The Nation’s Largest African American Video Oral History Collection Mobile search icon Mobile close search icon
Advanced Biography Search
Mobile navigation icon Close mobile navigation icon

Willie Pearson, Jr.

Sociologist Willie Pearson, Jr. was born on June 29, 1945 in Rusk, Texas. In 1968, Pearson graduated with honors from Wiley College with his B.A. degree in Sociology. Three years later, Pearson earned his M.A. degree in sociology (Presidential Scholarship) from Atlanta University. He received his Ph.D. degree in sociology in 1981 from Southern Illinois University Carbondale.

After graduating from college, Pearson moved to Kansas City, Missouri where he worked as a benefits claims examiner at the Department of Health Education and Welfare and as an administrative and legal specialist for the United States Army. In 1972, Pearson was hired as an assistant professor in the sociology and anthropology departments at Grambling State University where he was named an outstanding teacher. Pearson moved to North Carolina where he worked as an assistant professor at Wake Forest University in 1980 while completing his dissertation. In 1985, Pearson completed his first book, Black Scientists, White Society and Colorless Science: A Study of Universalism in American Science. In 1988, Pearson was awarded a Congressional Fellowship from the Office of Technology Assessment, Congress and received tenure at Wake Forest University. In 2001, Pearson joined the faculty at Georgia Institute of Technology as a sociology professor and chair of the School of History, Technology and Society. During the same year, Pearson was named a National Associate (life-time appointment) of the National Academy of Sciences.

Most of Pearson's research has centered around the U.S. scientific and engineering workforce and on broadening participation of underrepresented groups in science and engineering. In addition to having published numerous articles in newspapers and academic journals, Pearson has authored and co-authored seven books and monographs, including Blacks, Education and American Science , Who Will Do Science?: Educating the Next Generation, The Role and Activities of American Graduate Schools in Recruiting, Enrolling and Retaining United States Black and Hispanic Students, and Beyond Small Numbers: Voices of African American Ph.D. Chemists. Pearson has served on numerous committees, advisory boards and panels at the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Sociological Association and many more. He has a love of teaching, research and community service and he has mentored numerous undergraduate and graduate students throughout his career. Pearson has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Schoonmaker Faculty Prize for Community Service from the Wake Forest University Alumni Council and the Distinguished Lecturer award from Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society.

Willie Pearson, Jr. was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 13, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.014

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/13/2011

Last Name

Pearson

Schools

Wiley College

Clark Atlanta University

Southern Illinois University

Emmett J. Scott High School

W.A. Peete Elementary School

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Willie

Birth City, State, Country

Rusk

HM ID

PEA01

Favorite Season

Winter

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

6/29/1945

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Sociologist and sociology professor Willie Pearson, Jr. (1945 - ) was a sociologist whose research centered on the U.S. scientific and engineering workforce and increasing the participation of underrepresented groups in science and engineering.

Employment

Louisiana Tech University

Southern Illinois University

University of Central Arkansas, Conway

Wake Forest University

Georgia Institute of Technology

Grambling State University

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2914,77:3290,82:28246,331:28656,337:51830,657:55049,690:55493,695:56048,701:56825,709:60580,730:61196,736:61581,749:62274,760:67587,859:69281,885:79068,965:80082,985:80394,990:82578,1054:83202,1063:84138,1078:86010,1114:86322,1119:93290,1162:94650,1183:95290,1192:106715,1305:109565,1345:112115,1403:112565,1410:114290,1439:120040,1483:125860,1556:140150,1711:151940,1859:154145,1921:157346,1936:160271,1968:162359,2003:163751,2025:164099,2030:167550,2049:168846,2078:169350,2091:172302,2139:185159,2325:189440,2359:189712,2364:189984,2369:191300,2380:207670,2547:213664,2654:215830,2664$0,0:9070,113:13525,251:14190,259:16660,295:17515,312:18655,327:19035,332:30698,462:31306,471:31610,476:31914,481:33434,512:38498,565:42554,639:45206,701:45674,709:49920,729:52730,740:53450,751:54090,757:54410,762:60487,802:64456,855:64984,862:68768,923:72488,947:74380,980:75240,991:76014,1001:80443,1067:80727,1072:85058,1196:85626,1205:88111,1258:92730,1294:93258,1305:93984,1319:94314,1325:96628,1340:98072,1369:98376,1374:102024,1463:104532,1512:105216,1522:105520,1527:106964,1567:107876,1584:119451,1721:121713,1753:122409,1762:126871,1791:127701,1804:132183,1923:133926,1946:134341,1952:134839,1960:135171,1965:147010,2163:149650,2198:150860,2215:151300,2223:161340,2313:162502,2367:162834,2372:163249,2378:170048,2483:173194,2506:173534,2512:173942,2520:174486,2529:174962,2537:177002,2578:177614,2589:179110,2620:179722,2630:179994,2635:183540,2649:185250,2660:186504,2674:187416,2683:188556,2700:190970,2713:191642,2723:197186,2816:197522,2857:198110,2866:199790,2886:205290,2912:206050,2924:207800,2955
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Willie Pearson, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his mother's roots in Texas, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his mother's roots in Texas, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his maternal family's landownership

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the African American community in East Texas

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Willie Person, Jr. remembers his relationship with his father

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. reflects upon the lack of knowledge about his family background

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his parents' divorce

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his parents' personalities and who he takes after

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls the African American communities in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes the Juneteenth celebrations in Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls exploring his neighborhood as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his early religious experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his activities at the Bethlehem First Baptist Church in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls his experiences at W.A. Peete Elementary School in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers his favorite elementary school teachers, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers his favorite elementary school teachers, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls the sports teams at W.A. Peete Intermediate School in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers his teachers at Emmett J. Scott High School in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls playing sports at Emmett J. Scott High School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his early understanding of gender roles

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his early curiosity about the social sciences

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers questioning religion

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his athletic experiences at Emmett J. Scott Elementary School in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the professional athletes from Tyler, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his high school extracurricular activities

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls his decision to attend Wiley College in Marshall, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the prominent alumni of Wiley College, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his first impressions of Wiley College

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers the diverse faculty at Wiley College

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his coursework at Wiley College

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the prominent alumni of Wiley College, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers the civil rights activities at Wiley College in Marshall, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the connection between Wiley College and northern educational institutions

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the ideologies of Malcolm X and Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes the benefits of a liberal arts education

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls organizing a protest after Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls graduating from Wiley College

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers being drafted into the U.S. Army

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls his sports activities in the U.S. Army

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his experiences in the U.S. military

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls the lack of black faculty at Atlanta University

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers the prominent figures at the Atlanta University Center

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes the sociology curriculum at Atlanta University

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his experiences at Atlanta University

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers working for Kelly Spring Tire Company

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls his decision to join the faculty at Grambling College in Grambling, Louisiana

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls marrying his wife

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his teaching experiences at Grambling College in Grambling, Louisiana

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his accomplishments as a professor at Grambling College

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers teaching at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, Louisiana

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his students at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, Louisiana

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls his decision to attend Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers his decision to focus on the sociology of science

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls his research grant at Southern Illinois University

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers being mentored by his doctoral professors, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers being mentored by his doctoral professors, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls his aspirations for his career

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the problems faced by professors with multiple departmental appointments

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls his decision to join the faculty of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes how he was evaluated as a professor at Wake Forest University

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. remembers the African American professors at Wake Forest University

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the findings of his Ph.D. dissertation, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the findings of his Ph.D. dissertation, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the lack of visibility of African American scientists

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his book, 'Black Scientists, White Society and Colorless Science,' pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his book, 'Black Scientists, White Society and Colorless Science,' pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about science education in the African Americans community

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes the Mid-South Sociological Association

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls serving on the editorial board of Contemporary Sociology

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his work with the Office of Technology Assessment

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his work with the National Science Foundation

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his work on Project Mosaic

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his edited volume, 'Who Will Do Science?'

