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Dr. Edith Irby Jones

Pioneering medical physician Dr. Edith Irby Jones was born on December 23, 1927 to Mattie Buice Irby, a maid, and Robert Irby, a farmer. As a child, Jones witnessed her older sister die due to a typhoid epidemic and was encouraged to pursue a career as a medical physician. She attended Langston Elementary School and Langston Secondary School both in Hot Springs, Arkansas. In 1944, Jones’ high school teacher helped her obtain a scholarship to attend Knoxville College in Knoxville, Tennessee where she majored in chemistry, biology and physics. While at Knoxville College, Jones was an active member of the Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society and was initiated into the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. In addition, Jones was a member of the debate team, pep squad, drama club and the YMCA.

In 1948, nine years before the “Little Rock Nine” integrated Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, Jones became the first African American admitted to the University of Arkansas College of Medicine. Although she was not provided with the same housing, dining or bathroom facilities as white students, Jones received support from her high school alumni, neighbors and a black-owned local newspaper, The Arkansas State-Press. Afterwards, she received an internship at the University Hospital in Little Rock. In Arkansas, Jones practiced medicine and worked with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the Civil Rights Movement before moving with her family to Texas in 1958. In 1959, Jones began her residency in internal medicine at Baylor College of Medicine Affiliated Hospitals, but the hospital that she was assigned to segregated her, limiting her patient rosters. She completed the last months of her residency at Freedman’s Hospital in Washington, D.C., and in 1963, she received an academic appointment as a clinical assistant professor of medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine.

On May 4, 1979, Jones’ achievements were recognized by the State of Arkansas, and she was honored with the founding of the annual celebration of Edith Irby Jones Day. That following year, she became a founding member of the Association of Black Cardiologists Incorporated. In 1985, Jones became the first woman to be elected president of the National Medical Association, and in 1986, she led the United States Task Force on Health to Haiti where the medical and healthcare infrastructure were examined and potential solutions for the impoverished nation were explored.

In 1997, the Edith Irby Jones M.D. Hospital was opened in Houston, Texas. Later, in 2001, Jones was named in Black Enterprise Magazine’s selection of 101 leading black physicians in America. She has received numerous awards and recognitions for her contributions to the medical field and the American Civil Rights Movement including: the Sinkler Miller Medical Association National Achievement Award, Kato Models Woman of the Year Award, Pioneer Award from the Student National Medical Association, Mickey Leland Certificate of Congressional Award, Bennett College Belle Ringer Image Award and the Oscar E. Edwards Memorial Award for Volunteers.

Jones was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 10, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.041

Sex

Female

Interview Date

3/10/2008 |and| 5/10/2010

Last Name

Jones

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Irby

Schools

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Langston High School

Knoxville College

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

First Name

Edith

Birth City, State, Country

Mayflower

HM ID

JON20

Favorite Season

All Seasons

State

Arkansas

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hot Springs, Arkansas

Favorite Quote

I Love You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Texas

Birth Date

12/23/1927

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Houston

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Internal medicine physician Dr. Edith Irby Jones (1927 - ) integrated the University of Arkansas College of Medicine in 1950. In addition to practicing medicine, Jones served as president of the National Medical Association and on the faculty of the Baylor College of Medicine.

Employment

Baylor College of Medicine

Hermann Hospital

Favorite Color

Red and Black

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Edith Irby Jones' interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones talks about her relationship with her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her memories of her father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones talks about her parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers her father's employment

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones lists her siblings

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers her sister's death

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her neighborhood in Conway, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers contracting rheumatic fever

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her early education

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones talks about the community of Hot Springs, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones reflects upon her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers her favorite teachers

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her early activities

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers the Union Baptist Church in Hot Springs, Arkansas

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls her decision to attend a private university

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers her teenage social activities

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes the sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes the sights of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers Virginia Clinton Kelley

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls her aspiration to become a doctor

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers enrolling at Knoxville College in Knoxville, Tennessee

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls her work experiences at Knoxville College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her academic experiences at Knoxville College

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers joining the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls her medical school applications

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her decision to attend the University of Arkansas Medical School

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls her first day at University of Arkansas Medical School in Little Rock, Arkansas

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls her experiences as the first black student at the University of Arkansas Medical School, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her transportation to the University of Arkansas Medical School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers her apartment in Little Rock, Arkansas

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her private accommodations at University of Arkansas Medical School

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls her experiences as the first black student at the University of Arkansas Medical School, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers opening a private medical practice in Hot Springs, Arkansas

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones talks about her marriage

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones reflects upon her opportunity to attend medical school

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Edith Irby Jones' interview, session 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls her decision to practice medicine in Hot Springs, Arkansas

