Expected.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

8/19/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Newark

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Education administrator and marketing executive Karen Thomas (1955- ) served as marketing director at Essence magazine from 1982 to 2000, before serving as founder and chief executive officer the Marion P. Thomas Charter School since 1999.

Favorite Color

Turquoise

Joyce Roche

Marketing executive and nonprofit executive Joyce Roche was born on March 16, 1947 in Iberville, Louisiana to Julia Showers Roche and John Roche. Roche attended McDough 35 High School in New Orleans, Louisiana, and graduated in 1965. In 1970, she earned her B.A. degree in math education from Dillard University in New Orleans, Louisiana. Roche went on to earn her M.B.A. degree in marketing from Columbia University in New York, New York in 1972.

Following her graduation from Columbia University, Roche began working as a manager of merchandising at Avon Products, Inc. In 1978, she left Avon to work as the director of marketing at Revlon, Inc. She returned to Avon in 1981, and served as the first female African American Vice President at Avon and its first Vice President of Global Marketing. Roche went on to work at Carson Products, Inc. in 1995. At Carson Products she served as executive vice president of marketing, and was then promoted to president and chief operations officer. She then began working as an independent marketing consultant in 1999; and, in 2000, Roche became the president and chief executive officer of Girls, Incorporated.

Roche also served on numerous corporate boards, including AT&T and Tupperware Brands Corporation and she later joined the boards of Anheuser-Busch Companies, Macy’s Inc. and Dr. Pepper Snapple Group.

In 2013, Roche published a business memoir, titled The Empress Has No Clothes: Conquering Self-Doubt to Embrace Success. Roche was the recipient of the Business Achievement Award from the Black Retail Action Group in 1986, the Legacy Award from Black Career Women in 1997, the Distinguished Community Leadership Award from Bronx Community College in 2005, and the Presidential Medal of Honor from Dillard University in 2015, among many others. She has also been named one of the “21 Women of Power and Influence in Corporate America” by Black Enterprise magazine in 1991, one of the “Top 50 Women in Business” by Business Week magazine in 1992, and one of the “40 Most Powerful Executives” by Black Enterprise magazine in 1994. Roche has also received honorary doctorates from Dillard University, North Adams State College, Bryant University, Mercy College, and Old Dominion University.

Joyce Roche was interviewed by on February 7, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.023

Sex

Female

Interview Date

02/07/2017

Last Name

Roché

Maker Category
Middle Name

M.

Organizations
Schools

McDonogh No. 35 Senior High School

Dillard University

Columbia University

Stanford University

First Name

Joyce

Birth City, State, Country

Abbeville

HM ID

ROC03

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

Sponsor

Dorothy Terrell

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florence, Italy

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

3/16/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Savannah

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken

Short Description

Marketing executive and nonprofit executive Joyce M. Roché (1947 - ) was president and COO of Carson Products, and founded Girls Incorporated in 2000, and served as its president and CEO until she retired in 2010.

Employment

AT&T, Inc.

Macy's Inc.

Tupperware Brands, Inc.

Dr. Pepper/Snapple Group

Girls Incorporated

Independent Marketing Consultant

Carson Products, Inc.

Avon Products, inc.

Revlon, Inc.

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Turquoise

Denise Bradley-Tyson

Marketing executive and entrepreneur Denise Bradley-Tyson was born on December 5, 1958, in Chicago, Illinois to Lacey Bradley and Howard Bradley. Her family moved to Newark, Ohio, where she was raised, and where she graduated from Newark High School in 1977. Bradley-Tyson earned her B.A. degree in economics and communications from Stanford University in 1981, beginning her career in marketing and communications for HBO and Levi Strauss & Co. before attending Harvard Business School, where she earned her M.B.A. degree in 1986.

Bradley-Tyson worked as the business manager for CBS News’ Chicago Bureau until 1991, when she was recruited by Paramount Pictures to work on production finance for “The Arsenio Hall Show.” In 1993, Bradley-Tyson successfully pitched QVC on its first African-themed merchandising program, “The African Marketplace.” She moved on to Warner Brothers’ consumer products division as brand licensing manager, where she developed the merchandising strategy for Michael Jordan’s film, Space Jam. She would become director of international marketing for Warner Brothers, supporting the firm’s international offices and developing their marketing campaigns. She moved to London in 2000, where she was recruited by the Southbank Centre, Europe’s largest centre for the arts, to oversee audience development for the largest African contemporary art exhibition in Europe, “Africa Remix.” During her time in London, she also served on the steering committee of the Arts Council England under Prime Minister Tony Blair. Bradley-Tyson left London in 2005 when she was recruited to become the founding executive director of the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco, California. She brought the museum national and international recognition in its inaugural years. In 2015, Bradley-Tyson founded Inspired Luxe, an online curated shopping company.

Bradley-Tyson has garnered several honors in her career both for her business and marketing acumen, as well as her passion for the arts. She was presented a "Profile of Excellence" award by ABC-7, San Francisco, featured as a role model in Morrie Turner's syndicated cartoon, "Wee Pals," and named by the San Francisco Business Times as one of the Bay Area's Most Influential Women of 2007. Bradley-Tyson serves as President of the San Francisco Film Commission, and serves as Vice Chair of San Francisco Travel’s Tourism Diversity Committee.

Bradley-Tyson lives in San Francisco with her husband, Bernard Tyson, Chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente.

Denise Bradley-Tyson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 17, 2015.

Accession Number

A2015.009

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/17/2015

Last Name

Bradley-Tyson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Denise

Schools

Stanford University

Harvard Business School

Newark High School

Conrad Elementary School

Lincoln Junior High School

First Name

V.

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

BRA15

Favorite Season

Anytime

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

If You Can Conceive It, You Can Achieve It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

12/5/1958

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo, Grits, Fried Catfish, Fried Chicken, Caviar

Short Description

Marketing executive and entrepreneur Denise Bradley-Tyson (1958 - ) served as the founding executive director of the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco, California. She also developed the merchandising strategy for Michael Jordan's Space Jam and the marketing campaign for the Africa 05 art initiative.

Employment

British Broadcasting Corporation

Ogilvy and Mather

Home Box Office

Levi Strauss and Company

Chase Manhattan Bank

CBS News

Paramount Pictures Corporation

Warner Brothers Entertainment Inc.

Warner Home Video

Hayward Gallery

Museum of the African Diaspora

Inspiredluxe.com

Favorite Color

Black

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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Denise Bradley-Tyson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Denise Bradley-Tyson lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Denise Bradley-Tyson talks about her parents' personalities and how they met

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Denise Bradley-Tyson lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Denise Bradley-Tyson recalls the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Denise Bradley-Tyson remembers her community in Newark, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes her early personality

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Denise Bradley-Tyson talks about her early education

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes the racial demographics of Newark, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Denise Bradley-Tyson remembers her father's death from lung cancer

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Denise Bradley-Tyson talks about her home life

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Denise Bradley-Tyson recalls her early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Denise Bradley-Tyson remembers her college aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes her experiences at Stanford University in Stanford, California

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Denise Bradley-Tyson talks about the black community at Stanford University

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Denise Bradley-Tyson remembers her college internships

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Denise Bradley-Tyson recalls her aspirations and influences at Stanford University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Denise Bradley-Tyson recalls her first work experiences after graduation

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes her decision to attend Harvard Business School

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Denise Tyson-Bradley talks about the Harvard Business School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Denise Tyson-Bradley remembers her peers and professors at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Denise Tyson-Bradley recalls her decision to pursue a career in the media industry

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Denise Tyson-Bradley describes her role at CBS News

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Denise Tyson-Bradley recalls joining the Paramount Pictures Corporation

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Denise Tyson-Bradley talks about the entertainment industry in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Denise Tyson-Bradley remembers launching an African merchandising program on QVC

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Denise Tyson-Bradley recalls joining Warner Brothers Entertainment Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Denise Tyson-Bradley recalls her role as director of international marketing for Warner Home Video

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Denise Tyson-Bradley talks about the African American entertainment executives

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Denise Bradley-Tyson remembers moving to London, England

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Denise Bradley-Tyson recalls her work on the Africa 05 project

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes her experiences as an expatriate in London, England

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Denise Bradley-Tyson recalls joining the Museum of the African Diaspora

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Denise Bradley-Tyson recalls launching the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco, California

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes her role at the Museum of the African Diaspora

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Denise Bradley-Tyson recalls her decision to leave the Museum of the African Diaspora

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Denise Bradley-Tyson remembers the deaths of her parents

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Denise Bradley-Tyson talks about her marriage to Bernard J. Tyson

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Denise Bradley-Tyson reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Denise Bradley-Tyson shares her plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Denise Bradley-Tyson reflects upon the legacy of her generation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Denise Bradley-Tyson describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Denise Bradley-Tyson reflects upon the black experience

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Denise Bradley-Tyson reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Denise Bradley-Tyson narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Denise Bradley-Tyson narrates her photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

