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Dr. Linda Rae Murray

Dr. Linda Rae Murray was born in Cleveland, Ohio on August 25, 1948. After graduating from Collinwood High School in 1966, Murray attended the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she earned her B.S. degree in mathematics in 1973. Murray continued her education at UIC, earning her M.D. in 1977. Following the completion of her M.D., Murray attended the University of Illinois School of Public Health in Chicago, where she earned her master’s of public health in 1980; she later returned to school to continue her education in the doctoral program at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

After completing her medical degree, Murray became a resident physician in internal medicine and occupational therapy at Cook County Hospital, where she remained until 1980. In 1981, Murray left Cook County Hospital for Bethany Hospital, also in Chicago, and in 1983, became the medical director for the Manitoba Federation of Labour in Winnipeg, Canada. Murray returned to the United States in 1985, and began teaching at Meharry Medical College; in 1987, she returned to Chicago to work with the Chicago Department of Health. By 1992, Murray had become the medical director of the Near North Health Services Corporation. After a series of other high-level positions, Murray became the chief medical officer of Primary Care & Community Health: Ambulatory & Community Health Network of Cook County. Later, Murray became the attending physician at the Woodlawn Health Center. Throughout her career of health administration and medical practice, Murray also worked as a teacher, teaching internal medicine and midwifery, among other courses. In 2005, Murray was elected Chief Medical Officer of the Ambulatory & Community Health Network of the American Public Health Association, a position she would hold until 2009.

Murray was also an active member of her community, having been involved with dozens of groups and organizations over the years. From 1981 until 1983, Murray was a part of the First Congressional District of Illinois Health Task Force under Harold Washington; she returned to that role from 1985 to 1992 under Congressman Charles Hayes. Murray has received many awards, including the Daniel Hale Williams Award from the cook County Physician’s Association, and the Distinguished Service in the Health Field Award form the National Association of Minority Medical Educators.

Accession Number

A2004.151

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/30/2004

Last Name

Murray

Middle Name

Rae

Schools

Collinwood High School

Marion-Sterling Elementary School

University of Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois College of Medicine

Boulevard Elementary School

First Name

Linda

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

MUR07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Home

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/25/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Pototo Pie

Short Description

Medical instructor, internal medicine physician, and medical administrator Dr. Linda Rae Murray (1948 - ) held a variety of high-ranking positions in health administration in Chicago, Illinois, and Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Most recently, Murray served as the chief medical officer of the Ambulatory & Community Health Network of the American Public Health Association. Throughout her career of health administration and medical practice, Murray also worked as a teacher, teaching internal medicine and midwifery, among other courses.

Employment

Cook County Hospital

Bethany Hospital - Chicago

Manitoba Federation of Labour- Winnipeg, Canada

Meharry Medical College

Chicago Department of Health

Primary Care & Community Health: Ambulatory & Community Health Network of Cook County

Woodlawn Health Center

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Linda Rae Murray's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her mother's side of the family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray shares a story about her maternal great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her maternal great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her mother's side of the family, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her mother's childhood in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her family's limited educational opportunities

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers the impact of World War II on her family , pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers the impact of World War II on her family, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her early political activism

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her father's upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about cultural institutions in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls the social demographics of Cleveland, Ohio when she was growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers participating in a Marxist study group as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray explains how her view of civil rights activism was shaped by her studies of Marxism

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her experiences at Marion-Sterling Elementary School in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls being pestered by a librarian at the Sterling Branch Library in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her experiences at Marion-Sterling Elementary School in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her experiences at Boulevard Elementary School in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her experiences at Boulevard Elementary School in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers being a coach for her little league baseball team in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her involvement in sports growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about moving out of the projects in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls a memorable teacher from Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers taking time off at Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her family's views on religion

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about reactions to her identity as an atheist

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her experience serving on the board of the AIDS Pastoral Care Network in Chicago, Illinois while being an atheist

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about Reverend Bruce W. Klunder's death

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls protests against integrating Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls protests against integrating Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls how Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio was evacuated during violent protests

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray explains why she attended the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers being stopped by the Chicago police her first night at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about majoring in mathematics at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers a controversial instructor from the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers her decision to pursue medicine, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers her decision to pursue medicine, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her decision to pursue medical school while pregnant

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray explains her decision to transfer to the University of Illinois at Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers a sexist response when she asked for a recommendation to medical school

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers challenges at the financial aid office at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray explains how she received financial assistance for medical school as a research assistant at Cook County Hospital

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her impressions of medical school, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her impressions of medical school, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers the support network of minority students at University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about memorable medical professionals from University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her political involvement as a medical student at University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers specializing in environmental and occupational medicine

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her experiences working at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray details her work with labor unions at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes challenges she faced while working at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about leaving Chicago, Illinois for a position at Manitoba Federation of Labour in Canada

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her decision to lead Meharry Medical College's occupational health program

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray details her involvement with the Chicago Department of Health

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls her return to the Cook County health system

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her involvement in national and local health organizations

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers her involvement on the board of the American Public Health Administration during the Clinton health plan debates

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray reflects upon the factors that make a community healthy

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers Dr. Paul B. Cornely's impact on her public health interests

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about the accomplishments of Dr. Paul B. Cornely

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray reflects upon her life experiences

