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Charles Holton

Former Harlem Globetrotter Charles Holton was born on September 3, 1930 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to Alice and Frank Holton. Holton attended St. Benedict School in Milwaukee, where he was a good athlete and played basketball. He graduated in 1948 at the age of eighteen. Holton was the first black to graduate from St. Norbert College in De Pere, Wisconsin with a B.S. in economics in 1952. Holton became a member of the Harlem Globetrotters, the then Chicago-based basketball franchise headed by legendary coach William “Pop” Gates.

Invited to tryout for the Harlem Globetrotters at Chicago’s St. Anselm’s Gym, Holton became a member of the Abe Sapperstein’s Globetrotters, the popular barnstorming Chicago-based basketball franchise. He became a Harlem Globetrotter during their glory years (between 1951 and 1957) and witnessed first hand the passing of the comic basketball star baton from Reese “Goose” Tatum to Meadowlark Lemon. Holton made the Southern Harlem Globetrotters, one of three traveling squads. His teammates included Leon Hilliard, Junior Lee, Chico Burrell and Babe Pressley. In 1954, Holton and the Globetrotters were warmly welcomed in Europe and later in South America. Holton left the team at the age of twenty-seven in 1957.

Holton began working in social services as an administrator for Milwaukee County the following year, a position he would retain until 1966. In 1967, Holton obtained his M.S.W. degree from the University of Michigan and began working for the State of Wisconsin as a social services administrator, where he would remain until 1996. In 1997, Holton became executive director of Milwaukee’s House of Peace, a Capuchin Franciscan Ministry that Holton would lead until retirement in 2000.

Holton lives with his wife, Carol S. Oakes, whom he married in 1969. His daughter is Miss Lori the public television children’s host and his uncle is Chicago police commander and award winning mystery writer, Hugh Holton.

Holton was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 29, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.335

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2007

Last Name

Holton

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

St. Benedict School

St. Norbert College

University of Michigan

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Charles

Birth City, State, Country

Milwaukee

HM ID

HOL08

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Wisconsin

Favorite Vacation Destination

Door County, Wisconsin

Favorite Quote

Be Good To Yourself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Interview Description
Birth Date

9/3/1930

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Milwaukee

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Barbecue (Ribs)

Short Description

Social service administrator and basketball player Charles Holton (1930 - ) played with the Harlem Globetrotters from 1951 to 1957. He then became social services administrator for the State of Wisconsin. In 1997, Holton became executive director of Milwaukee’s House of Peace, a Capuchin Franciscan Ministry, where he remained with until his retirement in 2000.

Employment

Harlem Globetrotters

House of Peace

State of Wisconsin

Favorite Color

Gray

Timing Pairs
0,0:5650,87:11323,168:12093,179:12709,189:16428,218:16716,223:17508,235:19380,271:19812,280:21180,304:21684,312:25930,361:32860,473:33256,478:34741,500:35137,505:36919,531:43840,567:45190,586:47800,635:48160,640:67902,955:76826,1208:90400,1327:93136,1412:114202,1652:114572,1658:115830,1677:116200,1683:117014,1697:117310,1702:121015,1743:121645,1751:122065,1756:123640,1772:124060,1777:128670,1805:131311,1817:131846,1823:132702,1833:133130,1838:137220,1887:142462,1951:149256,2081:161080,2198$0,0:738,13:5166,179:5904,192:6232,197:6560,202:9430,252:13408,275:15046,297:15358,302:16138,314:17464,342:18322,354:19804,378:20350,386:21286,400:21598,405:22378,417:24094,448:25810,483:26590,494:27292,506:28462,523:29710,543:30022,548:30880,561:31738,573:32362,583:32752,589:33220,597:40342,635:41350,646:41938,655:43198,666:48826,735:49414,744:49918,760:50422,766:51766,782:52690,796:53782,813:56470,855:57058,864:59074,889:59410,894:60166,903:60754,912:69914,943:70695,955:71334,971:73890,1010:74245,1017:75239,1035:77880,1048:78160,1053:88440,1247:89865,1280:93536,1307:104237,1396:105189,1405:109130,1456:109690,1465:115610,1583:117690,1623:128064,1773:135680,1823:142478,1921:145208,1965:145832,1975:146144,1980:148250,2018:155891,2051:157629,2082:160710,2132:167306,2215:168847,2237:169383,2247:169718,2253:170930,2258
DAStories

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Charles Holton recalls his work for the House of Peace in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Charles Holton talks about his health

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Charles Holton reflects upon his life

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Charles Holton describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Charles Holton reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Charles Holton talks about his family

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Charles Holton reflects upon his experiences with the Harlem Globetrotters

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Charles Holton remembers Nathaniel "Sweetwater" Clifton

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Charles Holton talks about the contemporary Harlem Globetrotters

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Charles Holton recalls a challenging basketball game on the East Coast

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Charles Holton describes his daughters and granddaughter