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno's five city project, pt. 1

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno's five city project, pt. 2

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the prevalence of youth violence in Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. reflects upon the consequences of defunding social programs

Tape: 10 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the low retention of black high school students

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his book, 'The Role and Activities of American Graduate Schools'

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. reflects upon the credibility of social science research

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the sociology of education

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. reflects upon the public misunderstanding of the social sciences

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about higher education initiatives

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes the repercussions of underperforming schools

Tape: 11 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls joining the faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 11 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his book, 'Beyond Small Numbers'

Tape: 12 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his study of African American chemists, pt. 1

Tape: 12 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his study of African American chemists, pt. 2

Tape: 12 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. recalls his teaching experiences at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia

Tape: 12 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his current research projects

Tape: 12 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about researching his family history

Tape: 12 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his family

Tape: 12 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. reflects upon his experiences at the Kelly Springfield Tire Company

Tape: 12 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about his friendships

Tape: 12 Story: 9 - Willie Pearson, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 13 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. shares his advice to future scholars

Tape: 13 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the underrepresentation of African Americans in sociology

Tape: 13 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes the importance of mentorship

Tape: 13 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the importance of sociological research

Tape: 13 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his concerns for urban communities

Tape: 13 Story: 6 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the practical utility of sociology

Tape: 13 Story: 7 - Willie Pearson, Jr. reflects upon the benefits of a sociology background

Tape: 13 Story: 8 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about making science accessible to the everyday person

Tape: 14 Story: 1 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the value of quantitative research methods

Tape: 14 Story: 2 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes the challenges faced by social scientists

Tape: 14 Story: 3 - Willie Pearson, Jr. talks about the importance of peer review

Tape: 14 Story: 4 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes the careers of his wife and children

Tape: 14 Story: 5 - Willie Pearson, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$7

DAStory

6$5

DATitle
Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his maternal family's landownership
Willie Pearson, Jr. describes his students at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, Louisiana
Transcript
Did your mother [Odessa Price Pearson] grow up on one of the big holdings of land that--?$$Yes. In the area of Rusk, Texas, Cherokee County and--$$Now, is that Rust or Rusk?$$Rusk, R-U-S-K.$$Okay, all right.$$And, yeah, she grew up there.$$Did she have any stories of growing up that she--$$No, that's what I'm saying. There was never really any--a lot of details. She talked about, you know, like her brothers and sisters and a little bit about her family, but you have to remember that--see, I was born when my mother was around thirty-three. So I was basically a very late child. So, and my sister [Vassie V. King] being like a child, a very gifted child, would have been there for that first fifteen years. So my sister would have known a little bit more, but as I was saying because she was skipped, my sister was not really interested in a lot of historical stuff. So she knew some of the relatives, but my mother only mentioned occasi- if I would ask when I got to be in high school [Emmett J. Scott High School, Tyler, Texas], I would ask question because I knew that the level of education was not very high. But I knew they were very good with finances and kind of economic issues. And then I kind of learned probably later on, much, much later on that being black, you didn't put your resources in one bank or something like that because bad things could happen to them. So I had a better understanding that they were able to live way below their means, but she never spoke of any details, you know, besides she and my sister would go occasionally and sell timber, 'cause both my sister and I went to small, private colleges and that's how tuition and stuff was paid.$$Okay, so they had to consciously sort of live below their means in order to escape the consequences of racism in Texas?$$Yes, yeah, it was, I guess by the time I got to college [Wiley College, Marshall, Texas], I was given kind of control of the estate or resources. And I was just stunned at how much it was in terms of value, but I also came to understand that if they did not, 'cause there was no purchase of cars, no fancy homes, anything like that. But we never had any, took out any loans or anything like that. That's what I'm saying, it was like, it was contradictory in many ways. But as I got older I understood that the consequences of being conspicuous with your resources, that it could have been taken away from you. So in the end, it was very clever, and I think from my mother--'cause my parents were divorced fairly, when I was young, that to see how sophisticated she was with finances. Actually helped me quite a bit. I was, my minor was economics.$So you could imagine, I go over to Louisiana Tech [Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana]. It's about 99 percent white. And then I'm going over to Grambling [Grambling College; Grambling State University, Grambling, Louisiana], it's about 98 percent black. So you're going between two worlds. And the resources were very different. I had a grader, of multiple choice kind of stuff, and of course, I graded the essays myself over at Tech; didn't have anything like that until, at Grambling until much later. And so things went extraordinarily well, but because of my own experience I knew that you had talents students at both places. It's just that some of the students at Grambling had more to overcome because of their, the quality of their high school experiences and that I mean it's some fantastic students at Grambling. So I think my second year, we had the club up and running and students were doing placements, to do their research. So they were actually collecting empirical data. Even at the same time, Louisiana Tech didn't have anything like that, but part, if you recall, when I was in undergrad [at Wiley College, Marshall, Texas], see I did a thesis. So I had a research experience as an undergraduate student that would be more typical of a graduate student, that I was passing on to these students. And unlike, probably students at most places in the social sciences, they were going to professional meetings and presenting. That was more typical for students in biology or chemistry that went to all-black scientific meetings. This was not the case. So they learned to write articles for the newsletter, showed them how to design the fundraising activities. So by the end, I was also preparing them to go on to graduate school. So a number of them began to get accepted to graduate schools, primarily in the North. Some went to Smith [Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts], some ended up going to other places, like Texas A&M [Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas], LSU [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana], some of them went to the Midwest because keep in mind that they didn't have to be sociology majors to be part of the group. And then some of them went into industry. So part of my thinking by letting them know about my industrial experience [at Kelly Springfield Tire Company] and so some might wanna go that avenue. Some might wanna go to others, but at least they would have the skillsets and the tools to know what you might have to overcome because some time you could have the ability but because of certain kind of discriminatory practices that exists around promotion, access to the informal knowledge of the network, you can't let that deter you. You know, that's one thing you had to figure out, okay, if that's the case, what can I do to empower myself so I can still be competitive because eventually, competence, I believe out rules some of the other things.

Harry Edwards

Sociology professor and civic activist Harry Edwards was born in 1942 in East St. Louis, Illinois to Harry and Adelaide Edwards. Edwards grew up in East St. Louis, Illinois as the second child in a family of eight children. He attended the newly integrated East St. Louis Senior High School where he excelled in sports. After graduating from high school in 1960, Edwards moved to California where he attended Fresno City College. Edwards then transferred to San Jose State University where he majored in sociology and graduated summa cum laude with his B.A. degree in sociology in 1964. In 1966, Edwards went on to receive his M.A. degree in sociology from Cornell University where he was awarded the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. In 1970, he received his Ph.D. degree in sociology from Cornell University where he helped to found United Black Students for Action and the Olympic Project for Human Rights.

Due to his negative experiences as a student athlete on predominately white university campuses, Edwards became heavily involved in exposing the relationship between race and sports in society. By the late 1960s, Edwards began actively organizing protests and demonstrations like the 1968 Olympics Black Power salute at Mexico City involving John Carlos, Peter Norman and Tommie Smith. In 1970, Edwards was hired at the University of California, Berkeley where he taught courses on race relations, the sociology of sport and the family. In 1985, he was hired as a consultant for the San Francisco 49ers and developed the Minority Coaches Internship and Outreach Program with Coach Bill Walsh. Two years later, Edwards became special assistant to the Commissioner of Major League Baseball to help increase representation of minorities and women in baseball. From 1987 through 1995, Edwards worked with the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association, specializing in player personnel counseling and programs. The programs and methods he developed for dealing with challenges facing professional football players were adopted by the entire National Football League in 1992 and in 2000, he retired from the University of California, Berkeley.

Edwards has written extensively on the connections between race, sport and society. He is the author of "The Struggle That Must Be: An Autobiography," "The Sociology of Sports," "The Revolt of the Black Athlete," and countless articles on race, sports, and the sociology of sport in books, academic and popular press. Considered a leading authority on the sociology of sports and diversity, Edwards has appeared on nationally syndicated television shows and documentaries while traveling extensively to perform public engagements. He has been the recipient of several awards and honorary doctorate degrees.

Harry Edwards was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 6, 2011.

Accession Number

A2011.008

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/6/2011 |and| 11/9/2012 |and| 11/6/2013

Last Name

Edwards

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Schools

East St. Louis High School

San Jose State University

Cornell University

First Name

Harry

Birth City, State, Country

East Saint Louis

HM ID

EDW03

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

North Coast of California

Favorite Quote

Keep The Faith.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

11/22/1942

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/Berkeley

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Grilled Salmon

Short Description

Civic activist and sociology professor Harry Edwards (1942 - ) is known for his contributions to the study of the sociology of sport, his role as a consultant for professional sports teams, and his involvement in the 1968 Olympics Black Power salute in Mexico City.

Employment

San Francisco 49ers

University of California, Berkeley

Favorite Color

Black

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Harry Edwards' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Harry Edwards discusses his maternal family in Southern Illinois, part 1

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Harry Edwards talks about his maternal family, part 2, racism in the United States and the 1917 East St. Louis riots

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Harry Edwards describes his father and his paternal family

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Harry Edwards describes his father and his father's upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Harry Edwards talks about his father's life after his release from prison during the 1930s

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Harry Edwards describes his parents' marriage, siblings, and earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Harry Edwards describes losing a family friend in a railroad accident

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Harry Edwards talks about his first encounter with the police and integrating East St. Louis High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Harry Edwards describes the sights, sounds, and smell of his neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Harry Edwards talks about his early education, elementary school and teachers

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Harry Edwards describes East St. Louis, Illinois during the 1950s and 1960s

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Harry Edwards describes his father's love of books, his favorite teachers and the academic expectations of him as a student athlete

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Harry Edwards talks about his parents' separation

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Harry Edwards talks about his strained relationship with his mother and his home life after his parents separated

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Harry Edwards compares his early home life to that of his neighbors

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Harry Edwards talks about his sports heroes, broader influences and the effects of segregation on high school sports

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Harry Edwards continues discussing his sports heroes and East St. Louis High School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Harry Edwards describes his relationship and conversations he had with his father and mentor

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Harry Edwards describes neighborhood businesses in East St. Louis and his experience being part of the integration of East St. Louis High School