8$5

DATitle
Denise Tyson-Bradley recalls joining Warner Brothers Entertainment Inc.
Denise Bradley-Tyson recalls launching the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco, California
Transcript
And so I went from there [QVC, Inc.] to working at Warner Brothers [Warner Brothers Entertainment, Inc.]. Again leveraging my experience in terms of, and love of product and merchandising to ending up working in Warner Brothers consumer products. Where I was charged with I, you know, working with the team to help revitalize the Looney Tunes franchise. And it was done through Michael Jordan's 'Space Jam.' And so, I developed the branding strategy for that movie, for Warner Brothers consumer products which was hugely successful. From there I went to--$$Now, how large was the, your budget for that? And how much, how, what does success mean, in terms of revenue?$$They made over 100 million [dollars] from the licensing products associated with the movie, which then was a big number. Well it made in several hundred million I'm sorry, several hundred million on the, the licensing. The licensing was a much bigger sort of revenue generator I think than the movie itself. But, then a lot those movies exist to sell merchandise.$$(Unclear) this was, this was really a new trend at that point don't you think? I mean this and that, you're talking about in some respects is that called product placement?$$Sort of. It was licensing development where you are granting companies the right to put, you know, Looney Tunes on a t-shirt, on a toothbrush. And probably the closest analogy that sort of, you know, in terms of tapering to the present time is you look at all the, the product tie ins. And product that's been developed around the 'Star Wars' movie ['Star Wars: The Force Awakens']. So, everything that you can think of from, you know, cradle to grave we were selling. You know, with the Looney Tunes image you were paying a whole lot more if it included Michael Jordan. Always very savvy about his use of his image.$$In fact he just, he just won a big case and donated the money to--$$To Chicago [Illinois] charities.$$Um-hm.$$I think that was just announced yesterday.$Well, you would have been a real find for a startup black museum [Museum of the African Diaspora, San Francisco, California],$$Um-hm.$$Um-hm. And were they interested in your marketing background too in the, the merchandising and things like, was that?$$All that came into play and--$$So, so talk about what did you to launch the museum, 'cause it's one thing to have a building, it's another thing to open an institution. So, tell, tell us what you did?$$You know, we had lots of PR [public relations]. And you know, lots of access and large part that's to people like, you know, Belva [HistoryMaker Belva Davis]. Even though, I had worked with another local PR firm. As you know, San Francisco [California] said it's a little town with a big footprint. But, everything from, you know, I secured a cover story in The New York Times arts section to a piece in the Financial Times. I guess in some respects, you know, a visionary, but we also I mean in terms possibilities. You know, just as I was when I was growing up in terms of if you believe it you can achieve it. To, you know, the logo were already served, they had already been working with a firm out of L.A. [Los Angeles, California] to come up with the, the logos and the branding. So, it was a question of how the, you know, the implementation in terms of, of applying those across merchandise. How I opened the, with my staff, opened the gift store for the institution. Established the pricing model, the opening hours, I mean the hours of operations. I mean it truly was a, a start up, yeah.$$So, the, the whole thing is that this would have been the first of its kind on the West Coast, right?$$Um-hm.$$And I think there, there had been a conscious decision to go after, to focus on the diaspora--$$Um-hm.$$--with it, right?$$Um-hm.$$So, with, how--$$And the thing that I was particularly attracted to about what they were doing too as someone who had lived abroad and traveled extensively is that in someone who feels very passionately about education. And, you know, using the arts as a tool to educate and break down barriers so that they were--the museum was committed to again connecting the cultural dots. You know, showing first and foremost that we are all African. And how culture emanated from Africa, how it manifests itself in terms of its people migrated, you know, throughout the world. And, so that was a very powerful, for me, that was a very powerful mission that the museum had.$$And what did it take so, how long did it take from the time you were hired to the museum opening?$$It was very short. I was hired in--I think I was hired in April or May, but then wrapped things up--I started in June and we opened in December.$$That's a quick turnaround.$$Um-hm. As I said, you know a lot of things were already in place. And they already had a wonderful, you know, Lizzetta Collins was the curator, Dr. Lizzetta Collins [Lizzetta LeFalle-Collins], and had put together wonderful opening exhibit. So, again my job was sort of, you know, then starting to work with the, the board on the gala. And you know, all the wonderful things that go along with the keeping a nonprofit going on the fundraising side.$$And, and how much did you, how much did you raise, ultimately?$$For our first gala (unclear) I think we raised over, around five hundred thousand [dollars] on that one. But, then there's sort of the ongoing, in terms of finding you know underwriters for the ongoing institution. And, you know, for exhibitions schedule. But, these things become and you look at a place like, you know, the Studio Museum [Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, New York], which has such a wonderful team in place. Both, in terms of, you know, under [HistoryMaker] Thelma Golden but as well as, you know, their board. In terms of, having their model down so you look to places like that to borrow from best practices. In terms of, you know, people who've been doing it at such a high level for a long time.

Madeleine Moore Burrell

Marketing executive Madeleine Moore Burrell was born in 1940. She received her B.F.A. degree from New York University and studied industrial design at the Parsons School of Design. She also received her M.F.A. degree in writing from Columbia University.

Moore Burrell’s first carrier spanned ten years as an industrial designer with Henry Dreyfuss Associates and Goretz Industrial Design, where she designed products ranging from John Deere tractors and Datsun dashboards, to American Airlines interiors and the first snowmobile for AMF. She also designed the first plastic hangers in the United States, pay phones for Bell Atlantic, industrial cameras for Polaroid and sewing machines for Singer.

In 1985, Moore Burrell founded and spearheaded Moore Creative, a New York marketing firm with clients that included Anheuser Busch, the Apollo Theater, and the first of several hospital based HMOs that she marketed in the United States. In 1994, Moore Creative was the first African American marketing firm awarded a post-apartheid contract with South Africa, launching the Sister City agreement between New York City and Johannesburg, South Africa. Moore Burrell’s clients also included the annual Essence Music Festival in New Orleans, the Essence Awards on FOX TV and Dawn Magazine, the Sunday supplement to The Afro-American newspaper.

Moore Burrell served as chairman of Public New York, a SoHo based advertising firm, as well as president of Moore Creative @ Austin & Williams, Inc. She served as president of AARP for the State of New York and the founding chapter of The New York Coalition of 100 Black Women; and was a trustee of New York's Central Park Conservancy. In addition, she co-founded The National Professionals Network (NPN), convening leadership conference cruises for over twenty years.

As co- founder of the 21st Century Women's Leadership Center, a cultural collaboration of Black, Hispanic and Asian women’s organizations, Moore Burrell developed numerous scholarships, role model and mentoring initiatives for inner-city girls. She is an officer of the Board of Columbia College Chicago and has received an honorary doctorate degree from the City University of New York.

Moore Burrell and her husband, advertising icon and author Tom Burrell, reside in Chicago, Illinois, where they partner in The Brainwashed Resolution Project.

Madeleine Moore Burrell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 22, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.120

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/22/2014

Last Name

Burrell

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Moore

Occupation
Schools

New York University

Columbia University

Parsons School of Design

First Name

Madeleine

Birth City, State, Country

Brooklyn

HM ID

BUR22

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

New Orleans, Louisiana

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

9/10/1940

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Healthy Soul Food

Short Description

Marketing executive Madeleine Moore Burrell (1940 - ) founded the New York-based marketing firm, Moore Creative. She was a founder of the 21st Century Women's Leadership Center, and co-founder of the National Professionals Network, Inc. She served as president of the New York Coalition of 100 Black Women and AARP of New York State, as well as chairman of Public New York.

Employment

Henry Dreyfuss Associates

Goretz Industrial Design

Moore Creative

Favorite Color

Orange, Yellow, Warm Colors

Timing Pairs
0,0:1104,9:1472,14:4470,22:5294,31:9517,80:10341,85:11783,102:18799,154:19107,159:19646,167:20262,177:20647,184:21032,190:21417,196:25886,242:26376,248:27160,257:31080,308:32158,321:32746,328:33138,333:33530,338:34314,348:34706,353:39410,412:39900,418:45000,430:59960,535:63560,604:64960,621:66060,639:66560,645:74340,686:75536,700:76364,710:76824,717:78848,745:79860,757:98260,904:98820,911:100660,918$0,0:435,9:783,14:1305,21:3306,79:3654,84:4002,89:5829,128:6351,135:9570,166:11136,190:11745,198:13311,243:13833,254:14877,268:15573,277:17487,306:18444,320:25342,348:26574,357:33249,397:34162,412:37731,464:38146,470:38644,477:39889,494:41300,515:41632,520:44620,571:44952,576:46944,625:49185,660:49600,666:57655,727:58123,732:59293,746:59761,751:60463,759:66334,813:66694,819:69548,846:70874,860:71384,866:75668,915:76280,922:78320,950:78728,955:82960,973:89415,1044:90095,1058:90860,1070:94090,1118:94770,1127:96130,1150:96555,1157:97235,1166:97660,1172:98000,1177:98510,1185:101060,1242:103270,1282:103610,1287:104290,1299:112742,1344:113632,1357:113988,1362:114789,1372:115323,1379:120307,1454:123511,1481:130850,1497:131590,1508:132256,1520:132774,1528:134476,1568:135068,1578:138250,1631:143258,1713:143996,1725:149326,1779:160315,1884:160969,1891:170888,2006:175375,2033:182347,2146:182762,2152:183509,2164:187758,2189:188311,2198:192024,2265:192577,2274:192972,2280:200082,2373:200714,2381:203321,2419:204348,2434:205217,2446:205849,2455:211688,2474:212832,2484:214496,2508:216540,2513:217100,2522:218380,2538:220060,2551
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Madeleine Moore Burrell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her mother's involvement in advocacy and social activism

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her half-siblings and being an only child until the age of sixteen

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about growing up in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her life in her grandparents' home in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the central role of church in her community while growing up in Brooklyn, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about attending elementary school in Brooklyn, New York and junior high school in Westtown Township, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her mother's strong influence on her life

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience on her family's farm in Reading, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes being reunited with her father

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience in junior high school in Westtown, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her childhood friends and her mother's premature death

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her family's life after her mother's premature death

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon mentors, and her attendance at Northfield League in Westtown, Pennsylvania in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her family's perspective on race relations in the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her dyslexia and how it led to the development of her artistic talent

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell remembers coping with dyslexia during her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon her experience as the only African American student at Northfield League in Westtown, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her mother's premature death and how it impacted her family

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about starting college at New York University in New York, New York after her mother's death

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience at New York University in New York, New York and her decision to pursue industrial design

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Madeleine Moore Burrell explains how studying industrial design at Parsons School of Design in New York, New York helped her with her dyslexia

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience as an industrial designer at Henry Dreyfuss Associates, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience as an industrial designer at Henry Dreyfuss Associates, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience working with Dr. Edwin Land, the inventor of the Polaroid camera

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes the evolution of the industrial design industry

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her stepfather getting remarried

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes the roles of engineering and marketing in the design and manufacturing of products

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her transition into a career in marketing

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about designing plastic hangers to ship clothes without wrinkles

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell explains why she left her position at Henry Dreyfuss Associates to get married

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her work with health management organizations (HMOs) and Essence magazine

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about founding her marketing firm, Moore Creative, and establishing a client base

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her work with Apollo Theater in New York, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her involvement in transforming Beekman Downtown Hospital into a successful hospital system in the 1980s

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the first National Professionals Network, Inc. (NPN) cruise

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about co-founding the National Professionals Network, Inc. (NPN), pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about co-founding the National Professionals Network, Inc. (NPN), pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about planning programming and musical talent for the National Professionals Network, Inc's (NPN) cruises

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the Sister City agreement between New York City and Johannesburg, South Africa

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about marketing the annual New Orleans Essence Music Festival

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her experience as president of The New York Coalition of 100 Black Women

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes a collaboration between the African America, Asian and Hispanic women's leadership groups in New York, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes a collaboration between the African America, Asian and Hispanic women's leadership groups in New York, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the impact of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on her personal and professional life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her decision to preside over the New York Chapter of AARP

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her experience as the president of the New York Chapter of AARP

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Madeleine Moore Burrell explains how she met her husband, HistoryMaker Thomas J. Burrell

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her decision to marry HistoryMaker Thomas J. Burrell in 2008

