The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

James Hubbard, Jr.

Mechanical engineer and engineering professor James Edward Hubbard, Jr. was born on December 21, 1951 in Danville, Virginia. Hubbard received his high school diploma with a concentration in engineering in 1969 from the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. In 1971, he enlisted as an officer in the U.S. Merchant Marine and served during the Vietnam War. He attended the Calhoon MEBA Marine Engineering School and became the youngest serviceman to receive the unlimited horsepower, steam and diesel engine Marine Engineering license from the U.S. Coast Guard. Returning to the United States, Hubbard began his undergraduate studies at Morgan State College, but after receiving encouragement from teachers, family and friends, he enrolled at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Hubbard went on to graduate from MIT with his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering in 1977, 1979, and 1982, respectively.

Hubbard has served as a professor and a researcher both inside and outside of academia. After receiving his Ph.D. degree, Hubbard continued his work as an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at MIT until 1985, and as a lecturer until 1994. While there, he mentored both graduate- and doctorate-level students. Following his tenure with MIT, Hubbard was hired at the Boston University Photonics Center, PhotoSense, Inc. and iProvica. In 2004, Hubbard returned to academia and was named the Samuel P. Langley Distinguished Professor Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland. Hubbard’s research has included sensors and system concepts, optoelectronics, and photonics. His work in 1985 resulted in the production of what many consider the first example of an “adaptive structure,” or a structure that can respond to changes in its environment. He also received a patent for his work with “Smart Skin” technology, or a large-area blanket-like sensor that could be used in a number of applications. His work with the Morpheus Laboratory, Hubbard’s research group at the University of Maryland and NIA, has focused on aerodynamic engineering and has resulted in such projects as ornithopters and the Sky Walker program.

Hubbard is a member of the Air Force Studies Board, the Naval Research Advisory Committee, and the Committee on Space Defense Technology. He has garnered several awards in recognition of his work in both industrial and academic settings. Hubbard was the 2009 recipient of the Smart Structures Product Innovation Award from the International Society for Optical Engineering. In 2002, Hubbard received the Black Engineer of the Year President’s Award from U.S. Black Engineer & Information Technology magazine.

Hubbard and his wife, Adrienne Hubbard, have three adult sons: James, Drew, and Jordan.

James Edward Hubbard, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 19, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.090

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/19/2013

Last Name

Hubbard

Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

E

Schools

Baltimore Polytechnic Institute

Calhoon M.E.B.A. Engineering School

Morgan State University

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Search Occupation Category
First Name

James

Birth City, State, Country

Danville

HM ID

HUB01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Virginia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Near Water

Favorite Quote

All that glitters is not gold

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

12/21/1951

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Hampton

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Flounder (Fried)

Short Description

Mechanical engineer and engineering professor James Hubbard, Jr. (1951 - ) served in the U.S. Merchant Marine during the Vietnam War and became the youngest serviceman to receive the unlimited horsepower, steam and diesel engine Marine Engineering license from the U.S. Coast Guard. Hubbard is the Samuel P. Langley Distinguished Professor Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland.

Employment

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Charles Stark Draper Laboratory

Optron Systems, Inc.

Boston University Photonics Center

PhotoSense, Inc.

National Institute of Aerospace

University of Maryland, College Park

improVica

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:11274,151:11848,161:12750,173:13078,178:16828,217:19718,247:20074,252:20786,265:22388,294:22922,302:24168,321:24969,333:26304,363:26838,371:27283,378:27817,388:28618,399:29241,408:34350,442:34598,447:35218,460:38070,508:38380,514:40710,529:41070,534:42420,547:43140,558:48161,569:53000,586:54650,612:55025,619:55400,625:55925,634:56825,650:57500,662:59030,667:59395,673:60490,693:62242,733:62826,745:63264,753:63848,762:65860,769:66499,779:67422,792:75695,944:77225,967:78075,982:84012,1001:87241,1030:91535,1083:91860,1089:93300,1114:96040,1126:96392,1131:101910,1212:102398,1221:105789,1251:106738,1277:108782,1355:111629,1416:112578,1435:113381,1454:114768,1484:116301,1519:116593,1524:116958,1530:117250,1535:117542,1540:126062,1673:126734,1683:127070,1688:127658,1697:134272,1751:135217,1779:135532,1785:135784,1790:137359,1824:140005,1906:140824,1925:141265,1934:141517,1939:149373,2006:150242,2021:150795,2029:151348,2041:151822,2049:152770,2098:153244,2105:164239,2164:164871,2176:165187,2181:168584,2256:170620,2277$0,0:590,14:4034,62:4496,116:4958,123:5420,130:6652,148:7576,167:8654,185:12062,249:13482,280:16175,290:16745,297:18075,317:19025,328:23465,366:24400,380:25420,395:27630,441:36515,610:41014,632:42532,658:42946,665:43222,670:48992,722:49248,727:49504,732:49824,738:50272,747:50784,758:51936,783:54940,805:58632,854:59464,873:64754,960:65272,969:70839,1062:75064,1114:76232,1135:76743,1144:77181,1152:85788,1249:88032,1288:90408,1336:90936,1345:97838,1422:98446,1431:100420,1470:109005,1552:109488,1561:110178,1573:110661,1582:110937,1587:111420,1596:113460,1610:115860,1646:116310,1653:117210,1675:117660,1690:121757,1742:129410,1883:131956,1929:132425,1937:132693,1942:136466,1970:138106,1990:138926,2002:139418,2012:144502,2075:145568,2091:146060,2101:153767,2196:154334,2206:157860,2245:161010,2296:161290,2301:168990,2408:173733,2454:175110,2480:175515,2486:176325,2497:177216,2510:177621,2516:178674,2533:186490,2634:186874,2695:187642,2713:187898,2718:188602,2731:188986,2738:189434,2747:192020,2763:192770,2775:193820,2799:194570,2810:195695,2834:198845,2915:199145,2920:206680,2978:212269,3067:212617,3072:217420,3202
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of James Hubbard's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - James Hubbard lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - James Hubbard describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - James Hubbard describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - James Hubbard talks about his parents' education and their employment

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - James Hubbard talks about his family living under the Jim Crow laws in Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - James Hubbard talks about how his parents met and were married

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - James Hubbard talks about his father's move to Philadelphia to escape the Jim Crow laws of the southern United States

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - James Hubbard describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - James Hubbard talks about living in Philadelphia with his father for a year, and returning to Danville, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - James Hubbard talks about his sister

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - James Hubbard talks about growing up in Danville, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - James Hubbard describes his childhood in Danville, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - James Hubbard talks about living under Jim Crow laws in Danville, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - James Hubbard describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Danville, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - James Hubbard talks about the teachers who influenced him in grade school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - James Hubbard talks about his performance in math in grade school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - James Hubbard talks about attending Calvary Baptist Church in Danville, Virginia

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - James Hubbard talks about the Civil Rights Movement and Bloody Monday in Danville, Virginia in 1963

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - James Hubbard talks about his mother's involvement in the Civil Rights Movement, and his family's move to Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - James Hubbard talks about his experience in school in Baltimore, Maryland, and how it impacted him

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - James Hubbard describes his experience at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - James Hubbard describes his experience in the U.S. Navy Sea Cadet Corps

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - James Hubbard talks about how he became a part of the Maryland Naval Militia

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - James Hubbard talks about his experience in the Maryland Naval Militia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - James Hubbard talks about his experience at Calhoon MEBA, and entering the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - James Hubbard describes his experience in the Merchant Marines as a ship engineer on an ammunition ship in the Vietnam War

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - James Hubbard reflects upon his experience with racism during the Vietnam War

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - James Hubbard describes his decision to attend Morgan State University and his experience there

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - James Hubbard talks about those who influenced him to attend the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - James Hubbard describes his experience at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and talks about his mentors there

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - James Hubbard talks about his mentors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - James Hubbard talks about his involvement and leadership in the Black Mechanical Engineers (BME) organization at MIT

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - James Hubbard talks about HistoryMaker, Shirley Jackson, and the Bell Labs Fellowship for minority students

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - James Hubbard talks about his dissertation research in helicopter rotor acoustics at MIT

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - James Hubbard talks about his financial struggles as a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - James Hubbard describes his doctoral research on helicopter rotor acoustics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - James Hubbard talks about his mentor, Wesley Harris

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - James Hubbard talks about joining the faculty of the mechanical engineering department at the Massachusetts Institute of technology (MIT)

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - James Hubbard talks about his contributions to the field of piezoelectricity and smart structures - part one

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - James Hubbard talks about his contributions to the field of piezoelectricity and smart structures - part two

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - James Hubbard describes his decision to leave the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1985 - part one

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - James Hubbard describes his decision to leave the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1985 - part two

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - James Hubbard talks about working at Draper Laboratory, and with HistoryMaker Cardinal Warde at Optron Systems, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - James Hubbard talks about his work with photolithography techniques and his decision to become the executive vice president of Optron Systems, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - James Hubbard talks about co-founding the Boston University Photonics Center and founding PhotoSense, Inc. and iProvica, Inc.