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Harry Edwards discusses the change in his relationship with his father

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Harry Edwards describes his academic experience in high school and his plans to attend college

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Harry Edwards talks about conflicts he had with students, coaches and authority figures

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Harry Edwards discusses his exposure to the Civil Rights Movement and his traveling to California for college

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Harry Edwards talks about his experience with the admissions process in California and his first year of college

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Harry Edwards describes the benefits of attending community college and his experience at San Jose State University

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Harry Edwards talks about the 1960 Olympics and meeting several Olympic athletes at San Jose State University

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Harry Edwards discusses his challenges as a black student athlete in sociology

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Harry Edwards discusses sociology and the lack of black emphasis

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Harry Edwards links the incorporation of an African American emphasis into sociology, as part of the larger social and civil rights movements

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Harry Edwards describes attending Cornell University under his Woodrow Wilson Fellowship

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Harry Edwards discusses being recruited by the National Football League and pursuing graduate school before professional sports

Donald Carpenter

Distinguished professor of sociology Donald Ray Carpenter was born on September 27, 1943 in Tyler, Texas to Modestine Truesdale Carpenter. In the absence of his father, he was raised by his grandmother, a Seventh Day Adventist. As a youth, Carpenter moved to Ogden, Utah, a city known for its historical involvement as a railroad town saturated with black night life, when his stepfather, John Carpenter, a radio repairman, was hired at Hill AFB near Ogden. Carpenter attended T.J. Austin Elementary School before graduating from Ogden High School in 1962. He performed as an organist and pianist for New Zion Baptist Church for forty-seven years. Carpenter went on to enroll at Weber State University where he majored in sociology and minored in anthropology. While attending Weber State, Carpenter also earned a living by working for Wonder Bread Bakery and the U.S. Post Office.

In 1972, Carpenter entered the University of Utah where he pursued his M.S.W. degree in social work. Afterwards, he returned to his alma mater in 1973 and began teaching in Weber State’s Social Work/Gerontology Department. In 1974, he attended the summer institute at the University of Chicago where he studied curriculum development for social work education. Carpenter went on to further his education by earning his Ph.D. in cultural foundation of education in 1986. He was awarded tenure at Weber State University that same year, and in 1993, he became chair of the Department of Social Work and Gerontology at Weber State University.

After retiring in 2003, Carpenter became the Administrator/Head Start Director of the Ogden/Weber Community Action Partnership, an organization that helps the disadvantaged on the local, state and federal levels. He has received many awards and recognitions including: Social Worker of the Year, Utah Chapter of NASW, 1998; 33 Degree Mason, 1988; Past Master of Mt. Ogden Lodge #20, Ogden, Utah; Past Commander-in-Chief of Ben Lomond Consistory, Ogden, Utah; Past Potentate of Rabbak Temple #218, Ogden, Utah and LCSW Social Worker, State of Utah.

Carpenter has been married to the former Elizabeth Ann Washington for forty-six years. Together they have two daughters, Tamera Lynn and Leslie Ann, three grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

Carpenter passed away on November 9, 2018.

Carpenter was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 14, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.051

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/14/2008

Last Name

Carpenter

Maker Category
Schools

Ogden High School

North Davis Junior High School

T.J. Austin Elementary School

Lewis Junior High School

Roy Junior High School

First Name

Donald

Birth City, State, Country

Tyler

HM ID

CAR17

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Texas

Favorite Vacation Destination

California

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Utah

Birth Date

9/27/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Salt Lake City

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Beef (Ground)

Death Date

11/9/2018

Short Description

Social worker and sociology professor Donald Carpenter (1943 - 2018) served as the chair of the Department of Social Work and Gerontology at Weber State University. He was also the administrator and Head Start director of the Ogden-Weber Community Action Partnership, Inc.

Employment

Weber School

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
0,0:9222,163:18136,230:21354,266:30078,353:32589,383:38076,463:38820,475:68341,832:75646,870:75950,875:76482,884:79142,922:79902,935:83030,949:85437,980:85935,987:91685,1011:91985,1016:92360,1022:93410,1044:97085,1121:97460,1127:98885,1155:101885,1216:107402,1250:109900,1274$0,0:3600,113:12336,148:13337,161:18966,239:21786,284:22350,293:27760,321:33106,355:34900,392:37006,428:38020,445:41140,517:44829,526:45194,532:50750,609:51200,615:52100,627:52550,633:60459,727:63820,766:69608,815:75812,946:76791,960:78110,974:79295,1000:80401,1032:80717,1037:82771,1069:83324,1077:83640,1082:94068,1378:95095,1393:95648,1400:98334,1431:98650,1436:111184,1526:111776,1535:124500,1644:130060,1659:130456,1667:131446,1686:131842,1701:136890,1740:137298,1747:143878,1849:144293,1855:144791,1862:147990,1896:151830,1931:154458,1985:155480,2002:157232,2037:157524,2042:163476,2114:163866,2121:164490,2137:165348,2152:166050,2163:166986,2185:177394,2297:179878,2344:182728,2354:200258,2635:211398,2784:217582,2842:218734,2867:220678,2905:221254,2914:229025,3020:232066,3046:236034,3084:243552,3148:245300,3179:245604,3184:245984,3190:248416,3231:251912,3299:252216,3304:259580,3410:259975,3416:261634,3431:261950,3436:270102,3530:273510,3643
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Donald Carpenter's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Donald Carpenter lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Donald Carpenter describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Donald Carpenter describes his maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Donald Carpenter describes his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Donald Carpenter describes his birth father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Donald Carpenter describes his relationship with his birth father

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Donald Carpenter describes his stepfather's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Donald Carpenter describes his relationship with his stepfather

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Donald Carpenter talks about how his mother met his birth father

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Donald Carpenter describes his mother and stepfather's marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Donald Carpenter describes his relationship with his mother

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Donald Carpenter describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Donald Carpenter describes his neighborhood in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Donald Carpenter remembers the Liberty Baptist Church in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Donald Carpenter describes his relationship with the elders in his community

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Donald Carpenter remembers T.J. Austin Elementary School in Tyler, Texas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Donald Carpenter recalls his family's move to Clearfield, Utah

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Donald Carpenter remembers Ogden High School in Ogden, Utah

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Donald Carpenter describes his college aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Donald Carpenter remembers marrying his wife

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Donald Carpenter recalls his mentors at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Donald Carpenter talks about his early awareness of the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Donald Carpenter describes the demographics of Utah

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Donald Carpenter talks about race relations in Ogden, Utah

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Donald Carpenter remembers Professor Ray Clark

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Donald Carpenter recalls his work at the Clearfield Job Corps Center in Clearfield, Utah

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Donald Carpenter remembers the guidance of his mentor, Professor Ray Clark

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Donald Carpenter recalls becoming a tenured professor at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Donald Carpenter describes his Ph.D. dissertation

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Donald Carpenter talks about the termination of Director H.C. Massey from the Ogden-Weber Community Action Partnership, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Donald Carpenter talks about his directorship of the Ogden-Weber Community Action Partnership, Inc.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Donald Carpenter describes his plans to honor H.C. Massey

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Donald Carpenter recalls the controversy over H.C. Massey's termination

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Donald Carpenter describes his achievements with the Head Start program in Ogden, Utah

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Donald Carpenter reflects upon his directorship of the Head Start program in Ogden, Utah

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Donald Carpenter describes his hopes and concerns for the communities of color in Utah

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Donald Carpenter talks about H.C. Massey

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Donald Carpenter describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Donald Carpenter reflects upon his life, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Donald Carpenter describes his concerns for the Head Start program

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Donald Carpenter talks about the role of the church in the black community

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Donald Carpenter reflects upon his life, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Donald Carpenter reflects upon his legacy, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Donald Carpenter describes his family

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Donald Carpenter talks about the history of African Americans in Ogden, Utah

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Donald Carpenter reflects upon his legacy, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Donald Carpenter describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$4