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Charles Holton describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Charles Holton narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
Charles Holton describes his experiences with the Harlem Globetrotters, pt. 2
Charles Holton talks about playing with the Harlem Globetrotters in Europe
Transcript
Well, all those games are tough, you know, that pounding and we played every night and sometimes twice a day with the Trotters [Harlem Globetrotters] and that pounding eventually takes its toll on the body. Played in some interesting places, we played in some wonderful places. There was a, Vancouver, British Columbia [Canada], you hit that floor and it was like bouncing off a mattress, it was so springy, a new gym that they had built. We hit a lot of new gyms, even high school gyms that were very nice and held quite a few people. I--and there, you know, it wasn't all fun and games, you hit that bus and you had to go to the next town and try to be ready. We didn't have, you know, laundry service, we had to wash out our own uniforms.$$So where would you do that? I mean, if you're on road?$$In the hotel.$$In the hotel--$$Yeah.$$--just in the sink?$$If you were in a town long enough--$$Yeah.$$--the team would send 'em to the laundry. But most of the times you were in a town, gone the next day, so.$$And did you ever play the next day in a dirty uniform, I mean, in the (laughter)--$$Oh, yeah, yeah, all the time (laughter). You know I had a roommate, Jesse Coffey, who, who would wash out that uniform every night. And it would get a little crusty (laughter) after a while. But, you know, we didn't have a trainer. If you, if you got an injury, you know, you found a doctor in the town you were in and then got treated that way. But it was--I mean these guys--. We didn't get, we didn't get meal money when we played in the states. And now (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So it just came out of your salary?$$--you read about these guys getting what, fifty dollars a day meal money, and then they're making millions, when we went overseas we got five dollars a day. Now, in all honesty you could take that five dollars, eat heartily and still have a couple of dollars for souvenirs (laughter). But, you know, to hear these players getting whatever it is for meal money is unbelievable when you think about the salaries they make, what do they need meal money for? You could take that money and donate it to the old timers, you know. So many things it's, things change.$Yeah, was it refreshing to be over there and be treated differently than (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yes, yes, and, you know, they would look up to us [Harlem Globetrotters] like we were nine feet tall and (laughter) you know--we were compared to them, I guess, we were considered tall. But they enjoyed the basketball and that was the interesting thing. You go to those foreign countries and they enjoyed the basketball maybe more than the showmanship, and maybe they didn't understand some of the showmanship, but they did understand good basketball. Interesting thing was there were no teams in Europe. You know, you would have a few here and there, but basketball was not the sport, the worldwide sport that it is today. Later on when we went to South America we were amazed at how well some of the South American players played, had it all over the Europeans, and now it's, it's probably just the opposite. Rome [Italy] was an interesting place and being Catholic it was, it was interesting to have a chance to see the pope who had just come off an illness, I think it was Pius XI or XII [Pope Pius XII], so I went to St. Peter's Square [Vatican City] and--some of us went there. And we've had, subsequently we've had, and before that we've had private audiences with the popes who were in office at the time but I was never at one of those opportunities. Played in bull rings, swimming pools.$$Played in swimming pools?$$Yeah. You just take the water, take it--with the water out (laughter). And, you know, they set up the court, we had to carry, we traveled on buses over there, and we had to carry a portable floor. Played in--$$Was, was it made out of some kind of a hard rubber or something or what was it?$$No, it was wooden.$$Wooden?$$Plywood I think.$$Okay. Okay.$$'Cause, you know, dribbling wasn't always fantastic. But it was interesting to get a windy day or a night and have to--well, sometimes the wind was so strong you had to shoot the ball here (gesture) for it to go there and that was, that wasn't easy. But most of the games were on, you know, on like a, an open field and they'd lay the court down and it's and we'd perform and then they'd take it up. 'Cause it wasn't real popular sport in Europe in those days.

Ras Ammar Nsoroma

An artist known for his murals, Ras Ammar Nsoroma was born Kevin Wayne Tate on June 20, 1967 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. When he was only a teenager, Nsoroma became aware of the work of Reynaldo Hernandez, an inner-city mural artist, which inspired him. Nsoroma graduated from the Milwaukee High School of the Arts in 1985 and attended the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. Nsoroma completing his first mural as a senior in high school.

In the late 1980s, Nsoroma moved to Chicago and studied at Chicago’s School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He returned to Wisconsin and began working as an artist, designing three-dimensional murals on the Fond du Lac Avenue overpass for the north and south wing walls and bridge abutments. In 2000, two of Nsoroma’s murals were nominated for inclusion in the book, Walls of Heritage, Walls of Pride: African American Murals, a collection of 200 murals spanning three decades of African American mural art. In 2004, Nsoroma designed a mural to celebrate the radio station 1290 WMCS-AM’s 25th anniversary of African American community programming; entitled The Tradition Continues. Nsoroma utilized photographs and created a compilation of twenty-five portraits of men and women who participated in the growth of the station.

Nsoroma has painted more than forty murals, including pieces in Chicago, Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., as well as his hometown of Milwaukee.

Accession Number

A2007.334

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/29/2007 |and| 12/1/2007

11/29/2007

12/1/2007

Last Name

Nsoroma

Maker Category
Middle Name

Ammar

Occupation
Schools

Milwaukee High School of the Arts

Hawley Road Elementary

Bay View High

31st Street School

Phillis Wheatley Elementary School

Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ras

Birth City, State, Country

Milwaukee

HM ID

NSO01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Wisconsin

Favorite Quote

Know Thyself.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Interview Description
Birth Date

6/20/1967

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Milwaukee

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Black Bean Soup

Short Description

Muralist Ras Ammar Nsoroma (1967 - ) painted more than forty murals, including pieces in Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington D.C. and Milwaukee. Two of Nsoroma’s murals were nominated for inclusion in the book, Walls of Heritage, Walls of Pride: African American Murals.

Employment

School

Pick 'n Save Warehouse Foods

Self Employed

Favorite Color

Indigo

Timing Pairs
0,0:560,4:1120,19:3702,33:4850,44:5178,49:5670,56:22450,291:40084,560:42480,581:42724,586:45560,620:46385,632:48930,651:56030,748:56836,766:57394,782:60866,858:61114,863:66512,993:72012,1038:74607,1049:76169,1079:80855,1185:81636,1201:81991,1207:82275,1212:82843,1228:83411,1241:86890,1337:88310,1357:89091,1369:91718,1443:92002,1448:92286,1453:99663,1512:99955,1517:100539,1531:104262,1600:111732,1685:119547,1777:119831,1782:121038,1806:121393,1812:121819,1821:125918,1877:126242,1882:126971,1893:142780,2046$0,0:4682,51:13270,144:17342,167:17998,177:21524,268:24558,360:33140,518:34375,543:35990,578:36370,583:41975,740:47446,770:48274,780:52261,866:54378,880:54816,888:55911,922:63520,1018:72721,1129:73106,1135:73568,1142:77526,1171:77986,1178:87245,1303:87625,1308:92800,1370:106283,1572:107720,1577:111370,1649:111735,1655:112319,1665:114363,1716:118305,1799:119619,1842:126420,1954:133329,2030:137240,2064:137676,2069:138548,2090:148576,2256:160660,2407
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ras Ammar Nsoroma's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his aunt's practice of Islam

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers his conversion to Islam

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his father's reasons for leaving Mississippi

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his parents' marriage and separation

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his parents' personalities and his likeness to his mother

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his religious upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers the 20th Street School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma recalls moving frequently in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers his early drawings

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma recalls his art classes at the Milwaukee Art Museum in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers drawing the King Fearless Comics series