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her husband, HistoryMaker Thomas J. Burrell's book, 'Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority'

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about the Resolution Project

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon her marriage

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon the legacy of her generation, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon the legacy of her generation, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon her mother's and grandmother's influence on her accomplishments in life

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Madeleine Moore Burrell reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Madeleine Moore Burrell narrates her photographs, pt.1

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Madeleine Moore Burrell narrates her photographs, pt.2

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Madeleine Moore Burrell narrates her photographs, pt.3

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

5$7

DATitle
Madeleine Moore Burrell talks about her transition into a career in marketing
Madeleine Moore Burrell describes her decision to preside over the New York Chapter of AARP
Transcript
And so I went back to Columbia University [New York, New York] intending to get into marketing as the next notch on my career ladder. But I got involved with writing because I felt I could write about it and I could in so many ways begin to speak directly with consumers about things that they needed to be cautious of, things that they needed to know about these machines and this environment in which they're being placed, you know without any thought about what the impact will be. And in so doing, I was coming out of a marriage where to, to a position where HMOs [health maintenance organization] were just on the horizon. And the whole notion of empowering women as healthcare consumers was something that I found intriguing. So I got involved in marketing HMOs and Mayor [Ed] Koch appointed me to do one of the first hospital-based HMOs in New York [New York]. And it turned out to be in the United States.$You were just saying that it [September 11, 2001 (9/11)] made you reassess and what your focus was so that--$$Right, right. And legacy building was where I wanted to take it. I was already dealing with CEOs [chief executive officer] and, and people who were ultimate decision makers, or who had inherited companies you know, who were dealing with decision making that possibly could use a, a new direction or a clarification. There was a moment where all of our civil rights organizations we discovered were--had been found the--during the same era and were having the same challenge of mission. Are those missions--still those mission statements, are they still relevant, you know. And so too with a lot of companies that were created for a time that no longer exists. So what would one as a head of one of these corporations, say to their grandchildren about what their legacy is? And it can be, you know a market segment that they you know, were successful in, in winning. So legacy building became something that I took to heart. I still believe that we all have a legacy. If we don't shape it ourselves, somebody else will. So why not make a decision about what kind of legacy you're going to have, that you want to have? And from day one on the job, if it's in the mail room, or if it's in the boardroom, you know it should be purposeful. Your decisions should somehow or other be leading you in the direction of where you say you want your legacy to be. And so that took me to situations where I was talking about legacy and I, I had talked to any number of organizations about their legacy. And I came to the attention of AARP [American Association of Retired Persons], and they asked me to come in and talk to Bill Novelli and I've forgotten the ad agency that he was with. But he was--$$Novelli?$$Novelli, yeah, but it's got a multi--yeah. Anyway you know I talked about legacy and he asked me would I be interested in being involved in AARP. And then I met with, and I said yes because I was heading down that road anyway. And I always admired what AARP stood for. They always were as far as I was concerned, on the right side of the issue. And so legacy in terms of members saying okay, you want a legacy. Come, join AARP and we'll help you build your legacy. Essentially was the, the thing that I believed we could do so that it wouldn't just be wearing the t-shirt and showing up at hearings. But really on a personal level, shaping the legacy of people who had to reach that point in life where they looked at it.

Ricki Fairley

Marketing executive Ricki Fairley was born on June 17, 1956 in Washington, D.C. to Wilma Holmes and Richard Fairley. She graduated from Dartmouth College in 1978 with her B.A. degree in English. She went on to receive her M.B.A. degree from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management in 1981.

Upon graduation, Fairley was hired as an associate brand manager for McNeil Consumer Products Company in Fort Washington, Pennsylvania. She then worked as an associate brand manager at Nabisco from 1984 to 1988, and as senior brand manager at Reckitt & Colman from 1989 until 1995. In 1995, Fairley was named vice president of marketing for the SEGA Channel, and from 1996 to 2000, she served as marketing director for The Coca-Cola Company. She then worked as vice president of marketing for Chupa Chups USA from 2000 to 2003, and as partner and strategist for PowerPact, LLC from 2003 to 2005. In 2005, Fairley was hired as partner and senior vice president of strategy and planning for IMAGES USA, and promoted to chief marketing officer and partner in 2009. In February of 2012, Fairley established DOVE Marketing Inc., where she serves as president.

Fairley is the president emeritus of the Black Alumni of Dartmouth Association, is a member of the Dartmouth Committee on Trustees, and serves as board chair of Kenny Leon's True Colors Theatre Company. Fairley has also served on the boards of the Latin American Association, Ne-Yo’s Compound Foundation, and Move This World. She manages the relationship between the Links, Inc. and the White House Office of Public Engagement as a member of the National Women’s Issues and Economic Empowerment Committee, and is a member of the Silver Spring, Maryland Chapter of the Links, Inc.

Fairley holds the Leadership Award from the Creative Thinking Association of America, was named a Top 100 Marketer by Black Enterprise magazine in February 2011, and is a member of the 2011 Class of Leadership Atlanta. She received the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) 2013 Multicultural Excellence Award for the African American radio advertising for the Obama for America campaign.

Fairley has two daughters, Amanda and Hayley; both are graduates of Dartmouth College.

Ricki Fairley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 31, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.069

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/31/2014

Last Name

Fairley-Brown

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Occupation
Schools

Dartmouth College

Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Business

Academy Of The Holy Cross

Keene Elementary School

St. Anthony Catholic School

St. Michael the Archangel School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ricki

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

FAI04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Negril, Jamaica

Favorite Quote

No Is Never The Answer, It's Always How.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

6/17/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hot Fudge Sundaes

Short Description

Marketing executive Ricki Fairley (1956 - ) was the founder of DOVE Marketing Inc., and worked as a brand manager and senior marketing executive at top corporations for over thirty years.

Employment

McNeil Consumer Products Company

Nabisco

Reckitt & Colman

Sega Channel

The Coca-Cola Company

Chupa Chups USA

PowerPact, LLC

IMAGES USA

DOVE Marketing, Inc.

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
0,0:11882,242:12426,252:16564,271:19250,289:20340,302:20885,308:39646,610:40192,619:51335,754:51595,759:51855,768:55090,817:56440,849:59890,898:60640,910:61840,929:78120,1159:79256,1177:80818,1206:88645,1295:89425,1307:89880,1317:90985,1337:97485,1510:104110,1582:104630,1597:114965,1906:115355,1913:120262,1930:121419,1951:121864,1978:123288,1999:125890,2007:126640,2071:127240,2101:132190,2181:132790,2190:149710,2414:152990,2504:165619,2800:166222,2823:171220,2878:171780,2887:173220,2916:173540,2921:173860,2926:188239,3136:188634,3142:193216,3234:198904,3361:204325,3417:206788,3455:222235,3792:226180,3835:226600,3842:231710,3979:232690,4001:235420,4142:235700,4167:242015,4222:242477,4230:242939,4238:246480,4307$0,0:6972,201:14800,246:20456,323:20900,330:22824,379:25340,443:25636,448:32296,597:38303,638:38730,689:43254,760:48014,887:49578,919:72919,1349:81969,1423:117945,1998:118189,2003:122830,2096:127236,2151:127780,2161:128256,2171:128664,2178:128936,2183:130840,2219:131520,2230:134784,2314:149095,2537:156976,2718:157260,2744:171148,2891:172534,2927:175932,2940:176415,2949:177105,2960:179796,3013:187115,3193:187790,3203:195440,3373:204314,3549:241264,4050:241568,4154:250242,4267:253266,4338:253914,4350:262652,4457:265130,4556:271756,4623:280630,4734:288610,4872:289218,4882:306098,5067:307580,5102:318180,5311:318740,5370:333140,5498
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ricki Fairley's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ricki Fairley lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ricki Fairley describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ricki Fairley remembers her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ricki Fairley describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ricki Fairley talks about her paternal great-grandmother's memories of Frederick Douglass

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ricki Fairley talks about her paternal family's emphasis on education

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ricki Fairley describes her father's educational experiences

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ricki Fairley talks about her parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ricki Fairley describes her parents' personalities and her likeness to them

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ricki Fairley talks about her sister and immediate family

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ricki Fairley describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ricki Fairley describes her upbringing in Silver Spring, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ricki Fairley describes her schooling

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ricki Fairley remembers her father's emphasis on Ivy League education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ricki Fairley talks about her early interests and activities

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ricki Fairley remembers her first exposure to black advertising

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ricki Fairley talks about her father's involvement in her career

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ricki Fairley remembers her experiences at the Academy of the Holy Cross in Kensington, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ricki Fairley talks about her early literary interests

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ricki Fairley remembers traveling with her family

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ricki Fairley recalls her arrival at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ricki Fairley talks about the black community at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ricki Fairley remembers adjusting to college life

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ricki Fairley recalls her influences at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ricki Fairley remembers the all-black cheerleading team at Dartmouth College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ricki Fairley recalls her decision to attend the Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ricki Fairley reflects upon her father

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ricki Fairley recalls her experiences at the Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ricki Fairley remembers her internship at the McNeil Consumer Products Company

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Ricki Fairley talks about her first marketing position at the McNeil Consumer Products Company

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ricki Fairley describes Johnson and Johnson Products' response to the Chicago Tylenol murders

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ricki Fairley remembers marketing Children's Tylenol and CoTylenol

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ricki Fairley remembers working for RJR Nabisco, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ricki Fairley remembers her experiences at Reckitt and Colman plc

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ricki Fairley describes the collapse of the Sega Channel

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ricki Fairley recalls the discrimination against mothers in Corporate America

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ricki Fairley describes her role at The Coca-Cola Company

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ricki Fairley recalls establishing the Idea Works think tank at The Coca-Cola Company

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ricki Fairley remembers creating the Dasani bottled water brand

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ricki Fairley recalls developing the Coke Cards promotion

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ricki Fairley remembers initiating The Coca-Cola Foundation's sponsorship of the Essence Music Festival

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ricki Fairley remembers The Coca-Cola Company's advertising deal with the 'Tom Joyner Morning Show'

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ricki Fairley describes her work at Chupa Chups U.S.A.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ricki Fairley remembers marketing pasta during the low carb diet trend

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ricki Fairley recalls marketing Hillshire Farm to the black community

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ricki Fairley describes Hillshire Farm's relationship with Steve Harvey

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ricki Fairley remembers the impact of her breast cancer diagnosis

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ricki Fairley remembers her work on President Barack Obama's reelection campaign, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ricki Fairley remembers her work on President Barack Obama's reelection campaign, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ricki Fairley talks about founding DOVE Marketing, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ricki Fairley talks about the future of black advertising firms