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her children

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers moving to Houston, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her residency at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers her activism with the Freedom Four

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls the support of Daisy Bates

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones reflects upon her decision to integrate an all-white medical school

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers the support of H. Clay Chenault

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls opening a medical practice in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones talks about her medical office in the Third Ward of Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers joining the staff of Hermann Hospital in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones talks about her patients

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her teaching career, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones remembers the Civil Rights Movement in Houston, Texas

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her teaching career, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls the founding of the Association of Black Cardiologists

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her early involvement in the National Medical Association

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones talks about her mentor, Dr. Michael E. DeBakey

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones recalls her agenda as president of the National Medical Association

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones talks about the hot springs of Hot Springs, Arkansas

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her humanitarian work in Haiti, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her humanitarian work in Haiti, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes her hopes for the Haitian people

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones talks about her advocacy work

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones shares a message to future generations

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones describes a hospital named in her honor in Houston, Texas

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dr. Edith Irby Jones reflects upon her legacy

Dr. Hollis Underwood

Internal medicine physician Dr. Hollis Jonetta Crowe Underwood was born on October 29, 1957 in Chicago, Illinois to Robert Arthur and Janetta Martha Crowe. Underwood graduated from Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan in 1975. She attended the University of Maryland as a zoology major. Underwood then completed her M.D. degree at Howard University School of Medicine and did her post graduate residency training at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota.

In 1987, Underwood worked in the National Health Service Corps at Frederiksted Health Center in St. Croix, Virgin Islands. While there, Underwood co-chaired the 1989 Peer Review Committee at the Virgin Islands Medical Institute in Christiansted, Virgin Islands. Underwood then began working as the Medical Director and Acting Project Director for Frederiksted Health Center and as the District Health Officer at the Charles Harwood Memorial Hospital in Christiansted until 1990.

In 1990, Underwood was hired as the Lead Internist and Director of Hypertension & Lipid Clinic at the Ohio Permanente Medical Group in Parma, Ohio, before working as an intermediate Lipid Specialist for the American Heart Association at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1994, Underwood became a consultant for the Department of Community Internal Medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, where she worked until 2000.

In 1997, Underwood acted as a consultant on a sixteen member multi-disciplinary medical team that traveled to Dakar, Senegal to provide cardiovascular medical care for the community. The venture, Project MEDHELP, led by Albert F. Olivier, consisted of cardiothoracic and general surgeons, anesthesiologists, cardiologists, internists, public health experts, dermatologists and gynecologists.

In February 2000, Underwood became President of Sonoran Health Specialists, Inc., working alongside her husband Dr. Paul L. Underwood, Jr., in Scottsdale, Arizona. Underwood served on several boards and organizations including the Center for Women’s Health, Vibetree Foundation and Planned Parenthood. She is also active in several organizations including the Links, Inc., the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and Jack and Jill of America, Inc.

Dr. Hollis Jonetta Crowe Underwood resides in Phoenix, Arizona with her family.

Dr. Hollis Jonetta Crowe Underwood was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.208

Sex

Female

Interview Date

7/14/2007

Last Name

Underwood

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Holly

Schools

Cass Technical High School

University of Maryland

Howard University College of Medicine

Ernie Pyle Elementary School

Mayo Medical School

Lutheran Parish School

First Name

Hollis

Birth City, State, Country

Chicago

HM ID

UND02

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Illinois

Favorite Vacation Destination

Paris, France

Favorite Quote

If You Can't Be Who You Need To Be, By Remaining Who You Are.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Arizona

Birth Date

10/29/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Phoenix

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salad

Short Description

Internal medicine physician Dr. Hollis Underwood (1957 - ) specialized in internal medicine and was president of Sonoran Health Specialists, Inc. in Arizona.

Employment

Sonoran Health Specialists, Inc.

