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Marcia Sturdivant

Educator and nonprofit chief executive Marcia M. Sturdivant was born in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania. She received her B.A. degree in psychology and behavioral sciences from Point Park University in 1978 and her M.A. degree in criminal justice from the University of Detroit in 1980. She later earned her Ph.D. degree in educational and developmental psychology from the University of Pittsburgh in 1996.

From 1987 to 1990, Sturdivant served as director of early education programs at the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh. From 1990 to 1998, she worked in a number of positions at the Allegheny County Department of Human Services in the Office of Children, Youth and Families (OCYF), the second largest child welfare agency in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In 1998, she was appointed deputy director of the Allegheny County Department of Human Services and administrator of the OCYF. Sturdivant was then named president and chief executive officer of the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED) in 2013. She has also served as an assistant professor at Point Park University and an adjunct faculty member in the Graduate School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh.

Sturdivant is a past president of the Pittsburgh affiliate of the National Black Child Development Institute. She directs the Children’s Church and Children’s Choir at Nazarene Baptist Church in Pittsburgh, and has served as a board member of the American Association of Family Group Decision Making.

Sturdivant’s honors include the Three Rivers Youth Nellie Award for Community Leadership; the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh’s Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award and Ron Brown Civic Award; The YWCA of Greater Pittsburgh Racial Justice Award; and the National Association of Black Administrators in Child Welfare Valerie Bullard Award. She has been cited by Pittsburgh Magazine as one of “Forty Local, Gifted and Black African American Leaders,” and was recognized by the New Pittsburgh Courier as one of their 50 Women of Excellence in 2012. Sturdivant has also served as a repeat participant and research panelist of the Oxford University Educational Roundtable in Oxford, England.

She is married to Larry Anderson, Sr. and is the mother of two sons, Larry, Jr. and Marshall.

Marcia Sturdivant was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 8, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.174

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/8/2014

Last Name

Sturdivant

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Michelle

Schools

Homeville Elementary School

Homeville Junior High

West Mifflin Area High School

Point Park University

University of Detroit Mercy

University of Pittsburgh

First Name

Marcia

Birth City, State, Country

Homestead

HM ID

STU04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Disney World

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/24/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Pittsburgh

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Crab Legs

Short Description

Educator and nonprofit chief executive Marcia Sturdivant (1956 - ) , president and CEO of the Negro Educational Emergency Drive (NEED), was deputy director of the Allegheny County (Pennsylvania) Department of Human Services and administrator of the Office of Children, Youth and Families for fifteen years.

Employment

NEED (Negro Educational Emergency Drive)