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ricki Fairley describes her company, DOVE Marketing, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ricki Fairley talks about her breast cancer advocacy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Ricki Fairley reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Ricki Fairley talks about her father's perspective on her career

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ricki Fairley describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Ricki Fairley talks about the support for black entrepreneurs

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Ricki Fairley reflects upon her legacy and how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

6$6

DATitle
Ricki Fairley talks about her paternal great-grandmother's memories of Frederick Douglass
Ricki Fairley recalls the discrimination against mothers in Corporate America
Transcript
They're from your [paternal] great-grandmother, I guess right?$$Yes.$$Okay. What was her name?$$Her name was Cora Wilkinson.$$Um-hm.$$And--$$So you've got her letters, that's really--$$Yeah they are very, very cool, handwritten letters. She tells the story of moving to Washington [D.C.] when she was about twelve and her dad was actually run out of Charleston [South Carolina] by the Klan [Ku Klux Klan, KKK]. He was very kind of rebellious and kind of a (background noise)--you know, and they owned--the family owned a oak farm in Charleston and he was kind of run out of town and fled to D.C. and built a house in Anacostia [Washington, D.C.] using the oak from the farm and they were sitting on the porch one day and Frederick Douglass happened to walk down the street and walked up and knocked on the door and said, you know, "Who built your house? I just bought the land next door and I'm looking for someone to build a house." And her dad, I guess my great-great-grandfather said, "I built the house from my farm in Charleston." He's like, "Well build me a house." So he actually built Frederick Douglass a house next door. And her letters talk about how she was afraid of Frederick Douglass because her--him and her dad used to argue at night sitting on the porch. Her dad would always talk about him because he had--was like I think somewhat of a womanizer and always had white--had several white wives. They would have these arguments over politics or whatever and they always would kind of wake her up from sleep arguing about stuff. It was probably--you know, that was their relationship, I don't think it was mean, I think it was sort of how they talked to each other, it was fun. But it distur- it disturbed her as a kid and she told these stories like I don't know they woke me up again and I don't know what they are fighting about, I wish they would shut up and the letters are pretty funny. But, but that was sort of the story there and then later there is actually an area in Annapolis [Maryland] called Highland Beach [Maryland], you know Highland Beach? It's a black beach, so Frederick Douglass actually bought this peninsula in Annapolis called Highland Beach and sold the land to black families to have--to let them have a beach house. So, my--so, I think Highland Beach was established in 1896 [sic. 1893] and so somewhere in there our family did buy land there. So we have some land in Highland Beach.$$Yeah I think it was all--it was purchased in Douglass' name from what I recall on the tour, you know Douglass died in 1895--$$Yes.$$--but his son [Charles Douglass] actually managed the development (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Managed the development, and actually his daughter [Rosetta Douglass]--he never lived in the, in the house there. There is a house there that's his house but his daughter did--lived in the house and the house is like a museum. It's a very, very cool place to go to, and--$$Right, I think Mary Church Terrell's descendants operate the museum.$$Yes and she lives next door, Jean [Jean Langston], yes.$$Exactly.$$So they all grew up with my parents.$$So Douglass would argue about his--his girlfriends.$$His girlfriends, his politics, whatever and the way Cora described it, it was like gosh they are arguing again, now what are they talking about. I think she was probably like a young teenager.$$What--what was your--now this would be--Cora would be your great-grandmother so it would be your great-great-grandfather (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes, yes, yes.$$--who was arguing with Frederick Douglass. Do you know his name?$$No but I can tell you later, I can look it up.$$He was the one who was chased out of North Carolina [sic.] by the Klan (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Out of North Carolina, yes I do have his name I just--forgive me, I have a really great memory but I just don't have same day service (laughter).$$No this is good because it gives people a clue. That's why I asked the question just to give people a clue because if you don't know his exact name that's all right (unclear) (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) I have it though, yeah, we have--$$Yeah, okay.$$--a great recording and actually--actually what we've been able to find is that they--they all went to Oberlin [Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio].$Do you have kids yourself at this point?$$So, in--my daughters were born in '85 [1985] and '92 [1992]. So I had Amanda [Amanda Brown] when I was at Nabisco [RJR Nabisco, Inc.] and I was the--I should have told this story back then but I was the only woman in the office that had kids--had a kid. I hid it until I was six months pregnant. I just kept putting safety pins in my skirt. And, you know, I was pretty thin so I could sort of get away with it for a while until one day I threw up in my plate at the lunch table (laughter) and I had to finally tell them that I was pregnant. It was a major deal, I was, I was a month away of getting promoted; they promised me that I would be promoted to brand manager and the VP of marketing took me out to lunch that day and said, "Ricki [HistoryMaker Ricki Fairley] you have done a disservice to this company. We were banking on you, we were going to invest in you, we were going to promote you but now you got pregnant and I have no guarantee that you're going to come back. So and if you tell this conversation to anyone, it's between me and you, I am not going to be able to promote you now and if you reveal this conversation, I will deny it." So I went back after lunch--I'm, whatever, twenty-nine years old go back after lunch. My boss was a woman. The women in the company all wore suits with ties. A couple of them were married, most of them were not married, never had kids, weren't even thinking about it. The women before me were hard core.$$They wore men's suits and ties?$$They wore like (gesture)--they were hard core. They were not about to even think about having a baby. And my--so I had a woman boss, and she had a woman boss, and then we had a male boss on top of her who had five kids, whose wife stayed home. And so, so I went to my boss and I told her what happened and she was like horrified so she went to her boss and her name was Valerie Friedman--she went to her boss and he went to bat for me, the guy with the five kids and he reported to the VP at the time and he went to bat for me and I got promoted like three days later, eight months pregnant. But it was a fight and even then when I came back from maternity leave, they did everything possible to challenge me and they gave me an assignment where I had to travel every week to see if I would--if I could stick it out. And literally my mom [Wilma King Holmes] at the time was--I would literally get on a plane in Newark [New Jersey], fly to D.C. [Washington, D.C.], throw the baby at my mom, check the baby's luggage--Amanda's luggage on the plane and then I'd run and get on another plane going where I was going and my mom would take the kid and the--get the luggage and take the kid. And we did that for about six months until I proved myself that I was going to be able to work with a baby. And, for the first six months of her life we did that and then I had a live in nanny after that. They did everything possible to challenge whether I could have a kid and work too. So, and I was determined so, then I had Hayley [Hayley Brown] at Reckitt and Colman [Reckitt and Colman plc; Reckitt Benckiser Group plc] right when I started the trade marketing department and it was a new day and I said, "You know what, the kid is attached to the boob, the boob has to go on the road, the kid goes with the boob." I forced it on them and literally I would have the people working for me pushing this stroller and we would go on a business trip and one guy his name was Tim [ph.] and he's like, "I got the stroller today," because someone would carry my briefcase, somebody would take the baby but I took her everywhere. I travelled with her until she was off the boob for a year and I travelled with Amanda when she was out of school, we would all go, everywhere. So, you know, I was like--it was a different, you know, corporate environment and, and I tried to open the doors for other women to have babies because it was not heard of.$$So it's possible to do that, it's just the culture of the company that makes it difficult to--$$Yes, yes and in those days they didn't know it, their wives stayed home. They went home and dinner was cooked and the babies were in bed and they were happy campers. They didn't have a concept for a woman, "You know I've got to go get--my kid is sick, the school just called and I've got to go get my kid." That was not a concept for them and I think the women around me we just okay, we're going to deal, and teach them how to deal.$$So they were out of touch.$$Yeah they just didn't know. They were men--white men who never had to think about it, right.$$And their reaction--initial reaction was to stress you out.$$Yeah and so but I mean I had to have a live in nanny because I travelled and I had to make choices. I had--I had a live in nanny that lived with me from when Amanda was about six months until she was five and then we had a nanny until we moved to Atlanta [Georgia] until I'd say she was about eleven and then I had a nanny--and when they, when they--Amanda turned sixteen and could drive because at that point it becomes a driving thing. Amanda said, "Okay mom I'm done with nannies, I can drive now." So I said okay and we gave up the nanny. It was like a family decision, "All right well the nanny does these five jobs. Which one are you going to do, 'cause the jobs aren't going to go away." So, but, my kids are still very close to our one nanny that we had the longest, Holly Ann [ph.].

Amy S. Hilliard

Comfort Cake founder and CEO Amy Sharmane Hilliard was born Audrey Sharmane Amy Hilliard on August 16, 1952 in Detroit, Michigan. Hilliard received her B.S. degree (with honors) from Howard University in 1974 and her M.B.A. from Harvard Business School in 1978.

After school, Hilliard went to work for Bloomingdale’s as a member of their buying team in New York. In 1981, Hilliard joined the Gillette Company in the Personal Care Division working in Product Management. She led the team that successfully created and launched White Rain Shampoo in six months. In addition, Hilliard managed the development and execution of the multiple brand Miss America promotion during this period. By 1985, Hilliard was promoted to Senior Product Manager for Gillette at Division Headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts. She was responsible for the general management of Gillette’s largest personal care business, the $100 million White Rain hair care products franchise. In 1987, Hilliard became the Director of Marketing for the Lustrasilk Corporation (a Gillette subsidiary) in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In Minneapolis, Hilliard left Gillette in 1990 to work for The Pillsbury Company where, as the Director of Market Development, Baked Goods Division, she helped create some of the first Pillsbury Doughboy advertisements that were targeted to people of color. In 1992, Hilliard began working for the Burrell Communications Group in Chicago, Illinois as Senior Vice President and Director of Integrated Marketing Services. Burrell Communications Group specializes in developing advertising and marketing campaigns targeting African American consumers and the urban market. Hilliard then founded The Hilliard Group, Inc. in 1995 and served as its President and CEO. The Hilliard Group specialized in developing multi-cultural marketing and sales strategies for Fortune 500 corporations. In 1999, Hilliard became Senior Vice President of Marketing for Soft Sheen Products, a Division of L’Oreal U.S.A. While still working at L’Oreal, Hilliard made the decision to go into business for herself. Hilliard founded The Comfort Cake Company on February 15, 2001 and serves as its president and CEO. By 2002, The Comfort Cake Company had expanded into the Chicago Public School system cafeterias, and by 2003, Comfort Cakes were being sold on Amazon.com and in 7-Eleven stores.

Formerly an adjunct professor at DePaul University’s business school, Hilliard has lectured at leading universities including Harvard, The University of Chicago, Northwestern, Duke and UCLA. She has consulted internationally in London and in South Africa, where she presented business development opportunities to President Nelson Mandela’s cabinet. Her work has been profiled in The Wall Street Journal, Ad Age, Business Week, Working Woman, Entrepreneur Magazine, Essence, Black Enterprise, and Ebony among others. In 2005, Hilliard published a book entitled, Tap Into Your Juice: Find Your Gifts, Lose Your Fears, Build Your Dreams.

