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Derrick Brooks

Football player Derrick Brooks was born on April 18, 1973 in Pensacola, Florida to Geraldine Brooks and John Brooks. Raised by his mother and stepfather, Arthur Mitchel, Brooks graduated from Pensacola’s Booker T. Washington High School in 1990, and enrolled at Florida State University (FSU) in Tallahassee. At FSU, he was a member of the 1993 Seminoles National Championship team. He was also a four-year letterman, a consensus first-team All-American his junior and senior years, a three-time first-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference selection from 1992 to 1994, and named two-time Consensus first-team All-American in 1993 and 1994, and Atlantic Coast Conference Defensive Player of the Year in 1993. Brooks received his B.S. degree in business communications from FSU in 1995, and his M.S. degree in business communications from Florida State University in 1999.

Brooks was selected by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the first round of the 1995 NFL Draft. During his fourteen year career with the Buccaneers, Brooks was an eleven-time Pro Bowl selection and nine-time All Pro. He was named NFL Defensive Player of the Year after the Buccaneers’ Super Bowl victory in 2002.  He recorded 2,198 tackles, the most in franchise history, along with eight defensive touchdowns, second highest in Buccaneers history. In 2009, Brooks was released from the Buccaneers, and was declared a free agent for the 2009 season. During that time, Brooks joined ESPN2’s First Take as an NFL analyst and signed with Sirius NFL Radio in 2009. In 2010, Brooks announced his retirement from the NFL and was elected to the 2000s All Decade Defensive Team. In 2011, he became the co-owner and president of the Tampa Bay Storm team of the Arena Football League. Brooks was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2014. In 2018, Brooks became a minority investor in the minor league baseball team, the Pensacola Blue Wahoos.

He founded Derrick Brooks Charities, Inc. in Pensacola in 1997, which worked to develop educational youth programs and opportunities in the Tampa Bay community. In partnership with Pro Football Hall of Famer Edward J. DeBartolo Jr., Brooks co-founded the Brooks-DeBartolo Collegiate High School in Tampa in 2005. Brooks received an honorary doctorate degree in human letters from St. Leo University, in St. Leo, Florida in 2006.

Brooks and his wife, Carol Brooks, have four children: Briana, Derrick Jr., Darius and Dania.

Derrick Brooks was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 12, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.181

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/12/2018

Last Name

Brooks

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Derrick

Birth City, State, Country

Pensacola

HM ID

BRO68

Favorite Season

Christmastime

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Las Vegas, Nevada

Favorite Quote

Put God First In All You Do And Treat Others The Way You Want Them To Treat You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Florida

Birth Date

4/18/1973

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Tampa

Country

United States of America

Favorite Food

Pork Chops

Short Description

Derrick Brooks (1973 - )

Favorite Color

Blue

Percy Bates

Educational psychologist Percy Bates was born July 8, 1932 in Pensacola, Florida. Raised by his mother, Gladys Travis Bates, he attended Spencer Bibbs Elementary School and Booker T. Washington High School. After moving to Detroit, Bates ran track and played football at Hamtramack High School, and he graduated from there in 1950. Entering the United States Army in 1952, Bates served at Fort Bliss in El Paso, Texas, where he sang with fellow soldier and pianist Earl Grant. After earning his B.S. degree in biology from Central Michigan University in 1958, Bates received his M.A. in vocational rehabilitation in 1961 from Wayne State University and his Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Michigan in 1968.

In 1968, during a strike of black students demanding black faculty at the University of Michigan, Bates was promoted to assistant professor of education. At the University of Michigan’s School of Education, Bates served as assistant division director of curriculum, teaching and psychological studies and as director of programs for educational opportunity. He later became deputy assistant secretary of special education in the United States Department of Education.

Bates is a member of the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics at the University of Michigan. He is also very active in University of Michigan’s Student Athlete Advisory Committee. A founding board member and former chairman of the Higher Education Commission of the National Alliance of Black School Educators, Bates has received numerous awards. Bates lives in Ann Arbor with his wife Cheryl.