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - James Hubbard talks about his invention of Smart Skin and his patents

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - James Hubbard describes his decision to accept a position as the Langley Distinguished Professor of Aerospace at the University of Maryland

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - James Hubbard talks about the students he mentored, and the "art of being a wolf"

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - James Hubbard describes his experience and his work at the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA)

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - James Hubbard talks about the Sky Walker Program

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - James Hubbard talks about his work on the Air Wolf Project

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - James Hubbard talks about founding a company with his son

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - James Hubbard talks about his wife

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - James Hubbard talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - James Hubbard reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - James Hubbard reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - James Hubbard talks about his father's training as a pilot and how he owned and flew a Piper Cub plane

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - James Hubbard describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community today

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - James Hubbard shares his perspectives on today's generation

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - James Hubbard talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$6

DAStory

7$1

DATitle
James Hubbard reflects upon his experience with racism during the Vietnam War
James Hubbard talks about his work with photolithography techniques and his decision to become the executive vice president of Optron Systems, Inc.
Transcript
So did your view of the [Vietnam] war change any by being over there?$$Emm hmm (NODDING OF HIS HEAD).$$Okay.$$I grew up in the Maryland Naval Militia, part of a small elite team trained by a recon marine; we were all flavors. I was--you couldn't have found a more dedicated patriot; boy did I love my country, and I was proud of my skills; I had learned a lotta ways to kill a person at seventeen, like the military would, and volunteered. Even though I was sent over there by this guy to be hurt, I loved every minute of it. What happened was when I got there, two things happened; there were--everybody was there; there were all services, which shocked me; even Coast Guard. When we got there, you could look around, there was Coast Guard people, National Guard, there was Korean Elite Forces, I mean just around 'cause don't forget now, ships pull in, you got everybody running over there unloading it. I didn't expect that; there were uniforms and insignias that I did not recognize, and the white troops--if you weren't careful, they would call you Nigger in a minute--the white troops; that stunned me, that made a huge impact on me. And then I found out that a lotta them was getting fragged by the brothers over there--$$Emm hmm.$$--for that.$$And fragging is--$$Throw a hand grenade in the outhouse when they go to the bathroom, stuff like that (laughter).$$Getting rid of the Second Lieutenant or--$$They hated a lotta things man, you be walking down the street and a brother would see you and they had this thing that they would do; it was a sign thing.$$I believe it's called the Dap [ph.].$$No, it ain't no Dap. It was a lang-- (simultaneous)--it was a language; they would do this, and I found out that it meant 'Hi my brother, I would die for you.' It was stuff like that but it wasn't a Dap. You be walking, and on the other side of the street, a brother you ain't never seen, you turn to him and he would do this thing, and then you would learn how to answer him back. So it was more racist in Vietnam than it had been in Danville [Virginia], and I didn't expect that; I didn't expect that at all.$$Okay.$$Lotta killing; some guys on my ship killed some people and they (laughter) weren't even supposed to be doing that. Anyway. Nineteen [years old].$So what I was telling you Larry, was that Don [Donald] Fraser left [Draper Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts] to become Deputy Undersecretary of Defense and I left because he was my mentor, and I left to help Cardinal Warde [also a HistoryMaker] because Cardinal was trying to develop a device that I had a lot of experience developing for Draper--$$Emm.$$--and, because of my background, he also wanted me to run the company.$$Okay now, what is this device?$$Do you wanna know technically what--well (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--Yeah, technically yeah.$$Okay. So it was during the Star Wars era, and there were a bunch of challenges for Star Wars; people were developing high-energy laser systems, alright? And what they would like for them to be able to do is sit on the ground and shoot down missiles, trying to hurt the United States. The problem, Larry, is when you shine a beam of light through the atmosphere, the currents in the air and all make the beam move all around. I mean if I aim at you if there's wind blowing, it'll blow--literally blow the--you know; I won't hit you. So one of the things you can do is take the beam of light and let it hit a mirror, and then steer the mirror to hit you; and then have a sensor that looks at all these air currents and as they wiggle the beam, the mirror wiggles in the opposite direction, and so the beam stays right on you and you're dead; that's called adaptive optics.$$Hmm.$$Well it turns out, it's really hard to do (laughter). The government, Lincoln Labs, had received a lotta money to develop the system I just told you about, but it turns out that the mirror has to be really flat and hard so they made it out of titanium. But the biggest mirror they could polish that flat was six inches. Then it turns out to do air currents, you have to have at least a thousand action waves on the back to wiggle the frequencies they want. They can only get 300 because it's only a six-inch mirror, and they used 300 piezo crystals to move it. Well, you gotta run piezos at 600 volts Larry; so they had 300 amplifiers in a room, air conditioned to get the 300 but I mean it was huge, it took up a whole building. When I was at Draper, I developed a two-inch mirror that had a million actuators on it. And, you could put it in your pocket; I have a patent on that--$$Hmm.$$--so Cardinal found out about that; I never published anything--a million. And so he was trying to develop the same kind of mirror to do large projection displays for movie theaters and for military use.$$Right, that's right.$$And so it was a natural--he was a gem; come on man (laughter). SAIC [Science Applications International Corporation]--I was interviewing with them 'cause I had worked with the founder of SAIC through Don Fraser; I had been on a government committee with him; his name was Larry Crowe and he was like--Larry Cole--and he was like "Jim, come and work with us." But then Cardinal--so I went with Cardinal and developed this deformable mirror. All kinds of photolithography techniques; I was there four years.$$Okay, and this was for Optron [Systems, Inc.]?$$Emm hmm (NODDING OF HIS HEAD YES), Optron.$$Optron, okay. Cardinal Warde.

Marshall Jones

Mechanical engineer and inventor Marshall G. Jones was born on August 1, 1941 in Southampton, New York to Mildred and Dallas Jones. While his father served in the Navy during World War II, Jones and his brother lived with his great aunt and uncle in Aquebogue, New York on their duck farm. Although he had to repeat the fourth grade because of his reading skills, Jones excelled in math and science. Jones attended Riverhead High School and graduated with his diploma in 1960. Two years later, he received his A.A.S. degree from Mohawk Valley Community College. Jones then received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1965. In his graduating class, he was the only African American student in the engineering school. Following work as a development engineer at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Jones went on to attend the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering in 1972 and 1974, respectively.

Jones entered into industrial research in 1974, working with General Electric Global Research in New York. Jones was one of General Electric’s first scientists researching laser material processing and he soon became the manager of the Laser Technology Program. In 1982, Jones started research on high-power laser beam transmission through optical fibers. His research allowed for the passage of high power laser beams with high efficiency. Jones continued to specialize in laser technology, becoming a major pioneer in the field. His work included the use of lasers to join two dissimilar metal combinations together. He received fifty United States patents, thirty-one foreign patents and wrote over 45 publications. Jones served as an adjunct professor at SUNY of Albany and Schenectady County Community College. He is the subject of the children’s book, Never Give up: The Marshall Jones Story .

Jones won a number of awards for his groundbreaking work. He is the recipient of the General Electric Company’s highest honor, the E-GR Coolidge Fellow. Jones was named the 1994 Black Engineer of the Year for his technical contributions to industry. One year later, he received the Distinguished Achievement Award for Professional and Community Service from the University of Massachusetts. Jones went on to receive the Pioneer of the Year Golden Torch Award from the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) in 1999. He was also elected into the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 2001 for his contributions to the application of high-power lasers in industry. Jones was a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) and the Laser Institute of America (LIA).

Marshall G. Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 4, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.157

Sex

Male

Interview Date

8/4/2012

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Gordon

Occupation
Schools

Aquebogue Elementary School

Riverhead Senior High School

Mohawk Valley Community College

University of Michigan

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Marshall

Birth City, State, Country

Southampton

HM ID

JON30

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Reunions

Favorite Quote

Go Blue.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

8/1/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Albany

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Apples (Fried)

Short Description

Mechanical engineer and inventor Marshall Jones (1941 - ) was a pioneer in laser technology, receiving fifty United States patents.

Employment

General Electric Company

Brookhaven National Laboratory

Schenectady Community College

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:23704,112:33630,137:41218,206:43568,246:81347,489:83394,508:95782,598:99112,623:123436,882:191225,1423:241575,1965:247399,2011:273260,2263:276182,2278:280610,2322:281922,2340:283152,2355:283644,2362:284136,2370:310280,2631:314232,2660:377468,3463:379392,3481:392516,3666:416080,3869$0,0:5810,60:6760,71:9705,105:13220,159:26480,257:38288,326:38632,338:39406,348:39750,353:41470,375:42760,392:45082,423:49640,483:50414,493:50758,498:51360,507:57014,527:57752,538:58080,543:62098,595:62590,603:62918,608:63246,613:73348,693:73792,701:75272,734:76900,759:77566,772:82672,861:83190,869:84300,888:86742,930:94083,971:94567,976:95293,984:96624,996:97350,1004:100012,1029:103960,1039:106164,1071:106772,1083:107380,1097:109128,1115:109660,1124:110192,1132:110572,1138:111484,1155:113688,1193:114372,1206:115056,1218:115360,1223:115664,1228:120338,1243:122291,1290:122606,1296:123236,1309:123740,1318:135670,1561:136070,1567:136870,1585:137270,1591:139270,1637:141190,1667:141510,1672:142070,1680:142630,1688:143750,1711:148362,1730:148694,1735:154338,1822:154753,1829:155583,1841:155915,1846:158156,1879:158820,1889:165916,1934:166240,1939:166807,1947:167293,1955:167941,1965:169318,1984:171667,2014:171991,2019:173854,2040:174421,2048:174907,2055:180320,2070:185881,2151:186545,2160:186960,2166:187292,2171:187873,2180:188205,2185:189450,2199:202058,2307:202326,2312:203331,2330:204604,2357:206145,2383:206413,2388:218520,2536:219960,2559:220280,2564:221960,2597:222360,2603:228177,2643:228461,2648:230733,2680:231088,2686:231372,2691:233431,2740:234141,2752:234425,2757:240450,2812:241650,2826:242930,2831:243250,2836:245410,2864:246530,2875:247330,2888:248210,2896:248530,2901:249010,2909:249810,2922:254050,3021:268056,3111:270318,3148:270666,3153:273189,3182:273537,3187:275625,3213:276060,3219:279600,3227
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marshall Jones' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marshall Jones lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marshall Jones describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marshall Jones describes his great-uncle Lawrence Miller's duck farming business