Hilliard is the proud mother of two active teenagers, Angelica and Nicholas.

Hilliard was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.082

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/14/2008 |and| 11/20/2008

Last Name

Hilliard

Maker Category
Schools

Roosevelt Elementary School

Ludington Magnet Middle and Honors School

Cass Technical High School

Harvard Business School

Howard University

First Name

Amy

Birth City, State, Country

Detroit

HM ID

HIL11

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

SuperValu

State

Michigan

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Seek Progress, Not Perfection.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/16/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Watermelon

Short Description

Corporate chief executive and marketing executive Amy S. Hilliard (1952 - ) was the founder and CEO of the Comfort Cake Company. She worked in multicultural marketing for the Pillsbury Company, The Gillette Company and L'Oreal, and founded a marketing firm called The Hilliard Group, Inc.

Employment

Joseph's

Polaroid Corporation

Bloomingdale's

The May Department Stores Company

Young & Rubicam

Gillette

Lustrasilk

Pillsbury Company

Burrell Communications Group

The Hilliard Group

L'Oreal

Comfort Cakes Co LLC

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Lime Green

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Amy S. Hilliard's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her mother's upbringing during the Great Depression

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her likeness to her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her maternal great-grandmother and great-aunts

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her maternal aunts

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her great-aunts' catering business

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the death of her mother's oldest sister

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her likeness to her father

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her paternal great-grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her family's racial ancestry

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard lists her parents' siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her earliest memory of school

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the origin of her name

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her early personality

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her childhood friends

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the black business district in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard lists her siblings

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the holidays

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her father's occupation

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the Grace Episcopal Church in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers integrating Eugenia Mettetal Junior High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her social life at Eugenia Mettetal Junior High School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her experiences of integration busing

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her extracurricular activities

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her early interest in literature

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her graduation from Eugenia Mettetal Junior High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the riots of 1967 in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her early aspirations

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her college applications

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the assassination of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls joining the cheerleading squad at Cass Technical High School

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her transition to Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the civil rights activities at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her mentors at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers a friend who was murdered by her fiance

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her start as a fashion buyer

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her career as a fashion buyer

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the African American fashion buyers at Bloomingdale's

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her work at the May Merchandising Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her transition to the Harvard Business School

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the start of her interest in advertising

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the start of her interest in advertising

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Amy S. Hilliard's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her decision to study at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about H. Naylor Fitzhugh

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls her mentors at the Harvard Business School

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers becoming Bloomingdale's fashion buyer

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls joining The Gillette Company

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the Miss America pageant of 1984

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers The Gillette Company's interest in the black hair care market

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the black hair industry's resistance to majority corporations

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls The Gillette Company's acquisition of the Lustrasilk Corporation

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls joining the Pillsbury Company, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her multicultural education initiative at the Pillsbury Company, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the Pillsbury Company's first advertisement featuring people of color

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers her first day at the Pillsbury Company, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls hiring African Americans to work at the Pillsbury Company, LLC

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her role at the Burrell Communications Group

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the advertising industry in South Africa

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers founding the Hilliard Jones Marketing Group

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls managing Soft Sheen for L'Oreal S.A.

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the changes in the black hair care industry

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the founding of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard describes the founding of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the support of her children

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the operations of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard remembers the first customer of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her search for a production bakery

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard recalls the bankruptcy of her production bakery

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her children's roles at the Comfort Cake Company, LLC

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the staff of the Comfort Cake Company, LLC

Tape: 8 Story: 11 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her book, 'Tap Into Your Juice'

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Amy S. Hilliard reflects upon her life

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Amy S. Hilliard reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her plans for the future of Comfort Cake Co LLC

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the impact of the financial crisis of 2008

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Amy S. Hilliard describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about her family

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Amy S. Hilliard talks about the importance of community service

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Amy S. Hilliard describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$2

DATape

2$6

DAStory

6$10

DATitle
Amy S. Hilliard describes her early personality
Amy S. Hilliard recalls The Gillette Company's acquisition of the Lustrasilk Corporation
Transcript
So you were a good student. But what type of child were you?$$I think as a child, I was very inquisitive. I wanted to know how things worked. I wanted to know why. "Why is this this way?" And, "Why can't we do it that way?" I liked doing things my way, you know, finding ways to do it the way that I liked to do it. I liked to have things done right. I was, I liked my reports to be really, really well done. I liked to--when I would set the table at home I wanted it to be set just so. I liked cooking when I was very, at a very young age. In fact one of the things I did when I was growing up was, because my mother [Gwendolyn Russell Hilliard] was in school while I was in elementary school [Roosevelt Elementary School, Detroit, Michigan], she taught me how to cook. I guess she--since I learned how to cook, I used to have to cook dinner for my whole family, I think starting about the sixth grade. So, I learned how to cook for six people. And when I was out on my own, I only knew how to cook for six people. So (laughter) I had a lot of leftovers by the time I went out on my own. But I used to cook a lot. And I used to love to cook for my dad [Stratford Hilliard]. I used to love to make sandwiches, make his lunch. That was something that was very special for me. So, the napkin had to be folded very nicely. I would stick pickles on his sandwich on a toothpick, and I'd fold the napkin and I'd, you know, arrange his food. And he used to really love that. I remember making a pie for him when I was in elementary school. Because our neighbors next door to our home had fruit trees, and so I would go pick the cherries. And I made him--because cherry pie was his favorite. And I made him a cherry pie, and I forgot to take the pits out of the cherries. And the pie was delicious, and he broke into it and broke a tooth. But he was like, "Baby, this is the best pie anyone's ever made" (laughter). I broke his tooth. I was creative. I liked to experiment with food, and my mother always let me do it. One St. Patrick's Day I said, "I want to make green pancakes." And she said, she had food coloring, and she said, "Okay." And so I made green pancakes that looked horrible. Nobody would eat them because they looked bad. Green pancakes was a great idea, but they didn't look too good. So, I used to experiment with everything.$There was a company called Lustrasilk [Lustrasilk Corporation], which was owned, which was out in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which had the, a product called Luster Curl, and Right On Curl maintenance products. All these products were doing very well in black hair care. The company was never owned by black people, it was owned by a German guy. The company was started by a Mexican guy who was a chemist for 3M, and found out that he had a product that would straighten sheep's hair. So he figured there're a lot of wooly headed people in this world, and a lot of them are black. So, let's use this product to straighten some black hair. And that's how Lustrasilk got started.$$I can't see the image of a sheep with straightened hair.$$Yeah. So that's, you know, that's how that company got started. But they're out in Minnesota, this is a $50 million company. And Gillette [The Gillette Company] sent me out to have dinner with this guy. Sitting across the table just like I'm sitting across from you, and said, "You know, how much would it take for us to buy your company? We can buy it for at least--you're doing 50 million, we can buy it for 50 million." And he took me on a tour of his plant at midnight that so nobody would know he was thinking of selling. And that's the company that Gillette ultimately bought. And that's what brought me out to Minnesota in 1989, well, actually 1987. They bought the company and asked me to go out there as director of marketing for Lustrasilk. And so that's what moved me to Minneapolis, Minnesota. I had been married since 1982. I had just had my first child, Angelica [Angelica Jones]. She was born in 1986, and I was just going back to work when they asked me to go and move to Minnesota. So, I basically commuted for six months back and forth with a six month old daughter, who stayed in Boston [Massachusetts]. But I went ahead to Minneapolis to get a house ready for us, and commuted every two weeks. Sometimes my baby would come with me and stay with me for two weeks while I was learning a new company, getting the acquisition transitioned into Gillette. And then stayed with them, launched new products with Lustrasilk, and stayed with them through 1989, '90 [1990]. And that's when I left Gillette. And I left Gillette because at the time there were a lot of acquisitions starting, and Gillette was under fire to be acquired by a larger company. And so they had a plant in St. Paul [Minnesota], a big plant for Gillette in St. Paul, Lustrasilk had a big plant. They started consolidating, and they said "We're going to move the Lustrasilk operations back to Boston," and I didn't want to move back to Boston. I'd done, I'd moved my family across the country, I wasn't interested in moving them back. And that's when I said, "No, I'm going to resign and stay in Minnesota and stay here and find something else to do." And it was a tough decision, because, you know, Gillette wanted me to come back. But I stood my ground and said, "No, I'll take, you know, the package and stay here." But the saddest thing I ever had to do was when they--was to help them close the Lustrasilk plant. These were people who were, when we got there, they knew nothing of Corporate America, but yet they had built a $50 million business. The books were still kept by hand, and these were people who gave their all to this company. And when we got there, I just, I loved them all, you know. I had to go down many times to that plant floor when we were launching new products and say, "Look, guys, we need to make this happen. You know, who's got a new--I need a name for this new product, I don't have one." We'd have a contest. So, I had people who were workers in the plants submitting names for our new products, and they would get so excited. To have to go there and stand in line, shake each person's hand, and give them a mug that said, "Thank you for your work at Lustrasilk. We're sorry, we're closing the plant," was something I'll never forget. I'll never forget it, because that was their livelihood that they gave. And Gillette--you know, this is what big companies sometimes do, and they just closed the plant. And it taught me a very valuable lesson. I had tried actually to buy Lustrasilk from Gillette when I knew that they wanted to move the operations, because I didn't want to close that plant. I wanted to keep the company going as an independent company. I raised $75 million with a team of people who worked at Gillette. You know, the general manager for Lustrasilk was a black man. The head of sales was black. I was black. The three of us were together. And I went to a venture capitalist and we raised $75 million to buy it, and Gillette wouldn't sell it. And that's when I said, "I'm not going back to Boston." So they rolled it back to Boston and they did their thing, and I stayed in Minneapolis.

Cheryl Mayberry McKissack

Founder, CEO and president of Nia Enterprises L.L.C., Cheryl Mayberry McKissack was born on June 24, 1955, in Seattle, Washington. Born the middle child and only girl to Thelma and Donald Mayberry, McKissack attended Seattle’s Dunlap Elementary School and graduated from Franklin High School. She went on to earn her B.S. degree in political science in two and a half years from Seattle University in 1976.