Allegheny County Department of Human Services

Allegheny County Office of Children, Youth and Family Services

Allegheny County Office of Children and Youth Services

Sturdivant Educational Consulting

University of Pittsburgh

Point Park College

Duquesne University

Carlow College

Community College of Allegheny County

Rankin Christian Center

Lemington Home for the Aged

Favorite Color

Pink

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176786">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marcia Sturdivant's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176787">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176788">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her maternal family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176789">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her maternal family's relationship to the Brownrigg plantation in Columbus, Mississippi</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176790">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her mother's childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176791">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her mother's experiences at Union Academy High School in Columbus, Mississippi and Mary Holmes College in West Point</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176792">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her father's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176793">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the history behind her family name</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176794">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her father's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176795">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers her father's morning ritual</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176796">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her father's interest in politics and her parents' voting advocacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176797">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her father's experience stationed on the U.S.S. Intrepid aircraft carrier in the United States Navy during World War II</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176798">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her father's homecoming after serving in the United States Navy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176799">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant describes how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176800">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers an early lesson in ethnic pride</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176801">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her family's migration from Columbus, Mississippi to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176802">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her family's migration from Columbus, Mississippi to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176803">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her mother and considers which parent she takes after most</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176804">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her siblings, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176805">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her childhood neighborhood in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176806">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about camaraderie between black students in the West Mifflin, Pennsylvania public school system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176807">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her siblings, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176808">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experiences with racism in elementary school, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176809">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experiences with racism in elementary school, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176810">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experiences with racism in elementary school, pt. 3</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176811">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers the death of a cousin in Vietnam and the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176812">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers writing an essay on civil rights leaders, H. Rap Brown, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Stokely Carmichael</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176813">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers her influential sixth grade school teacher</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176814">Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers overhearing a grade school teacher using the N-word to address students</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176815">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experience at Homeville Junior High School in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176816">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about Civil Rights and Black Nationalist activity in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the 1960s and 1970s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176817">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about being forbidden from wearing an afro by her grammar school administration</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176818">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experience cheerleading at West Mifflin North High School in Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176819">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers the support of an influential math teacher named Mr. Caldwell</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176820">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the influence of the Pentecostal church in her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176821">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers Kennywood amusement park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176822">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers influential African American faculty at West Mifflin High School and being introduced to career options in psychology</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176823">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant remembers a racially charged altercation with her high school typing teacher</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176824">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant explains how she elected to go to Point Park College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176825">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her undergraduate experience at Point Park College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176826">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her undergraduate experience at Point Park College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176827">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her experience as a research assistant and graduate student in forensic psychology at the University of Detroit</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176828">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the University of Detroit's campus</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176829">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about working in the Detroit Police Department and deviating from forensic psychology</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176830">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about becoming a probation officer for the Pittsburgh juvenile court system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176831">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant describes the philosophy of the Pittsburgh juvenile court system in the 1980s, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176832">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant recalls a memorable juvenile court case, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176833">Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Marcia Sturdivant recalls a memorable juvenile court case, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176834">Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about working on her Ph.D. in educational psychology at the University of Pittsburgh</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176835">Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Marcia Sturdivant describes working on her dissertation in educational psychology, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176836">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant describes working on her dissertation in educational psychology, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176837">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the psychological effects of stereotypes on an individual's self-regard</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176838">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the impact of slavery on black American families</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176839">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant describes the research method she used for her dissertation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176840">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant explains how she met her husband</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176841">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about working as director for early childhood education for the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176842">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant describes working in the Allegheny County Department of Human Services child welfare sector</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176843">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant describes contemporary methodology in the child welfare system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176844">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant addresses issues surrounding transracial adoption, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176845">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Marcia Sturdivant addresses issues surrounding transracial adoption, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176846">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant addresses issues surrounding transracial adoption, pt. 3</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176847">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the trauma children experience in a child welfare system</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176848">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant describes how cultural misunderstandings can influence decisions made about a child's welfare</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176849">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about the impact of crack cocaine to the families in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the 1990s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176850">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about becoming the Deputy Director of Children, Youth, and Families in the Allegheny County Human Services Department</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176851">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her tenure as Deputy Director of Children, Youth, and Families in the Allegheny County Human Services Department</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176852">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her involvement with the National Association of Black Social Workers and the Black Administrators in Child Welfare</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176853">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her tenure as president of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania affiliate of the National Black Child Development Institute</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176854">Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Marcia Sturdivant describes funding and budgeting for child welfare in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176855">Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Marcia Sturdivant talks about her relationship with NEED, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176856">Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Marcia Sturdivant explains the history of NEED, the Negro Educational Emergency Drive</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176857">Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant describes programs that NEED, Negro Educational Emergency Drive, operates</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176858">Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176859">Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Marcia Sturdivant considers what she would do differently in her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176860">Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Marcia Sturdivant reflects upon her professional legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176861">Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Marcia Sturdivant describes her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176862">Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Marcia Sturdivant considers how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/176863">Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Marcia Sturdivant narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$7

