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Princell Hair

Broadcast executive Princell Hair was born on February 2, 1967 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Hair attended Fort Lauderdale High School and graduated in 1985. That same year, he enrolled in the U.S. Naval Academy, where he spent the next four years. Hair was then admitted to Florida International University in Miami, graduating two years later with his B.S. degree in broadcast journalism. He entered the world of journalism soon after, working as a writer and producer for WPLG-TV and WSVN-TV, ABC and Fox-affiliated stations, respectively. In 1993, Hair was hired as an executive producer for Chicago’s WSVN-TV. After two years, he was hired as an assistant news director for the CBS station WKMG-TV in Orlando, Florida. Hair was then named news director for Hearst television station WBAL-TV in Baltimore, Maryland, where he served from 1998 to 2001.

In 2001, Hair was hired by Viacom to oversee thirty nine CBS television stations. After two years with Viacom, he was appointed general manager for the Cable News Network (CNN) and later promoted to senior vice president at Turner Broadcasting, Inc. After enrolling at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School in Atlanta, Georgia, Hair obtained his M.B.A. degree in 2006. He was then named senior vice president of news operations for Comcast SportsNet, two years later; and, in 2012, was promoted to senior vice president of news and talent for NBC Sports Group, overseeing talent recruitment, negotiation and development.

Hair has served on the board of directors of the Radio and Television News Directors Association/Foundation (RTNDA/F), and the board of visitors at Florida A&M University’s School of Journalism and Graphic Communication. He won a 1994 Emmy Award in Chicago as Executive Producer of "Our Future Crisis," a broadcast special about inner-city violence. He is a former member of the National Association of Black Journalists, the National Black MBA Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. He and his wife have five children.

Princell Hair was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on May 21, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.130

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/21/2012

Last Name

Hair

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Emory University

Florida International University

Fort Lauderdale High School

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Princell

Birth City, State, Country

Fort Lauderdale

HM ID

HAI01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Anyplace Warm and Tropical

Favorite Quote

Managers do things right, but leaders do the right thing.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Pennsylvania

Birth Date

2/2/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Philadelphia

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sushi

Short Description

Broadcast executive Princell Hair (1967 - ) is an Emmy Award winning journalist and senior vice president for NBC Sports Group.

Employment

NBC

Comcast SportsNet

Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.

CNN

Viacom Productions

WBAL TV

WKMG TV

WMMB TV

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Princell Hair's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Princell Hair lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Princell Hair describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Princell Hair talks about his mother's education and her childhood aspirations

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Princell Hair describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Princell Hair reflects upon his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Princell Hair describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about moving around during his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Princell Hair describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Princell Hair describes the church he attended, the National Church of God in Christ

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Princell Hair talks about his experience at North Side Elementary School

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Princell Hair talks about his neighborhood peers' fear of white people

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Princell Hair talks about the demographics of Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Princell Hair recalls his mother's initiative in helping him get a good education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Princell Hair describes his mentors in elementary school and high school

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about the demographics of his school classrooms

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Princell Hair talks about his brother's trouble in school due to his mental handicap

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Princell Hair describes the challenges of growing up in the projects while attending school in a more affluent neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about his musical interests

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Princell Hair documents his interest in television as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Princell Hair talks about competing in the state championship with his high school track team

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about the history of Fort Lauderdale and Fort Lauderdale High School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Princell Hair reflect upon a negative encounter with the Fort Lauderdale police

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Princell Hair discusses his high school extracurricular activities and early career ambitions

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Princell Hair talks about his high school heroes in journalism including Max Robinson and Dwight Lauderdale

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Princell Hair talks about his decision to join the U.S. Navy after high school

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about being named Mr. Fort Lauderdale in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Princell Hair talks about why he joined the U.S. Navy and the reason he was discharged

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Princell Hair discusses his dropping out of Florida Community College in Gainesville, Florida after becoming a father

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about the end of his relationship and moving to South Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Princell Hair talks about how he met his wife, Jodie Hair

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Princell Hair talks about his internship and job offer while attending Florida International University (FIU)

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about one of his mentors, Joel Cheatwood

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Princell Hair describes his journalistic philosophy

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Princell Hair talks about the coverage of Hurricane Andrew in 1992

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Princell Hair talks about important skill sets needed in news productions

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about producing news in a crisis situation