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes the Hawley Road School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers the blaxploitation films of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers his mentors and influences

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his artwork during high school

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers his first public murals

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes Bay View High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes the creation of the Milwaukee High School of the Arts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma recalls his disciplinary problems in elementary school

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his art training during high school

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma recalls his scholarship to the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his art education and internship in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers his political influences

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes the Pan-African Revolutionary Socialist Party

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers the Black Arts Movement

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers travelling with Emerson Matabele

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his decision to pursue a career in art

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his work with the Chicago Public Art Group

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Slating of Ras Ammar Nsoroma's interview, session 2

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers painting 'The Circle Journey'

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his mural, 'Patchwork'

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma reflects upon his artistic influences

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma recalls studying the Yoruba religion

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his artistic philosophy

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his work with the Wisconsin Black Historical Society

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his work with the Walker's Point Center for the Arts

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma reflects upon his depictions of religious figures

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his murals for the Ausar Auset Society

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma talks about the cost and time frames of his murals

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma talks about the murals in Milwaukee's America's Black Holocaust Museum

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes the Marquette Interchange mural, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma talks about the Marquette Interchange mural, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma talks about his mural, 'The Resurrection of Watts'

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma remembers his exhibition, 'JuJu'

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his plans for the future

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma talks about his organization involvement

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma reflects upon his life

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma talks about his wife and children

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Ras Ammar Nsoroma narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

4$6

DATitle
Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes the creation of the Milwaukee High School of the Arts
Ras Ammar Nsoroma describes his decision to pursue a career in art
Transcript
But what they did, they had this program in high school where you would go to school half a day and then the other half you could go to the art museum [Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee, Wisconsin] and it was called satellite program and you go to the art museum the other half and do courses there. So I got--I became part of that and then you had to have good attendance and you know good grades and stuff so that got me back in, in the swing of it and stuff and so but Bay View [Bay View High School, Milwaukee, Wisconsin] was the artist specialty school and then my last year in high school I guess they wanted a more centralized location and this, this was like right after that movie 'Fame,' I think and I think it might influence a lot. They, they put a lot of money, they had investors and they put a lot of money into the schools it was West Division High School [Milwaukee High School of the Arts, Milwaukee, Wisconsin] and it was, it was more--it was more in the neighborhood where I grew up and they made that the art specialty school and before it was a law specialty school and they switched specialties with Bay View, so Bay View became the law specialty school, like law enforcement and stuff like that and [U.S.] military and ROTC [Reserve Officers' Training Corps] and stuff like that.$$Okay so they turned West Division which is was that a traditional black high school?$$Yeah it was traditional.$$And they turned it into the arts high school for the whole city?$$Yep and then they named it the High School of the Arts. So, so they came, my junior year they came over and did like a program and they recruited a lot of us from Bay View to try to come over to the High School of the Arts. So that's what I did, I went over there. I say that was my last year of high school and that was the first year the High School of the Arts.$$Now did you get any honors in high school for your art or? How, how, how was your art viewed in high school, how did they?$$The teachers took like interest in me, the art teachers they liked my work.$From there I just decided to concentrate on my art career and I was growing locs [dreadlocks] at the time. And I thought you know my locs would help me, help me in my drive and determination to continue this career because you know I didn't think anybody would try to hire me with locs. Locs weren't very popular then like the early '90s [1990s]. Maybe in New York [New York] or something but like as far as--$$So, it would kind of keep you in the arts because nobody would take you otherwise.$$(Laughter) And I found that out when I moved to Chicago [Illinois]. I tried to get jobs like through the school and stuff and everything would be fine over the phone when I would call and stuff and they say come on down and stuff and once I got down there, you know it was a different story. They saw my hair and stuff and you know I had, I had a lot of money saved. You know I didn't have to find a job right away 'cause I, I actually I was saving money. It was gonna be my back to Africa fund or something you know but I decided to go to school I used that money to you know to get me a place and live for a while 'til I you know I start making money so, but eventually you know I never got a job you know working at a Gap [Gap, Inc.] or, or vitamin store or wherever I tried you know. So I just, I had to keep working and doing art you know. That's how I made my money, I just kept doing art. So eventually I just--I just stopped. I was paying out of pocket at the School of the Art Institute [School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois] so you know I had to take time off to catch up paying and stuff and never went back.$$So you were never offered a scholarship or anything? Or did you try--$$I had a scholarship, it was a partial scholarship and then the rest I, I was paying out of pocket. I was paying the difference out of pocket because I didn't wanna take out any loans and stuff. I'm real cheap that way you know. I like you know I like to take care of myself. I don't like to be in debt and stuff so so the remainder I was paying like maybe four thousand [dollars] a semester out of pocket or so you know.$$That's a lot of money.$$Yeah. So then I still I think I might still owe, I'm not gonna say it on tape. But you know so I took time off and then I never went back and then I just kept doing my art you know as paying--I was doing my art anyway to pay for it, I just kept working.

Bishop Sedgwick Daniels

Bishop and pastor Sedgwick Daniels was born the second youngest of eight children on August 16, 1959 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to John and Kathleen Daniels. He became City of Milwaukee Plan Commissioner and the first Protestant board member of the Catholic Central City Schools. Daniels joined Antonio Riley and the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority on several projects, assisting in developing a housing complex for seniors and developing Milwaukee home ownership.

In 2001, Daniels was elevated to the role of Bishop by Bishop Gilbert E. Patterson and the Church of God in Christ General Board. Daniels’ jurisdiction covered more than 105 Institutional Church of God churches in Wisconsin and northern Illinois. During Daniels’ tenure as Bishop, his own church, Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ, became a multi-million dollar operation that addressed both the educational and social service needs in the Milwaukee community.

In 2002, the Bush Administration began conferences for faith-based groups. President Bush and David Kuo, then-deputy director of the Office of Faith-Based Initiatives, visited Daniels’ Holy Redeemer Church. A political independent and close friend of Reverend Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr., Daniels took a controversial stand two years later, endorsing George W. Bush primarily on the basis of his faith-based initiative. Daniels continues to serve as Pastor of Milwaukee’s Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ.