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marshall Jones talks about his great-uncle, Lawrence Miller, and great-aunt, Mary Jackson

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marshall Jones talks about his mother, Mildred Green

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marshall Jones describes his father's family background

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marshall Jones talks about his father, Dallas Jones

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marshall Jones talks about his parents' marriage and his father's career in the U.S. Postal Service

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marshall Jones describes his relationship with his father

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marshall Jones describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marshall Jones talks about his parents' role in his upbringing (part 1)

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marshall Jones talks about his parents' role in his upbringing (part 2)

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marshall Jones describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marshall Jones recalls stories from his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marshall Jones describes the medical condition of being tongue tied

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marshall Jones describes the sights, smells and sounds of growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marshall Jones describes his experience in grade school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marshall Jones describes his relationship with his great-uncle, Lawrence Miller

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marshall Jones talks about repeating the fourth grade

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marshall Jones talks about his mother moving away from home

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marshall Jones describes his teenage interest in airplanes and in becoming a pilot

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marshall Jones talks about learning algebra at Aquebogue Elementary School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marshall Jones talks about the demographics at Riverhead High School

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marshall Jones talks about playing sports in school - part one

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marshall Jones talks about playing sports in school - part two

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marshall Jones describes his decision to attend Mohawk Valley Community College

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marshall Jones talks about the death of his great-uncle, Lawrence Miller

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marshall Jones talks about how he explained his engineering drawings to his mother

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marshall Jones describes his experience at Mohawk Valley Community College

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marshall Jones describes his first encounter with racism

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marshall Jones talks about his mentor at Mohawk Valley Community College

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marshall Jones describes his decision to transfer to the University of Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marshall Jones describes his experience with racism in Florida in 1961

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Marshall Jones talks about his mentor at the University of Michigan

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Marshall Jones talks about Ted Kaczynski and Marina Oswald attending the University of Michigan

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marshall Jones describes his experience at Brookhaven National Laboratory

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marshall Jones talks about meeting his wife and getting married

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marshall Jones describes his decision to pursue his Ph.D. degree at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marshall Jones describes his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marshall Jones talks about his mother's unexpected death

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Marshall Jones talks about taking the professional engineering exam

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Marshall Jones describes patent rights and his work at GE Global Research

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Marshall Jones describes lasers and his work using lasers

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Marshall Jones describes his pioneering work with lasers

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Marshall Jones talks about the awards that he has received

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Marshall Jones describes his work on processing laser energy through fiber optics

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Marshall Jones talks about his advisory role at the National Science Foundation (NSF)

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Marshall Jones talks about using lasers in additive manufacturing

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Marshall Jones describes his work on using lasers in underwater cladding

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Marshall Jones describes his work on laser-based hotwire welding

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Marshall Jones describes his work on portable plenum laser forming

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Marshall Jones reflects upon his contributions to laser technology and science

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Marshall Jones talks about his overall experience at the General Electric Research Center

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Marshall Jones talks about mentoring and competitive running

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Marshall Jones describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Marshall Jones talks about the inspiration for his book, Never Give Up - The Marshall Jones Story

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Marshall Jones reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Marshall Jones talks about his family

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Marshall Jones reflects upon his career path

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Marshall Jones talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Marshall Jones describes his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

7$8

DAStory

1$1

DATitle
Marshall Jones describes lasers and his work using lasers
Marshall Jones describes his work on laser-based hotwire welding
Transcript
Just summarize for those who don't know, what is a laser anyway and what--?$$A laser is a device that's able to generate light in a form that essentially has one color. And it could be essentially a color that you can see or it could be a color that you can't see. What you can see is from blue to red, the colors in a rainbow. And if you look at, if you put numbers on those colors okay and we'll use microns as numbers, and if you go from .4 to say .8 microns, that's going from blue which is .4 to red which is .8. If you go below .4 you're in a region that's referred to as ultraviolet and that's sort of the color that you can't see and this is the color that everyone is concerned about you know dealing with ultraviolet coming from the sun that can cause skin cancer. If you go above .8 say to 1 and larger that's into the infrared. Lasers operate from the ultraviolet through what you can see all the way into the infrared. The uniqueness of the laser in addition to the fact that it's very, it's only of one color you know the, sort of the, the word that best describes that it's a fairly large word but it's called, it's monochromatic and that means one color. The other feature of the laser is that it's the most collimated light source known to man. If you take a flashlight and shine the flashlight over some distance, the light beam from a flashlight essentially diverges as it leaves the flashlight source.$$It gets wider and wider.$$It gets wider and wider.$$Disperses.$$And it's the same for your headlamp on your car you know, the light coming from that headlight divide, diverges out okay. The light from a laser stays very collimated. If I took a laser in this room and shined it on the wall over here and shined it on another wall the spot on the wall is almost the same size as the beam leaving the source. If you shine a laser beam from the earth to the moon, the moon is 250,000 miles away. When the laser beam gets to the moon it's going to cover an area maybe the size of this museum. And you say well that's not so good but you have to think how far did the laser travel? It traveled 250,000 miles and when it got to the moon it only illuminated a region that's the size of this museum. That's a pretty collimated light source. Being that collimated, that means that if you put this light source through a lens you're able to focus it down to a very, very small spot okay. I usually tell kids in the classroom I always ask the question, how many you know how many students have taken a magnifying glass and either ignited paper or tried to pop an ant and most of them was--raised their hand. But you're able to do that, you're able to walk around in the sun and for the most part it doesn't bother you unless you're out there too long. But if you focus the rays from the sun you know through a magnifying class it's able to focus down to a very, very small spot such that the intensity is so high that you can ignite the paper and the kids that were able to pop the ants always ask the question, why did you know why did the ant stand still? So I says--but it probably temporarily blinded it. That's what you're able to do with a laser. I've spent the last thirty-five years taking the laser beam such that if the laser beam is the size of a quarter, you know I could put something in front of the beam very quickly and it will do nothing to it. When it goes through a lens and it's focused down I can do things like what we just talked about. I can weld copper to aluminum, I can cut with it, I can heat treat with it, I can do so many different things totally non-contact which is the most exciting thing of all that you don't have to touch the part, the component, the material and you're able to impart this energy which is nothing other than light on a material in order to energize it and do some useful things.$Okay. So in 2004, you published 'Laser Hotwire Welding for Minimizing Defects' during the international congress on applications of lasers and electro optics proceedings. Right, that's (unclear).$$Okay. This hotwire laser approach you know just prior to that you know we had a patent issued in this area also and the idea, some of the materials that they use for you know building certain components for gas turbines as well as for jet engines, these materials are super-alloys. Typically when they are welded the material aspects is such that you know they will literally crack. And so we came up with this technique of this hotwire laser welding where we would essentially--it would be used to join two materials that are very difficult to weld, okay, number one. Number two, we would be able to reduce the amount of heat that would go into the welding process because we've used another means of heating the wire that we would be feeding into the joint. And we were able to demonstrate that we could weld some of these materials without cracking them okay, and without the part actually having distortion which is another issue that occurs with certain welding techniques, even with lasers. And even in the same time frame you know there was like a ten-year period where we were doing research for Lockheed Martin [American defense, technology, aerospace, advanced technology company] and when we came up with this technique the folks at NASA [National Aeronautics and Space Agency] was interested, became interested in the technique relative to the space shuttle. And the space shuttle, all the welding on the space shuttle because it's aluminum is done with another process that's called friction stir welding. And they wanted to go to, away from aluminum to some of the nickel-based alloys but they didn't have a good way at that time cause friction stir welding would not work with these nickel based alloys. And we were showing that we could use this hotwire laser process to weld the materials that they had of interest without having distortion and still maintaining the properties that they want. And I had actually visited the location where they make the fuel tanks for the shuttle down in Michoud [NASA Michoud Assembly Facility, New Orleans, Louisiana] in Louisiana and presented this technology and so forth. And we were in the process of moving forward with that and on my way home when I was in the Atlanta [Georgia] airport, that's when the Challenger [space shuttle Challenger] went down. And so I was really obviously taken back because I was, I mean I was just there where they actually made these you know fuel tanks and we were look--because where they were going was you know they wanted to--you know because the fuel tank is discarded you know with the shuttle the way it works now and they were heading in the direction of having the system to be able to come back to earth and be able to be re-used. And that was the reason for going to the new material but after that accident that approach went out, you know they just went down a different track. But that's where that, that was the potential use for that technology and it's still an area that you know we're still doing work in.

Lucius Walker

Mechanical engineer, engineering professor and education administrator Lucius Walker was born on December 16, 1936 in Washington, D.C. to Inez, a housewife and M. Lucius Walker, Sr., a public school teacher. After attending Armstrong High School for one year, he received a Ford Foundation scholarship to attend Morehouse College at the age of fifteen. In 1954, he transferred to Howard University to study engineering. Walker graduated with his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering in 1957. He continued his studies at Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University), earning advanced degrees in mechanical engineering, his M.S. degree in 1958 and his Ph.D. degree in 1966. During his studies, he served as an instructor at Howard University and Carnegie Institute of Technology.

In 1963, Walker joined the faculty of Howard University as an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering; in 1967, he was promoted to an associate professor and in 1970, he became a full professor. A year later, he became chair of the department of engineering. In 1972, Walker co-founded and directed the Engineering Coalition of Schools for Excellence in Education and Leadership and co-founded the organization, Advancing Minorities' Interest in Engineering. In 1976, Walker became acting dean of the School of Engineering and a graduate professor of mechanical engineering. He was appointed dean in 1978. Throughout his career, Walker also worked for General Electric, Exxon, Ford Motor Company, and Harry Diamond Laboratories. He published many scientific research articles covering topics such as transportation systems analysis, fluid mechanics, and bioengineering. Walker also conducted aerodynamics research using airplane models and holds a patent on a Fluidic NOR device. Lucius Walker retired as dean in 2002 and became a professor emeritus at Howard University.