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Princell Hair talks about his job offer from WDIV in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Princell Hair shares a story about his move to Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about an employment offer from WBBM Chicago in 1993

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Princell Hair shares some of the news stories from WBBM in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Princell Hair talks about his decision to leave WBBM Chicago after his mentor, John Lansing, departed

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about his first opportunity to run a newsroom in Orlando, Florida in 1995

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Princell Hair talks about workplace tensions at his first news director job in Chicago, Illinois in 1997

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Princell Hair discusses the backlash at WMAQ Chicago after they hired Jerry Springer

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about his decision to move to WBAL Baltimore in 1998 after WMAQ Chicago's staff overhaul

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Princell Hair remembers some of the major stories at WBAL Baltimore

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Princell Hair discusses having to think on your feet during live coverage

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about WBAL Baltimore's superior coverage of the 2000 mayoral election

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Princell Hair discusses the importance of understanding live reporting in the newsroom

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Princell Hair remembers some of his favorite reporters

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about leaving the Hurst Group for Viacom in 2001

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Princell Hair talks about his opportunity to join CNN in Atlanta, Georgia in 2003

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Princell Hair talks about lessons he learned as CNN's Domestic News Director and workplace politics

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Princell Hair talks about his time at CNN in Atlanta, Georgia and his decision to move into sports

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Princell Hair talks about going into sports news with the Comcast Sports Group in 2008

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Princell Hair describes Comcast Sports' news programs and coverage

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Princell Hair describes what it is like to work in local sports news

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Princell Hair talks about Philadelphia's sports fans

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Princell Hair talks about developing sports news based on regional preferences

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Princell Hair describes his expanded role with NBC Sports Group

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Princell Hair discusses hiring former athletes and how they fare on air

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Princell Hair talks about the most successful regional sports stations

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Princell Hair describes his goal in broadcasting to own a network

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Princell Hair discusses the impact of his M.B.A. on his career

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Princell Hair talks about what he might do differently

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Princell Hair reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 13 - Princell Hair talks about his family

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Princell Hair describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Princell Hair talks about his favorite phrase

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Princell Hair talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