Bishop Sedgwick Daniels was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 28, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.333

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/28/2007

Last Name

Daniels

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Thirty-Fifth Street Elementary

Addison Elementary

Custer High School

First Name

Sedgwick

Birth City, State, Country

Milwaukee

HM ID

DAN05

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Wisconsin

Favorite Vacation Destination

Africa

Favorite Quote

If God Can Do Anything, God Can Do Everything. There Is Nothing Too Hard For God.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Interview Description
Birth Date

8/16/1959

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Milwaukee

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Pork Chops, Ham

Short Description

Bishop and pastor Bishop Sedgwick Daniels (1959 - ) was the pastor of Milwaukee’s Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ. He is a former City of Milwaukee Plan Commissioner and was the first protestant board member of the Catholic Central City Schools. As Bishop, Daniels oversaw more than 105 Institutional Church Of God churches in Wisconsin and northern Illinois.

Employment

City of Milwaukee

Catholic Central City Schools

Church of God in Christ

Holy Redeemer Institutional Church of God in Christ

Favorite Color

Purple

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Bishop Sedgwick Daniels' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels remembers his maternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels talks about his mother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his mother's education

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels recalls his family's move to Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels talks about his parents' personalities

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his neighborhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels recalls his responsibilities as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes the demographics of his neighborhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels recalls the role of religion in his upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels remembers the deaths of his father and maternal grandfather

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels remembers Custer High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels remembers his popularity at Custer High School

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Bishop Sedgwick Daniels describes his early aspirations

Joan M. Prince

Hematologist Joan Marie Prince was born on January 14, 1954 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and grew up in the neighborhood around 12th and Center Streets. Prince attended Wisconsin Lutheran School, graduating in 1971. She became a student at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

In 1977 and 1981 respectively, Prince earned her B.A. and B.S. degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She was the first African American to finish the school’s medical technology program and its clinical laboratory master’s program in 1992.

Prince joined St. Joseph’s Hospital, becoming a hematologist. In 1981, Prince became an associate member of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, and the following year joined the Group Cancer and the Black Community. In 1983, she became a member of the Black Women’s Health Project, and joined the McDonalds House speakers’ bureau in 1984 and the American Cancer Society’s board of directors one year later.

In 1988, Prince became the supervisor in hematology for the Medical Science Labs, and in 1989, the Milwaukee Public Library named her a black role model. She also began working for the University of Wisconsin’s medical school around this time, to implement the Health Professions Partnerships Initiative collaborative project as lead strategist. Prince also worked for Covenant Health Care Systems as a clinical laboratory supervisor.

Prince was named Vice Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2000, where she managed the University’s external relations program. She earned her Ph.D. from the University in urban education with a focus on medical science education, and was named one of the ten most powerful women in Milwaukee in the February 2006 issue of Milwaukee magazine.

Prince was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 28, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.332

Sex

Female

Interview Date

11/28/2007

Last Name

Prince

Maker Category
Middle Name

M.

Schools

Twelfth Street School

St. Philips Lutheran School

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

University of Wisconsin-Madison

First Name

Joan

Birth City, State, Country

Milwaukee

HM ID

PRI07

Favorite Season

Holiday Season

State

Wisconsin

Favorite Vacation Destination

Italy

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Interview Description
Birth Date

1/14/1954

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Milwaukee

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Banana's Foster

Short Description

Academic administrator Joan M. Prince (1954 - ) was named Vice Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2000. She was the first African American to finish the University of Wisconsin-Madison's medical technology program and its clinical laboratory master’s program in 1992.

Employment

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

University of Wisconsin, Madison Medical School

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:960,9:4880,77:13338,263:14166,273:18430,312:20185,344:21160,365:21615,373:21875,378:22460,389:22980,402:23565,412:23825,417:24670,436:25060,443:25385,449:29111,464:30612,484:31086,492:31481,498:31955,506:32587,519:35115,560:35510,566:36300,579:36695,585:40232,601:40676,608:41120,615:42156,639:42970,653:44820,686:45486,697:45782,702:46152,708:46448,713:48668,761:58246,866:58626,872:62260,915$0,0:5226,90:5772,99:8892,135:10686,165:11154,176:11544,182:13572,218:16068,266:30668,415:38150,548:41160,587:54474,716:69293,962:69804,970:80361,1055:80993,1064:83284,1112:83679,1118:84469,1134:84943,1141:89446,1220:92953,1234:93484,1242:94192,1258:100808,1333:101684,1346:102852,1361:103290,1370:103582,1375:106867,1459:114470,1556:118850,1584:123015,1684:126245,1757:128540,1790:129305,1801:129985,1812:139511,1903:139925,1910:140615,1926:140960,1932:143582,1975:144272,1986:145997,2019:147170,2048:151492,2073:154822,2106:155784,2143:156672,2159:162666,2253:163406,2266:168364,2360:184950,2523
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Joan Prince's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Joan Prince lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Joan Prince talks about her mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Joan Prince talks about her mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Joan Prince talks about her father's stories about the Roswell UFO sightings

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Joan Prince talks about her maternal grandfather and her mother's large family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Joan Prince talks about her mother's upbringing in Roswell, New Mexico and her parents' migration to Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Joan Prince talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Joan Prince talks about her biological grandmother and her children from a second marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Joan Prince talks about the struggle to piece together her paternal family history

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Joan Prince talks about her father's upbringing and education

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Joan Prince talks about her father's high school aspirations and his and her mother's work in factories

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Joan Prince shares how her parents met and her father's first visit to her mother's house

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Joan Prince talks about her mother and popular fascination with Roswell, New Mexico

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Joan Prince talks about her likeness to her parents

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Joan Prince describes her earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Joan Prince recalls when her childhood home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin burned down

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Joan Prince recalls Civil Rights Movement figures and happenings in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Joan Prince describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Joan Prince talks about her early aspirations

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Joan Prince shares her memories of her grade school years in Milwaukee, Wisconsin where she attended public and Lutheran schools

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Joan Prince talks about attending St. Philip's Lutheran School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Joan Prince talks about her early interest in outer space

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Joan Prince shares her experience attending Wisconsin Lutheran High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Joan Prince talks about the activities she participated in while at Wisconsin Lutheran High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Joan Prince talks about her decision to attend the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Joan Prince talks about taking classes from Tejumola Ologboni and racial incidents at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Joan Prince explains her background in medical technology and her specialty in hematology