Walker has been recognized many times throughout his career including receiving the 2008 Distinguished Alumni Award from Howard University. He served on the board of directors of Carnegie Mellon University; Junior Engineering Technical Society and the Center for Naval Analysis, as well as MIT’s Visiting Committee of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences. Lucius Walker has two children and six grandchildren.

Lucius Walker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.054

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/15/2012

Last Name

Walker, Jr.

Marital Status

Seperated

Schools

Lovejoy Elementary School

Terrell Junior High School

Armstrong Technical School

Morehouse College

Carnegie Institute of Technology

First Name

M. Lucius

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

WAL17

Favorite Season

Spring

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

The Future Is Now.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/16/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chocolate Bars

Death Date

6/22/2013

Short Description

Mechanical engineer, engineering professor, and education administrator Lucius Walker (1936 - 2013 ) served as dean of the College of Engineering for thirty years and was a major advocate for minority science education.

Employment

Howard University

Carnegie Institute of Technology

Favorite Color

Cream, Crimson

Timing Pairs
0,0:1264,38:1896,62:15046,220:15491,226:16025,233:16381,238:17894,262:24451,341:25375,357:26453,386:27993,419:34926,503:35238,508:43176,626:43624,634:43880,639:44136,644:44840,654:45288,662:48680,735:59500,897:60166,907:60980,919:62090,945:72790,1118:75004,1213:76726,1250:79678,1296:81564,1328:82220,1341:83368,1358:83778,1364:93241,1497:93696,1503:95516,1534:97518,1564:107970,1686:116822,1783:118402,1806:122905,1901:123300,1907:129146,2041:130726,2080:134992,2161:138073,2241:157268,2398:157772,2406:162710,2477$0,0:2595,23:3306,35:4096,49:23180,382:34080,573:75670,985:76230,993:78430,1005:89240,1135:89690,1146:90050,1151:102626,1286:113178,1391:129768,1575:135763,1709:139494,1831:145924,1923:146722,1931:156252,2002:175486,2277:176172,2285:180876,2381:187285,2478:191280,2531:197778,2581:213320,2755:222052,2848:224348,2888:225578,2908:226480,2926:234260,3060:244985,3227:261640,3582:267618,3618:277000,3693:292137,3884:294284,3902:295979,3936:311244,4114:322526,4252:325425,4281:326270,4315:326530,4320:338666,4565:364316,4963:386550,5157
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Lucius Walker's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Lucius Walker lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Lucius Walker describes his mother's family background - part one

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Lucius Walker describes his mother's family background - part two

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Lucius Walker talks about his mother's life

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Lucius Walker describes his father's family background - part one

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Lucius Walker describes his father's family background - part two

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Lucius Walker talks about his father's life

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Lucius Walker talks about his father's interest in science

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Lucius Walker talks about his father's growing up and education

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Lucius Walker talks about how his parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Lucius Walker describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Lucius Walker talks about being an only child

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Lucius Walker describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Lucius Walker describes his childhood in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Lucius Walker describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Lucius Walker describes his experience at Lovejoy Elementary School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Lucius Walker describes his childhood interests

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Lucius Walker talks about World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Lucius Walker describes his childhood interest in sports

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Lucius Walker talks about the Ford Foundation Early Admission Program

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Lucius Walker talks about his classmates at Morehouse College in the Early Admission Program

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Lucius Walker describes his experience at Morehouse College in the Ford Foundation Early Admission Program

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Lucius Walker describes his decision to attend Howard University

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Lucius Walker describes his experience at Morehouse College and Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Lucius Walker talks about his mentors and peers at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Lucius Walker talks about HistoryMaker Percy Pierre

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Lucius Walker describes his experience as a student at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Lucius Walker talks about Carnegie Institute of Technology/Carnegie Mellon University

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Lucius Walker describes his dissertation research

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Lucius Walker talks about how he met his wife

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Lucius Walker describes his decision to pursue a Ph.D. degree in engineering

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Lucius Walker talks about his doctoral dissertation research at Carnegie Institute of Technology/Carnegie Mellon University

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Lucius Walker describes his experience as a faculty member at Howard University

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Lucius Walker talks about his work towards increasing African American representation in engineering - part one

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Lucius Walker talks about his work towards increasing African American representation in engineering - part two

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Lucius Walker talks about his work towards the study of cardiac dynamics

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Lucius Walker reflects upon engineering training in America

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Lucius Walker reflects upon his career at Howard University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Lucius Walker talks about the solar car competition

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Lucius Walker describes his post-retirement work in science education

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Lucius Walker reflects upon the awards that he has received

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Lucius Walker reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Lucius Walker describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Lucius Walker reflects upon his career

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Lucius Walker talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Lucius Walker describes the Highland Beach community

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Lucius Walker describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Lucius Walker describes his photographs - part one

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Lucius Walker describes his photographs - part two

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Lucius Walker describes his photographs - part three

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

1$2

DATitle
Lucius Walker talks about his father's interest in science
Lucius Walker reflects upon his career at Howard University
Transcript
My father [Lucius Walker, Sr.] and my mother's [Inez Landers] brother were both in the physics program at Howard [University, Washington, District of Columbia], in the graduate program.$$Okay, all right, now, is there a story behind your father's involvement in physics, you know. That's a--$$Well, I mean, he just always as a young person aspired to be a scientist, you know what I'm saying. At least that's what he told me. And then he sort of influenced my thinking as well, you know, and gave me some confidence that if it was something I wanted to achieve, I could, which I think was a very important dimension that's missing from some young and women's lives, you know, someone who tells them, look, you know, (laughter). My father, incidentally, my father never tutored me per se. What he did was always reassure me that within my own abilities I could do the work, which is kind of a different perspective from, you know, you think that maybe he taught me physics. He never taught me physics. He taught me that if I needed to do physics, I could, you know (laughter).$$Okay, you know, with the emphasis today, I know we've been talking about STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics] education in the black community for years and how it's not, the hard sciences and some of the equipment to pursue them are not available in the black community--$$Um-hum.$$--especially in the old days when the one-room schools and people, you know. But, so I just imagine there's a story here on some level behind your father being even involved in physics in that, during that time period, you know. I mean, you know, Howard had a department but who inspired--did your father ever talk about how he was inspired to pursue physics?$$Well, it strikes me that he liked science before he ever came to Howard. But I may, you know, that's as best I recall, his telling me that, well, as a young person, like I said, I told you the story about, you know, he had entered a science fair and somehow, someone confiscated his science project. He was eternally upset about that even though he was, you know. I mean it was a thing of his past when I was growing up, you know. He was maybe thirty or forty years old and still talking about his high school science project (laughter), said someone had confiscated it, you know, so and unfairly so. So, he, he--but there's no science, I mean nothing beyond that I could really say at this time.$$Okay.$$That occurs to me.$Now, so what have been some of the highlights of your career at Howard [University, Washington, District of Columbia]? What would you say they are, if you could pick like three things maybe, as highlights?$$Well, one, I mean I've always enjoyed, you know, working with young men and women and, you know, seeing and I'm hoping, hopefully, opening up their vision, you know, for the future and especially as it relates to engineering opportunities. And, of course, Howard gave me a platform to pursue that concept and hopefully, I've inspired many people to, you know, be, pursue engineering careers and be successful in their careers as engineers. Secondly, I guess it would be, and I was real worried back--well, and National Science Foundation [NSF] introduced the idea of engineering education coalitions in the late '80s [1980s], I was concerned that, you know, we'd be a full part of that exercise of--the notion was to renew engineering education and its infrastructure with a special emphasis on increasing, you know, minority and women participating in engineering. But, but it involved more than just the, the people power issue. It also involved, you know, curriculum reforms and, and curriculum restructuring. So, you know, I took the initiative to organize a number of schools under what was titled 'The ECSEL Coalition'. And so finally, I was successful in bringing these schools together, which included MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts] and I had a (unclear), my son finished MIT. So that sort of gave me access. I, City College of New York, University of Washington, Seattle, Penn State [Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pennsylvania], University of Maryland [College Park, Maryland] and Morgan State [University, Baltimore, Maryland]. That should be seven schools. So those were members of our coalition, and we were funded for, you know, fifteen million dollars for five years, over a five-year period to, to carry out these studies. Subsequently, we were refunded, although I was, you know, so you kind of know when to hold and you know when to fold (laughter). So I was sort of moving out of engineering education, and my directorship of Excel, and, but we were subsequently refunded for another fifteen million [dollars]. And actually, over the course of the program itself, we were funded maybe a couple extra million [dollars] here and there, you know, during the first five years. So I felt some pride that, you know, we were able to play some role, and our greatest contribution was, I think, introducing engineering in the beginning years of students' course of study. And so we had, we had some, that was the Engineering Design 'cause that was our theme, designed across the curriculum broadly conceived was the essence of engineering. And so, so a lot of schools now, you know, try to introduce students, you know, early on in their academic careers to, you know, doing engineering problems and doing engineering designs. And the one, the design we had, it was very exciting in the Washington metropolitan area. It was homeless shelters. You know, a lot of people sleep in the streets during the coldest month of the year, but the students, you know, came up with some low-budget, low-cost type of shelters that these, you know, people could live in. And they actually tested them in the streets here and there. But that has, you know, finally, we understood, you had to be a little careful about that (laughter) because of the liabilities involved in this, you know, in this society that we live in. But in any event, that was one of the contributions that we made, and then on the other end, well, the other end was, you know, maybe changing people's philosophy about how to teach, you know. Myself was, you know, more weighted to just the chalk-talk method as opposed to the whole idea of involving students in the teaching learning process, and, which I think, you know, we were fairly effective at different institutions in changing the philosophy, you know, of how to teach. Well, you've probably heard the Chinese proverb, what is it, "Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, and involve me, I understand". That was the concept. And so that was one of those things that we got across. And then the last thing was, you know, just to make all participating schools more conscious of the need to increase minority and women as engineering graduates. So those were the three by-products of the effort and, you know, one thing I came to understand was that when you talk about social change, you're talking about a big investment and a lot, lot in terms of, in terms of money and time, wow. It's unbelievably costly to realize social change, but, but, you know, I think all of our schools benefited from the program. And there's some evidence, because like I said, it was funded for an additional ten or, ten years or so.$$Okay.$$What else? Well, those were a couple of the major things that I was involved in, that I feel excited about the outcome. I guess that was the largest quote "program" that I, you know, had any role in developing.