Accession Number

A2005.020

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/19/2005

Last Name

Bates

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

Spencer Bibbs Elementary School

Spencer Bibbs Academy

Hamtramck High School

Central Michigan University

Wayne State University

University of Michigan

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Percy

Birth City, State, Country

Pensacola

HM ID

BAT06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

You Bet.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Michigan

Birth Date

7/8/1932

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Detroit

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Banana Cream Pie

Short Description

Education professor Percy Bates (1932 - ) served as assistant division director of curriculum, teaching and psychological studies and as director of programs for educational opportunity at the University of Michigan’s School of Education. Bates was also a member of the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics at the University of Michigan, and has served in the United States Department of Education.

Employment

University of Michigan

U.S. Department of Education

Boys Training School

Ypsilanti Public Schools, Program in Educable Mentally Impaired

Detroit Public Schools

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:395,5:892,14:5933,146:7140,183:11536,196:18489,247:19233,252:19698,258:22674,294:23232,305:23976,315:26774,331:28654,362:30158,379:34840,438:35148,443:38004,472:41720,505:42195,515:42955,525:43335,530:47705,618:53718,671:56094,765:56710,775:57326,789:59614,850:101673,1406:106603,1443:113250,1559$0,0:1513,41:7757,111:12716,216:20140,281:37970,509:38270,514:38570,519:41120,573:44237,585:70492,1008:73433,1049:73921,1059:74226,1065:74836,1078:75080,1083:75324,1088:78552,1121:83558,1174:85799,1196:86629,1208:90615,1231:90945,1238:91220,1245:91660,1255:92155,1265:94124,1287:97015,1313:97555,1318:99040,1334:102844,1350:103676,1360:104612,1370:110272,1448:110674,1461:122150,1653:123340,1671:128456,1686:129286,1698:129618,1704:129950,1709:130282,1714:131112,1726:141254,1926:141622,1931:141990,1936:142450,1942:143738,1961:144382,1969:145118,1978:146130,1983
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Percy Bates' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Percy Bates lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Percy Bates describes his maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Percy Bates talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Percy Bates describes his paternal family history, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Percy Bates describes his paternal family history, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Percy Bates talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Percy Bates describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Percy Bates describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Percy Bates talks about his childhood in Pensacola

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Percy Bates describes church and the music of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Percy Bates describes Spencer Bibbs Elementary School

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Percy Bates describes his experience in segregated schools and reflects on the pitfalls of school integration

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Percy Bates remembers being well-behaved in school from a young age

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Percy Bates talks about moving to Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Percy Bates describes his neighborhood in Detroit

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Percy Bates talks about his activities at Hamtramck High School, Hamtramck, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Percy Bates recalls an English teacher who cared about him

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Percy Bates talks about expectations around college

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Percy Bates talks about his job in the U.S. Army base in El Paso, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Percy Bates describes starting college

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Percy Bates remembers his friendship with musician Earl Grant

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Percy Bates describes his short-lived singing career

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Percy Bates remembers becoming an A student at Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Percy Bates remembers the support of Bernard Meltzer

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Percy Bates describes his decision to get a PhD in psychology

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Percy Bates talks about receiving support from his mother, Gladys Travis Bates

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Percy Bates talks about his Ph.D. dissertation on motivation, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Percy Bates talks about his Ph.D. dissertation on motivation, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Percy Bates talks about the ways black people have been socially conditioned

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Percy Bates talks about the importance of questioning assumptions in learning

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Percy Bates describes his career path from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan to U.S. Department of Education

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Percy Bates describes the demands of the Black Action Movement at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Percy Bates describes the peaceful Black Action Movement negotiations at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Percy Bates talks about his position for the U.S. Department of Education

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Percy Bates describes his position as NCAA representative from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Percy Bates talks about the difficult choices of student athletes

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Percy Bates describes the financial situation of college athletes