4$11

DATitle
Princell Hair describes the challenges of growing up in the projects while attending school in a more affluent neighborhood
Princell Hair talks about his time at CNN in Atlanta, Georgia and his decision to move into sports
Transcript
Now--so you're living in two different worlds basically--back and forth. You even have the social dynamic in the white world--$$Right.$$--going on sleepovers and things like that.$$Right.$$So how were you accepted in your own community? You know, with that kind of background, was it tough on you?$$Yeah, that's a great question. It was a little challenging at times; I spoke differently than the other kids in my neighborhood. They always told me I talk white or I think I'm white, or I'm an Oreo--black on the outside, white on the inside. I got all of those, you know, those kinds of comments growing up. A lot of kids in my neighborhood just didn't understand me and didn't understand why I was the way that I was and, you know, again, it was just--I was different; I was different than they were. You know, I, I found acceptance at church. I think that may have been why I gravitated; it was just a much more accepting environment but, you know, when you're out on the, on the playground or out on the, on the basketball court and, you know, I'm the only one that talks the way that I do, you get ridiculed 'cause people don't understand it--$$Okay.$$--or they're threatened by it, or whatever it is, you know.$$So you didn't make any attempt to try to change the way you talked when you were back home?$$No, I, I, I didn't because it just wasn't, it wasn't me; it wasn't true to me and no matter what I--no matter if I tried, you know, if that's not who you are, you know, people are gonna see right through that so I just dealt with the, with the ridicule; I just dealt with the jokes, you know, and just tried to, you know, laugh it off and, you know, not, not allow it to, to get me angry.$$Okay. Now I don't know if this is fair or not, but I got almost an even chance of speaking like you did in the projects in school--I guess, because you could have chosen to do that--$$I could have.$$--you know, but that probably wouldn't have been successful in school.$$Probably not, probably not--$$So--$$--and I don't know why, you know, I grew up--well, I do know why; because I spoke like the people that I was around most of the time, you know, growing up.$$Okay. So you spent most of your time in school?$$Yeah.$$Okay, all right.$$It was a safe place for me--$$Yeah, okay.$$--'cause I was just as smart as the other kids, smarter than most of 'em, so there was this, there was this--even if it wasn't equal, there was a feeling of equality, and they would look at me and they would admire the fact that I was as smart as they were, so on some level, I was on their level, which made it easier to fit in.$So what you've experienced, it sounds like a book I heard of called "Swimming with Sharks," (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous)--Yeah, yeah, very similar.$$Yeah. So is this a typical experience in the news and the TV news world?$$I think it's a typical experience in the corporate world--the corporate news world; big organizations, big corporations that are, you know--have these, these intricate, you know, organizational structures and relationships are sometimes difficult for outsiders to navigate, and that's, that's what I experienced.$$Okay. So you were there for--$$I was running the Domestic News Operation [at CNN in Atlanta, Georgia] for fourteen months, and then I was moved into a position overseeing talent and programming across all of the different CNN platforms. I was in that job for about a year, and the fact of the matter is that's a job that really didn't have a lot of teeth because--the network heads, they wanna hire their own talent, you know, they don't really need me telling them who to hire; they got into that position because they know a little something about talent, so I found myself running up against walls with the various network heads who I was, you know, really liaising with because they had their own ideas of what their talent should be--as they should. So I went to, to Jim and Phil [Kent] and just said, "Look, guys, I'm happy to stay here and collect a paycheck and do this for as long as you want me to, but the fact of the matter is you're not really getting the value out of me; you're not really getting as much as you can out of me; I can do more, I'd like to do more." So they moved me into corporate strategy. It was a position that I was--or it was an area of the business that I didn't know, that I was interested in, and it also gave me an opportunity to go back to school and get my MBA, which is what I did at Emory [University, Atlanta, Georgia], so I was working full time while getting my MBA, and I was working on a project--we were going to take WTBS which is, you know, Turner[ Broadcasting]'s first station, and figure out what we were gonna do with that locally, and turn that into a--you know, there's the TBS Superstation and then there's a local station in the market--WTBS, and at the time, their programming was the same, but Phil Kent who's, who's running Turner at the time, wanted to turn that into something else--more of a local station, so that TBS could be a separate, completely separate station. So that was my project and, you know, amongst working on other things with the, with the, the strategy group--and at the end of that year, and after I got my MBA and had finished--completed the projects, I was ready to run something else; I was in a position now where I, where I was down two years removed from, from running something, and I went to Phil and said, "Hey, look, I'm ready to run something; you know, I can stay in corporate strategy as long as you want, but I'm really ready to run something." And, you know, "We don't really have anything for you to run," to which--I, I saw that as a sign that, you know, maybe it was time for me to, to move on and try something else, take some time off, which is what I did. I took about a year and a half off which, you know, fortunately, I was able to do to really figure out what I wanted to do next. I had been in news for now 20--20 years, and was really burned out with, with, with news. I didn't wanna really go back into a local news situation because it, it had changed so much, and resources had been drained from local markets, local news stations, and I wanted to try something, something different; and that is what led me to sports.

Dorothy Terrell

Corporate executive Dorothy Ann Terrell was born June 12, 1945 in Hallandale, Florida. Her parents, Pearlie Weeks Terrell and Charles Walter Terrell, sent her to Lanier Elementary School, Lanier Junior High School, and Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale. Aspiring to be a journalist, Terrell graduated from high school in 1963 and enrolled at Florida A&M University. Terrell graduated cum laude from Florida A&M University in 1966 with her B.A. degree in English.

After accepting a counseling position with Job Corps, Terrell moved to Poland Springs, Maine. In 1967, Terrell moved to Boston, Massachusetts, where she worked as a counselor for Reverend Leon Sullivan’s Opportunities Industrial Corporation (OIC), and eventually rose to the position of assistant director. In 1973, Terrell joined the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Office for Children, where she became the associate director in 1975. Serving on the advisory board of OIC brought Terrell into contact with representatives of the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), who offered her a job as a training manager in 1976. From 1978 to 1980, Terrell was plant human relations manager in Westminster, Massachusetts. She later became group human relations manager of systems manufacturing from 1980 to 1983 and, from 1983 to 1984, served as group manager for engineering and manufacturing. In 1984, Terrell was promoted to plant manager of the DEC plant in Roxbury, Massachusetts. She was the first African American woman to hold this position. Primarily manufacturing keyboards, Terrell reduced the new product cycle from ninety days to seventy-five days and reduced manufacturing costs by more than 30%. Terrell also served as DEC’s group manager of interconnect/packaging from 1987 to 1991. Terrell joined Sun Microsystems, Inc. in 1991 as president of Sun-Express, and as a corporate officer through 1997. At Sun Microsystems, she led the company in asset management performance and grew revenues to over $300 million per year. After 1997, Terrell was served simultaneously as senior vice president of worldwide sales for NMS Communications and president of Platform Services Group. Terrell temporarily left First Light Capital as a partner and became president and CEO of Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC), a national nonprofit organization that promotes economic prosperity in America’s inner cities through private sector engagement with local residents. Terrell later returned to work for First Light Capital.