Darryll Pines

Aerospace engineer and mechanical engineer Darryll Pines was born on August 28, 1964 in Oakland, California. received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He went on to receive advanced degrees in mechanical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his M.S. degree in 1988 and his Ph.D. degree in 1992.

Pines worked for the Chevron Corporation and Space Tethers, Inc. before joining Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)’s Advance Technology Program. At LLNL, he helped design the sensor technology of Clementine-1 spacecraft. In 1995, Pines joined the faculty of the University of Maryland (UMD) as an assistant professor. He became the director of UMD’s Sloan Scholars Program in 1996 and the director of the GEM Program in 1999. Pines has also served as chair of the Engineering Council, director of the NASA CUIP Program and director of the SAMPEX flight experiment. He took a leave of absence from 2003 to 2006 to serve as the program manager for the Tactical Technology Office and Defense Sciences Office of DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency). In 2006, Pines became chair of UMD’s Department of Aerospace Engineering, where under his leadership, the department was ranked eighth overall among United States universities. Three years later, he was named dean of the A. James Clark School of Engineering and the Nariman Farvardin Professor of Engineering. Pines’ research focuses on structural dynamics, smart sensors, biologically inspired structures as well as the guidance and control of aerospace vehicles.

Pines was named a fellow of the Institute of Physics, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He has received the NACME Alumni Circle Award and a National Science Foundation CAREER Award.

Darryl Pines was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 13, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.155

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/13/2012

Last Name

Pines

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

University of California, Berkeley

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Darryll

Birth City, State, Country

Oakland

HM ID

PIN05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

California

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anywhere Historic

Favorite Quote

Scientists study the world that is. Engineers design the world that will be.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/28/1964

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Aerospace engineer and mechanical engineer Darryll Pines (1964 - ) is the dean of the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Employment

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

University of Maryland, College Park

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:5610,126:13738,233:14074,238:14494,244:14914,250:17182,291:17518,296:18106,304:19114,317:19534,323:20206,333:21886,356:25080,372:25324,377:25995,389:31058,536:31485,544:32766,580:33254,589:37330,625:37634,630:38090,637:38394,642:39078,656:39762,669:44626,762:45386,813:46602,837:52003,948:53849,999:56796,1068:58713,1104:59068,1115:59352,1120:61198,1167:61908,1182:62831,1200:63257,1207:72218,1351:72623,1357:74810,1424:75134,1429:75944,1445:77888,1476:81042,1521:86082,1611:88026,1664:89826,1708:93433,1718:94978,1735:97553,1766:98377,1775:100937,1788:101221,1793:102783,1818:104061,1841:110042,1906:128724,2083:129543,2094:130271,2105:135119,2177:136304,2199:138358,2227:141610,2240:142330,2271:142930,2282:144906,2314:145518,2325:146130,2338:146674,2349:147218,2358:148034,2374:148306,2379:148986,2391:149326,2397:150006,2408:153915,2426:154511,2431:156612,2440:156942,2446:157932,2470:158592,2482:159120,2491:159450,2497:159714,2502:160880,2508:163982,2552:169602,2622:170562,2637:170946,2642:172098,2651:173442,2669:174594,2679:175074,2685:176322,2700:182323,2755:182608,2761:182893,2767:183748,2785:184432,2803:184660,2808:184888,2813:185116,2818:185401,2824:189178,2877:189646,2888:193196,2932:193977,2946:196959,2994:200377,3013:200653,3019:202309,3061:202861,3071:203482,3083:203827,3089:204724,3104:205690,3122:206380,3133:207898,3171:208726,3195:209140,3202:209761,3216:210037,3224:219213,3365:220381,3385:221038,3395:224177,3455:227389,3561:227681,3566:228119,3573:228703,3586:232887,3602:233232,3608:234957,3638:235233,3643:236268,3666:236544,3671:237441,3687:237855,3694:238683,3710:242860,3745$0,0:2683,24:3267,33:3997,43:7866,153:9545,188:10567,213:11443,227:11881,234:13122,256:13779,268:15385,294:16553,313:20933,404:21444,412:23561,452:24364,467:24729,473:25021,478:26189,500:26846,514:27138,519:27868,530:28233,536:34200,544:34608,549:36342,577:40410,586:40750,592:41430,611:41974,620:42518,632:43062,655:45374,706:46054,719:46394,725:47210,740:47686,747:50066,795:50678,805:51154,820:51562,827:52378,842:56060,852:56510,860:58085,886:58685,896:59435,907:63860,986:64235,992:64535,997:64910,1003:65210,1008:68386,1016:70222,1082:70630,1089:70902,1094:77362,1220:77974,1239:78450,1247:80422,1280:80898,1288:81578,1300:83346,1352:84162,1367:88574,1378:89254,1389:89934,1406:90478,1417:94092,1474:96140,1528:96972,1544:97356,1551:99212,1598:99852,1612:100748,1637:101708,1657:102348,1669:105560,1677:106296,1687:107124,1698:108044,1709:110038,1721:110749,1733:111776,1747:112487,1758:113356,1770:113988,1779:115930,1790:116382,1795:116947,1801:117399,1806:119695,1821:119955,1826:120215,1831:120670,1841:121060,1850:121515,1859:121840,1865:122880,1878:124180,1906:124505,1912:124765,1917:126838,1928:128822,1961:129270,1969:130166,1987:130742,2001:133616,2033:135184,2052:136458,2068:137046,2073:137438,2078:138810,2097:139692,2109:144170,2139:145370,2164:149540,2216:150580,2232:151140,2240:151460,2245:154340,2296:156500,2338:157700,2358:158580,2373:158980,2379:167628,2533:168164,2548:176305,2654:179611,2727:179896,2733:180580,2747:182770,2756:183920,2769:184610,2775:186060,2793:186390,2799:186984,2810:187380,2818:189360,2863:189822,2871:190350,2881:191934,2914:192330,2920:192726,2931:196290,2995:196686,3002:197280,3018:197940,3031:198534,3041:198996,3053:199524,3063:200316,3078:200712,3084:201240,3100:201570,3106:202164,3119:207784,3146:208119,3152:209325,3180:209593,3186:213680,3273:214015,3279:217066,3350:218848,3400:219172,3408:219388,3413:220971,3427:221379,3440:222093,3455:222399,3463:222909,3474:223113,3479:223725,3498:223980,3504:226562,3534:226872,3541:227492,3555:227802,3561:228298,3575:228608,3581:229228,3595:229600,3603:229848,3608:230468,3622:231212,3639:231646,3647:233816,3689:234312,3698:239080,3721:239590,3727:254842,3810:257278,3856:257866,3865:258454,3874:258874,3880:263520,3929
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Darryll Pines' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Darryll Pines lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Darryll Pines describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Darryll Pines describes his mother's childhood in Liverpool, England

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Darryll Pines describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Darryll Pines describes his father's decision to join the U.S. Air Force and his parents meeting in Liverpool, England

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Darryll Pines talks about American servicemen who married British women while stationed in England

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Darryll Pines describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Darryll Pines describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Darryll Pines talks about his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Darryll Pines describes his parents' careers

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Darryll Pines describes the sights and sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Darryll Pines talks about the Black Panther Party, the loss of jobs, and the gradual deterioration of the East Oakland neighborhood where he grew up

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Darryll Pines talks about the prominent entertainers and athletes who came from Oakland, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Darryll Pines talks about political activism in the San Francisco Bay Area

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Darryll Pines describes his exposure to technology

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Darryll Pines describes the neighborhood where he grew up in East Oakland

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Darryll Pines describes his mother's role in getting into Berkeley High School

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Darryll Pines describes his experience in grade school at Markham Elementary School and St. Benedict's Catholic School

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Darryll Pines describes watching the moon landing and meeting Neil Armstrong

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Darryll Pines talks about the major events of 1994

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Darryll Pines describes his relationship with his twin brother

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Darryll Pines talks about playing basketball

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Darryll Pines describes his decision to become an engineer

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Darryll Pines describes his decision to attend the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Darryll Pines talks about his mentor and advisor, Daniel Mote

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Darryll Pines talks about his interest in science fiction

Tape: 2 Story: 15 - Darryll Pines talks about political activism in Berkeley in the 1980s

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Darryll Pines talks about his decision to study mechanical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Darryll Pines talks about the relationships he formed at the University of California, Berkeley

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Darryll Pines talks about decision to attend MIT and his dissertation on the control of structures in space

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Darryll Pines describes human powered aircraft

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Darryll Pines describes his Ph.D. dissertation research

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Darryll Pines talks about his doctoral advisor, Andy von Flowtow

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Darryll Pines talks about meeting his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Darryll Pines describes his space research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Darryll Pines describes his decision to work at the University of Maryland, College Park