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Joan Prince talks about her work and studies in the medical technology field

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Joan Prince recalls interning at Columbia Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Joan Prince talks about working at the University of Wisconsin Medical School in Madison, Wisconsin

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Joan Prince explains her dissertation, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Joan Prince explains her dissertation, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Joan Prince reflects upon her role as Vice Chancellor for Partnerships and Innovation at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Joan Prince talks about the importance of inclusivity and cultural competence on campus

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Joan Prince talks about boards she sat on at the time of the interview

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Joan Prince talks about her future plans

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Joan Prince reflects on changes at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee since 1971

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Joan Prince describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Joan Prince reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Joan Prince reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Joan Prince talks about her extended family and mentees

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Joan Prince reflects upon how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Joan Prince narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

8$9

DATitle
Joan Prince talks about her early aspirations
Joan Prince recalls interning at Columbia Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Transcript
Now, now what were you interested in when you were growing up? What kind of things did you like to do the most?$$Oh, reading. I was, oh, my goodness--reading, reading, reading. I always wanted to be a physician. I wanted to be a person--I knew I wanted to do something with healthcare. Like I said, I loved people, I knew I needed a field where I'd have daily contact with people. I wanted to do something like that. I was never really quite sure, but knew that I needed a job where I could talk to people. So, actually, in my teens I ended up being a candy striper at a local hospital. And, that's really where I sort of fell in love with the whole thought of healthcare, and working in that field some kind of way. I thought about physician because that's all I knew. I knew I didn't want to be a nurse. I wanted to do something in healthcare, but not daily hands on of patients, but something.$$Okay.$Before we get there, are there any stories about, about your work as a, as a?$$Oh, sure. Stories, things like, part of my job besides analyzing, I was one of those people who would come up and draw blood as well--not just from adults, but from babies and different things. And I had people refuse to have blood drawn by an African American. It got to a--on a very regular basis. I had that happen a lot. I had people ask, you know, the questions, "If I need blood, make sure that it's not from an African American." Oh yeah. I remember very clearly gowning and gloving to go into surgery, they were doing a procedure on an individual, and we needed to get a piece of the biopsy, and we needed it--you have to special handle it as soon as it's removed from the body. So, you would go into surgery with the physician and stand there and they would plate it for you. And, I remember this gentleman, before--the anesthesiologist was at his head, and he was getting ready and, to apply the mask to him, and the gentleman looked up and saw me, who was actually standing a little bit on the other side. I was being shielded by the doctor just from where my physician was. And, the gentleman saw me, and he said very clearly, very clearly that he did not want me in the room. And, I'll never forget, the physician said, "I don't discriminate against who is here; we have professionals in the room, and if you don't want her in the room, you don't want me here either." And, he didn't say anything else, and then they put him to sleep. But, that was, that was more the norm, and after a while, you learned how to handle it.$$So that was the norm?$$That was the norm.$$Okay, so.$$That was the norm. You learned how to handle it, and you know, over the years, Milwaukee transformed and changed in such a way where you started to have more African Americans move in, the whites moved out. You know, people like to call it white flight, whatever it is. The industry, the industrial engine started to change. There started to be a black middle class in Milwaukee. And that black middle class was then able to purchase homes--able to do a number of those things that, you know, they got to feel and realize some of their dreams. So, the population changed, and life changed for a lot of us. Instead of what used to be the norm, started to even out a lot more. There wasn't the overt examples of racism. It was still there; people just knew not to say the wrong things to you. You couldn't legally get away with it.

Irma Daniels

Educator Irma Daniels was born Irma Dean Hall on April 21, 1949 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to Levester Powell Hall and Daisy Lee Hortman Hall. Raised in the Brewer’s Hill section of Milwaukee, Daniels’ family were members of the Bethesda Church of God in Christ. She attended Palmer Elementary School, Twelfth Street School, Robert Fulton Junior High School and graduated as an honor student from North Division High School in 1966. Attending Oshkosh State University, Daniels graduated in 1971 with her B.S. degree in education.

After teaching for a year in Fondulac, Wisconsin, Daniels married John W. Daniels, Jr. in 1972 and accompanied him to Boston, Massachusetts. There, she taught health and coached a championship girls basketball team. In 1974, Daniels returned to Milwaukee and worked in City Hall for a short time. In 1975, she was hired by Milwaukee Public Schools where she taught elementary and middle school. In 1978, Daniels joined Lady Pitts School Age Parent Center which was founded on January 25, 1966, through the efforts of forty black women known as the “Our Concern Committee.” They were concerned about the school policy of requiring pregnant students to drop out of school. The first school was above the Shiloh Tabernacle and was a privately run school with MPS support services, similar to the present-day partnership schools. Lady Pitts became part of MPS in the early 1970s. The school provides comprehensive services to 200 pregnant students, grades six through twelve and a special completion program with job training for forty-five parenting students with twelve or more credits. At Lady Pitts, Daniels taught prenatal health until her retirement.

Daniels is a member of Holy Redeemer Church of God in Chritst, where she is actively involved in the youth ministry. She is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., the Links and the Bethesda Senior Citizens Board. She and her husband, John, have a son and a daughter.

Daniels was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 26, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.329

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

11/26/2007

Last Name

Daniels

Maker Category
Schools

North Division High School

Palmer Elementary School

Twelfth Street School

Robert Fulton Junior High School

University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Irma

Birth City, State, Country

Milwaukee

HM ID

DAN03

Favorite Season

Christmas

State

Wisconsin

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France, New York City

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Wisconsin

Interview Description
Birth Date

4/21/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Milwaukee

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Cake (Red Velvet)

Short Description

High school health teacher Irma Daniels (1949 - ) taught in Milwaukee Public Schools and Lady Pitts School Age Parent Center.