Terrell has been the recipient of many awards, including being named one of the Top 50 line managers in America by Executive Female magazine, a Top Ten Business Marketer by Business Marketing magazine, and one of 20 Women of Power and Influence by Black Enterprise magazine. She also received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Florida A&M University. Terrell was a subject in The Wizards and Their Wonders: Portraits in Computing, an exhibit and book by Christopher Morgan, as well as The Enterprising Woman by Mari Florence.

Terrell lives in Miami Beach, Florida.

Dorothy Terrell was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 11, 2007 and March 9, 2017.

Accession Number

A2007.133

Sex

Female

Interview Date

4/11/2007 |and| 3/9/2017

Last Name

Terrell

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Dillard High School

Lanier Elementary School

Lanier Junior High School

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

First Name

Dorothy

Birth City, State, Country

Fort Lauderdale

HM ID

TER03

Favorite Season

Fall

Sponsor

Genelle Trader

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

While We Can.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

6/12/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Miami

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pasta

Short Description

Corporate executive Dorothy Terrell (1945 - ) was the former president of Sun Microsystem’s Sun-Express.

Employment

SunExpress

Initiative for a Competitive Inner City

Digital Equipment Corporation

Job Corps

Office for Children

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:8633,90:12455,151:13820,165:26256,337:26552,342:39530,517:39850,522:40650,535:59580,801:60490,822:64546,858:64762,863:64978,868:70488,927:72868,964:74296,977:91640,1129:94570,1143:95830,1156:114360,1388:117048,1424:120324,1463:120996,1473:124835,1492:126733,1524:142498,1692:148402,1791:148812,1797:159739,1939:182524,2073:184474,2102:194766,2200:196790,2231:203230,2300:205254,2329:205990,2340:207278,2357:210130,2392:225674,2506:229544,2539:230189,2545:238902,2644:245844,2745:277813,3077:280104,3109:280499,3115:284212,3174:285081,3189:287135,3224:287688,3236:291990,3258$0,0:5561,211:9545,277:14110,372:14691,380:15355,391:16102,401:18320,407:19332,423:20160,438:20896,452:22184,468:22828,477:24208,497:36215,608:37250,618:38170,630:38860,637:39780,648:44186,673:54574,742:60165,826:60483,833:62792,856:63622,867:64535,881:65531,893:66444,906:66942,914:68270,945:69183,961:69515,966:69847,971:70428,980:70760,985:71092,990:74906,1006:75302,1011:76391,1021:76787,1026:78074,1042:78470,1047:86088,1096:86424,1102:88356,1123:88944,1139:90708,1200:99516,1274:100270,1288:100560,1295:100792,1300:101082,1306:103160,1324:103420,1329:103810,1337:106320,1359:106740,1365:107664,1376:108000,1381:108336,1386:109092,1396:109764,1407:111444,1445:112032,1455:112620,1464:114384,1496:115812,1510:117576,1537:118668,1559:120852,1602:121188,1607:121608,1613:122196,1622:130765,1651:131685,1660:136649,1680:145187,1782:149669,1849:152408,1924:154981,1964:155645,1973:159214,2020:159712,2027:160044,2032:165480,2037:165960,2044:166632,2052:167496,2063:170970,2122
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dorothy Terrell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell describes her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes her father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell describes her siblings and adopted siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell describes her parents' marriage and economic status

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her family's involvement in the A.M.E. Church

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes Lanier Elementary School in Hallandale, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell describes Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes her teachers and aspirations at Dillard High School

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her childhood pastimes

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell describes her older brother's life

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell describes her decision to attend Florida A&M University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes her experiences at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her civil rights activity in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her teachers at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell talks about the Marching 100 and Bob Hayes

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her graduation from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell recalls working at a Job Corps center in Poland, Maine