DAStory

6$6

DATitle
Marcia Sturdivant remembers an early lesson in ethnic pride
Marcia Sturdivant describes her tenure as Deputy Director of Children, Youth, and Families in the Allegheny County Human Services Department
Transcript
Now there's one more story about your father [O.C. Sturdivant] that's one of the early stories and you said that he did not, that you mentioned once, you asked your father at one point when you were a little girl how do we get straight hair? Or so-called good hair.$$Yeah, yeah, before my enlightening days, but he, my dad was a very simple man, liked simple things and I still can picture him in overalls. You know, whenever he wasn't working he would have overalls and piddlin' in the dirt. But, one thing that he liked was a clean shave and that hot shave with that hot lather and-$$And put the hot towel over himself--(simultaneous)--$$Yes.$$--And put the hot lather--$$Right, and a haircut. And, he would go, I could still picture the barber, but sometimes I would cut his hair, you know, when I got older, and I remember, you know, touching his hair and running and I says, "Daddy," and I'm so ashamed of this, I says, "Daddy, your hair, you have such pretty hair. It's so good." Oh my goodness, and I can count the number of times my dad yelled at me 'cause he was, he was real quiet but he grabbed my hand, I remember, and he turned me around and he said, "Don't you ever say that." And he said, "All hair is good hair. If you got some hair, you have good hair." (Laughter) and he said, "do you know why my hair is like this?" And he went on to explain. He says, "My mother's mother didn't have a choice." Yeah, you know, that--$$So did you get that--$$Well, you know, yeah, I started to, you know. And he was pretty graphic about it, which, again, was one of the few times we ever had that kind of a conversation, but I remember him telling me that black women, and he would call it, he said, "colored women back then--you didn't have a choice of who you selected to date." And he said, "There was nothing that we could do. So, if I'm looking like this, it wasn't by choice. So, he said, that's not something to be proud of. That's not something you celebrate or anything." And that had a lasting, you know, impression, and both my parents were very proud--are very, well my mom's [Jean Barron Sturdivant] still with us--very proud, black people and we were never able to say things like use color shades like light-skin, dark-skinned people couldn't say that, couldn't hear whatever, we just weren't allowed to say that, saying "nigger" would immediately get you a beat-down. I mean, there were just certain things that related to ethnic pride, even before the Black Power Movement or the, you know, when people were into that. In my family, we were just not allowed to make those differences and I, you know, I see now and you know, I saw once I started to really study, that it was a different time, a different experience for them and not very easy but they never accepted that, which is, I think, rather unique.$So, you were in that role [Deputy Director of Children, Youth, and Families, Department of Human Services, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania] through-$$Through 2013.$$--2013. Okay. (Laughter) so what were some of the, I guess milestones along the way you endured during this period?$$Well, I think that I was able to see during my tenure there, and by the way, I just loved that job. It was very stressful though, as all child welfare positions are. But I was able to, it's hard for me to talk about myself but this is what other people have said. That I was able to open up the relationship between the black community and the system, that other than law enforcement, child welfare might be the only other "system" that is more feared, you know, by the black community and there was a very negative view by the African American community as CYF [Department of Children, Youth, and Families] and was, you know, very much a closed system and I knew that in order to make it better for children, that we had to have some open discussions and some of the players in the helping profession in child welfare had to look the kids we served. So, you know, I began to advocate and provide contracts to African American grass roots organizations, churches; that was another thing. We didn't use the church. You can't talk about black folks and not talk about the church in the helping community, and I was very proud to let people know and help the black community understand the workings of child welfare. What are the laws, the regulations, but more importantly how can you partner with this system that, for decades, was viewed as really denigrating to the black community. You know, Malcolm X talked about how child welfare he thought was one of the significant systems that just broke up the black family. The other thing, proud, very proud moments was the issue of bringing race to the table. It was challenging and I took a lot of hits for it, but making sure that you just can't say anything and you also have to consider race and culture in the delivery of service. Third, I would say opening up and really pushing for kinship care. That's really what we should be doing. If we are child protection, we have to protect kids and if we can't keep them in their own home, then put them with their family. And I don't know, and we really, we were, we are the leaders. They are still the leaders in kinship care in this county. But I often wondered if people understand it wasn't just about kinship care, which was so important, but the history of black people in the United States. Child welfare sometime was a modern day way of breaking up families and changing the history of black people, just like slavery. It's another, it's a history of changing forever the life of that child. You know, it's beyond just what you do today. You take this child, remove them from their whole family. That has an impact for generations to come! You're not just changing that day, you're changing that forever. And I've often, I said I'm gonna write about it, often equated many of the practices and policies, power and control, economic survival, and who benefits a lot from child welfare, to that much of our history of slavery in this country. People don't like to say that 'cause they're well meaning, but we can see a lot of similarities between that, and just being able to say that, people, oh, would get up in arms, but I was proud that I was able to try to have those, you know, have those discussions. Then, prevention. You know that being able to bring to the table the fact that no one wants to harm their child. No one gives birth and says, you know, I think I'm going to be a terrible parent. I'm going to get on drugs. I'm going to developmental health issues, I'm going to harm my child--no one does that. But things happen to people. So, what can we do to support parents and families and communities so that there are healthier environments so they never have to come to us, never have to come to child welfare. And, you know, we were able to implement a lot of prevention programs, a lot that were culturally based, really amped up, created, actually, kinship care and amped up our kinship care component, and brought the whole issue of culture and race as important factors in delivery, so it wasn't always an easy ride, and the support and acknowledgments of my hard work outweighed those who criticized it.