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

1$4

DATitle
Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her experience serving on the board of the AIDS Pastoral Care Network in Chicago, Illinois while being an atheist
Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers a sexist response when she asked for a recommendation to medical school
Transcript
I was going to tell you one story about the religious--the, the one time in my life where I thought this was really relevant. Early in the AIDS [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome] epidemic, a Baptist minister approached me to, to make a tape that they were using to educate Baptist ministers about AIDS. And he actually was one of the board members of an organization that used to exist in Chicago [Illinois] called the AIDS Pastoral Care Network. And this was a group of Catholic priests and other leaders of religion who came together to work on the AIDS problems and, and to deal with the homophobia in all the churches. The feeling was many of the organized churches were not responsive to the AIDS epidemic early on and this was a group of ministers and priests who were trying to respond. And so after I had worked with them a little bit, they asked me to be on the board. And you know they, they were very careful. They have, you know, rabbis and Baptists and you know all the, you know all the different groups. And I told them, I said well I'll be glad to be on your board, but I, I'm an atheist. And they said, "Oh, [HistoryMaker Dr.] Linda [Rae Murray], don't worry, we're ecumenical. We have Jews and radical faeries and Catholics. We won't mind an atheist or two." So that was their approach. And as a matter of fact when I went off the board, because we would always have these discussions on the board and--I was always the one that would say, I thought you guys were supposed to be spiritual leaders. You know, shouldn't we be doing this and that and the other? And so I, I have a plaque that's in my office and it, and it is from them and it doesn't say I'm an atheist, but it says--but, but they would always say is, "Well, you may be an atheist, but you're very spiritual." That, that's what they would always tell me, you know. "When you talk, you're very spiritual." So I said, well if you say so. So I guess that's where I am, that's what--that's--I suppose if I was pressed against the wall, that's what I would tell people. I'm an atheist, but I guess I'm spiritual enough that the, that the organized religions can tolerate me, so.$$What do you think they mean by that when they say you're spiritual?$$Well--'cause I always referred back to the principles that we worked under, you know and, and you know I mean for lack of a better word, they're the principles of any religion, you know, that you want to be compassionate, that you want to be fair, that you want to take the organization in a direction that fulfilled its mission. So if there was a grant proposal out there that took us in an opposite direction, that we really, you know we were really supposed to be doing, providing spiritual support for people with AIDS, and for their families. And so you know if there was a choice, should we do--be doing pastoral care or should we do something else like spend more time on the AIDS walk. You know I would always say well what are our basic principles say? I think that's what they meant by it, that I would always refer back to what the organization's principles were.$At U of I [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois] they called me in and said, you know, "[HistoryMaker Dr.] Linda [Rae Murray], you have," you know, "you need 200 hours to graduate, you got 250," or what--you know I had, I had way over what, you know and, "you're taking up space. We need you to graduate." I, you know I had long since finished all my math courses and stuff and I said well, the reason I haven't graduated is because I'm really pre-med and I'm applying to medical school and you know and I, you know, just had whatever cell biology. I was in the process of doing that. And they said, "You're never getting into medical school, you know, you need to go on and get out of here. You, you have a degree in math. You have no choice. We're, we're going to make you graduate." It was December or something. So I walked down the hall and I changed my major to art. Filled out the paperwork. I didn't have a art course. I tried to pick something I didn't have a course in. So I changed my major to art so they couldn't force me to graduate. I only had one more semester to go. And that's the, that's the time when I was applying. And I, I remember my organic--you know U of I is a huge place. And so you don't, you know it's not like U of C [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois]. So you don't, you don't know very many fac--I didn't know any of the faculty there, nobody. You're in this huge classroom, three hundred kids, you know, nothing. And you had to have recommendations. And so they had a system where they would, they would give you a generic recommendation that some English major would write, just based on your grades. And, but you had to have it. So I went to my organic teacher and I remember Marcus [Murray]-- Marcus was--my son--was a little baby in arms then, I had had him. And, and I had gotten a good grade in organic chemistry. So I said, well let me, you know go talk to him. And I had, had some interaction with the professor, not very much, but--and I said, you know "I'm trying to go to medical school and you know I, and I need you--I need a recommendation". You know and so, "I, I would like to ask you to give me a recommendation." It was very difficult for me to go ask. And he, and he, you know, looked up his files and he said, "Oh, I remember, I remember you. You were an excellent student. He said I would love to give you a recommendation, but I just can't." So I was--I said well why not? He said, "Because I don't think women should be doctors." I was in shock. We talked for like two hours. I said, "Well why do you say that?" He had grown up in the [Great] Depression. His mother was a stay-at-home mother and she had to go to work during the Depression. You know he--and that just scarred him. He just didn't think women--he thought women should be at home. And I said, "Well do you, do you know who I am?" I said, "I'm a"--I said, "The women in my family all work. First they were picking cotton as slaves, I mean they all--what are you talking about? We're--you have to work," you know. I said, "I'm a single mother. If I don't work, my son is going to starve. I would prefer to work as a doctor than scrubbing out toilets, but I'm going to work. Now the question is"--so we had this big discussion back and forth and I was trying to say, you know, working class women and black women, we've always worked. If you don't work, your kids starve, you know. I couldn't understand. He never budged. So I said--so I finally told him I don't--I guess he didn't do horrible, 'cause I got in. I said, "Well I'll tell you what. I said you know I have to have three recommendations. If you write down exactly what you told me, I could live with that." He said, "What?" I said, "If you just, if you promise me that you'll write down that if I was a man, you would think I would be a great doctor and I was a good student, but you don't think I should--if you just are honest. If you, if you're going to write down I shouldn't be a doctor, I don't want--but if you can promise me that you'll write down the real reason, exactly what you've told me, I'll live with that." He said, "Okay, I can do that," you know. So I was shocked at that time to have somebody verbally say that.