After graduating from Seattle University, McKissack began a career with the IBM Corporation as a sales and marketing executive. While fulfilling her duties at IBM, McKissack decided to continue her education by enrolling at the Northwestern Kellogg School of Management. After graduating with her M.B.A in 1989, McKissack became the Western Area Branch Manager for the IBM Corporation in San Francisco, California, where she served until 1992. Afterwards, McKissack became Vice President of Sales and a founding member of the Network Systems Division at 3Com. In 1997, she served as the Senior Vice President and General Manager of Worldwide Sales and Marketing for Open Port Technologies, Inc.

In 2000, McKissack founded Nia Enterprises L.L.C., a Chicago based marketing data solutions firm designed to provide companies with direct access to the consumer habits of African American families, particularly focusing on African American women. Nia Enterprises L.L.C. functions through various outlets including NiaOnline and Nia Access. McKissack has been featured in several publications and is the co-editor of a series of books including The Nia Guide For Black Women: Balancing Work and Life and The Nia Guide For Black Women: Achieving Career Success On Your Terms. McKissack has been recognized for her entrepreneurial achievements and has received many honors including the Marketing Opportunities in Business and Entertainment’s (MOBE) “Influencers and Innovators of the Internet and Technology” Award and the Chicago United People of Color Leadership Award. In 2006, she was named by The Network Journal as one of the 25 Influential Top Women, and in 2007, McKissack was awarded the State Farm Phenomenal Woman Award-Business Entrepreneur.

McKissack and her husband, Eric, live in Chicago, Illinois.

Photo courtesy of Victor Powell

Accession Number

A2008.015

Sex

Female

Interview Date

2/7/2008 |and| 12/17/2008

Last Name

McKissack

Maker Category
Middle Name

Mayberry

Occupation
Schools

Franklin High School

Dunlap Elementary School

Seattle University

University of Washington

Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Business

Rainier Beach High School

First Name

Cheryl

Birth City, State, Country

Seattle

HM ID

MCK13

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Washington

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

We Have To Do What We Need To Do Now So That We Can Do What We Want To Do In The Future.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

6/24/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Entrepreneur and marketing executive Cheryl Mayberry McKissack (1955 - ) founded Nia Enterprises L.L.C., a Chicago based marketing data solutions firm designed to provide companies with direct access to the consumer habits of African American families, particularly focusing on African American women.

Employment

International Business Machines (IBM)

One Moment in Time

U.S. Robotics Corporation

Open Port Technology, Inc.

Nia Enterpresises

Kellogg School of Management

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Cheryl Mayberry McKissack's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack lists her favorites, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her maternal great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her parents' move to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her childhood in Coffeyville, Kansas

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her paternal grandfather's church, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her paternal grandfather's church, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her neighborhood in Wichita, Kansas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers celebrating Christmas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about segregation in Wichita, Kansas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers moving from Kansas to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls the Central neighborhood in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers the Rainier Beach neighborhood of Seattle, Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon her family's move to a majority-white neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her school environment in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers Rainier Beach Junior Senior High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her experiences of bullying at Rainier Beach Junior Senior High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers how she coped with bullying

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls transferring to Franklin High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the racial atmosphere of Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the racial demographics of Franklin High School

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her experiences at Franklin High School

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the political activism at Franklin High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls Seattle University in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her parents' divorce

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the demographic changes in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers graduating from Seattle University in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls political activism at Seattle colleges

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her college coursework

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her trip to Europe

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her career at IBM

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the workplace culture at IBM

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes lessons from her time at IBM

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about diversity at IBM

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls how she came to study at the Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls becoming a branch manager at IBM

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her M.B.A. degree program

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her personal life during her career at IBM

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the technological advancements at IBM

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her formalwear rental business, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her formalwear rental business, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Cheryl Mayberry McKissack's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack lists her favorites, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her father's upbringing

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her early experiences in Alabama

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her mother's move to New York City

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her likeness to her parents

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls attending a Baptist church in Wichita, Kansas

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her mother's move to Seattle, Washington, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers returning with her family to Seattle, Washington

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her mother's move to Seattle, Washington, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls moving to Rainier Beach in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about Dunlap Elementary School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers the holidays

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her experiences of school integration

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her transition to Franklin High School in Seattle, Washington

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers her parents' divorce

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her aspiration to attend college

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her college education

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers backpacking in Europe

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her backpacking experiences in Europe

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls lessons from her trip to Europe

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the discrimination against black women at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the training programs at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the products of IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the office environment at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her career at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the lack of black executives at IBM

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her interest in sales

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her decision to attend the Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her program at the Kellogg School of Management

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her decision to leave IBM

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls the early personal computing market

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls the opposition to affinity groups at IBM

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her first entrepreneurial venture

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her early success as an entrepreneur

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers joining the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her interview at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the mission of the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her role at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the growth of the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her colleagues at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls her experiences at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her daily activities at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the national expansion of the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers the sale of the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls lessons from her time at the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls leaving the U.S. Robotics Corporation

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her lack of corporate role models

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes Open Port Technology, Inc.

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack recalls the closure of Open Port Technology, Inc.

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers founding Nia Enterprises, LLC

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes Nia Enterprises, LLC

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes the changes at Nia Enterprises, LLC

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her corporate board memberships, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her corporate board memberships, pt. 2

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her civic activities

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about teaching at Kellogg School of Management in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack shares her advice to future businesspeople

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about the election of President Barack Obama

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon contemporary racism in the United States, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon contemporary racism in the United States, pt. 2

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon her generation's legacy

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes her hopes and concerns for young African Americans

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack talks about her husband

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Cheryl Mayberry McKissack reflects upon her legacy

DASession

2$2

DATape

11$9

DAStory

7$8

DATitle
Cheryl Mayberry McKissack describes Nia Enterprises, LLC
Cheryl Mayberry McKissack remembers joining the U.S. Robotics Corporation
Transcript
And what we decided to do was that we would, we would take--first of all, we'd build a community. This was back before Facebook [Facebook, Inc.] and all of these other kinds of things. And, and we wanted to take the African American people that were online and bring them together. And, and our primary focus was African American women. We wanted to have African American women kind of be our, our gateway, if you will, into the African American family. And so we, we started out by building a, a community site where we would provide them information that would help them with their families. And after a period of time, we would then go to them and ask them if they'd like to be a part of our consumer advisory panel. And the whole objective was to build this, build the largest consumer advisory panel, which we did, where we could have easy access to get into the minds and insights of African American families, and be able to provide that information in a research format to corporations so that they would have better information in the products that they were putting into our communities. And we were especially interested in areas like healthcare, because we ultimately wrote a book on, on choosing health and wellness. And the book was really all about African Americans really choosing to live healthier lives because we found out that we index at the top levels of every major disease, you know, you name it. Whether it's cancer or heart disease, African Americans lead the chart in every one of those disease and, and primarily African American women, and men also. So we, we could see by that there was this really--you know, a lot of disparities in the healthcare. So our thought was, well, you know, if corporations could have a better understanding of what African Americans thought they needed in these areas, they could put some of these things into products, or have us be involved more in the testing phases before it gets into, you know, your local, you know, drugstore, 'cause by that time it's a little late. And as we did some of our research, we found that African Americans had, had some, you know, had some issues with research. You know, they, they still--you know, even though some of them had an experience, that they had heard stories about the, you know, Tuskegee days [Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male] and you know, being used kind of as guinea pigs or whatever, and they just, they didn't have a, a trust level as to what were you gonna do with that information? How are you gonna use it? How is it gonna impact our community? How is it gonna better my life or the life of my family? And so we found that we had to, to build this whole what we call trusted dialogue first before they would give up the information.$$Okay. Now what were the steps along the way? Because I remember you starting--really, you wanted to be--look at Essence and being, you know, somewhere--$$No.$$--not, not at--$$No.$$--Essence online?$$No, because Essence wasn't--Essence didn't have an online--$$They were thinking--$$--at that time.$$--about an on--$$Yeah.$$--but they didn't want you to start. Was that it?$$Yeah, they, they--well, no, they, they--we, we just--they were print, and they were definitely print, and, and that was their business. And, but they were gonna get into the online business. And we met early on with one of the founders. He had actually summoned us to New York [New York] to meet with him, with the idea that we might be able to do something together. But, you know, that just didn't work out because of what our objectives were and, and what, you know, he expressed as their objectives. But, but their primary business was always, you know, to--$$Right.$$--to do print. And certainly they've expanded and evolved into online now, because, you know, that's just the way of the world. I mean you, you can't--$$That's right. That's right.$$--really have a business today without having an online component. But, but our focus really was to build the community first, get people comfortable that we were gonna offer them something of value, and then once they were comfortable, ask them if they would be a part of our, our panel so that we could do this research on a, on a regular basis.$$So (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) That was really kind of it.$$So--$So what happened to U.S. Robotics [U.S. Robotics Corporation] then? How did (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well--$$--that come about?$$Well, what happened was, is that we were, we [Mayberry McKissack and Bonita Coleman Stewart]--I--we had both left IBM [International Business Machines Corporation].$$IBM.$$And we were both working in the business [One Moment in Time] full time. And we really had come to the conclusion that for us, we had objectives about what we wanted to do. And we--it was very clear to us that for us to meet the objectives that we wanted to do, instead of having three stores, we would need a hundred. You know, literally, we would need to have stores in just about every state, you know, in order to be able to, to get the economies and scales to achieve the kind of objectives that we have. And we found that something my mother [Thelma Roberson Arnold] told me very early on, that, you know, just because you like clothes and, and, and like fashion, doesn't mean you own--need to own a retail store. And so we, we, you know, we found that out and decided, actually decided pretty much at the same time that we wanted to both get back into, to business. We--it was a great, you know, opportunity, and we were able to sell off, you know, the assets of the business, but we decided that it wasn't something that we probably wanted to do long term. And right about that time, right before that, a good friend of mine here in Chicago [Illinois] was talking to a, a search firm, a friend of hers who was heading up a search firm. And they were looking for someone with a strong sales management background to, to work in this very entrepreneurial high, high, you know, growth entrepreneurial company here in Chicago called U.S. Robotics, which was really responsible for modem technology with the PC [personal computer] environment. But, but really what was prompting this business and made it just go crazy was the, was the advent of the Internet. And so she called me, 'cause, you know, I think I had been out with her a few weeks before and probably was commiserating about, you know, all of my, you know, money that I had earned at IBM was now, you know, being poured into this entrepreneurial business and, and how I wanted to, you know, get back to making money again. And so she said to me, she said to me, you know, "Would you ever be interested in doing that?" And I said, "Oh, I don't think so," but, but I, I, I, I had a little bit of interest. And I went home and, and actually--I wasn't married at the time, but my, my husband [Eric McKissack], who was my boyfriend at the time, told him about it. And he says, "Well, you might want to think about that. You know, that sounds like something would be right up your alley," and so I went up and, and interviewed with them. And, and the reason why I decided to do it is because it was really the perfect merger of, of what I wanted to do in my life. It was very entrepreneurial, had huge growth, was back in my core business, which was technology, and they were, they had lots of plans and ideas of new, creative things that they wanted to do. And I could use all of the, the training and skills and experience that I had, both from my entrepreneurial background and my corporate background, and apply those to some new ideas that, that were very exciting. And so that's why I decided to do it.$$What was the company you found, though? What was the U.S. Robotics you found when you joined it? How large was it?$$Well, U.S. Robotics when, when I joined it was about $80 million sales. Five years later, when it was sold to 3Com [3Com Corporation], it was about $2.2 billion in sales. And it was sold for just a little bit over 7 billion. It was one of the largest technology sales, company sales at that time in the industry.