Maxine Beatrice Baker

Foundation chief executive Maxine Beatrice Baker was born on February 29, 1952 in Homestead, Pennsylvania. Her paternal great-grandfather, Cumberland Posey, was the first African American engineer and boat builder in Pennsylvania. Her paternal great-uncle, Cumberland Posey, Jr., played for and eventually owned the Homestead Grays baseball team. Raised in Washington, D.C. by her mother and maternal grandmother, Baker attended Washington, D.C public schools and graduated from Western High School in 1969.

Attending Emerson College in Boston on a National Merit scholarship, Baker earned her B.S. degree in speech communications in 1973. After spending several years in the aviation industry, Baker joined the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) in 1982 as a budget administrator. She quickly moved through the management ranks at Freddie Mac, serving in various leadership positions including vice president of administration & corporate properties and vice president of human resources. While working as vice president of industry & trade relations, Baker expanded minority business development programs and minority recruitment. In 1997, Baker was named vice president of community relations and president and chief executive officer of the Freddie Mac Foundation, one of the nation's largest corporate philanthropy programs. Under her leadership, the Foundation’s net assets grew from $22 million in 1997 to $235 million in 2003.

Active in many organizations including the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute, the Washington Regional Area Grantmakers, the Metropolitan Washington Boys and Girls Club and Voices for America's Children, Baker has received many awards for her civic leadership.

Baker was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 1, 2005.

Accession Number

A2005.057

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/1/2005

Last Name

Baker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Beatrice

Organizations
Schools

Western High School

Jefferson Middle School Academy

John Quincy Adams Elementary School

Mrs. Dorothy's Garden of Children

Emerson College

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Maxine

Birth City, State, Country

Homestead

HM ID

BAK05

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Pennsylvania

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

You've Been Paid For.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

2/29/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Mexican Food

Short Description

Foundation chief executive Maxine Beatrice Baker (1952 - ) was the President and CEO of the Freddie Mac Foundation.

Employment

Air Transport Association

Beauvais, Robert, and Kurth

Urban Institute

Pacific Consultants

Freddie Mac

Freddie Mac Foundation

Favorite Color

Purple

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290378">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Maxine Beatrice Baker's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290379">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Maxine Beatrice Baker lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290380">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290381">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her father and her parents' meeting</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290382">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her mother's work and family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290383">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers childhood rituals</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290384">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290385">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her paternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290386">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her father's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290387">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her great-uncle, Cumberland Willis Posey, Jr.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290388">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Maxine Beatrice Baker recalls her maternal grandparents' dry cleaning shop</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290389">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes a typical day in her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290390">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers her childhood birthday parties</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290391">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers holidays in Washington, D.C., pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290392">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers holidays in Washington, D.C., pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290393">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers growing up in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290394">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her elementary schools in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290395">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her childhood personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290396">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290397">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Maxine Beatrice Baker recalls attending Berean Baptist Church in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290398">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers her junior high school years</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290399">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers her experience at Jefferson Junior High School</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290400">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers feelings of privilege</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290401">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her time at Western High School in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290402">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her decision to attend Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290403">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers being on the homecoming court at Western High School in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290404">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers changing her name at Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290405">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Maxine Beatrice Baker recalls her time at Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290406">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her jobs after college</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290407">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Maxine Beatrice Baker recalls her initial impressions of Freddie Mac</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290408">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers adopting her daughters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290409">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes being a working mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290410">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her work with Freddie Mac and the Freddie Mac Foundation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290411">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her work with 'Wednesday's Child'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290412">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes changes at Freddie Mac</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290413">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Maxine Beatrice Baker talks about philanthropy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290414">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her experience with breast cancer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290415">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Maxine Beatrice Baker reflects upon being a role model</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290416">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Maxine Beatrice Baker reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290417">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Maxine Beatrice Baker describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290418">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Maxine Beatrice Baker reflects upon her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290419">Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Maxine Beatrice Baker reflects upon her legacy and how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/290420">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Maxine Beatrice Baker narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