Employment

North Division High School

Clarence R. Edwards Junior High School

Milwaukee City Council

Lady Pitts School

Favorite Color

Blue, Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Irma Daniels' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Irma Daniels lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Irma Daniels describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Irma Daniels describes the Smith Settlement in Gibsland, Louisiana

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Irma Daniels talks about the history of African American dispossession, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Irma Daniels talks about the history of African American dispossession, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Irma Daniels talks about her mother's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Irma Daniels describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Irma Daniels describes her father's education and career

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Irma Daniels remembers her father's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Irma Daniels describes her mother's personality

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Irma Daniels describes how her parents met

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Irma Daniels remembers her relationship with her father

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Irma Daniels describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Irma Daniels recalls her neighborhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Irma Daniels describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Irma Daniels recalls her experiences in the Church of God in Christ

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Irma Daniels recalls the entertainment of her youth

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Irma Daniels lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Irma Daniels remembers her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Irma Daniels describes her success as a student

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Irma Daniels talks about her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Irma Daniels recalls her decision to attend Wisconsin State University-Oshkosh

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Irma Daniels remembers segregation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Irma Daniels recalls the racial demographics of Milwaukee's high schools

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Irma Daniels remembers her college aspirations

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Irma Daniels describes her experiences of discrimination at Wisconsin State University-Oshkosh

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Irma Daniels remembers occupying the president's office at Wisconsin State University-Oshkosh

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Irma Daniels recalls her temporary expulsion from Wisconsin State University-Oshkosh

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Irma Daniels remembers the support for the Oshkosh 94

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Irma Daniels reflects upon her experiences at Wisconsin State University-Oshkosh

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Irma Daniels recalls her parents' support for her activism

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Irma Daniels remembers teaching in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Irma Daniels remembers the desegregation of the Boston Public Schools

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Irma Daniels recalls coaching basketball at Clarence R. Edwards Junior High School in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Irma Daniels remembers meeting her husband

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Irma Daniels recalls her role at the Lady Pitts School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Irma Daniels describes her philosophy of education

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Irma Daniels describes her experiences as a teacher at the Lady Pitts School

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Irma Daniels talks about teenage pregnancy, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Irma Daniels talks about teenage pregnancy, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Irma Daniels reflects upon the parenting practices in the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Irma Daniels recalls her students at the Lady Pitts School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Irma Daniels describes the prenatal training at the Lady Pitts School

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Irma Daniels talks about the perceptions of teenage pregnancy

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Irma Daniels describes her organizational involvement

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Irma Daniels describes her concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Irma Daniels reflects upon her life

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Irma Daniels reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Irma Daniels talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Irma Daniels describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Irma Daniels narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

4$7

DATitle
Irma Daniels describes her experiences of discrimination at Wisconsin State University-Oshkosh
Irma Daniels describes her experiences as a teacher at the Lady Pitts School
Transcript
So I was seventeen going away to college [Wisconsin State University-Oshkosh; University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, Wisconsin] so I guess that was a good thing that I was close to home. And Oshkosh [Wisconsin] was a whole new awakening though because I had never been away from home like that and then to go to a community that was all white and some of the people were not very welcoming so it was like the first time where you would be called out of your name--$$Oh.$$--walking down the streets so.$$So people would, would call you the N word?$$Yes.$$(Unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) So that to me was a whole new, a whole new awakening. And so Oshkosh took a lot of adjusting for me. It was not a, a friendly place. There were some people who were friendly but--$$In retrospect when you look back, back at it--$$Um-hm.$$--and you, you said your brothers [Daniels' older brothers, Samuel Hall and James Hall] had a good experience there.$$My brothers' friends.$$Your brothers' friends.$$Um-hm.$$All right.$$Yeah, so my brothers did not go to college, they started out at MATC [Milwaukee Area Technical College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin] but the pull of A.O. Smith [A.O. Smith Corporation, Milwaukee, Wisconsin] and working they decided to take the money and work the jobs so that's what they were doing. And so fellows who had played on the football team with them, who were good friends of theirs were at Oshkosh. And, and again when you're on the football team maybe you have a different experience so maybe they were more welcomed and didn't have to endure much of that but--$$What would you guess, I know you don't know exactly but what was the percentage of black students there would you say roughly?$$At Oshkosh--$$Or how many say--$$--the population was like ten thousand and I think, I can actually tell you that we had maybe about, and it was the record number of blacks at Oshkosh the year that I attended, I think there were ninety-six.$$Okay. Out of ten thousand?$$Um-hm.$$Okay.$$And so that was the highest number of blacks they'd ever had there. And so I think it was an eye-opener and a lot of kids were from rural Wisconsin and so had never even gone to school with blacks, some had never been up close with blacks so we would have girls who would come in the room, we would sit around and talk and they would just out of curiosity want to know things, if you're doing your hair they would just come and sit and (laughter) look at you like okay, "Let me see how you do that." So it was a learning experience. I can remember having a roommate my sophomore year because my freshmen year my, my good friend from high school [North Division High School, Milwaukee, Wisconsin] we roomed together, my sophomore year though a girl from Illinois and they put us together as roommates and I had an early morning class and I can remember coming back and she was telling other girls I was a great roommate if only she could bleach me (laughter). I thought, what (laughter)? So that was the end of us rooming together so after I confronted her on that 'cause I walked in on her saying that, I said, "What do you mean, if only you could bleach me, what does that mean that you wouldn't mind me being your roommate if I was white, I mean, you wanna bleach me?" So she went down and asked to be moved, and I was glad so I got to have a room to myself for the rest of the semester but I just thought that showed her, the way she was thinking coming from Chicago [Illinois] area I would have thought she wouldn't have had those views but I guess prejudice was just there. So there were girls like that and there were other girls who I think just genuinely wanted to know more about me because they just had not been around blacks and so their questions and concerns were just genuine so I just tried to take it for that, to think not everyone was prejudiced but there were definitely some who were.$So you taught physical education at Lady Pitts [Lady Pitts School; Lady Pitts School Age Parent Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin] too?$$Well, at Lady Pitts we had prenatal health classes so I taught the prenatal health class and it's a very small school. At one time we may have had an enrollment up to 200 but I think, a 125 may have been the enrollment when I left. So a very small school, very small staff. We have a day care, we have a full-time nurse, full-time social workers, and teaching classes that they would have in a regular school along with parenting and prenatal health classes. And so I enjoyed working with that population. It was a group that you could see changes taking place. Girls who had very poor attendance, girls who very low reading scores but to see them improve. So I think that's one of my fondest teaching experiences would have been at Lady Pitts.$$Okay. And do you have any stories from Lady Pitts you can tell us?$$Oh, lots of stories--but I think how girls were just so naive about things, my girls, because for some of them this was a pattern in their life, their mothers were teen mothers, their grandmothers were teen mothers, so to have that cycle broken was something that I really preached you might say (laughter) that you don't have to continue in this cycle. And, and so having the opportunity to tell them that and to point things out to them. One girl came in one day just upset because a lady on the bus stop was looking at her and asked why she was so young and pregnant and, "It's none of her business." And I said well, you know, "She probably is concerned because it is a little bit of her business because the tax dollars have to pay for people who have babies without insurance and are you in that category?" She said, "Yes. But I don't see why people always throw it up at me because you get your money back anyway." I said, "We do what?" "You get your money back." "What money?" "Your tax money." I said, "How can you say that?" "Well, my sister she got all her money back." I said, "Okay, where did your sister work 'cause I wanna go (laughter) and get all my money back." Well, her sister had a, the first one to have a job in the family really at like a McDonald's so because she made so little--$$She got income tax returned?$$--she got all of her, all of her income tax money back so she thought all of us got all of our money back that she didn't see why we were complaining about our taxes. So I had to give her a lesson that no, people, we don't all get our tax money back, that this is the case with her sister because of the low amount she made just working part time but for most people a lot of us pay more taxes at the end of the year and she just couldn't even believe that. She just thought I was making this up, that it was not true but she had never had anyone in her family who worked and paid taxes, so she had no idea how that whole system worked so we had to actually show her a tax return that said you owe money because she wouldn't have believed me if I hadn't brought it in to say okay, people get tax bills sometimes thousands of dollars, so then she could understand why the lady going to work on the bus stop was upset looking at all of them standing there pregnant. So, so we would talk about issues like that to get them to understand that it wasn't just being nosy or people not liking teenage pregnancy just because they thought it was wrong morally or something but it was also something that was tied to the tax dollar and people were concerned about that also.