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell describes her early career in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell remembers being hired at Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her career at the Digital Equipment Corporation, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes her career at the Digital Equipment Corporation, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell recalls becoming a plant manager at the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell recalls running Digital Equipment Corporation's Roxbury plant

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell describes her team based production strategy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes her family's move to Cupertino, California

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon her career at Digital Equipment Corporation in Cupertino, California

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell recalls making major layoffs at Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell describes how she came to work for Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes the mission of SunExpress

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Dorothy Terrell's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her childhood games

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes her relationship with her father

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell remembers Greater Ward Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Hallandale Beach, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her early religious inquires

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes her early household and extended family

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her reasons for attending Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell remembers the social environment at Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell describes her high school personality

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her decision to attend Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her social life at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her decision to join the Job Corps in Poland Spring, Maine in 1963

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes her experiences at the Poland Spring Job Corps Center for Women in Poland Springs, Maine

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her move to Boston, Massachusetts in 1967

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell describes her work with the Opportunities Industrialization Centers

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her time with the Office for Children

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell remembers Paul Newman's invitation to join Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Dorothy Terrell describes the work environment at Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell describes affirmative action practices at the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell remembers challenges and support groups in her start at the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell compares work environments at the Digital Equipment Corporation and Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell remembers becoming plant manager at the Digital Equipment Corporation's Boston plant

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell talks about the impact of core groups at the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell talks about racial diversity within the Digital Equipment Corporation

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell remembers improving production times at the Digital Equipment Corporation's Boston plant

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell recalls lessons and challenges from managing the Digital Equipment Corporation's Boston plant

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell remembers colleague Barbara Walker's advice at a difficult time

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Dorothy Terrell describes the support she received from colleagues Richard Farrahar and Kevin Melia

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell remembers implementing just-in-time manufacturing at the Digital Equipment Corporation's Boston plant

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell talks about competition in the computing industry in the 1980s

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her promotion to lead the Digital Equipment Corporation's plant in Cupertino, California

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her family's move to Saratoga, California

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes the development of the VAX 9000 supercomputer

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell remembers laying off workers at the Digital Equipment Corporation's plant in Cupertino, California

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell recalls Scott McNealy's offer to become president of SunExpress

Tape: 9 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell describes Scott McNealy's initial plans for SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her family's reluctance to leave California

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell recalls hiring Genelle Trader to join SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell describes sales innovations at SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell talks about building SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes her approach to hiring SunExpress' personnel

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her hiring process

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell remembers key executives at SunExpress

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell describes infighting within Sun Microsystems, Inc.

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell remembers other women and people of color from her time in the technology industry

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell talks about the importance of support to care for a family while sustaining a corporate career

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon her success as a business leader

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her decision to leave SunExpress

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her first board memberships

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell names corporate boards and committees where she has served

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell remembers her colleagues from corporate boards

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon the significance of diversity on corporate boards

Tape: 11 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her experiences on corporate boards

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell talks about Corporate America's global position

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell remembers joining the NMS Communications Corporation in Framingham, Massachusetts

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell recalls her experiences at the NMS Communications Corporation

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes the NMS Communications Corporation's operations

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell talks about joining the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Dorothy Terrell remembers projects of the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Dorothy Terrell recalls buying an apartment in Miami, Florida

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon her attraction to Miami, Florida

Tape: 12 Story: 9 - Dorothy Terrell describes the Perez Art Museum Miami in Miami, Florida

Tape: 12 Story: 10 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her home in Newport, Rhode Island

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her political involvements

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Dorothy Terrell reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Dorothy Terrell talks about her philanthropic interests in Miami, Florida