DAStory

12$5

DATitle
Donald Carpenter describes his relationship with his mother
Donald Carpenter reflects upon his directorship of the Head Start program in Ogden, Utah
Transcript
When you think about the personalities of your mother and your stepfather [John Carpenter] in particular, who do you think you take after the most?$$My mother, no question. Her and I be--she had so many children and they were so close in particular when we came to Utah I had to really kind of step in and help her quite a bit with those children, and even now my father was a good person, but in the early days he drank quite a bit. So, I had to be the buffer quite a bit between him and her and she depended a lot on me because she was quite young. See she was only about twenty-two, twenty-three when we came to Utah, so she was a young woman herself. In fact, my mother and I are more like brothers and sisters than mother and son. In fact, I call her Modestine [Modestine Truesdell Carpenter]. I don't call her mother, I call her by her name. And, but we--I know what she went through for me, so therefore I'm pretty wired close to her, which gets into a whole lot of things later in years, but she make great sacrifices, I mean no question in my mind. I can name them, go through them. So, we have quite a close relationship. In fact, she says to me all of the time, even today, "If I lost any of my children," the most difficult one would be if she lost me.$So this will be your last job you think as such (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, oh absolutely.$$Okay.$$I'm just, I've got to stay until we've overcome the obstacles. I, I don't know how much longer I'll stay. I, it's really a more rewarding job to me than when I was teaching school. That was an easier job, but this job is more rewarding in the sense that--well it think one of the things that have worked, I've had a career, I've had positions, so I don't have nothing to prove other than to come here and help the staff here. I'm not coming in on an ego trip, I, I've been there, done that. And these people bust their butts for me, and a lot of these people have been here twenty years they know a hell of a lot more than I know about Head Start, but they are so committed and since I've been here I mean they make sure that--it was the staff that led this agency [Ogden-Weber Community Action Partnership, Inc., Ogden, Utah] to a zero finding, which is very unusual in the Head Start world. But one of the things I like about it is that it's put me in contact with people I never would have met at the college level, you know like Bob Coard [Robert M. Coard] out of ABCD [Action for Boston Community Development] out of Boston [Massachusetts]. I don't know if you're familiar with him. You really need to do him. I mean he's got the biggest community action program in the United States, Coard, ABCD. He's got four thousand kids in the Head Start program. But, at the nation, at the, at the regional and national level the contacts that I made have just been invaluable, and I think his help helped the, helped the agency tremendously. It's no secret in terms of people knowing about the troubles of this agency, but people coming in saying we want to help has a lot to do in terms the network that I've developed with it and we're making progress and we're, we just don't have those problems anymore and so I've got to stay just long enough that I get the seed planted where it continues to grow. It's got to do even better when I leave, and I'm trying to look at succession planning that when I leave you don't have to go all around the country to find a new director, you have one right here, right here in this agency.$$To have, so--$$People who and I've convinced the board we need to do succession planning. I've made sure that the managers understand if you want this seat it's gon- you gonna have to have at least a master's degree to get it. So, through your T and TA [training and technical assistance] plan I sent them to this Johnson and Johnson Institute in California [Irvin, California] to get that certification, the Head Start certification, you know the career development. I'm saying that, "My last hoorah in this agency is to see--I got five managers. One of you five ought to get this job. I want all of you to be so qualified until the board is going to struggle with who to give it to because you paid your dues." And I think when people feel that they can, if, if I work hard, if I do what I need to do, I might have chance to be promoted when something come up. And so it's, it's, it's, it's work, worked well and I mean I have great respect in the region. I'm, like I say, president of the Region 8 board. I deal with Denver [Colorado]. I deal with D.C. [Washington, D.C.], deal with them all. And it's really been a fun job, in particular with the state level CSBG and that whole system. I, it's, it's worked out really well, so it's been a great experience for me. Actually I'm having more fun here then I did at Weber [Weber State College; Weber State University, Ogden, Utah].

John S. Butler

John Sibley Butler was born on July 19, 1947, in New Orleans, Louisiana, to Thojest and Johnnie Mae Butler. While attending the Washington Parish schools, Butler was in the honor society and played the trombone in the school band; he also was active in Little League baseball and the Boy Scouts.

Butler served in Vietnam in the 1960s. In 1969, he earned his B.A. degree from Louisiana State University. Continuing his education at Northwestern University as a Fellow of Social Change, Butler received his Ph.D. in sociology in 1974. After receiving his degrees, Butler taught M.B.A. programs in Mexico and Japan. Butler was the founding editor of the National Journal of Sociology, which he edited for 15 years. In 1988, the University of California at Berkeley sought Butler for a think tank on Testing and American Organizations.

Butler authored several books, published numerous journal articles, and was recognized with several awards. Butler was also one of the distinguished professors selected for the election committee advisory board for then Texas governor George W. Bush in 2000.

Butler became the chair of the Department of Management in the Graduate School of Business at the University of Texas at Austin in 1999; in 2002, he became the Director of the IC2 Institute where he also held the Herb Kelleher Chair for Entrepreneurship and Business and was the Sam Barshop Research Fellow. Butler served on the board of directors for Morehouse Research Institute in Atlanta, Georgia, and the Langston University National Institute for the Study of Minority Enterprise. In 2006, Butler was appointed by President Bush to the J. William Fulbright Scholarship Board; he was reappointed in 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.045

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/5/2007

Last Name

Butler

Maker Category
Middle Name

S.

Schools

Washington Parish Elementary School

Washington Parish High School

Louisiana State University

Northwestern University

First Name

John

Birth City, State, Country

New Orleans

HM ID

BUT04

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Louisiana

Favorite Vacation Destination

California, Florida

Favorite Quote

If I Tell You That A Chicken Dips Snuff, Look For The Can Beneath Its Wings.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

7/19/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Austin

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Gumbo

Short Description

Sociology professor and academic administrator John S. Butler (1947 - ) was twice appointed to the J. William Fulbright Scholarship Board by President George W. Bush, and serves as the director of the IC2 Institute at the University of Texas at Austin.

Employment

Northwestern University

University of Texas at Austin

U.S. Army

The IC2 Institute

Aoyama Gakuin University

State Farm Insurance Companies

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:2210,26:16800,282:31665,485:51496,785:51851,791:52490,820:54052,855:56537,913:57034,921:62180,972:64990,1024:95016,1494:95754,1505:117096,1794:119280,1838:128427,1991:184245,2987:184720,2993:186240,3017:186905,3026:190759,3042:191124,3053:197694,3318:198205,3330:204702,3473:210612,3505:212590,3527:213115,3535:216440,3584$0,0:5292,128:5964,137:16434,337:22826,446:32020,526:32388,531:35792,571:36804,580:57460,888:58270,898:66920,1017:74280,1159:75000,1173:76360,1187:76920,1196:85695,1301:91245,1402:91845,1411:92145,1416:92445,1421:96526,1438:98340,1448:99240,1465:106350,1577:108142,1670:110062,1740:126679,1985:144590,2166
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of John S. Butler's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - John S. Butler lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - John S. Butler describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - John S. Butler describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - John S. Butler describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - John S. Butler describes his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - John S. Butler lists his siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - John S. Butler describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - John S. Butler describes his grade school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - John S. Butler describes his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - John S. Butler remembers his influential teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - John S. Butler describes segregation in Franklinton, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - John S. Butler remembers the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - John S. Butler recalls the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - John S. Butler describes his early musical activities

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - John S. Butler remembers Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - John S. Butler recalls his U.S. military service in the Vietnam War

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - John S. Butler recalls his graduate studies at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - John S. Butler describes his graduate work in sociology at Northwestern University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - John S. Butler describes his postdoctoral research fellowship

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - John S. Butler remembers writing 'All That We Can Be' with Charles Moskos

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - John S. Butler describes the start of his career in academia

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - John S. Butler describes his research on educational testing

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - John S. Butler talks about his organizational affiliations

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - John S. Butler describes the Innovation, Creativity and Capital Institute in Austin, Texas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - John S. Butler talks about entrepreneurship in the African American community

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - John S. Butler describes the differences between the North and South

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - John S. Butler talks about the role of immigrants in American industry

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - John S. Butler talks about his political activities

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - John S. Butler recalls serving on the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - John S. Butler remembers President George Walker Bush

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - John S. Butler describes his experiences of teaching abroad

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - John S. Butler talks about his interest in music, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - John S. Butler talks about his interest in music, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - John S. Butler describes GloFish, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - John S. Butler talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - John S. Butler reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - John S. Butler describes his concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - John S. Butler shares a message to future generations

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - John S. Butler describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