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Darryll Pines describes his students' research in deep space navigation and uninhabited air vehicle systems

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Darryll Pines describes his professional relationship with Freeman Hrabowski

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Darryll Pines describes programs designed to increase minority student enrollment in STEM

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Darryll Pines describes the NASA CUIP program for the next generation of space vehicles

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Darryll Pines describes the SAMPEX program at NASA Goddard

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Darryll Pines describes his research with DARPA

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Darryll Pines talks about DARPA's technological contributions to modern-day society

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Darryll Pines describes his experience as chair of the aerospace engineering department at the University of Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Darryll Pines talks about the current generation of students in engineering and science

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Darryll Pines describes his students' efforts to use their engineering skills to have a positive impact on society

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Darryll Pines talks about the balance between his research and administrative roles

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Darryll Pines talks about recruiting minority students to the University of Maryland's College of Engineering

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Darryll Pines describes cutting edge research in science and engineering

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Darryll Pines talks about his hopes and concerns for the African-American community today

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Darryll Pines talks about what he would have done differently to prepare for his career

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Darryll Pines reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Darryll Pines talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Darryll Pines describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

3$8

DATitle
Darryll Pines talks about decision to attend MIT and his dissertation on the control of structures in space
Darryll Pines describes his space research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Transcript
Okay, alright. Alright, now, okay, so MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts] now, how did you choose MIT? Was it easy--well, if you can get in, you should choose it (laughter).$$Well, okay, you know, four years later after coming out of high school, I was a much smarter person, much wiser about the world. And I realized that, and I'm a very competitive person, so once I realized--I went to U. C. Berkeley [University of California, Berkeley] and I was able to do well. I realized that I wanted the biggest challenge. I wanted to take on the toughest challenge and I wanted to be at the best school this nation had to offer, and I felt that was MIT. And I wanted to also experience the East Coast, and so I applied to MIT, Stanford [University, Palo Alto, California], U.C. Berkeley, University of Washington [Seattle, Washington] and Cal Tech [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California]. The only school I didn't get into, and I won't hold it against them, was Cal Tech, and it really made me mad at the time, I mean, to be honest with you. And I still hold that letter today, right. And it's used, I've used that letter as ammunition for my entire life, to be honest with you. Even though this is on this tape, I'm just telling it like it is (laughter). You know, because I said I got into every school and I didn't get into Cal Tech, you gotta be kidding me, at that time, you know, twenty, twenty-one, twenty-one years old. So, I went to MIT, and being the competitive person that I am, I wanted to go to the best college, and I felt MIT was that school. And it actually turned out to be one of the best decisions I ever made in my life. And because I went to MIT, got admitted, obviously started my graduate program, met some fantastic people--I mean people who just are my colleagues and best friends today--I met a fantastic advisor who took me underneath his wing. His name was Andy von Flotow. He was--$$Can you spell that?$$Yeah. Andy, A-N-D-Y, von Flotow, V-O-W [space] F-L-O-T-O-W. And he was, Andy was a person who grew up in Canada and got his Ph.D. from Stanford [University] and ended up on the faculty at MIT in the aeronautics and astronomics department. Even though I was a student in mechanical engineering, Dr. von Flotow was willing to take me as a student, a graduate student, and do some research on space structures control. And at that time, in space research there was this interest in building these very large telescopes. I mean, telescopes, if you can imagine, ten kilometers in length, I mean ten kilometers in length in space, to look deep into the vacuum and see if there are other solar systems, civilizations, so forth. And one of the problems that these large structures had is that they were so long that they would vibrate, and therefore when they vibrated they would affect the focus of the instrument. So, the problem I worked on was could I develop a method that can control these structures to, you know, fractions of an arc, what we call the arc second of angle, very small fraction of an angle, to get the resolution that these instruments needed? And I ended up developing the sensor that could be used to control these vehicles of large spatial extent, and that's what I worked on for my Ph.D. But I worked on it for Andy von Flotow. And in so doing I met so many fantastic people at MIT, and really understood why I was in MIT, just like I had thought. I didn't know what it would be, what the experience would be, but the experience was even better than I could imagine. So, I truly enjoyed it, and to this day I feel like it was one of the best decisions of my entire life, was to go there and be educated at MIT, so--.$Okay, okay. Now, 1992, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [in Livermore, California]. So, what was going on there?$$So, I chose Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory because at the time, even though it's a Department of Energy facility and tends to work on big physics projects--because Livermore's lab is dominated, again, by scientists as we had an earlier discussion about (laughter). So, big physics happens at Lawrence Livermore Lab. But what they were doing just before I got there is that they had this incredible space project that involved-- you may remember this, as under President [Ronald] Reagan's time, 'Star Wars', do you remember that? And during this time period he put a lot of money into a space shield for the United States that literally, for any intercontinental ballistic missile [ICBM] coming from Russia or anywhere, that we could put up and deploy a family of spacecraft that would not only look out for the intercontinental ballistic--ICBMs, but it would also shoot them down in their ascent trajectory. So, I joined that program. Honestly, I joined that program because it was spacecraft and I was excited about being a part of that, to be honest with you. And they had a lot of money. They had a billion dollars of money. Livermore had several hundreds of millions of dollars for this program, and they were looking at the time for a spacecraft engineer to help solve that problem. So, I was in heaven. I was like wow, I get to work on all this stuff, this is great. So, I went to Livermore and I became part of the main team that was working on this problem. And while we were working on that problem we got another big project which was called the Clementine Spacecraft, which was a demonstration program to demonstrate advanced technology that would help legitimize the Star Wars problem. That is, that you could detect ICBMs coming at you and you could shoot them down. So, Clementine was the demonstration project that demonstrated this could be done. So, my job was to do the navigation for the spacecraft, but also help design and analyze some of the instruments, the sensors, the optics that were used to track the ICBMs. So, this turned out to be a great project for me, because what happened was there was a major science part of the project. So, we were going to deploy the spacecraft. It was going to do an orbit around the moon and then after it did an orbit around the moon it was going to fly by an asteroid, the spacecraft. So, I, with a couple of colleagues at National Naval Research Lab was developing the navigation algorithms and the control algorithms for the vehicle. And it turned out that this particular spacecraft with the sensor sweep was the first spacecraft to discover water at the South Pole of the moon, which allows for life to exist on the moon. But no one had confirmed whether there was water on the moon and not at the South Pole. So, this did it at the South Pole. Using the hyper-spectra imagery system that we had, we were able to ascertain that indeed water was present at the South Pole. It was a major discovery in science, and it was such a major discovery in science at the time, that to this day a replica of the Clementine Spacecraft sits in the [National] Air and Space Museum [Smithsonian Institute, Washington, District of Columbia]. So, that was a proud moment for me personally to be a part of that program and a part of that accomplishment with my colleagues from Livermore and from Naval Research Lab. So, I was just lucky, again, in the right place and the right time there to work on that program. And then I worked on several other programs related to uninhabited air vehicles also, for Livermore up until about 1994.$$Okay, okay. That's big stuff. So '94 [1994], is that your last year with Lawrence Livermore?$$That's right. So I ended up having a great time. I worked there from 1992 actually to 1995.

Gwendolyn E. Boyd

Mechanical engineer and civic leader Gwendolyn Elizabeth Boyd was born on December 27, 1955, in Montgomery, Alabama to Dora McClain. Boyd’s mother passed away when Boyd was thirteen years old, and her godmother, Emzella Mapson, raised her. Boyd's teachers, at the all-black McDavid Elementary School, nurtured her love of math from a young age. Boyd was one of five black students to integrate Jefferson Davis High School in Montgomery, Alabama. In high school. she helped establish a student interracial council, was a member of the math honor society, and performed choir before graduating as valedictorian in 1973. Boyd attended the historically black Alabama State University in Montgomery, Alabama on a scholarship, graduating summa cum laude with her B.S. degree in mathematics and minors in music and physics in 1977. She received a fellowship to attend Yale University's School of Engineering in New Haven, Connecticut, becoming the school's first African American woman to receive an M.S. degree in mechanical engineering in 1979.

Following her graduation, Boyd worked briefly as an engineer at IBM in Kingston, New York. In 1980, she was offered a position as a submarine navigation systems analyst at the Applied Physics Laboratory at John Hopkins University. Boyd was later appointed to high-level administrative positions, first as the assistant for development programs in 1998 and then the as executive assistant to the chief of staff in 2004.

Boyd has been an active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., rising through the ranks of the sorority's leadership since joining as a student at Alabama State. In 2000, Boyd was elected for a four-year term as the national president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. Boyd also serves on the board of directors of Leadership Greater Washington, the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., Bennett College and the National Partnership for Community Leadership. She is a member of The Links, Inc., the National Council of Negro Women and Ebenezer A.M.E Church in Fort Washington, Maryland where she serves on the ministerial staff. In 2007, Boyd received her M.Div. degree at Howard University and is an ordained itinerant elder in the A.M.E. Church. She has also received honorary doctorates from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and Bennett College in North Carolina. In 2010, President Barack Obama nominated Boyd to the board of trustees of the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation.

Gwendolyn E. Boyd was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 25, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.161

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/25/2007

Last Name

Boyd

Maker Category
Middle Name

E.

Schools

McDavid Elementary School

Jefferson Davis High School

Alabama State University

Yale University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Gwendolyn

Birth City, State, Country

Montgomery

HM ID

BOY02

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

South Africa

Favorite Quote

The Lord Is My Light And My Salvation. Whom Shall I Fear?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Alabama

Birth Date

12/27/1955

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Montgomery

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken, Collard Greens

Short Description

Civic leader and mechanical engineer Gwendolyn E. Boyd (1955 - ) was the first African American woman to receive her M.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Yale University. In 2000, she was elected national president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Boyd became the president of Alabama State University in 2014.