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Percy Bates describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Percy Bates talks about his disagreement with Bill Cosby's remarks

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Percy Bates reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Percy Bates talks about being the longest serving African American faculty member at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Percy Bates reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Percy Bates talks about affirmative action at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Percy Bates talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Percy Bates describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Percy Bates narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

6$5

DATitle
Percy Bates remembers his friendship with musician Earl Grant
Percy Bates describes his career path from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan to U.S. Department of Education
Transcript
What kinds of things would you sing? Now these are--you would go in popular venues and you're singing popular songs?$$Popular songs. I actually when I got, when I was in the [U.S.] Army I met a young man who was a musician named Earl Grant, and Earl later became reasonably famous. But Earl played the piano and organ and so he would accompany me and then we would sing duets together and so forth. When I got out of the [U.S.] Army, Earl said that his sister owned a club in Missouri some place, and that if I wanted to come there he could get me a job and I could go. I said well actually I think I wanna go to college, and I'm not sure I wanna do this. And so I came to Central Michigan [College; Central Michigan University] in Mount Pleasant [Michigan], Earl went home, and the next thing I knew Earl was on ['The] Ed Sullivan [Show'] and then he had a couple of hit records there--$$He had a couple. I'm trying to think of his big hits, but he was big in the '50s [1950s].$$He did, he, he--I remember he had one called the number 64 [sic. 54], the house, the house with the bamboo floor [sic. 'House of Bamboo']. I've forgotten the name of the, all of the song. He did, he did quite well for himself--$$Earl Grant was very (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) and then he was killed in an automobile accident. He--it was ironic because when I was in the Army I used to kid him about his, his driving and then he actually stopped driving and got himself a driver and was driving to a gig somewhere and ran off the road and he was, he was killed--$Well tell me about your career now when, when you, now after you got your Ph.D. what did you, where did you go next with your career?$$I was, I got my Ph.D. at the University of Michigan [Ann Arbor, Michigan] and at that time we had a rule that we didn't hire our own Ph.D.'s, but that was in 1968 we were right in the middle of a frantic search for minority persons. In fact, we had just had a student strike here on campus and I had been teaching while I was working on my degree, and the dean said didn't make much sense for him, for me to go someplace else while he's looking for minority professors.$$Let me put this in perspective a bit. This is like '68 [1968], this is right after the or just before the assassination of [Reverend] Dr. [Martin Luther] King [Jr.]. He was assassinated--$$Right.$$-in '68 [1968]. A lot of students are calling for reform on campus and black studies programs.$$Oh, we shut down the, the University of Michigan was shut down. It was called the BAM strike, the Black Action Movement, and the university both black and white students was shut down completely, and we had, they had placed ten demands on the table, one of which was to increase the minority faculty and students on campus and that's when I became an assistant professor here at the university. When I moved from that to I was a program head, I became an assistant dean with a couple of deans, in the end of the [President James Earl "Jimmy"] Carter [Jr.] administration I was appointed as a deputy assistant secretary in the U.S. Office of Education [U.S. Department of Education] and I took a leave of absence from the university and when I left that, then I came back here. In addition to that, I've been involved in athletics here on campus. I'm also the, what's called the faculty athletic representative for the university to the Big Ten [Conference] and the NCAA [National Collegiate Athletic Association]. So, I've been doing that now for about fifteen years as well.

Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom

Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom was born on March 14, 1925 in Pensacola, Florida. His mother was a domestic and later a chef. After the death of his father during his early childhood, Bascom was raised by his maternal grandmother. He earned his high school diploma in 1942 from Washington High School where he was active in the chorus, drama club and a member of the tennis team. That same year Bascom was called to the ministry and preached his trial sermon at Mount Olive Baptist Church in Pensacola.

In 1946, Bascom earned his B.S. degree in English from Florida Memorial College. He also served as pastor of Shiloh Baptist and First Baptist Church, both in Pensacola. In 1948, he earned his bachelor’s of divinity degree from Howard University. The following year, Bascom began his 46-year tenure at Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore, Maryland.