Henry H. Brown

Henry Hartford Brown was born on November 17, 1930 in Houston, Texas. Brown attended Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana and graduated from Texas Southern University where he also did graduate study.

Brown served as an adjunct professor at Howard University School of Business and Industry. In 1959, he started his career at Anheuser-Busch, Inc. as a wholesaler representative. Brown was recognized as a superior sales achiever, was promoted and received “The Adolphus Award,” the company’s highest recognition for excellence in sales, named after the founder of Anheuser-Busch and the Fortune 500 Corporation. In 1975, Brown developed Budweiser’s Great Kings and Queens of Africa, an educational program that showcases the rich ancestral history of African Americans. In 1980, he was named Vice President of Marketing Development at Anheuser-Busch for his meritorious contributions resulting from his many innovative programs and projects. In 1990, Brown was elected as Senior Vice President of Anheuser-Busch, becoming the first African American to be elevated to the Senior Executive Suite of the world’s largest brewery. In 1994, Brown retired from Anheuser-Busch as Senior Vice President after thirty-five years of work and launching major initiatives for the company including the Budweiser Community Health Mobile, Budweiser’s Living Legends and The Lou Rawls/UNCF Parade of Stars (He assumed a key role in developing the initial corporate sponsored telethon.).

Brown has received several honors and awards during his career including the Thurman Award from the Association for Retarded Children, 1992; the Presidential Award from the National Conference of African American Mayors, 1994; the Friend of the Community Award from the State of Texas, 1997; and the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Lifetime Achievement Award, 2004.

Brown lives in Houston, Texas.

Brown was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 9, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.228

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/9/2007 |and| 8/12/2007

Last Name

Brown

Maker Category
Middle Name

H.

Occupation
Schools

Jack Yates High School

Texas Southern University

Xavier University of Louisiana

Blackshear Elementary School

Speakers Bureau

Yes

Speakers Bureau Availability

Any

First Name

Henry

Birth City, State, Country

Houston

HM ID

BRO46

Speakers Bureau Preferred Audience

Teens and Adults.

Speakers Bureau Honorarium

No

Favorite Season

Fall

Speaker Bureau Notes

Preferred Audience: Teens and Adults.

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

What's Up?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

11/17/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Italian Food

Short Description

Marketing executive Henry H. Brown (1930 - ) was senior vice president of Anheuser-Busch for thirty-five years, where he worked and launched major initiatives for the company, including the Budweiser Community Health Mobile, Budweiser’s Living Legends and the 'Lou Rawls Parade of Stars.'

Employment

Anheuser-Busch Companies

Lakeside Country Club

Favorite Color

Green, Rust

Timing Pairs
0,0:539,11:1078,19:17940,252:41380,368:70082,741:70598,748:80606,823:154722,1568:161145,1715:186425,2011:193012,2125:197375,2162:204942,2266:207786,2326:208418,2341:212830,2366:213182,2371:214440,2392$0,0:7785,55:14085,110:32982,285:40902,366:41406,374:41910,382:42198,387:43710,407:43998,412:75884,793:79610,805:87936,914:92077,968:93188,976:100577,1036:100925,1041:105623,1092:108233,1155:111887,1210:112409,1218:125751,1353:133553,1474:140398,1498:156740,1685:157590,1696:158355,1707:158865,1718:160650,1738:173738,1907:178442,2058:179282,2066:181550,2097:185918,2157:190030,2164:193260,2200:193600,2205:194535,2213:195300,2221:200910,2309:202015,2327:208360,2368
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Henry H. Brown's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown talks about his family's move to Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Henry H. Brown describes his relationship with his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Henry H. Brown remembers his early mentors

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Henry H. Brown describes the Third Ward of Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown describes the Juneteenth celebrations in Houston, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown describes the Juneteenth celebrations in Houston, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown talks about Jesse H. Jones

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown remembers the black business community of Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown describes his early experiences in Houston, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown remembers his interest in basketball, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown describes his activities at Jack Yates Senior High School in Houston, Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Henry H. Brown remembers his aspirations to a career in business

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown remembers his involvement in the Boy Scouts

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown remembers his interest in basketball, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown describes his activities at Jack Yates Senior High School in Houston, Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown remembers Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans, Louisiana

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown describes his early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown remembers his enlistment in the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown remembers joining the U.S. Army Military Policy Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Henry H. Brown remembers the racial discrimination at Camp Gordon in Georgia

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Henry H. Brown recalls his U.S. Army service in Frankfurt, Germany, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown describes the aftermath of World War II in Germany

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown recalls his U.S. Army service in Frankfurt, Germany, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown describes the history of Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown remembers his early interest in Corporate America

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown talks about Milton Wilson's mentorship

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown reflects upon the importance of mentorship

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown remembers quitting his job at the Lakeside Country Club in Houston, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Henry H. Brown recalls his marketing pitch to the Anheuser-Busch Companies, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown recalls his marketing pitch to the Anheuser-Busch Companies, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown remembers the start of his career at the Anheuser-Busch Companies

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown describes his early career at the Anheuser-Busch Companies

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown remembers the support of Jay R. Rideout

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown recalls joining the Anheuser-Busch Companies' headquarters in St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown recalls becoming an officer of the Anheuser-Busch Companies

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown describes his early civic engagement

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown describes the history of racial tension in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown recalls a police riot at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown talks about race relations in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown remembers his move to St. Louis, Missouri

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown talks about Mickey Leland

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown describes his support for the Congressional Black Caucus

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown talks about his approach to marketing

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Henry H. Brown describes the creation of the Great Kings of Africa program, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Henry H. Brown talks about the portraits of the Great Kings of Africa

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown describes the creation of the Great Kings of Africa program, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown remembers promoting the Great Kings of Africa program

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown describes the motivation behind the Great Kings of Africa program

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown remembers the success of the Great Kings of Africa program

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown talks about the expanded Great Kings and Queens of Africa program, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown talks about the expanded Great Kings and Queens of Africa program, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown describes his hopes for the Great Kings and Queens of Africa program

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown describes his supporters at Anheuser-Busch Companies

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown talks about distributing posters of the Great Kings and Queens of Africa

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown describes John Henrik Clarke's role in the Great Kings and Queens of Africa project

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown describes the artists of the Great Kings and Queens of Africa program, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown describes the artists of the Great Kings and Queens of Africa program, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown remembers the response to the Great Kings and Queens of Africa program

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown talks about the Anheuser-Busch Companies' Clydesdale horses

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Henry H. Brown talks about the Anheuser-Busch Companies' heritage programs

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown describes his involvement in the 'Lou Rawls Parade of Stars'

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown describes the success of the 'Lou Rawls Parade of Stars'

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown describes the Chief I and Chief II programs

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown talks about the Budweiser's Living Legends program

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown remembers honoring Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown reflects upon his community engagement, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown reflects upon his community engagement, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Henry H. Brown talks about Corporate America's responsibility to the black community

Tape: 9 Story: 9 - Henry H. Brown reflects upon his career at the Anheuser-Busch Companies

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Henry H. Brown reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Henry H. Brown reflects upon his upbringing

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Henry H. Brown describes his family

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Henry H. Brown talks about the Boule

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Henry H. Brown describes his activities as a member of the Boule

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Henry H. Brown reflects upon his decision to share his story

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Henry H. Brown describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 10 Story: 9 - Henry H. Brown narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Henry H. Brown narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$2

DATape

4$7

DAStory

8$4

DATitle
Henry H. Brown recalls his marketing pitch to the Anheuser-Busch Companies, pt. 1
Henry H. Brown remembers the success of the Great Kings of Africa program
Transcript
I was very popular with the manager who had kind of been a grandfather, a godfather I mean of mine while I was at the club [Lakeside Country Club, Houston, Texas], and he called practically for the next two weeks trying to convince me to come back and that sort of thing, but I had quit. So I didn't have a job, just quit cold turkey. And then I made my decision to approach Anheuser-Busch [Anheuser-Busch Companies] because Anheuser-Busch was about to introduce a new product in this area called Busch Bavarian. So I looked in the telephone directory for the distributorship, and, and found the one that distributed Anheuser-Busch products. It was called Glispin Distributing Company [Houston, Texas], G-L-I-S-P-I-N. And so early that Monday morning I made an appearance down there and met the secretary and asked to speak to the distributor, Mr. Glispin [Frank Glispin, Jr.]. And she asked me if I had an appointment and I said, no, but that I was wanting to apply for an employment job in sales. And so she says, "Well he's in, but I'm not sure if he'll be able to see you since you don't have an appointment." And I said, "Well can I wait?" And she says, "Yes." So I sat there, and his door to his office was open slightly, and as I sat there he was on the telephone talking to some person, and as he began to talk the N word continually came outta his mouth: N this, N that, N this, N that, N this. So I began to doubt my decision as to whether or not I was in the right place and whether or not I had made a mistake, even though this was the only job that I really, really sought after. So I, I eventually sat there for maybe forty minutes, forty-five minutes, and he eventually came out. And he came out, he asked me why was I there? I told him I was interested in employment working for Anheuser-Busch, working. So he says, "Well I'm the Anheuser-Busch distributor, come on in." So we sat there and he says, "Well what can you do?" And so I said, "Well I don't know, I have a degree in business administration from Texas Southern [Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas], and I just graduated two weeks ago." And he says, "Well what make you, what makes you think that you can help me?" So I said, "Well I notice you have a lot of beer boxes back there, and there are five hundred thousand black people in this town, and I can help you sell some of those boxes."$Following our expanded efforts in, with the program by adding certain dimensions to it, by getting and asking Roscoe Browne [HistoryMaker Roscoe Lee Browne] and Alex Haley to cut tapes, to cut radio commercials on the program, also including Lou Rawls to also involve his voice in the program, the program overnight became extremely, extremely successful. We began getting letters from teachers, educators from around the country asking us to send them reprints of the Great Kings and Queens of Africa [Great Kings of Africa; Great Kings and Queens of Africa] because they wanted to use the material that we had developed in their classrooms as an exercise in African American history. So then it became a problem with the budget because the overall budget that I had at that time could not sustain the requests that were being made for additional reprints, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. But thank god I had people that I could go to and say, "Look, we've got a program that is being widely accepted in the black community, and I need support." And so I was able to convince corporate management [of Anheuser-Busch Companies] to provide additional funds for the program, and the way this was done I was able to take all of the requests, the numbers that were being generated for reprint requests and compared those numbers to other programs that people were writing the company asking them about. And one of those programs was the Clydesdales. And we found that we were getting many, many more requests for Great Kings of Africa reprints than we were getting for reprints of the Clydesdale calendars. So it opened up a lot of eyes right away, and it also provided for me the additional dollars to expand the program. So we had subsequent unveilings. As I said initially we made the first unveiling at the Johnson publication [Johnson Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois]. We then went to Dr. Margaret Burroughs [HistoryMaker Margaret Burroughs] at the DuSable Museum [DuSable Museum of African American History] in Chicago [Illinois], and she quickly supported our efforts with the program and allowed us to utilize the DuSable Museum as the second site for unveiling Great Kings. We then went to Chicago State University [Chicago, Illinois] the next year and made a third unveiling. So then that was the, the basic foundation for the program growing.