Employment

International Business Machines Corporation

Johns Hopkins University. Applied Physics Laboratory.

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:3500,16:4716,39:7452,94:12620,195:14900,239:15432,247:16724,270:17256,278:17712,285:20904,337:21436,346:21968,354:22500,366:22956,373:23716,385:30150,412:30940,425:32283,452:32678,458:33942,474:34890,487:37892,523:38208,560:38998,571:42711,636:46503,699:47135,722:49505,764:58930,836:59270,841:59695,847:61565,880:74066,1060:74885,1070:80955,1119:81550,1127:82060,1134:83675,1160:84270,1169:86565,1206:88860,1244:92198,1267:92494,1272:94640,1308:95602,1325:96638,1350:97156,1358:97452,1363:97748,1368:100042,1394:101300,1415:110880,1522:113890,1590:114730,1604:116620,1636:116900,1641:119980,1696:122780,1752:123200,1759:123690,1782:126980,1832:129570,1885:130060,1893:140600,1956:141880,1976:144912,2004:147096,2046:147486,2052:148188,2063:148500,2068:157750,2208:160504,2267:164311,2331:164635,2336:164959,2341:168442,2399:168928,2407:170548,2437:171034,2445:171439,2451:172087,2461:173140,2479:179296,2565:188882,2612:192236,2665:198372,2736:199308,2756:200010,2770:200400,2776:202896,2818:209472,2893:218493,3038:219237,3047:225840,3137:229095,3193:243916,3368:248130,3456:252736,3516:257480,3527:257720,3532:258080,3539:263475,3624:264276,3636:265344,3650:270854,3720:271340,3728:277334,3839:279278,3874:287030,3933:290267,3987:291014,3998:292093,4013:292923,4026:293421,4035:300366,4117:302070,4153:302638,4162:303419,4183:306250,4206$0,0:735,3:1163,8:1912,16:4435,23:4839,35:10394,86:11101,95:11707,102:13121,121:14939,144:15343,158:15747,163:16151,168:16858,176:22290,203:24840,261:25740,275:27165,324:27840,335:28365,344:31440,411:31890,419:32265,426:33165,441:40920,458:41886,466:42852,474:48150,506:48890,514:49482,523:51036,551:51332,556:52220,571:52960,583:59028,667:63960,709:64260,715:64710,722:68668,758:71048,796:71388,802:72884,830:75520,847:79390,904:80380,914:81460,931:81910,938:84700,982:85420,992:86500,1006:88840,1047:89920,1063:90730,1073:96760,1178:97390,1187:104440,1192:108700,1282:113812,1323:115990,1351:116386,1356:117475,1370:120883,1396:124231,1440:128842,1487:129222,1493:130590,1523:131426,1549:131806,1555:141914,1783:148830,1928:156060,1942:156558,1949:161123,2033:161538,2039:167431,2170:167763,2175:168261,2183:168842,2192:170834,2221:174584,2227:175102,2235:175620,2244:176138,2252:176656,2260:178432,2289:178802,2295:179394,2310:183464,2417:184278,2431:188065,2445:188585,2456:191965,2524:192355,2532:192615,2537:204470,2683:206390,2713:206950,2721:208310,2741:208630,2746:209030,2752:209350,2757:211050,2763
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gwendolyn Boyd's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gwendolyn Boyd lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her upbringing and the role of God in her life

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gwendolyn Boyd remembers her mother's death and her last words to her

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about not knowing her father

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her elementary school experience

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about growing up in the Tulane Courts projects of Montgomery, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her childhood friends and her interest in math

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gwendolyn Boyd describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about overcoming her hardships and being independent from an early age

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience in junior high school during integration

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her role on an integrated council with black and white students at Jefferson Davis High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about protesting the song "Dixie"

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the social and political activities during the 1950s and 1960s and their influence

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her decision to attend Alabama State University

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her transition to Alabama State University and her community activities

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her interest in math, and about being recruited to pursue her graduate studies in engineering at Yale University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about being accepted into Yale University's School of Engineering

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about transitioning from Alabama to Connecticut, finding Varick AME Church, and funding her education

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience at Yale University's School of Engineering

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience working at IBM, and her decision to leave IBM and join Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience at Johns Hopkins University and her experience in submarine school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about becoming the president of the Washington, D.C. chapter and the millennial president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her leadership initiatives in South Africa as the president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her leadership initiatives as the president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the Project SEE initiative

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the mission of the Delta Homeownership Initiative for Financial Fortitude program

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the Leadership Delta program

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her faith and her admiration of HistoryMaker Bishop Vashti McKenzie, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her faith and her admiration of HistoryMaker Bishop Vashti McKenzie, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her board appointments with Leadership Washington, the Children's National Medical Center, and United Way

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about the National Partnership for Community Leadership, The Links, Inc., and her other professional affiliations

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her faith in God

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Gwendolyn Boyd shares her message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gwendolyn Boyd describes her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

9$4

DATitle
Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her interest in math, and about being recruited to pursue her graduate studies in engineering at Yale University
Gwendolyn Boyd talks about her experience working at IBM, and her decision to leave IBM and join Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory
Transcript
So did you know what you were going to become or what you would do?$$I didn't know what I was going to become but whatever it was, I knew it had to involve math.$$Okay.$$I just knew it had to be something that involved math, that involved problem solving, that involved putting things together. Again, it goes back to my love of sewing, which is putting pieces of a puzzle together to make a garment, my love of music, which involved, you know, notes, which have, you know, mathematical connotations to them. So everything that I did, not knowing it then, but everything that God ordained for me had mathematical background in it. So I knew whatever career I wanted, it had to involve math. Alabama State [University] was traditionally and still is, traditionally known as a teachers' college. It was founded as a teachers' college. So just about everybody who came through there became a teacher. That's what, that's what you went there for. But somewhere in my spirit, the Lord said, no, I don't think you're gonna be a teacher, didn't know what, but I knew something that had to do with math. So as I matriculated I started taking Physics, and really loved Physics, which, you know, combined my love of math and problem solving to real-life situations. We did not have Physics, as a major. We had it as a minor at Alabama State. So I took all the courses that were available to me for, as a Physics minor. I was also a Music minor. Again, my love of music, but knowing in my mind or telling myself in my mind I did not have the talent that would take me to the Metropolitan Opera, and I wanted to eat every day. So I wanted to stick with something that would put food on the table. So I was a music minor. I had to do two recitals and all the other things that, you know, were a part of that discipline. But somewhere towards my junior, the latter part of my junior year, I started talking with my advisor and he said to me, "You need to start thinking about going to grad school". And I said, "To do what?", you know, and he said, well, just start looking at some things and start reading, you know, look at some ways you can use your talent and your skill. And I just started reading about engineering, never met an engineer in my life. No engineers were on our campus, so I had no point of reference as to what, you know, to talk with someone. But in reading about what engineers did, I said, this is what I want to do. I wanna be able to solve problems, using my math and using my physics and solve world-life problems. This is what I wanna do. And so as my senior year approached, I took the GRE and did well on that and then I started applying to graduate school. And my advisor said, you know, just apply to a broad number of schools and the --I said, well, I don't have any engineering as an undergraduate. What will happen if I apply, you know, for graduate school for engineering without an engineering undergraduate major? And he said, well, let's just try it and see, and so I did. And so I applied for grad school and had actually been accepted at the University of Illinois and had talked to the dean there and was, you know, ready, had my apartment all set, getting ready to graduate, and graduated top of my class at Alabama State. So, and then I got this phone call from Yale [University]. I have to be perfectly honest. I thought it was one of my friends playing a joke on me (laughter). They said, this is, you know, Dr. Aptful (ph.) from Yale University. And I said, yeah, right. Okay, and we understand that you're interested in pursuing graduate work in engineering. I said, yes. Well, we'd like to offer you a fellowship to come to Yale. And I said, okay, who is this? (Laughter). He says, no, this is actually, you know, I'm the associate professor, you know, here in the School of Engineering, and we'd like to talk to you about applying to Yale because, of course, I had not applied, applying and coming here as--and being a part of our graduate program. So without an application or anything, he said, if you're willing to come, yeah, if you have them send us your transcript, and we'll work through the details. And I was accepted into Yale's graduate school for engineering.$So what happens next?$$Well, I now have to get a job (laughter). And needless to say, having a degree from Yale opened a number of doors, doors that I didn't even know existed before, and companies were calling me and saying, we wanna, you know, we want you to California to work for such and such, and, you know, and I was flying all over the place. This was wonderful. I said, this is nice, you know, but you have to make a decision to go somewhere. And I started working with IBM in Kingston, New York, another shocking transition (laughter). Now, I've learned how to live in New Haven [Connecticut], which is, you know, Metropolitan kind of a city. Kingston, New York is in the Catskills. It's where, you know, people kind of go for meditative--there is nothing in Kingston except IBM. And I think even now they've closed the plant there. So, again, I'm in an environment where I am the only African American, female, and, you have a sense of, this is why they've hired me. But there was absolutely no fulfillment in the assignment that I was given. IBM is a wonderful company, and I don't want to disparage it in any way, but I, the assignment that I was given was not one that was very enlightening, encouraging, whatever word you wanna use for it.$$What was the assignment?$$Actually, nothing. I was to read through some manuals and comment on some pieces, but I wanted to do engineering, didn't really want to read manuals and give comments and so I became impatient and said, I don't think I'm going to be able to stay here. And so some of those people who I had flown on the planes with and, you know, done interviews with, before I decided to come with IBM, I called them back, and said, "Remember me?" (Laughter) And that's when my godmother's advice of "Don't burn your bridges and be careful how you treat people and how you talk to people". They said, oh, yes, yes, we remember you very well. And so, I said, I'm interested in coming back or, you know, at least talking with you again about an opportunity. And one of those opportunities was at Johns Hopkins at the Applied Physics Laboratory. And the gentleman who had interviewed you said, oh, we would just love to have you here. We can't offer you IBM money because that was another mistake that I made and which I tell young people all the time. I know that this, in this environment, in this society we live in, everybody goes for the money. But going for the money in that case was a mistake for me. I should have gone with the kind of assignment, the kind of work that I really wanted to do. So he said, we can't offer you IBM money, but we can offer you a great job and a great assignment. And so, in 1980, I came to Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and I've been there ever since.