While at Douglas, Bascom demonstrated his strong leadership skills in the pulpit as well as the community. In 1962, he created “Camp Farthest Out,” an overnight summer camp for underprivileged children. In 1963, Bascom participated in the Gwen Oak Park Demonstration, a protest that led to the desegregation of Baltimore’s amusement parks. Bascom was appointed Baltimore’s first African American Fire Commissioner in 1968, and under his leadership and direction calm was restored to the city after the disturbances following Martin Luther King’s assassination. In 1970, he received an honorary doctorate of divinity from his alma mater, Florida Memorial College.

Bascom also founded the Association of Black Charities, an umbrella organization of the United Way. Bascom’s commitment to the community included the development of Douglas Village, a 49-unit apartment complex, The Douglas Memorial Federal Credit Union and a “Meals-on-Wheels” program for the sick and elderly.

After his retirement from Douglas Memorial in 1995, Bascom served as the interim Director of Morgan University’s Christian Center. He received numerous awards for his civic and community leadership. He was a member of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance, the National Council of Community Churches and the Baltimore Hospitals Commission Board.

Bascom passed away on May 17, 2012 at age 87.

Accession Number

A2005.008

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/11/2005

Last Name

Bascom

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Curtis

Occupation
Schools

Washington High School

Booker T. Washington High School

Spencer Bibbs Elementary School

Ray Elem School

Florida Memorial University

Howard University School of Divinity

First Name

Marion

Birth City, State, Country

Pensacola

HM ID

BAS01

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Florida

Favorite Vacation Destination

Nassau, Bahamas

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Maryland

Birth Date

3/14/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Baltimore

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Rack of Lamb

Death Date

5/17/2012

Short Description

Civic leader and pastor Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom (1925 - 2012 ) served over four decades as a reverend at Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore, Maryland. He created “Camp Farthest Out,” an overnight summer camp for underprivileged children, and was appointed as Baltimore’s first African American Fire Commissioner. Reverend Marion Bascom passed away on May 17, 2012.

Employment

First Baptist Church of St. Augustine

Douglas Memorial Community Church

Baltimore City Fire Department

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:1540,26:1820,31:2520,42:3150,53:3990,66:5740,106:6510,121:9703,132:12052,175:12457,181:12943,192:18010,245:21222,316:23120,349:24142,370:24507,376:25091,384:31124,444:31514,450:40236,541:44752,580:47130,602:49930,643:51750,650:52606,660:55963,688:56418,694:57510,707:59148,716:59496,721:65634,785:69326,839:72820,865:73450,871:74458,902:74962,907:83048,963:83484,971:88130,1014:99122,1098:104860,1172:105235,1179:111466,1264:111906,1270:116920,1312:117928,1323:120056,1351:123600,1368:124005,1374:124491,1381:124896,1387:125463,1396:136830,1526:144640,1621:149024,1632:152222,1719:152714,1729:155790,1753$0,0:539,48:1078,57:1386,62:12705,167:13109,172:20578,271:21735,286:24550,298:28162,382:35211,429:35697,436:37560,466:40407,485:40859,490:41424,497:43878,507:47910,564:48845,580:51851,595:55174,603:78670,763:92680,865:94230,871:99690,905:101032,920:101886,928:105300,959:105993,966:106609,975:107841,993:109381,1024:109689,1029:110151,1036:110459,1041:110844,1047:115375,1082:115747,1094:116305,1116:117142,1136:137088,1210:141390,1240:142173,1255:143652,1289:147306,1343:147915,1356:148350,1362:150210,1368
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes his paternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes his maternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes the segregation in Pensacola, Florida during the 1930s and 1940s

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom remembers his neighborhood in Pensacola, Florida

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about Spencer Bibbs Elementary School in Pensacola, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom recalls his early aspiration to be a preacher

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom remembers Vernon T. McDaniel, principal of Washington High School in Pensacola, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about growing up with his strict maternal grandmother