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Dorothy Terrell describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Dorothy Terrell describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Dorothy Terrell recalls becoming a plant manager at the Digital Equipment Corporation
Dorothy Terrell describes her team based production strategy
Transcript
And then I got a call one day from Ralph [Ralph Gillespie] and he says, "I'm leaving this plant. I've been promoted to another job." He says, "Are you interested in running a plant," and I laughed. I said, "Ralph, you called me out of a meeting to ask me about running a plant. You know that doesn't happen here," because plant managers came from engineering or they came from these materials. You had to be technical in order to be a plant manager in Digital [Digital Equipment Corporation]. He says, "Why don't you just wait and see what the job description is and you decide from there," so I said fine. I went back to my meeting. But, it was at a time when I had moved from Boston [Massachusetts], I lived in Marlborough [Massachusetts] for a while, then in Chelmsford [Massachusetts], and I was getting to the point where I wanted to, if I didn't move back into Boston, I wanted to be closer to Boston. I felt like I had been blessed, I had learned a lot of things and I wanted to, wasn't so much go back home, I wanted to give back and be closer to be able to do that, and so I was in the process of trying to think about where could I work to make that happen and so Ralph's call caused me to do some thinking, although I thought it was the longest shot in the world, but when the job description came out, it played to my strengths as opposed to my weaknesses. I didn't have the technical piece but I knew Digital. That plant was a low-end manufacturing plant and that was the group that I supported, so I knew the people there. They knew me. I knew manufacturing, after all I had been in Westminster [Massachusetts] for quite some time. I grew up in manufacturing. So, I went after that job with a vengeance and I competed with a person who was an engineer, I interviewed with the group managers, I interviewed, you know, with the plant staff and I was selected to run the Boston plant in Roxbury [Boston, Massachusetts]. It was such an honor. And--$$Now what year is this?$$Eighty-four [1984].$$Okay.$$So, the Boston plant manufactured keyboards, but it was the highest volume manufacturing operation Digital had, and we had to go to three shifts because of the volume at that point. When Ralph was there, Ralph hired a really good staff and then, that's when he got a promotion, so I had great material to work with. These were really competent people and helped me to understand that I didn't have to know everything. What my job was, was to provide leadership and to bring people together to help to form a team to make that place really hum. It was at the time when just-in-time was coming in and I, when I, to tell you a story, when I went after that plant, I talked with the plant manager that I supported in Westminster and he told me, he says, "You know, you're probably gonna have to make some changes when you go to Boston." He said, "We know you in Westminster; we know you in Maynard [Massachusetts]. When you say something, that's what you mean. You might not smile a lot or you need to show emo-, you need to show more emotion." And I said, "What are talking about?" Because for me, being black, being a woman, emotion is the last thing I want. He says, "Because people are not going to understand what you're really trying to say."$How did the team, how did it help them to do it as a team, I mean, I know there's one, are they making like several keyboards at once, or are they, what do they (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, they could because what was going on is you do one thing--it wasn't like one person making an entire keyboard, one person who was doing one function and then pushing it to someone else to do something else. When you form a team, then the team would be responsible for that one person, then got to know how to put together an entire keyboard themselves, and then there would be decisions as to who would make decisions today, in a sense, around, if they had to do a hundred keyboards, then how would that get done? You know, would X number of people do it and Y number of people go get the material, or allotted, so it was the team's decision as to how the production happened, not waiting for something to come to them to do one little thing to pass it on, and they felt that was much more exciting, and I also found out that being me didn't mean that folks didn't understand me at all. It meant that, because I got a poem from one of the folks on the floor out of the group, and it pretty much said that and I think I still have it somewhere. I don't know. But it was like understanding that I care about people. I may not take care of people, but I do care about people and that came across in that I was interested in getting the best out of people. I want the best out of me, so why wouldn't folks want to have the best. You come to work, you've gotta be there, you might as well use all of you to make these kinds of things happen. So, it was an exciting time and then after Boston [Massachusetts], I got promoted to Maynard [Massachusetts] to work for Bill Hanson, who was in charge of manufacturing and I was responsible for helping with the strategy of manufacturing [for Digital Equipment Corporation]. That didn't last too long. Oh, the other thing that happened while I was in Boston is I got married for the second time just when I started working in Boston, and I got pregnant when I was in the, in the plant.

Niara Sudarkasa

Accomplished scholar, educator, Africanist, and anthropologist, Niara Sudarkasa, was born Gloria Albertha Marshall on August 14, 1938, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Sudarkasa was a gifted student who excelled at Dillard Elementary and Dillard High School; skipping several grades, she was a junior at the age of fourteen, and accepted early admission to Fisk University on a Ford Foundation Scholarship when she was just fifteen years old. In 1955, Sudarkasa transferred to Oberlin to complete her studies. Sudarkasa earned her A.B. degree in anthropology and English from Oberlin in 1957. In 1959, Sudarkasa received her M.A. degree in anthropology from Columbia University. In 1961, Sudarkasa traveled to London and Nigeria to complete doctoral research on Yoruba language and culture. While completing her PhD, Sudarkasa taught at Columbia, becoming the first African America woman to teach at the university; she earned her PhD from Columbia in 1964.