Robert Sherwood Dorsey

Engineer Robert Sherwood Dorsey was born on October 9, 1293 in Lafayette, Louisiana. The son of Rita Starling Allen and Willie Dorsey, he graduated from Phillis Wheatley High School in Houston, Texas. Enrolling in Prairie View College in 1941, Dorsey volunteered for the U.S. Army Reserves and studied engineering. Drafted into the segregated U.S. Army, Dorsey served in the 92nd Infantry Division and worked as a water purification specialist for a combat engineering battalion. Honorably discharged in March of 1946, Dorsey eventually enrolled at Ohio State University where he excelled at football and earned his B.S. degree in 1949 in mechanical engineering.

Hired by General Electric, Dorsey helped develop the engines used in airplanes like the B-1, B-2, F-14, F-16, and F-18. He also participated in the joint venture between GE and French company SNECMA which created the CFM56 engines used in many commercial jets. After leaving GE in 1987, Dorsey worked with Belcan, a consulting firm, analyzing problems associated with military engines.

Ohio State University awarded Dorsey the Distinguished Football Alumnus Award and he has also received awards from the NCAA and the Cincinnati chapter of the National Football Foundation and Hall of Fame. An inductee into Tau Beta Pi, the engineering honor society, and Pi Tau Sigma, the international mechanical engineering honor society, Dorsey is also a member of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity. He served on the board of trustees for the Ohio State University and as the president of the National Alumni Association of the Ohio State University.

Dorsey was married to Helena Fredericka Harris and they had three daughters. Dorsey passed away on February 11, 2011.

Accession Number

A2005.063

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/14/2005

Last Name

Dorsey

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Sherwood

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Phillis Wheatley High School

Prairie View A&M University

The Ohio State University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Lafayette

HM ID

DOR03

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hilton Head, South Carolina

Favorite Quote

You should change the problems that you can change and accept those you cannot change and then have the wisdom to know the differences.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

10/9/1923

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Cincinnati

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Spaghetti, Meat Sauce

Death Date

2/11/2011

Short Description

Mechanical engineer Robert Sherwood Dorsey (1923 - 2011 ) worked as a mechanical engineer for General Electric, where he helped develop engines for various commercial and military aircrafts from 1949 to 1987. After retiring from GE, he worked with Belcan, a consulting firm that analyzes problems associated with military engines.

Employment

General Electric Company.

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2100,36:2400,41:3525,53:4050,62:8025,144:8550,153:14762,244:15034,249:15714,260:16462,273:16938,278:17550,289:17822,294:18638,308:18978,314:19454,323:19794,329:25094,366:31960,409:33390,427:34490,438:35700,447:36800,458:37460,464:39220,479:40210,489:40980,498:45588,514:46512,523:46848,528:47940,545:48780,555:49284,563:53484,638:55668,662:56004,667:56928,681:57768,692:58860,702:59952,713:63732,766:65496,775:65916,781:72708,795:74600,826:75202,836:76062,847:76922,860:77954,875:81652,920:83286,950:87750,965:88839,980:96165,1085:96660,1091:102326,1120:103150,1130:107976,1180:110736,1224:111656,1235:116974,1278:120130,1289:120725,1298:123275,1340:124890,1364:125315,1370:126080,1383:126760,1393:127100,1398:127780,1407:128800,1415:131010,1436:131520,1444:134930,1449$0,0:5324,100:9932,181:10892,191:11564,200:11948,205:12524,212:14156,232:15116,243:20752,322:27745,374:29785,398:30380,407:31485,415:34848,431:35586,442:36078,449:37226,460:38046,474:39686,490:41572,504:41900,509:42966,524:44524,549:45098,557:45590,564:49980,572:51450,585:52136,593:54978,613:55860,624:61446,688:70974,727:72118,741:72646,748:72998,753:73350,758:79620,782:80577,792:82665,816:88059,905:88755,915:94088,943:94862,953:95722,962:96066,967:96926,978:98732,1008:99420,1017:100108,1031:100710,1039:101484,1049:102344,1058:103032,1067:110757,1118:111576,1130:111940,1135:113578,1149:113942,1154:117536,1173:118272,1184:119376,1193:122136,1218:123700,1239:125632,1259:127196,1275:128576,1289:131796,1320:138132,1339:146193,1407:146746,1416:150380,1489:150854,1496:155240,1529:157176,1551:158144,1563:158760,1571:160872,1595:161752,1606:162896,1635:171332,1708:171588,1713:171844,1735:172292,1743:173956,1761:174468,1771:175812,1793:176452,1802:177156,1811:177412,1816:185044,1864:188021,1885:189305,1903:193371,1947:197800,1962
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert Dorsey's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Robert Dorsey lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert Dorsey talks about his mother, Rita Allen

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert Dorsey talks about his father, Willie Dorsey

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert Dorsey describes his childhood in Houston, Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert Dorsey describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert Dorsey describes his experience in Houston's segregated school system in the 1930s and 1940s

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert Dorsey talks about his teachers in school

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert Dorsey talks about joining the U.S. Army during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert Dorsey describes his experience with the Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP) during World War II - part one

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert Dorsey describes his experience with the Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP) during World War II - part two

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert Dorsey talks about segregation in the U.S. Army during World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert Dorsey talks about applying to college after returning from World War II

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert Dorsey talks about his mentors during his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert Dorsey describes his experience at Ohio State University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert Dorsey talks about segregation in Columbus, Ohio, in the 1940s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert Dorsey describes how he met his wife

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert Dorsey describes his decision to work at General Electric

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert Dorsey describes his first year at General Electric

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert Dorsey describes the creative process in engineering

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert Dorsey discusses the changes in minority rights that began in the 1940s and 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Robert Dorsey describes his experience at the General Electric plant in Cincinnati

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Robert Dorsey describes General Electric Company's involvement in manufacturing jet engines

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Robert Dorsey reflects upon keeping abreast with changes in technology

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Robert Dorsey describes his proudest contribution at General Electric Company

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Robert Dorsey talks about his family

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Robert Dorsey reflects upon the opportunities for the African American community in the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Robert Dorsey reflects upon his experience as one of the first African Americans at the General Electric plant in Evendale

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Robert Dorsey talks about his simulation project at General Electric

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Robert Dorsey describes his post-retirement consulting work with H&R Block and Belcan Engineering

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Robert Dorsey reflects upon the future of engineering and race relations in America

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Robert Dorsey reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Robert Dorsey describes his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$3

DATitle
Robert Dorsey describes the creative process in engineering
Robert Dorsey describes his proudest contribution at General Electric Company
Transcript
Now, Mr. Dorsey, you mentioned that your decision to take the assignment with GE [General Electric] was influenced by the fact that you thought might be able to be creative on the job.$$Um-hum.$$So can you just help me to understand what is it that mechanical engineers do that allows for this creativity to enter into the whole process?$$Well, it's--the creativity that enters into it is the, the solving of problems that are associated with the mechanical parts because in any machinery that you have, there are problems that will arise. You know, you have an automobile, and you know your automobile doesn't, it doesn't perform as it should always. There's some problems that creep up. Well, the creativity comes in and how do we go about researching, say the cause of those problems, and what do we do to fix 'em? And also, the creativity comes in the design and the improvements of the parts because as you see that the automobile, say went from a Model-T Ford to now we have these big SUVs [sport utility vehicle] that we have. And so the creativity comes in and how do you start from this humble Model-T and arrive at something like the Escalade [Cadillac SUV] or the Expedition [Ford SUV]? So that's where the creativity comes in and all the conveniences that are associated with the controls, how you control things, the air conditioning and all of these things are a result of some creative efforts that an engineer has come up with.$Mr. Dorsey, you said you were with GE [General Electric] for over thirty-eight years?$$Thirty-eight years, over thirty-eight years, yeah.$$Okay.$$About thirty-eight and a half.$$Is there any phase of your career with GE that you're especially proud of, any product or any project that you worked on that you're especially proud of?$$Well, I was really proud of the last job that I did with GE, and that was when we started what is called the Office Automation which was the introduction of computers and word processors and that into the work place because before that we just had the desktop calculators and the pencil and paper that was creating all the documents that we had to create because with the new applications, the documentation became much more critical. And also the volume of documentation that grew fantastically, and it just grew to a point where we just couldn't handle it with the old paper and pencil method. So when the computers came in, word processors came in and what not, and the personal computer, the desktop computers came in, this was really the big breakthrough in us being able to do things in a more efficient and more creative way. And part of my activity before I retired was the introduction and the application and the support of that system of the equipment and the work and the personnel that was necessary for, to operate that equipment. So I was--and, you know, that was sort of outside of my field of training because my field of training was mostly mechanical, and, but now, we get into this business of information systems processing, which is an altogether different field. And all of that was really just learned on the job. We didn't go back--we went, we took some classes, but the classes that we took were mostly to familiarize ourselves with the software more than anything else. But the techniques and the organization and the gathering and the storage and all that was just an on-the-job creation, yeah.