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom remembers first preaching at Mount Olive Baptist Church in Pensacola, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about attending Florida Normal and Industrial College in St. Augustine, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom recalls his first jobs as pastor of Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church and First Baptist Church in St. Augustine, Florida

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes his experience at Howard University School of Divinity in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom recalls becoming pastor at Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes the rise of the Civil Rights Movement in Baltimore, Maryland, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes the rise of the Civil Rights Movement in Baltimore, Maryland, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom shares his past hope during the Civil Rights Movement and present frustration

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom recalls responses to demonstrations and riots in Baltimore, Maryland in the 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom remembers the meeting of several prominent African American leaders with Maryland's Governor Spiro Agnew in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about the establishment of Camp Farthest Out in Sykesville, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about the founding of Douglas Village in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes the creation and achievements of Associated Black Charities in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about his retirement from pastoring Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about his concerns for the black church, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about his concerns for the black church, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom reflects upon his accomplishments as pastor of Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore, Maryland

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom talks about his vision for African American churches

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom gives advice for those seeking to be clergy

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

3$6

DATitle
Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom describes the rise of the Civil Rights Movement in Baltimore, Maryland, pt. 2
Reverend Marion Curtis Bascom reflects upon his accomplishments as pastor of Douglas Memorial Community Church in Baltimore, Maryland
Transcript
I was commissioner of the fire department during the disturbances when Mart- [Reverend Dr.] Martin Luther King [Jr.] was killed, so that I was one of the few people who could drive around the city [Baltimore, Maryland], anywhere I wanted to go, because I wore a white hat from the fire department. There were three commissioners, and I was the one black.$$You were the first African American.$$Yeah, yeah. I not only hope I, I know I was the first black, but I hope that I, because of my actions, elicited support and, and everything else because I did a good job and helped to break the backbone of segregation in the fire department, when blacks could not sleep in the same beds that white firefighters used, so that this was a time of great ferment. This as a time when [H.] Rap Brown [Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin] was loose, when Gloria Richardson was loose, the Black Panthers [Black Panther Party] were loose, so that, as I said, it was fortuitous that I was here at that time, and I got into it. And I don't remember all the details, but I was present. And when Martin Luther King wanted to come to town or needed to come to town for support--the man who lies dead today, Samuel T. Daniels, you never, you did not get a chance to interview him, did you?$$I don't believe so.$$No. Well, Samuel T. Daniels became the grand master of the Masonic fraternity. And every single thing that I'm talking to you about now Samuel T. Daniels had his hands in it. This was the time of [HistoryMaker] Parren [J.] Mitchell, [III]. This was a time of Joseph [C.] Howard [Sr.]. It was just a time when everybody was on tiptoe, anxious to break, as Mordecai Johnson used to put it at Howard [University, Washington, D.C.], to break the backbone of segregation.$[HistoryMaker] Reverend [Marion Curtis] Bascom, when you look back at your life, what stands out the most to you and why?$$I think what stands out most with me is the fact that the church [Douglas Memorial Community Church, Baltimore, Maryland] that I led provided me an opportunity to establish a credit union [Douglas Memorial Federal Credit Union Inc., Baltimore, Maryland] with around a million dollars in assets; a Meals on Wheels program where volunteers take food to the hungry five days a week; for Camp Farthest Out [Sykesville, Maryland], that cares for children and is still ripe for further enhancement and to give further service; I think of Douglas Memorial Village [Douglas Village, Baltimore, Maryland]; I think of the loyalty of those people who provided for me, flight to go to the march on Selma [Alabama] and Montgomery [Alabama] and provided a place where we were one of the churches that permitted Stokely Carmichael [Kwame Ture] to, to have a speaking engagement in our church on one Saturday evening when nobody else would accept him. Those, those are just some of the things that I'm happy about and remember, that Douglas Memorial has loved me when I strained them, and well, in the words of Mordecai Johnson, in answer to that question, I've just given you the introduction to the answer. There are so many others that I could think about.