5$6

DATitle
Maxine Beatrice Baker remembers changing her name at Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts
Maxine Beatrice Baker talks about philanthropy
Transcript
You decided to go to Emerson?$$Um-hm.$$And, what were your experiences like there?$$Well I got to Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts, my mother [Thelma Maxine Reynolds Baker] drove me up and my recollection, she dropped me off on the curb and her last thing she said to me was, "Make sure you're getting a minor in education in case you ever have to fall back on it." And so that mentality of, of a woman getting a degree, but always have something to fall back on in case your husband and you split up, you know it was very important. When I went to school I had very long hair, it, the movement was really between the Vietnam War movement and the Black Power movement, I think about two or three weeks later, I cut all my hair off, I went to this black salon in, in Boston, I had an afro created. Now my hair is pretty, pretty dead straight, so I got this permanent and every night I would put a 125 perm rods in and then I could roll 'em real fast, you know, I'd get 'em all in and I'd get up in the morning and take 'em out and I'd pick my hair out, pick, pick, pick, pick, pick, pick, pick, it'd take a while to pick it out and I'd take a can of hairspray and I'd spray my hair and then I'd put this scarf on it, I'd hold the scarf and sort of do it, you know, and it big like [HistoryMaker] Angela Davis, you know, and of course when I walked, you know, it would sort of like--it would sort of move--$$(Laughter).$$--like this, you know? It, it definitely moved with me and I was finding myself. Changed my name.$$What did you change your name too?$$My name was Amanata [ph.]. My friend, my good friend from high school [Western High School; Duke Ellington School of the Arts, Washington, D.C.], Linda [ph.], with whom I'm still friends with named me Amanata. It had a, it had a meaning but to this day we can't remember, I should probably look it up. Never told my family that I had changed my name and changed my persona and that Thanksgiving when I came home, I came off of the airplane, I had my head wrapped in a gele, and my mother was standing at the gate when I got off and she saw this very tall head wrapped, I had on a gorgeous navy blue suede coat with zippers all over. And I caught that eye of hers and walked over to her and she says, "I'll meet you out front," and she scurried on away and I said, "Well what about my bags?" She was gone. And I come out with my bags and I get them in the, in the car and we're riding home and she says, "Well what is, what is this rag on your head?" And I said, "It's a gele and I say it's an African head dress." And she says, "Well Maxine, what, what's going on here?" "Don't call me Maxine anymore, I've changed my name, that's my slave name and I'd prefer if you'd call me Amanata." We got home, I had a date that evening with my boyfriend, I went upstairs, 'cause I had the perm rods underneath the gele, okay? So I took the gele, and got the, got the afro positioned and I told her I was going out about eight o'clock, and about a quarter to eight, or seven thirty, eight o'clock she called me downstairs, I came downstairs, through the living room and dining room, turned into the kitchen and she took a pot of water and threw it on me and she said, "Let me be real clear about this, as long as I'm supporting you, I'm sending you to school, you're living in my house, your name is [HistoryMaker] Maxine Beatrice Baker and blow that hair out and no more Amanata."$$What happened to Amanata after that?$$It was almost like a reverse baptism, or, or in that scene in 'The Wizard of Oz,' when the Wicked Witch just sort of, she sort of left.$$Amanata just kind of faded away?$$Um-hm.$Why is philanthropic work important?$$Well, I think it's the, the essence of what the company's [Freddie Mac, Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation] about. Our company is about financing homes, our foundation [Freddie Mac Foundation] is about making homes a safe, sound, healthy, happy places for children. We know that if children are stabilized, families are stabilized, if families are stabilized, communities are stabilized, so, you know it all goes together about making a better place, better place than what we found. We understand that to whom much is given, much is required, and so we, we take our philanthropic work, as like any other business, we want to be effective, efficient.$$And do you think that, what are some of your thoughts on African Americans and philanthropic work? Often times, it, it's usually not the face that you see when you hear of philanthropy and that kind of thing, what are some of your thoughts?$$You know, I think it depends on how you define philanthropy. I many times our traditional model is someone who is wealthy, and is investing money and putting their names on, you know, different buildings or programs. I would suggest that I think the African c- American community has always been philanthropic, I think we're taught very early on to take care of our own, to support our family and, you know, the, the neighborhood, you don't have to just give dollars, you can give time and we certainly know that our ancestors, those that we know and those that we, that were here before us, have made this place a better place for us to live in. That's what I think philanthropy is about. I love when Dr. Angelou [HistoryMaker Maya Angelou] talks about we've been paid for, we've been paid for by the generation that came before us, by their giving back to the community to make sure that which they came to is better. And that's what I think philanthropy is all about. So, while we may not have big names, other than the Cosbys or that are giving at, at, you know, to may institutions, or Oprah [Winfrey] or whatever, I think we have a history, a rich history of giving back and taking care of others. I--it reminds me of Aunt Beulah's [Beulah Burke] table (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) (Unclear).$$You know it's, Aunt Beulah taught me early on, it doesn't matter if they're related, they have a right to be here at this table and if as long as we have something to offer, and to share, then that's what we will do.