Melvin Hart

Marketing executive and newspaper publishing executive Melvin Hart was born on January 7, 1952 to Cleola Kimpson Hart, a homemaker and Furman “Toot” Hart. Furman is a World War II veteran, former member of the Civilian Conservation Corps and one of the founders of the local branch of the NAACP in St. Matthews, South Carolina. Hart attended Guinyard, a segregated African American elementary school. When he reached the eighth grade, Hart became one of a small group of African American students to integrate Saint Matthews High School. In 1970, Hart was one of five African Americans, out of a class of approximately seventy-five students, to graduate from St. Matthews.

Hart was the Senior Vice President of Marketing and Advertising for South Carolina Black Media Group, publisher of Columbia, South Carolina's African American newspaper, "Black News." As manager and director of marketing at the organization, Hart worked to ensure that the information needs of the African American population in South Carolina were met. Black News, a weekly publication, serves South Carolina’s forty-six counties, including rural, suburban and metropolitan areas.

Active in his church and community, Hart was re-appointed to the Historic Columbia Foundation Board of Trustees for 2005 and 2006, his second term.

Melvin Hart was interviewed by the HistoryMakers on July 14, 2005

Accession Number

A2005.164

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/14/2005

Last Name

Hart

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Saint Matthews High School

Guinyard Elementary School

South Carolina State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Melvin

Birth City, State, Country

Saint Matthews

HM ID

HAR16

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

South Carolina

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Carolina, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, New Orleans, Chicago

Favorite Quote

Stay Here Until I Get Back.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

South Carolina

Birth Date

1/7/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Columbia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken, Macaroni, Cheese, Collard Greens, Rice, Cornbread, Sweet Tea, Baked Turkey Wings

Short Description

Marketing executive and newspaper publishing executive Melvin Hart (1952 - ) was the manager and director of marketing for the Black Media Group as well as publisher of South Carolina's weekly African American newspaper, Black News.

Favorite Color

Navy Blue, Gray

Timing Pairs
0,0:346,7:8396,62:9108,71:12560,88:13628,96:14696,101:17870,115:21580,124:42194,278:42466,284:42806,290:51228,377:51658,383:55699,399:66150,514:67110,527:67990,540:74535,611:75325,622:75957,632:76273,637:86320,752:86920,761:87220,766:91870,877:101720,1007:105072,1039:105408,1044:106416,1058:111792,1163:112212,1169:119376,1249:120346,1262:132546,1386:133320,1397:141490,1594:141834,1599:142264,1605:148982,1676:151390,1718:152250,1731:152680,1737:159044,1852:174138,1941:177818,1992:178738,2003:179842,2078:180762,2089:181866,2104:185590,2122:186070,2128:186646,2135:187030,2140:190486,2195:192118,2221:192886,2240:198840,2290$0,0:7954,169:22380,281:22944,288:23602,297:28350,357:31462,393:31906,400:35310,466:39084,548:51011,776:51546,782:54222,797:58787,865:59119,870:62356,931:69930,1000:71570,1006:73702,1090:79251,1147:80245,1170:80671,1177:81239,1187:81594,1193:82091,1202:92031,1472:100677,1551:111170,1704:112072,1719:115956,1753:116520,1760:116896,1765:119246,1809:119810,1816:120562,1826:127487,1854:127915,1859:129092,1871:131704,1885:133860,1922:136940,1970:144380,2052:145036,2062:145774,2072:148616,2085:149260,2095:149904,2102:151008,2123:159885,2226:161160,2271:170850,2404:173060,2437:178630,2453:179530,2469:182105,2487:183730,2492:184434,2497:185490,2504:188840,2512:190580,2517:192308,2545:192668,2551:194972,2593:195404,2601:201236,2711:205015,2726:205370,2732:206435,2755:207145,2768:207855,2782:208139,2787:210553,2836:212612,2874:215800,2880:244210,3205
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Melvin Hart's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Melvin Hart lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Melvin Hart describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Melvin Hart describes his parents' hometown of St. Matthew, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Melvin Hart describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Melvin Hart describes his father's family farm and his father's occupation

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Melvin Hart describes how his parents met and their childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Melvin Hart describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Melvin Hart describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Melvin Hart describes his elementary and high schools

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Melvin Hart describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Melvin Hart describes his childhood activities, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Melvin Hart describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Melvin Hart describes his childhood activities, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Melvin Hart describes his elementary and high school experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Melvin Hart remembers his elementary and high school teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Melvin Hart remembers South Carolina educator John Ford

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Melvin Hart describes integrating Saint Matthews High School

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Melvin Hart recalls the public outrage over school integration

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Melvin Hart describes his father's involvement with the NAACP

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Melvin Hart remembers SNCC and reading newspapers in his youth

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Melvin Hart recalls playing sports at Saint Matthews High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Melvin Hart describes the racial tension at his integrated high school

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

1$4

DATitle
Melvin Hart describes his earliest childhood memory
Melvin Hart recalls the public outrage over school integration
Transcript
Do you have an earliest childhood memory?$$I think part of my earliest memory is around four or five years old and that was going to kindergarten to school and I remember you had to be six, five or six, I think to go to kindergarten, but the neighborhood that I grew up in, you know, there were, my, friends my age and the kindergarten teacher lived maybe two blocks away, she would come by and the library, at the time, the colored library at the time was a few houses, a few doors from where I grew up. So, the kindergarten teacher, Ms. Parker [ph.], was also the librarian for the public library, so in the afternoons after she left school, kin--school, she would run the colored library, so we would go to the library and things as a little kid. Well, my best friend at the time, that lived across the street, Donald Benjamin [ph.], was going to kindergarten, Donald's a year older than I am, he was old enough to be in kindergarten so, she would come by to pick him up and take him to kindergarten. Well, that was my friend so now he's getting, he's able to get in the car and go wherever. I had no idea of where he was going, all I knew he was, everyday going somewhere, this car would come back and pick him up and he'd and then here I am having to be there by myself in essence, not by myself because my brothers and sisters were there but, I wanted to go with Donald but, I wasn't old enough. Well, the library was popular, you know, so well, and my mom [Cleola Kimpson Hart] would try to explain, well you're not old enough, you know, next year, you know, Ms. Parker says, "Well, just bring this boy on, I'll take him on to kindergarten, you know." So why, you know, so I ended up going to kindergarten about two or three years, you know, I--and my friends tease me to this day that I flunked kindergarten but, I actually went, and, and that was an early history, remembrance of my childhood. Then, you know, some other, you know, moving on up, I remember going, you know, to elementary school [Guinyard Elementary School, St. Matthews, South Carolina] and, and elementary school was two blocks away, two, three blocks away from me so we just walked past the library another few blocks and the elementary school was there. There were some of my early, early teachers and--.$And it was a struggle even for us getting there [Saint Matthews High School, St. Matthews, South Carolina], when my dad [Furman Hart, Sr.] for, before we integrated the school, he talked with the superintendent, now we, remember we talking about dual school districts. We had the county board of education and then we had the St. Matthews [South Carolina] school board and we had the colored school boards and, you know the superintendent said, well, you know, did everything to discourage my dad and I'm sure some of the others, "You don't wanna send your kids there, why you wanna send 'em there? You live right across the street [from John Ford High School, St. Matthews, South Carolina], we've got a new school and you've got water," and this and that and it got to the point where even our state senator, who happened to live in, in the town, you know, he'd even spoke to my dad, "Well, Furman, I don't think you want to do that, it's not, won't be a good idea." And the senator even, at the time, from the s--, from the floor of the senate [South Carolina State Senate], the state senate and it came well before, you know, black kids and white kids would go to school together, blood will run down the streets like water, you know, I mean, it's a (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) This was a white man, right?$$Yeah, yeah, you know and, and you know my dad's well, you know, we, you know, we--we're not looking for trouble, you know, well, but you're making a big deal out of it, you know? My dad's well, no, I don't think we're making a big deal out of it, I, you all are making much, you know if the schools are the same, and it wouldn't matter here or there, you all are making a much bigger deal out of it than we are, so, obviously it's a bigger deal than you all are saying, you know. But the ironic thing was that, arguably probably the most influential legislator in state government at the time was the senator from our home town and he had made this statement, and when my dad said, "Well, you know, you do what you need to do but, after the Christmas holidays, my boys, two boys," myself and a younger brother of mine at the time, "I'll be taking them down to the white school, enrolling them." And, you know, the senator who knew my dad, you know, they, and knowing my dad was a no nonsense kind of person, he just said, well okay, I guess he's just hell bent on doing this and as some other family members in the community were, they got to the place, we did not have that public outrage that everybody was suspecting we would have because the senator had already said before, this happen, not just in St. Matthews, but the State of South Carolina, blood would run down the streets like water. And it never happened, but in other areas of the state, we had some rioting and turning over buses and all, later we found out the senator said, "Well you know, it's coming, I don't want any violence or trouble in my county," so he talked, I guess to his good white folk, if you will, yes.$$So what, wh- what senator was this?$$This was Senator Marion Gressette, Senator L. Marion Gressette [Lawrence Marion Gressette].$$And, wh--how, how do you spell his last name?$$G-R-E-S-S-E-T-T-E.