Sudarkasa achieved another first when she became the first African American woman to be appointed assistant professor of anthropology at New York University in 1964. Sudarkasa was also the first African American to be appointed to the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan in 1969. While at Michigan, Sudarkasa became involved in civil rights and student issues; she quickly climbed the academic ladder at Michigan, ending her seventeen year tenure as associate vice president for academic affairs. Sudarkasa left Michigan in 1986 when she became the first female to serve as president of Lincoln University in Pennsylvania.

Sudarkasa passed away on May 31, 2019.

Sudarkasa’s accomplishments at Lincoln are highlighted in the report, Lincoln University – The Drive Toward Distinction. Under Sudarkasa's presidency the university increased enrollment, strengthened its undergraduate and international programs, and put into place an ambitious minority recruitment effort; she left her post at Lincoln in 1998.

Sudarkasa serves as Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the African American Research Library and Cultural Center in Fort Lauderdale. Sudarkasa has authored numerous publications, including The Strength of Our Mothers: African And African American Women in Families; Where Women Work: Yoruba Traders in the Marketplace and in the Home; and Exploring the African American Experience. Sudarkasa has been awarded thirteen honorary degrees over the course of her career, including one from Ft. Hare in South Africa, and is the recipient of nearly 100 civic and professional awards. In 2001 Sudarkasa became the first African American to be installed as a chief in the historic Ife Kingdom of the Yoruba of Nigeria.

Sudarkasa passed away on May 31, 2019.

Accession Number

A2005.014

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/13/2005

Last Name

Sudarkasa

Maker Category
Schools

Dillard High School

Fisk University

Oberlin College

Columbia University

First Name

Niara

Birth City, State, Country

Fort Lauderdale

HM ID

SUD01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

To Everything, There Is A Season.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

8/14/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Fort Lauderdale

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Grapes

Death Date

5/31/2019

Short Description

Academic administrator and anthropology professor Niara Sudarkasa (1938 - ) was the first African American woman to be appointed assistant professor of anthropology at New York University, the first African American to be appointed to the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan, the first female to serve as president of Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, and the first African American to be installed as a chief in the historic Ife Kingdom of the Yoruba of Nigeria. She is Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the African American Research Library and Cultural Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Employment

The University of Michigan

New York University

Lincoln University

Florida Atlantic University

African American Research Library and Cultural Center

Centre for Advanced Studies of African Society

Favorite Color

Earth Tones

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Niara Sudarkasa's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Niara Sudarkasa lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Niara Sudarkasa talks about her mother's profession

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her father and his profession

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her maternal grandparents' family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her siblings and daily life in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Niara Sudarkasa describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her love of oceans

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Niara Sudarkasa recalls her childhood in Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Niara Sudarkasa recalls moving to Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her time at Dillard Elementary and High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Niara Sudarkasa recalls her grandmother's admiration for Mary McLeod Bethune

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Niara Sudarkasa recalls her childhood dreams and aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Niara Sudarkasa recalls her high school experience and college plans

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Niara Sudarkasa recalls her decision to attend Fisk University

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her experience at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Niara Sudarkasa talks about her decision to transfer to Oberlin College

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Niara Sudarkasa recalls her interest in anthropology at Oberlin College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Niara Sudarkasa relates her regrets at leaving Fisk University

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her experience at Columbia University in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Niara Sudarkasa remembers travelling to London and Nigeria for her doctoral studies

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Niara Sudarkasa recalls how Nigeria changed from the 1960s to the 1980s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her impressions of African women in Nigeria

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her early teaching positions

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her book 'Where Women Work'

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Niara Sudarkasa remembers the death of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her involvement with the Black Action Movement

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Niara Sudarkasa describes the courses she taught at the University of Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her administrative role at the University of Michigan

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Niara Sudarkasa reflects upon the outcome of Grutter v. Bollinger, 2003

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Niara Sudarkasa talks about affirmative action versus legacy admissions

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Niara Sudarkasa shares her concerns for historically black colleges

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Niara Sudarkasa describes the climate at Pennsylvania's Lincoln University in 1987

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Niara Sudarkasa recalls her interest in serving as president of Lincoln University

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Niara Sudarkasa describes her accomplishments at Lincoln University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Niara Sudarkasa shares her concerns about standardized tests and the state of education

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Niara Sudarkasa reflects upon the factors that impact student success