Michael A. Schultz

Film director Michael Schultz was born on November 10, 1938, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. After graduating from high school in 1957, Schultz attended the University of Wisconsin, where he spent a great deal of time watching foreign films. After dropping out of school, Schultz returned to Milwaukee where he worked in a steel mill from 1960 to 1961, eventually returning to school, studying at Marquette, and graduating in 1964.

After graduation, Schultz attended Princeton University, where he was given the opportunity to direct his first play, Waiting for Godot, in 1966. Schultz's work brought him to the attention of the Negro Ensemble Company; he joined the group in 1968. The following year, Schultz staged a production of To Be Young, Gifted and Black, which launched his success; he re-staged the play for television two years later. In the early 1970s, Schultz directed a number of television programs, including Baretta and Starsky and Hutch, and then began to focus his time on films. In 1975, Schultz directed Cooley High, and the following year, Car Wash; his success continued, directing more than a dozen movies for the television and the big screen throughout the 70s and 80s, including Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hears Club Band, Krush Groove, about the rise of hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons, and the comedy Disorderlies.

Schultz continued to direct throughout the 1990s, directing a number of popular television shows, including Chicago Hope, JAG, Ally McBeal, and Charmed, as well as several more made for television movies. After 2000, Schultz directed several other television shows, and in 2004, he directed Woman Thou Art Loosed. Schultz has also been involved in film and television production, having served as producer of the popular television show Everwood, as well as having produced some of his earlier film work.

In addition to his work on the big and small screen, Schultz also found time to direct theater; notably his Broadway production of Mule Bone, written by Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston, staged in 1991.

Accession Number

A2004.193

Sex

Male

Interview Date

10/5/2004

Last Name

Schultz

Maker Category
Middle Name

A.

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

Riverside High School

Marquette University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Michael

Birth City, State, Country

Milwaukee

HM ID

SCH01

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Wisconsin

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/10/1938

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

USA

Favorite Food

All Food

Short Description

Film director Michael A. Schultz (1938 - ) directed the feature films Cooley High, Car Wash, and Krush Groove, as well as the television shows Chicago Hope and Ally McBeal.

Employment

Steel Mill

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Michael A. Schultz's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Michael A. Schultz lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Michael A. Schultz talks about his mother's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Michael A. Schultz describes his mother's background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Michael A. Schultz talks about his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Michael A. Schultz describes the origin of the Schultz family name

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Michael A. Schultz describes his father's childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Michael A. Schultz lists the members of his childhood household

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Michael A. Schultz describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Michael A. Schultz remembers growing up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Michael A. Schultz details his early activities

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Michael A. Schultz recalls converting to Catholicism

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Michael A. Schultz describes radio and television programming from his childhood, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Michael A. Schultz describes radio and television programming from his childhood, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Michael A. Schultz reflects upon his early ambitions

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Michael A. Schultz remembers activities he participated in and movies he saw during high school

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Michael A. Schultz recalls his career goals before entering college

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Michael A. Schultz describes his time at University of Wisconsin-Madison

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Michael A. Schultz describes Riverside High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Michael A. Schultz describes his interest in film at University of Wisconsin-Madison

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Michael A. Schultz describes his favorite films and directors

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Michael A. Schultz explains his decision to leave University of Wisconsin-Madison in Madison, Wisconsin

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Michael A. Schultz remembers entering the theater program at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Michael A. Schultz remembers Reverend John J. Walsh's approach to theatrical directing

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Michael A. Schultz describes his theater experience at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Michael A. Schultz describes his theatrical training at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Michael A. Schultz recalls moving to New York City in 1964

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Michael A. Schultz recalls working for Wynn Handman at New York's American Place Theatre

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Michael A. Schultz recalls acting in 'Benito Cereno' at New York's American Place Theatre

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Michael A. Schultz describes how he met his wife, Gloria Schultz (Lauren Jones)

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Michael A. Schultz remembers directing 'Waiting for Godot' and 'The Emperor Jones' at Princeton's McCarter Theatre

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Michael A. Schultz remembers the Negro Ensemble Company's inaugural season

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Michael A. Schultz describes directing 'Song of the Lusitanian Bogey' for New York's Negro Ensemble Company

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Michael A. Schultz remembers the success of 'Song of the Lusitanian Bogey' at New York's Negro Ensemble Company

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Michael A. Schultz recalls the success of the play 'Kongi's Harvest'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Michael A. Schultz recalls directing his first film, 'To Be Young, Gifted and Black'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Michael A. Schultz considers his transition from theater to film