7$7

DATitle
John S. Butler describes the Innovation, Creativity and Capital Institute in Austin, Texas
John S. Butler describes his experiences of teaching abroad
Transcript
What happens next in your life as far as--we're talking about, we're going into the 1990s now.$$Well I'm rearing a son [John Butler] who's my namesake, and he's finishing high school in 1995, and he attends the University of Texas [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas] and finishing, finished this year, and became the fifth generation college graduate in the family, which we are very proud of. And of course I'm getting more involved into chairing things, I'm chair of the sociology department, I chair the management department and I was interim director of African American studies so, I'm getting to be an old head at the university so they're pulling on me to do administrative work. And my research is, I published a book called 'Entrepreneurship and Self-Help among Black Americans' [John S. Butler], which is a history of the greatest generation, of how people came out of slavery, within one hundred years, they created business enterprises, over one hundred private colleges and universities. And how that sort or parallels the emphasis on civil rights and how the Civil Rights Movement came out of that. And so, I'm still publishing, I'm still writing, but I'm getting more involved with this administrative stuff, and now I'm director of IC^2 Institute [Innovation, Creativity and Capital Institute] at the University of Texas where we do lots of, create companies, we have an incubator, we do a lot of research on wealth creation.$$We probably need to explore that a little bit more.$$Okay.$$IC^2 Institute, tell me more about that.$$It's an institute for innovation and creativity and it was, you know the universities are designed to, to have departments and institutes and basically we collect faculty around the, the campus and study market economies and how can market economies improve and the founder of that is George Kozmetsky, who is the former dean of the business school, Michael Dell came through his tutelage when he was at IC^2. We've built over a hundred companies, we had six companies to go public, we've created a lot of wealth, so as the component of the university engages in technology transfer, and our laboratory is not a chemistry laboratory but rather it is, like the medical students, we have a laboratory where we learn to start companies. And so what I have to manage is the IC^2 Institute and the incubator, we have a commercialization area and we get grants and instead of it being in a biology lab it's, it's a lab about wealth creation and it's kind of similar to what, similar to what Booker T. Washington did with Tuskegee [Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute; Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama] at the turn of the century when he had George Washington Carver creating the peanut and industries all around the peanut.$$Um-hm.$$So right now we're looking at, we have an incubator, we do clean energy, we do traditional IT [information technology], so we're doing all of the, trying to stay ahead of, here in Texas those things that would allow jobs and opportunities. Texas is a state that creates wealth, and you know that Southwest Airlines [Southwest Airlines Co.] came out of here, Dell [Dell Inc.] computers came out of here, Whole Foods [Whole Foods Market, Inc.] came out of here, National Instruments [National Instruments Corporation] came out of here, Golfsmith [Golfsmith International Holdings, Inc.] came out of here, (unclear), it just goes on and on and on. So, the thing about this state is that the University of Texas is committed to staying ahead of the industry and IC^2 is a part of that.$Did you say that you lived in Japan?$$I was a professor at Aoyama Gakuin [Aoyama Gakuin University] in Japan [Tokyo, Japan] for fourteen years in the summer, I taught an M.B.A. program, the entrepreneurship in Japan, as a fellow, from the IC^2 Institute [Innovation, Creativity and Capital Institute] as a professor at the University of Texas [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas].$$What was that like living in Japan?$$Well it was very good 'cause it is so different, the language is very different, and I think the last three years I just requested to live in Japanese only hotels so I could get around, you know, (speaking Japanese), and I could, I could get a taxi, it's a very interesting language. You know I do French pretty well and I do English pretty well, I do jive very well too, by the way (laughter).$$Let me hear (laughter).$$But it was good, it was good, it was different because they have a different kind of entrepreneurial culture. It would be done I think out of large companies there, that is the individual entrepreneurial spirit is not the same as America, and Japan would solve its own future by depending probably on large companies and continuing to turn out products based on entrepreneurship, or entrepreneurship within large companies. The opposite is true of China. I was a professor in China last year, year before last.$$Um-hm.$$And the entrepreneur spirit there is much more like the Western tradition even though it's based on an economy society, what China is doing is very, very interesting and if you add the innovation to it, that is if they ever make their own televisions, their own automobiles, their own airplanes, they don't need the rest of the world for customers. And so, I think that China represents the future in a lot of ways. I think that it is gonna be a, a great competitor to innovation and job creation and web creations in America. And again, as I said earlier, staying ahead on the innovation, innovative curve, that is, what will products look like? What will manufacturing look like? Would it be nanomanufacturing, would it be biomanufacturing, becomes very important for the 21st century.

J. Herman Blake

Born John Herman Blake on March 15, 1934, Blake grew up in Mount Vernon, New York, as one of seven children raised by his single mother, Lylace E. Blake. Blake’s family lived in poverty, surviving only by welfare. Blake’s mother encouraged each of her children to participate and excel in school; all seven children completed high school; six received bachelor’s degrees; five achieved master’s degrees; and two earned doctorate degrees.

After serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War, Blake continued his education with the assistance of the G.I. Bill; he enrolled in New York University in 1955, and received his B.A. degree in sociology in 1960. Blake went on to receive his M.A. degree and his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley. In 1966, Blake, as the Assistant Professor of Sociology, became the first African American on the University of California Santa Cruz faculty. During his eighteen year tenure, Blake also served as the Founding Provost of Oakes College at the University of California Santa Cruz.

After leaving the University of California Santa Cruz, Blake served as the President of Tougaloo College until 1987; held positions at Swarthmore College; served as the Vice Chancellor at Indiana University; and served as the Director of African American Studies at Iowa State University. In 2002, Blake was named Iowa Professor of the Year and received an Honorary Degree from Indiana University.In addition to his career in education, Blake published several projects including Revolutionary Suicide, an autobiography of Huey P. Newton, which was the result of his research on black militants in urban areas.

Blake also researched many other topics; his work made him a leading authority on the Gullah culture. Additionally, Blake served as the Scholar in Residence and Director of the Sea Island Institute at the University of South Carolina, Beaufort, an institution whose primary focus is the study and promotion of Gullah Cultures. In 2008, the Medical University of South Carolina appointed Blake as the first Humanities Scholar in Residence. Blake served as an advisor to the University’s Humanities Committee and to the President and Provost on matters of cultural enrichment.

Accession Number

A2007.036

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/31/2007

Last Name

Blake

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Herman

Schools

Northeastern Academy

New York University

University of California, Berkeley

First Name

J.

Birth City, State, Country

Mt. Vernon

HM ID

BLA12

Favorite Season

Spring, Summer

State

New York

Favorite Vacation Destination

Central California

Favorite Quote

Keep On Keepin' On.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

South Carolina

Birth Date

3/15/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Charleston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Potato Cobbler

Short Description

University president and sociology professor J. Herman Blake (1934 - ) was the president of Tougaloo College, and was a tenured member of the the University of California Santa Cruz faculty for eighteen years. Blake also authored the Huey P. Newton biography, "Revolutionary Suicide," and is a well-respected as a leading authority on Gullah culture.

Employment

University of California Santa Cruz

Tougaloo College

Iowa State University

Favorite Color

Sky Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:6586,98:19430,265:20343,283:32852,432:36750,519:37185,525:38838,567:46059,696:51478,761:55622,852:55918,901:82324,1246:100049,1453:100759,1464:108100,1582:112420,1661:121950,1850:140114,2118:146935,2208:148720,2239:154836,2291:159136,2338:160648,2359:161572,2372:162328,2383:164764,2412:168192,2427:168707,2433:177359,2537:177874,2543:178492,2550:180243,2575:180758,2581:185690,2605:188228,2638:191641,2681:192579,2697:193852,2719:194120,2724:197170,2755:197470,2761:198490,2783:203894,2835:205708,2848:206544,2860:207608,2876:211028,2942:214700,2956:217872,3043:222528,3076:222832,3081:223364,3089:228946,3185:230510,3220:232890,3286:233298,3293:237166,3353:241582,3405:250690,3566:256470,3667$0,0:3998,110:4703,116:6536,126:8510,141:9497,149:21870,206:25398,255:26574,270:28002,289:30522,327:40241,388:40850,397:41546,409:42242,419:43286,432:46000,442:56492,572:57148,581:63110,647:78558,900:79952,923:80854,936:81838,951:99083,1141:99375,1146:99959,1156:104631,1257:109000,1267:110148,1286:110968,1297:113346,1332:113838,1339:114248,1345:114658,1351:124366,1487:126998,1525:134758,1597:135416,1605:136262,1615:140540,1644:141380,1653:149470,1689:150280,1698:151009,1709:152180,1716:156412,1740:161990,1792:162620,1801:166320,1823:166645,1829:167295,1842:167880,1856:168855,1874:175472,2051:178880,2127:179600,2138:180680,2162:193956,2322:196882,2366:197806,2383:210549,2548:211872,2575:213258,2634:213510,2639:213951,2647:214644,2660:219512,2707:219808,2712:230670,2817:233960,2909:237200,2944
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of J. Herman Blake's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - J. Herman Blake lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - J. Herman Blake describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - J. Herman Blake recalls his childhood home in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - J. Herman Blake describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - J. Herman Blake describes his paternal ancestry on Johns Island, South Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - J. Herman Blake describes his father, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - J. Herman Blake describes his father, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - J. Herman Blake describes his two oldest brothers

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - J. Herman Blake recalls the generosity of Lillian Tinsley

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - J. Herman Blake lists his siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - J. Herman Blake describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - J. Herman Blake recalls living with the family of Thaddeus Wilson, Sr.