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Niara Sudarkasa describes social issues that impact education

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Niara Sudarkasa explains her decision to leave Lincoln University, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Niara Sudarkasa explains her decision to leave Lincoln University, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Niara Sudarkasa talks about the African-American Research Library and Cultural Center

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Niara Sudarkasa reflects upon her life

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Niara Sudarkasa talks about her son, Michael Sudarkasa, and her grandchildren

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Niara Sudarkasa describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Niara Sudarkasa narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Niara Sudarkasa narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Niara Sudarkasa narrates her photographs, pt. 3

DASession

1$1

DATape

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DAStory

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DATitle
Niara Sudarkasa describes her book 'Where Women Work'
Niara Sudarkasa describes her accomplishments at Lincoln University
Transcript
Let's talk a little bit about your book, `Where Women Work[: A Study of Yoruba Women in the Marketplace and in the Home,' Niara Sudarkasa].$$Okay.$$Published in 1973.$$Um-hm.$$Can you tell us a little bit about the book?$$Well, you know, ironically, this was a revision of my thesis and it was supposed to have been published in '68 [1968], the year after I went to Michigan [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan]. It was accepted by Mouton [Mouton de Gruyter; Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin, Germany] for publication in '67 [1967], no '66 [1966]. It was supposed to be published in '67 [1967], and I just, I don't know, I think I squandered an opportunity but I said, well who knows why things happen, but it would have been published as Gloria Marshall [HistoryMaker Niara Sudarkasa] then, and so maybe it wasn't meant to be. But that book is a very descriptive picture of the life of the women in the town where I lived [in Nigeria]. It talks about women and their families, their roles as wives, as mothers, sisters, daughters. It talks about women in the marketplace and, in fact, the subtitle is 'Where Women Work: Yoruba Women in the Marketplace and in the Home,' and I tried, and it has held up well, because I don't think there has been a ethnographic description of women and their total way of life since that time.$$Did those women remind you of your mother [Rowena Evans Marshall] and your [maternal] grandmother [Tryphenia McNeal Evans] in some aspects?$$In some respects, yeah. Some respects, especially their self-reliance and, I always that the idea of being strong women was a very positive thing. I didn't know until later that people consider that to be a negative attribute, but my, my grandmother, you know, was physically larger than my mother. She, she and I were the same height. My grandmother, maybe she was even about an inch taller than me, but my mother was an inch shorter than I am, so that means that her mother is two inches taller than she is, so my grandmother was always a very formidable presence wherever she went. She was just imposing and I met a lady in Nigeria who reminded me so much of her in her physical commanding of things, you know. She just took charge. And this lady adopted me just as I adopted her, so she really reminded me a lot of my grandmother.$What are you most proud of in terms of your accomplishments at Lincoln [Lincoln University, Lincoln University, Pennsylvania]?$$Well, I think it was that, I don't know how to say this modestly, but I think that, that the institution was reclaimed and sort of revitalized, resurrected so that Lincoln's past accomplishments were thrust into the, you know, consciousness of the academic world once again, and we did quite a bit in terms of the emphasis on excellence, the numbers, both the numbers of students went up dramatically, and the quality of the student body improved quite a bit (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) The number, enrollment was?$$Oh yeah. Enrollment, I think, when I went to Lincoln was about twelve hundred or so, no, not even, about that let's say, and it was well over, well over two thousand on a sustained basis all the time when I left. And we didn't have any, we were at capacity because we didn't have any more room for on-campus students. The other thing is that the SAT scores, if that's a measure, you know, of the quality of the students had improved very dramatically. The average SAT when I first went there was like six hundred and something total.$$Combined?$$Combined. And the average, we, we then average in the high nine hundreds, but now, in general though, you know, black students don't do all that well on the SAT, but whether you looked at GPAs or SATs, they had definitely gone up. There's a report which I hope will stay with my files, there's a report on, that sort of gave a summary of some of the highlights of Lincoln under the Sudarkasa [HistoryMaker Niara Sudarkasa] presidency, and I think student enrollment, improvement in the student quality, enhancement of the faculty and the technological conversion of the campus, those were a number of things that we accomplished. We built, there were two buildings. These were all, they were done with state monies, but the thing about it is that this big living learning center that we built had been on the drawing board for ten years and they were unable to get the governor to move and build it and I just made that a priority. I said we're going to get this building and we did.