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Michael A. Schultz remembers directing the play 'Dream on Monkey Mountain'

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Michael A. Schultz describes his transition to Hollywood in the early 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Michael A. Schultz describes his failure to produce the film 'Death at an Early Age'

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Michael A. Schultz remembers his first Hollywood experience directing an episode of 'Roll Out,' pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Michael A. Schultz remembers his first Hollywood experience directing an episode of 'Roll Out,' pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Michael A. Schultz details the creation of the film 'Cooley High'

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Michael A. Schultz describes the cast members from the film 'Cooley High'

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Michael A. Schultz reflects upon the audience response to the film 'Cooley High'

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Michael A. Schultz describes the dialogue and music in 'Cooley High'

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Michael A. Schultz recalls challenges he faced in the white movie industry while directing 'Cooley High'

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Michael A. Schultz considers Hollywood opportunities for women and minorities

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Michael A. Schultz reflects upon the success of the independent film 'Woman Thou Art Loosed'

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Michael A. Schultz remembers the offer from Universal Studios to direct 'Car Wash'

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Michael A. Schultz describes his experience directing 'Car Wash'

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Michael A. Schultz remembers directing Richard Pryor in the film 'Which Way Is Up?'

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Michael A. Schultz describes Richard Pryor's descent into drug addiction

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Michael A. Schultz remembers being recruited to direct the film 'Bustin' Loose' after Richard Pryor's accident

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Michael A. Schultz describes the success of 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Michael A. Schultz describes directing the cult classic 'The Last Dragon'

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Michael A. Schultz describes the achievements of the film 'Krush Groove'

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Michael A. Schultz describes the exclusion of black films from movie theaters

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Michael A. Schultz describes the film 'Woman Thou Art Loosed'

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Michael A. Schultz shares his philosophy of filmmaking

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Michael A. Schultz reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Michael A. Schultz shares his perspective on young black filmmakers

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Michael A. Schultz describes the work of Robert Townsend, Bill Duke and the Wayans brothers

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Michael A. Schultz reflects upon the persistence of African American stereotypes in Hollywood films

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Michael A. Schultz reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Michael A. Schultz describes his mother's pride in his success

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Michael A. Schultz describes his children's successful careers

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Michael A. Schultz describes his current film projects and his definition of a black movie

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Michael A. Schultz describes his marriage to Gloria Schultz (Lauren Jones)

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Michael A. Schultz describes how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$6

DAStory

11$3

DATitle
Michael A. Schultz remembers entering the theater program at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Michael A. Schultz remembers being recruited to direct the film 'Bustin' Loose' after Richard Pryor's accident
Transcript
So what, what happened? Did they get you, they draft you?$$No, no, actually, I, I was kind of shielded (laughter) from, from all of that. I decided--I spent about a year working and going to school part-time at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee [Milwaukee, Wisconsin]. And during that year I had saved up enough money to do something. And I decided that I'd better get my butt back in school because that was the only way I was going to stay out of the--the draft was getting heavier and heavier. And I said, "If I'm going back to school, it has to be something that I would really love to do." And almost out of the blue, it seemed to me at the time, I, I said, "Well, I could go study theater," you know. And I couldn't afford to go to UCLA [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California] or USC [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California] for their film schools, so that was out of the question. And Milwaukee [Wisconsin] had a great theater school at the university, at Marquette University [Milwaukee, Wisconsin] that was a Jesuit college. And friends of mine told me about it and said, "Well, why don't you go check it out," you know? Now during this year of working, I, I had also gotten involved with a community theater and wound up being in a production of 'Finian's Rainbow' in the chorus, you know, and all of that. And I was telling my mother [Katherine Leslie], you know, I really love--I, I could, I could do this for a living; I could be in the theater. This is great fun, you know. And she was always the encouraging type. And her attitude was, whatever you want to do, just be the best at it, just do it, you know. So when I decided to go try and get into the university, to Marquette University, it was kind of a, a long shot because it, it was a private college, university, and I didn't have that kind of money. And when I went to talk to the priest [Reverend John J. Walsh] who ran it [Marquette University Players], I said, "Look, I'd love to be involved in theater, but I can't really afford it. Do you have any scholarships?" And it just so happened that the student who was designing the lights for the theater was leaving, and they needed to replace him. So, he made a deal with me: if, if I learned how to design lights and became the lighting director, that I'd get a scholarship. And that's how I got through Marquette.$$Okay, well, what year did you come out of Marquette?$$I graduated Marquette in '63 [1963]--'64 [1964].$Then he [Richard Pryor] had this accident where he set himself on fire. And he called me--oh, he had done another movie called 'Bustin' Loose,' which had been put on the shelf at Universal [Studios]--and it was a project of his heart--that they hired a young director, a new director, who had never directed a movie before, a producer who had never produced a film before--done television--a DP [director of photography] who had never shot a feature before (laughter). They surrounded him with people who were doing their first movie, and so it was disastrous, and it was unreleasable. And when the studio found out that he wasn't going to die, he--here he is, guy is laying covered in bandages in the burn ward, and they call him up and say, "Richard, we're glad you're okay. Will you finish," (laughter), "finish the movie when you get well?" (Laughter) And because it was dear to his heart, you know, he said yes. And then he called me and asked me if I would come talk with him and, and direct, you know, try and fix it. So I go visit him. He's recovering in Hawaii, in his house in, in Maui [Hawaii]. And he, he can hardly move because of the skin grafts, you know, and all of that. And he sits down on the couch, and he says, you know, "I don't--my heart is really not in this business anymore because it's a waste of time." And he said, "But I really want to do this picture," you know. "So, will you help me do it?" And I couldn't, couldn't say no. So I got the studio to throw away half of the footage and let me reshoot half the movie. And I rehired the writer that Richard had fired, you know, the original guy. And we, we took the pieces that were, that were salvageable, 'cause they had Cicely Tyson doing a wonderful role, and, and Richard, and all these kids, and took the pieces and then created a script around what was salvageable that made sense, you know. And then two years later the kids had grown, you know, six inches. Richard was--we're trying to--hide his burns, you know. And, and trying to make all of that match was a major feat. And the picture went on to gross $35 million or whatever and be a big success because it had a lot of heart in it. So that's my Richard Pryor story.