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - J. Herman Blake describe his neighborhood in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - J. Herman Blake describes his early education in Mount Vernon, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - J. Herman Blake recalls his influences at Harlem Junior Academy in New York City, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - J. Herman Blake recalls his influences at Harlem Junior Academy in New York City, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - J. Herman Blake recalls learning about African American history

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - J. Herman Blake recalls attending New York City's Harlem Junior Academy

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - J. Herman Blake describes his early work experiences

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - J. Herman Blake remembers being drafted to the U.S. Army

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - J. Herman Blake recalls being stationed in France

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - J. Herman Blake recalls his marriage to Bessie Jefferson Blake

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - J. Herman Blake remembers attending New York University

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - J. Herman Blake recalls his graduate studies at the University of California, Berkley

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - J. Herman Blake describes his social activism in California

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - J. Herman Blake recalls testifying at Huey P. Newton's trial

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - J. Herman Blake remembers visiting Huey P. Newton in prison

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - J. Herman Blake recalls coauthoring 'Revolutionary Suicide'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - J. Herman Blake remembers author Alex Haley

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - J. Herman Blake describes his civil rights activity in the 1960s, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - J. Herman Blake describes his civil rights activity in the 1960s, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - J. Herman Blake remembers his mother's death

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - J. Herman Blake recalls his mother's pride in his accomplishments

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - J. Herman Blake recalls founding Oakes College in Santa Cruz, California, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - J. Herman Blake recalls founding Oakes College in Santa Cruz, California, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - J. Herman Blake recalls designing a course for Oakes College

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - J. Herman Blake describes the significance of his lapel flower

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - J. Herman Blake describes his work with the Emil Schwarzhaut Foundation

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - J. Herman Blake recalls the service projects he implemented in the Sea Islands

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - J. Herman Blake recalls his students' interactions with the community of Daufuskie Island, South Carolina

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - J. Herman Blake describes Pat Conroy's interpretation of Daufuskie Island

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - J. Herman Blake recalls lessons from the residents of Daufuskie Island

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - J. Herman Blake talks about Pat Conroy's book, 'The Water Is Wide'

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - J. Herman Blake describes storyteller Thomas Stafford

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - J. Herman Blake recalls editing the journal of the National Black Law Students Association

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - J. Herman Blake remembers community activist Thomas Barnwell

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - J. Herman Blake describes the Penn Center on St. Helena Island, South Carolina

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - J. Herman Blake recalls founding Oakes College in Santa Cruz, California

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - J. Herman Blake describes the faculty of Oakes College

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - J. Herman Blake describes the students at Oakes College

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - J. Herman Blake remembers Alex Haley's Kinte Library Project

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - J. Herman Blake describes his friendship with Alex Haley

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - J. Herman Blake recalls watching the filming of 'Roots'

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - J. Herman Blake recalls Alex Haley's article about Daufuskie Island

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - J. Herman Blake recalls leaving Oakes College in Santa Cruz, California

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - J. Herman Blake recalls his presidency at Mississippi's Tougaloo College

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - J. Herman Blake describes the financial challenges he faced at Tougaloo College

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - J. Herman Blake describes the students at Tougaloo College

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - J. Herman Blake describes his philosophy of learning

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - J. Herman Blake recalls a conflict with the alumni of Tougaloo College

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - J. Herman Blake recalls an incident of sexual assault at Tougaloo College

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$8

DAStory

4$1

DATitle
J. Herman Blake recalls coauthoring 'Revolutionary Suicide'
J. Herman Blake recalls his presidency at Mississippi's Tougaloo College
Transcript
Well there was a time when his mother made a mistake and she came with two of her daughters, as I recall, on my day because you see, if you visited with Huey [Huey P. Newton], he wasn't in solitary confinement so we each came on a different day. There was one day when you couldn't visit, that's when his lawyers would come and they weren't on the list anyhow so it was keeping him out of solitary confinement. So on my day we're sitting there, Huey and I talking, and here comes Mrs. Newton [Armelia Johnson Newton] along with one or two of her daughters, there's several of us and they came in. So we were all there talking and in the course of the conversation Mrs. Newton got into talking about Gene Marine, who had written a book ['The Black Panthers'] about the Black Panther Party and this, that and the other and Ms. Newton said, "You know, that white man came and talked to me and then he went and lied on me." She did not like the book. She said, "He lied on me," and she's calling "Huerry"; she didn't say Huey, Huey--, "Huerry." She said, "Huerry, Huerry, why don't you write a book?" And Huey said, "I can't write a book, Dr. Blake [HistoryMaker J. Herman Blake] can write a book," and out of that interchange came the notion that Dr. Blake would do a biography of Huey Newton. There would be a, quote, authorized biography. So I picked up on the idea and started organizing my material, contacted Alex Haley for counsel and began collecting data on Huey Newton, mainly from him. We talked about a lot of things and he thought he was going to be in there for seventeen years and he told me a lot of stuff. Well what Huey would do was he would talk and then I'd come out of the prison [California Men's Colony, San Luis Obispo, California] and I had a tape recorder in my car and as soon as I came out, I would go over what he said and put it on the tape recorder. Now our style of working with, we'd talk about something for two hours and I'd review it. And we'd talk about something more and I'd review it and then before I left, I'd go down the list of issues and when I got in the car, on that tape, one of my students would be driving and I'd be talking on that tape, recording that account and that's how we began to do that. And then in August of 1970, as I recall, his conviction was reversed and he was released. It was at that time we decided to change it from an authorized biography to a first person account with me as, you know, Huey Newton as the author and me assisting but I wrote every line, every single word and I put it in the first person. Now let me say that was a task I would never do again because you have to give up your own personality and your own ego and step into somebody else's body and I was never comfortable with that being a scholar, because you're not doing scholarly work, you're essentially just channeling somebody else's material and ideas and Huey and I had some strong disagreements because I felt there had to be some analytical approaches in there but he did not want that but I don't know how you do this without being analytical. He just wanted it to be descriptive and he wanted it to be the kind of thing that would sell, he saw it selling like 'The Autobiography of Malcolm X' [Malcolm X and Alex Haley], things like that. It didn't but, I mean, it's not a good book but it's all right but that's how that came to be and I wrote it ['Revolutionary Suicide,' Huey P. Newton and J. Herman Blake], like I said, but we had real conflicts. I learned things about him and about his father that he had forgotten or didn't know but he didn't want that stuff in there. Oh, it was interesting.$You were going to tell me about your experience at Tougaloo [Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, Mississippi].$$Well, Clark Kerr, the quintessential college president of the 20th century was one of my mentors, and Clark and I use the same phrase when we talk our presidencies. That is, I left my presidency the same way I entered it: fired with enthusiasm. I went to Tougaloo really wanting to focus on building an academic, intellectual community that would provide upward mobility through intellectual achievement for Mississippi students. Tougaloo was on hard times, it had suffered serious declines in enrollment and it was literally trying to buy students to come to Tougaloo. I did not realize and did not understand that many people wanted me to come to Tougaloo from the University of California [University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California] because they thought I would attract back to Tougaloo those outstanding, high achieving students who came to Tougaloo when they couldn't go to the University of Mississippi [Oxford, Mississippi]. That's not what I was interested in. My position was, if they can go elsewhere, they should be encouraged to go elsewhere and we should reach down in the well and bring out those who haven't been able to. This college has a historical contribution in that regard and we should reach those people and I was good at it. I had done it at Santa Cruz so that's what I wanted to do at Tougaloo. There were many people who had no interest in that kind of a mission or that kind of a vision. That was number one. I found myself up against serious financial constraints but even more, a cultural dynamic of negative self-perception that was willing to accept mediocrity, and I found that in key administrators, and I found that in the board of trustees. One of the first things I did when I got to Mississippi was I contacted the former, not the former president, the president of Alcorn State [Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College; Alcorn State University, Lorman, Mississippi], Herman Washington [sic. Walter Washington], who was a Tougaloo graduate and Herman Washington told me that my biggest problem at Tougaloo was going to be the believability barrier. People don't believe they can be good. Then I contacted William Winter, the former governor of Mississippi who had done so much to improve education in the state and I recruited him as a mentor with the hope, eventually, of recruiting him to join the board. He came and gave talks to my board at dinner meetings and the first thing William Winter said to me was, "Dr. Blake [HistoryMaker J. Herman Blake], your biggest challenge in Mississippi is the believability barrier," the same thing Herman Washington had said but William Winter was talking a broader context. I did not understand that, I did not understand that. If you have an opportunity to bring the resources and get people to grow, why would they not?

Troy Duster

Sociology professor and author Troy Duster was born on July 11, 1936, in Chicago, Illinois. The son of Alfreda Duster, a community organizer, he was raised on the south side of Chicago. His extraordinary grandmother, Ida B. Wells, was born a slave in 1862 in Mississippi, months before the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. She became an editor and co-owner of The Free Speech and Headlight, a local African American newspaper in Memphis, Tennessee, and was among the first generation of writers to invent investigative journalism. She continued her tireless crusade for equal rights for African Americans until her death in 1931. Duster’s father died when he was nine, leaving behind his mother, sister, and two older brothers. Becoming editor of his high school newspaper and graduating first in his class, Duster attended Northwestern University where he studied journalism and sociology. Earning his B.S. degree in journalism in 1957, he continued his studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he earned his M.A. degree in sociology in 1959. In 1962, he was awarded his PhD in sociology from Northwestern University.

In 1999, Duster became professor of sociology and director of the Institute for the History of the Production of Knowledge at New York University. He is also the Chancellor’s Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1970. In 2004, he served a one-year term as president of the American Sociological Association. Duster’s research and writing have ranged across a variety of subject areas: the sociology of law, science, deviance, inequality, race and education. In 1970, his first book, The Legislation of Morality: Drugs, Crime, and Law became a classic in the drug field.

Duster is co-author of Whitewashing Race: The Myth of a Color-Blind Society (2003), which won the Benjamin Hooks Award and was a finalist for the C. Wright Mills Award in 2004. Among his other awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship at the London School of Economics; an honorary Doctor of Letters from Williams College; and the Dubois-Johnson-Frazier Award from the American Sociological Association. With his siblings, Duster established the Ida B. Wells Foundation, which gives awards to journalists and researchers working in Wells’ tradition of writing and speaking out for civil rights, civil liberties and social justice.

Duster lives in New York with his family.

Accession Number

A2005.268

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/21/2005

Last Name

Duster

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Troy

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

DUS02

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Pass It On.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/11/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Sociology professor Troy Duster (1936 - ) was the grandson of Ida B. Wells. Duster directed the Institute for the History of the Production of Knowledge at New York University, and was Chancellor's Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:1338,16:1794,26:8780,99:17980,234:45798,577:52199,667:69156,905:70316,922:76742,949:77239,966:89775,1156:90123,1161:91515,1187:91950,1193:93081,1226:112782,1491:113268,1498:125396,1703:126740,1731:127244,1738:128588,1763:130436,1788:131864,1816:133880,1862:138430,1900:146630,2076:147450,2087:155750,2148:156236,2155:157127,2165:160853,2240:162554,2286:170087,2458:183090,2568$0,0:288000,4101
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Troy Duster's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Troy Duster lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Troy Duster describes his mother, Alfreda Barnett

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Troy Duster talks about his maternal grandmother, activist Ida B. Wells' background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Troy Duster talks about his maternal grandmother, activist Ida B. Wells' background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Troy Duster recounts his maternal grandmother, activist Ida B. Wells' journalistic career

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Troy Duster describes the community of Mound Bayou, Mississippi, and his maternal grandfather, Ferdinand Barnett

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Troy Duster describes his father, Benjamin Duster's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Troy Duster recounts his father, Benjamin Duster's education at Indiana State University in Terre Haute

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Troy Duster recounts how his parents, Benjamin Duster and Alfreda Barnett, met

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Troy Duster talks about his parents and siblings during the Great Depression

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Troy Duster talks about his maternal grandfather, Ferdinand Barnett, and growing up in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Troy Duster recalls growing up on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois during the 1940s

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Troy Duster describes social dynamics and group signaling among black Chicago youth during the 1940s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Troy Duster describes his home life growing up in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Troy Duster recalls race relations in Chicago, Illinois, and the reaction to Emmett Till's 1955 murder

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Troy Duster compares the reactions to the Emmett Till, O.J. Simpson, and Rodney King cases

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Troy Duster recalls the reaction to the Brown v. Board of Education verdict

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Troy Duster recalls entering Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and the racial makeup there

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Troy Duster describes studying journalism and then sociology at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Troy Duster talks about his mother, Alfreda Barnett's education at the University of Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Troy Duster recalls his interest in journalism at Wendell Phillips Academy High School in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Troy Duster recounts switching from studying journalism to studying sociology

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Troy Duster talks about his decision to pursue a Ph.D. in sociology at the University of California - Los Angeles

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Troy Duster describes the University of California - Los Angeles sociology department during the late 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Troy Duster describes the fledgling state of the Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Troy Duster talks about his relationship with his mother, Alfreda Barnett during the 1950s

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$2

DAStory

2$5

DATitle
Troy Duster describes studying journalism and then sociology at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois
Troy Duster describes social dynamics and group signaling among black Chicago youth during the 1940s
Transcript
And I spent the first few years doing news editorial work, then I went in the, the what was called television and radio news and what that meant was rewriting the news copy for those who were gonna be in front of a camera, because in those years, it was not even considered possible that an African American would be in front of a camera. This was (unclear) as 1956, '57 [1957], and the only people you saw in front of the TV cameras were white.$$Period.$$Period. I mean, even, you, if you, if you were in Brazil or Mexico now, you have the same phenomenon, you, you're, you have people in Salvador and Bahia, the, the actual society maybe 50 percent black, but on television there're only white newscasters or white soap opera stars and so on. That was Chicago [Illinois] in 1955, so there I was in news editorial work and then television work but I was always gonna be in the person in the back room writing the, the script and I had all these lessons that I'd learned, you know, not, not from books but from the, from my colleagues, from my friends, from my, my peers, one of the first things I learned was about differentiation among what I thought were just white people. So my first year, someone comes up to me and says, you know, you, you and I are on the same page, I really appreciate the fact that, you know, we--you, you and I have to share these things in common, and I think now, what's this person talking about? And he said, I, I'm Jewish he said, and then he gave me a social history of Northwestern [University, Evanston, Illinois], he said over here are the all-Jewish fraternities, you see Jews can't go into the gentile fraternities, he gave me a quick historiography and a, a geography of the map of the social world of Northwestern in which working-class kids were over in these kinds of scenes, the upper middle class kids were over here, the what do you call the, WASP, White Anglo-Saxon Protestants were in certain fraternities and I just thought people were in these categories called white and black, (laughter). And in a very short period I understand that there is visceral anger amongst certain people, towards Irish, Italians, towards Jews, towards Poles, towards working-class white people at the, at this, you know, what I thought in my world in Chicago was a black-white world, was now a much more heterogeneous, richly, variegated and diverse scene. And I think that was why I begin to do well in sociology, 'cause that was a discipline that begin to talk about these things, about the ways in which societies are stratified.$Now, let me tell you a little bit about what dual life was like, because I said the streets were tough and the home was the, what? Haven, a safe place, so we ha--we all had to live it in some ways dual lives and we had to navigate the streets, each of us had the same, the same problem but, each of us had our different skill levels, but, you know, we had to either be at the edge of this kind of life and on the streets and in the school situation and I, I'll tell you a story which is, I think emblematic of the way I've learned the way the world works. Each of my four siblings, before me had been of the same school [Wendell Phillips Academy High School, Chicago, Illinois], each of them, they'd all been good students, for example, my oldest brother was valedictorian of his high school class, second brother, valedictorian, third brother, number two, sal--salutatorian, sister, salutatorian, so there you have four in a row, either number one or number two in their high school class, so the reputation of my family was, we were good students. Okay, so here's the story, I come along and people assume, well one of 'ems gonna be the black sheep, that was the li--that was the line, you know, it's gotta be me 'cause the other four had done, done so well, but, I was a pretty good student but, I was what they call now, a code switcher, that is I could both speak the language of the school and of the streets, I can't anymore, but that, you know, when I was a kid I could code switch and I got pretty good at it so, I could signify, you know, with, with the worst of them, with the best of them, I wasn't that good at it but I knew what the rules were, I knew what to s--what the language games were. So, one day I was in this role called, the head of the class, captain of the boys, I was supposed to, at a certain hour have the boys line up and go to the library and Mrs. Jackson, who was the instructor said, all right Troy, at three o'clock I want you to do this, and I said fine, I do it all the time. She left went around to the library and at a certain hour and a certain point, ten past the hour, I got up and I did my code switch, which was I acted out what would be the equivalent now of some kind of ruckus hip hop. We didn't have hip hop, but there was an equivalent and I knew enough to be able to do some things, and there was a stony silence suddenly, and everyone in the classroom froze because Mrs. Jackson suddenly appeared in the doorway, she said Troy Duster, you are a disgrace, you're a disgrace to your family, the Duster name, you know, you're to go to the back of the class, so I did of course, I mean, I had my punishment. But here's the part of the story that's fascinating, I suddenly became a culture hero. To a certain part of the class, this moment where I was quote, getting my comeuppance by being the one who was cut, cut down, I was celebrated, so the world looked very strange to me, you know, the very thing that had gotten me in trouble was now getting me some credits from the street side, now there's a lesson there somewhere, I'm not sure what it is, there's a metaphor, but I learned about the, the problematic nature of social status at a very early age. That depending upon what group you're in, your status can change based upon the exact same behavior and it happened with me in a moment, a split second, when Mrs. Jackson said, you're a disgrace to your family. Well, I may have been for that moment for her, but for these other people I was, you know, bad boy, that bad boy's a good boy. (Laughter). Now that story, people have said to me well that maybe why you became a sociologist, I don't wanna be reductionist, well, I, I do think there's something to it. And there's some--there's something about the world being fluid, you know, not solid--$$What year did this happen? I just want to put that in.$$Let's see, I'm probably, let's see, six, seven, I'm in the sixth grade--$$Okay.$$--Which just means I'm probably around eleven or twelve (simultaneous)--$$--Twelve, yeah.$$--Twelve years old.$$So, that's like 1948?$$Yeah.$$Yeah.

Adelaide Cromwell

Boston University professor emeritus Adelaide McGuinn Cromwell was born on November 27, 1919, in Washington, D.C. In 1936, Cromwell graduated from Dunbar High School and in 1940, went on to earn an A.B. degree in sociology from Smith College. One year later, she earned a M.A. degree in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania and went on to earn a certificate in social casework from Bryn Mawr College. After earning a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard’s Radcliffe College in 1946, she became the first African American instructor at Hunter College in New York and then at her alma mater, Smith College.

From 1951 to 1985, she worked as professor of sociology at Boston University. In 1951, Cromwell was a leading member of the committee that established Boston University’s African Studies Program. In 1953, she was appointed as administrator and research associate of the program. In 1969, Cromwell was appointed director of Boston University’ graduate program in Afro-American Studies.

In 1960, Cromwell convened the first conference of West African social workers in Ghana. That same year, she was the only woman and African American appointed to a five-member committee commissioned by the Methodist Church in America to assess the state of higher education in what was then called the Belgian Congo. In 1983, Cromwell convened a conference of African American scholars and policymakers at the University of Liberia in Monrovia in 1983.

Cromwell has been recognized by a broad community of educators, administrators, and policymakers. She was appointed to the executive council of the American Society of African Culture, the American Negro Leadership Conference in Africa and the advisory council on Voluntary Foreign Aid. She maintains active membership in the Council on Foreign Relations, the African Studies Association, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) and the American Sociological Association.

Cromwell has been recognized for her outstanding contributions to academia with awards and honors that include a Citation from the National Order of Cote d’Ivoire, the Smith College Medal, and the Carter G. Woodson Medal from ASALH.

Cromwell is the author of significant books and articles and is the mother of one son, Anthony Cromwell Hill. In retirement, her current research is on the history of her family as black intellectuals.

Cromwell passed away on June 8, 2019.

Accession Number

A2004.243

Sex

Female

Interview Date

12/2/2004

Last Name

Cromwell

Maker Category
Middle Name

M.

Organizations
Schools

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Garrison Elementary School

Shaw Middle School @ Garnet Patterson

Lucretia Mott Elementary School

Smith College

University of Pennsylvania

Bryn Mawr College

Harvard University

Speakers Bureau

No

First Name

Adelaide

Birth City, State, Country

Washington

HM ID

CRO05

Favorite Season

None

State

District of Columbia

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

11/27/1919

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Boston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Death Date

6/8/2019

Short Description

Academic administrator and sociology professor Adelaide Cromwell (1919 - ) was the first African American instructor at Hunter College in New York and Smith College. Cromwell also helped to establish the school’s African Studies program and earned the honor of professor emeritus at Boston University.

Employment

Smith College, Northampton, MA

University of Ghana

Boston University

Sargent College

Favorite Color

Green

Timing Pairs
0,0:3650,125:12010,388:19720,477:21786,530:22146,536:22578,544:26034,651:27042,674:28266,695:28554,700:29058,708:30858,735:51728,1091:52574,1108:56146,1177:56522,1238:71550,1407:81492,1586:96099,1825:97095,1840:102020,1893:104224,1956:110988,2187:111368,2193:114520,2210:115600,2227:139559,2578:141160,2667$0,0:24640,463:25186,472:39120,718:40290,757:48456,912:52404,974:55506,1025:61910,1298:89982,1618:90802,1647:99134,1747:99790,1756:105310,1846
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Adelaide Cromwell's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Adelaide Cromwell lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Adelaide Cromwell describers her maternal family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Adelaide Cromwell describes her mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Adelaide Cromwell describes her father's personality and education at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers her paternal grandfather, John Wesley Cromwell, Sr., and his prominence in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Adelaide Cromwell describes her childhood household and early childhood memories

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Adelaide Cromwell describes her childhood neighborhood in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Adelaide Cromwell describes her elementary schools in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers her teachers and her temperament at Garrison Elementary School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Adelaide describes her experiences at Garnet-Patterson Junior High School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Adelaide Cromwell describes her experiences as Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in Washington D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers her teachers at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Adelaide Cromwell recalls her and her high school classmates' career aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Adelaide Cromwell describes childhood extracurricular activities and going to Camp Atwater in North Brookfield, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about attending St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Adelaide Cromwell recounts how she entered Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Adelaide recounts stories of racism from her days at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Adelaide remembers a college classmate who defended her against racist remarks

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Adelaide Cromwell describes her courses and professors at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about her first published academic paper

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Adelaide remembers how she met close friend and mentor, sociologist E. Franklin Frazier

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers her college field trips to Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers her master's program at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Adelaide Cromwell describes meeting and marrying her husband, Henry A. Hill

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers the segregated housing situation at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about racial discrimination in her field placements at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers teaching at Hunter College in New York, New York while working for the Urban League in Englewood, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers her time as a doctoral student at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about teaching at her alma mater, Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers the founding of the Boston University African Studies Program

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about creating the graduate Afro-American Studies Program at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about convening the first conference of West African social workers in Ghana

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about her research on higher education in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about heading a conference of African American scholars at the University of Liberia in Monrovia, Liberia

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about the faculty in the Afro-American studies program at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about the prominent students she has taught at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers academic debates about the purview of the African Studies Program at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers meeting the subject of her book, Adelaide Smith Casely-Hayford, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Adelaide Cromwell remembers meeting the subject of her book, Adelaide Smith Casely-Hayford, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about the publication of her book, 'An African Victorian Feminist: The Life and Times of Adelaide Smith Casely Hayford 1868-1960'

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about her book, 'The Other Brahmins: Boston's Black Upper Class 1750-1950'

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Adelaide Cromwell explains how she collected data for her book 'The Other Brahmins: Boston's Black Upper Class 1750-1950'

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about writing a feminist analysis of the works of Harlem Renaissance novelists Dorothy West and Nella Larsen

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about her study, 'Developing a Black Meritocracy: A History of Black Graduates of the Boston Latin School'

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Adelaide Cromwell describes her future plans

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Adelaide Cromwell reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Adelaide Cromwell describes her hopes for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Adelaide Cromwell describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Adelaide Cromwell reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Adelaide Cromwell describes the Conference for Women of Africa and African Descent in Ghana

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Adelaide Cromwell talks about what she contributed to Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Adelaide Cromwell narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

6$7

DATitle
Adelaide Cromwell recounts how she entered Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts
Adelaide Cromwell talks about creating the graduate Afro-American Studies Program at Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts
Transcript
As you approach your senior year in high school [Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Washington, D.C.], you began to make some decisions about where you were going--$$Before my senior year in high school (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Before. What did you decide and how'd you make those decisions?$$Well, my, I didn't have much choice. My Aunt Otelia [Cromwell] as I told you, was the first black graduate of Smith College [Northampton, Massachusetts]. I may not have said that but she went to Smith. And so as long as I was doing well in school and I, you know, everybody said [HistoryMaker] Adelaide [Cromwell]'s going to Smith. On those days that I wasn't doing so well or misbehaving, they thought maybe I might go south for school. They would choose to mean as kind of, well maybe you don't wanna go to Smith, Adelaide. I rather liked the idea of going to Oberlin [College, Oberlin, Ohio]. I had gone out to Oberlin to visit my great-aunt, my father's mother's [Lucy A. McGuinn] sister when I was twelve, I guess, (unclear) and I liked it. It was a different environment, you know, it was all white, small sort of a, a small town. And they lived on the edge of town, so I kind of thought I, I would go to, I mean I talked that talk but nobody paid any attention to it. I, Auntie thought well, if she doesn't get into Smith, that was always a possibility, then you'll spend a year in a prep school. So she had arranged for me to be interviewed by Northfield [Seminary for Young Ladies; Northfield Mount Hermon School, Gill, Massachusetts]. So the lady from Northfield came to see me, I think I was sitting on that sofa, that stool, I didn't have the slightest intention of going to Northfield (laughter) but I, I allowed her to ask the questions. So, of course, when I got accepted, I think that was a big experience too because you had to take the scholastic aptitude exam then. And I, as I said to you before, Washington [D.C.] was a restricted world but they gave the exam over at Georgetown [University, Washington, D.C.] or [The] George Washington [University, Washington, D.C.] or something, so I had to venture over there. And I don't think there was another black face in the room that day to take that exam but I was ready for it because I had had these experiences I just said, I, you know, I, in camp and in Ohio and talking with her. So I, it just that I looked back on it as being probably more traumatic than it was. So, of course, when I got the big fat envelope from Smith and it had all the, you're accepted, there was never any question that I wouldn't go.$$Now what year did you enter Smith College?$$Thirty-six [1936], 1936.$But all the time you were teaching you were still associated with the African studies program?$$Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. And I was with them until the '60s [1960s] when this guy named, I guess, I think he just died, (unclear) he died now, Bob Austin [ph.], did you ever know Bob Austin. He was a student at BU [Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts]. And he was a student in my class, no he wasn't in my class but he came to me as an instructor because he felt that the teachers he had well, well the students he had, were racist in the way they were treating some of the material. Maybe on the family (unclear) whatever it was, I was given the same course with (unclear), he wasn't in my class. So he told me all this he said I've talked to, around to everybody and, and nobody seems to be interested in doing anything about Afro-American. So I said well, I, I don't have any, I didn't know there were any problems. Oh, yes he said. And then I went to dean, dean, I think it was, dean, he's in psychology, however, I went to him and told him this student had come to me and said he was upset about the way the courses were given. This was an auspicious time because the foundations were beginning to get interested. So he let me, we had a questionnaire of BU and to find out what faculty were doing and most of them weren't doing anything, and they said they didn't because they didn't know anything. But one Clara Mayo was in psych [psychology] and was the only one who said she was interested and she wanted to do more. So we designed a graduate program, 'cause just, 'cause see, because we patterned it after the African, it was, I also was, like I just told you earlier, committee on that so we patterned the Afro-American and the graduate program and we recruited people. I, I was director of that, founder and director of that.