Mayo Clinic

Ohio Permanete Medical Group

Charlest Harwood Memorial Hospital

Frederiksted Health Center

Favorite Color

Chartreuse

Timing Pairs
0,0:4757,167:5695,187:8844,288:9849,303:10318,312:10586,322:11122,337:15209,441:16683,467:16951,472:17554,483:18358,499:18626,504:19229,515:30944,671:32388,725:32768,732:34516,766:35580,782:39684,876:45840,1008:51134,1047:51926,1075:54230,1121:56534,1184:57182,1194:57470,1199:58190,1210:62366,1307:65246,1376:65678,1394:66110,1402:82676,1628:83084,1636:87912,1781:88456,1790:88728,1795:89136,1802:89408,1807:94000,1829:95470,1861:95750,1866:96520,1883:97010,1891:98620,2002:99390,2021:100580,2047:100860,2052:104080,2118:104990,2132:108280,2197:108910,2207:112480,2280:113110,2290:115210,2341:132256,2698:138557,2794:139040,2802:139316,2807:140627,2840:142007,2865:143456,2901:145181,2929:145457,2934:161758,3276:162646,3290:162942,3299:163978,3310:168190,3354$0,0:6834,173:7303,184:7571,189:7839,194:8375,203:10720,263:11926,289:12529,299:13467,317:14070,327:14405,333:14807,340:15410,351:15946,361:17487,401:18425,428:19095,442:19497,453:20301,468:20569,473:20971,539:28110,601:29070,614:29390,619:29790,625:35150,702:35630,710:36030,716:37070,740:38670,835:38990,841:39310,847:44490,896:51240,1118:72390,1612:72730,1618:73580,1631:74345,1637:78972,1774:97944,2172:103346,2278:103638,2283:103930,2288:105901,2342:123366,2701:128334,2838:128694,2844:130926,2898:134980,2936
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Hollis Underwood's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Hollis Underwood lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her maternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her paternal grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls living in Gary, Indiana and Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Hollis Underwood lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her neighbors in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes the socioeconomic climate of Gary, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes Ernie Pyle Elementary School in Gary, Indiana

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls living on St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her community in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers her father's death

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls moving to Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her early aspirations to become a doctor

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her peers at Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers applying to college

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers the University of Maryland in College Park

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her professors at the University of Maryland

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her extracurricular activities

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls the summer program at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers Howard University College of Medicine

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her mentor, Dr. John Townsend

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers treating her first patient

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers her experiences at the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers dating her husband, Dr. Paul Underwood

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her fellowship at the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Hollis Underwood recalls working at the Frederiksted Health Clinic in St. Croix

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers becoming a mother

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Hollis Underwood reflects upon her humanitarian medical work

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers moving to Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Hollis Underwood talks about her community activism

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

5$2

DATitle
Dr. Hollis Underwood describes her peers at Cass Technical High School in Detroit, Michigan
Dr. Hollis Underwood remembers treating her first patient
Transcript
So you go to Cass Tech [Cass Technical High School, Detroit, Michigan], now for the benefit of our viewers, Cass Tech is considered, was considered one of the elitist schools of Detroit, Michigan?$$Um-hm.$$So now you go to Cass Tech and what, what happens there for you?$$Well, you know, well the first thing is that, and this was a new concept for us, but, you're right, it was a magnet school, but you had to test to get in but there was, there were some of us who were invited to attend. And we were invited to attend and become a part of science and arts curriculum, which was an honors curriculum and, and not knowing Detroit, so we're relatively new there, but my mother's [Jonetta Everette Crowe] best friend who was like a second mother to me in many ways, just said, "Oh, absolutely, this is an opportunity you don't want, you know, not take advantage of," and, and that was it. You know, that was it and I, Cass was--it opened up even broader horizons, now you know we used to call it the pickle factory 'cause it looked like a pickle factory, you know, it was a pretty big old school, we had to all take the city bus to go to school. But I went to school with some kids that were just incredible people, some of whom are friends to this day, some of whom have done some amazing things in this world, made some tremendous footprints.$$Okay give us a few names of people that that, that we might want to know about.$$Oh wow. Well one is David Alan Grier, who is a very well-known actor, and he was a Cass Techite, you know, a Cass Techie, and Wanda [Wanda Whitten-Shurney], oh gosh, I'm blocking out her last name, she's a hematologist, her father [HistoryMaker Dr. Charles Whitten] was a, a very, very well-known hematologist in Detroit, did a lot of ground breaking research with sickle cell disease and she was a classmate, actually not only in high school, but also medical school [Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, D.C.], Harriet Covington [Harriet Covington-Smith], also a friend from medical school as well as high school, oh my gosh. And then, then you had the musicians who are amazing, Geri Allen, one of my classmates who is a very well-known established recording artist, straight ahead jazz pianist, J. Jones [ph.], a very accomplished saxophone player, I mean, so we, you know, we had all of the curriculums, then you had the perfor- the performing arts crowd and you know, and nobody gave any credence to the computer science club, but they're probably all, they've--$$(Laughter).$$--probably all became millionaires, up to the '90s [1990s], and we just lost track, I don't know (laughter).$$So--so Cass, they had a very fertile environment for you to grow, would you say (simultaneous)?$$(Simultaneous) Oh amazing. So, so much, I mean, you know, friends were attorneys and, and you know, the whole, you know the, the legacy, the Patti Coutiver [ph.], a very good friend of mine in high school, an attorney, her fam- her father was an educator, a very well established and well known educator. The former superintendent of schools [Cornelius L. Golightly], his daughter, Linnie Golightly [Linnie M. Golightly], was a classmate at Cass, so it was incredible and many of my friends wer- are physicians and, and, and attorneys and other careers that are considered leadership type careers as a result of that.$(Simultaneous) Do you recall your first assignment?$$Uh-huh. I was in community internal medicine, oh my goodness, ha, ha, with a gentleman who sadly, y- what I've come to realize is that some people's mediocrity prevents them from seeing the greatness in other people and they make it a conscious effort to put the squash on other people because of their own internal insecurity, and I saw a lot of that, I saw a lot of that, people hiding behind the shields of the Mayo Clinic [Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota] and with their own mediocrity. And I saw some things that really exposed what that whole experience was, was all about but, but I, I remember being nervous, a, a new intern, first rotation out of medical school [Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, D.C.] and a patient came in, he was very, very, very critically ill, we worked on him, you know, along with the, you know, the E- you know he came in through the ER [emergency room], I worked on him, did, you know, some things; read, worked, read, worked, you know, you had to really kind of move fast, got him kind of stabilized but you know, the, the attendings, consultants would always say, you know, call us, keep us posted, let us know what's going on. So maybe I called them at four o'clock and when I said, "I just wanted to let you know about the person came in and this is what happened and, you know, he's, he's doing better now." He said, "Well if he's still alive, call me in the morning," bam! Or, "We'll deal with it in the morning," and he hung up the phone on me, and I thought, okay so that, that, that was the first baptism by fire, and I realized, okay, so now I understand.$$So, so, so what did you do at that point when he did that to you?$$Oh, I--$$Were angered, or, or do you say, or what did you do?$$Oh, yeah (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) 'Cause you--$$--it angers you.$$--had a patient.$$But it makes you strong. Let me tell you something, and, and this is what the old folks say, if it doesn't kill you, it'll make you strong. It made you strong. Every little hurt, every little slight, every little obstacle, every little pin that was pushed in my side intentionally, and mes- mostly intentionally, it just made me stronger. I'm, I, I'm, I made sure that there wasn't anything in medicine that I had not seen or knew about and I've, I've made that my philosophy. And I read, I read the PDR ['Physicians' Desk Reference'] and never forgetting once, I went to see somebody at his office, one of the consultants and I had the PDR and I was reading about something, he said, "What are you doing? Reading the PDR?" You know, he was kind of snickering, kind of in a very snide, and I said, you know, and I just laughed and said oh no. Yeah, I was reading the PDR, as a matter of fact, I was gonna read every aspect of that drug, at least what we knew about so I would be that much better informed so.

Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr.

Internal medicine physician Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. was born on March 22, 1925 in Tuskegee, Alabama to Dr. George Clayton Branche, Sr. and Lillian Vester Davidson. Branche attended Boston Latin High School in Boston, Massachusetts and graduated in June of 1942. He then attended and graduated from Bowdon College in Brunswick, Maine, earning his B.A. degree in 1946. Branche graduated from Boston University’s Medical School in 1948 earning his M.D. degree.

After earning his medical degree, Branche worked as a medical intern at Boston City Hospital between 1948 and 1949. In July of 1949, Branche started his residency in internal medicine at Cushing Veterans’ Hospital. After his residency ended in 1951, he earned a cancer fellowship at Tufts Medical School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. After his cancer fellowship, Branche entered the U.S. Army. Between October and December of 1952, Branche attended medical field service school at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas in preparation for service overseas during the Korean Conflict. Between December of 1952 and May 15, 1954, Branche served in the U.S. Army as a medical officer. He was honorably discharged in November of 1954, achieving the rank of captain.

Branche started to practice internal medicine in Richmond, Virginia near the end of 1954 after leaving the U.S. Army. The following year, he got married and started a family. After seven years in Richmond, Branche and his family moved to New York City, where he practiced medicine with his brother, Dr. Matthew Branche. Branche worked in the Admissions Department at Columbia University Medical School. Branche also helped found the organization, 100 Black Men. He was involved with the organization for forty-three years and was an active member for many years.

Branche passed away on April 23, 2009 at age 84.

Accession Number

A2006.152

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/6/2006 |and| 12/12/2006

Last Name

Branche

Maker Category
Middle Name

Clayton

Schools

Boston Latin School

James P. Timilty Middle School

Chambliss Children's House at Tuskegee Institute

Boston University School of Medicine

Bowdoin College

First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

BRA06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/22/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken, Fish, Vegetables

Death Date

4/23/2009

Short Description

Internal medicine physician Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. (1925 - 2009 ) was a medical officer during the Korean Conflict, was a founder of 100 Black Men and had his own internal medicine practice in New York City.

Employment

U.S. Army

Boston City Hospital

Cushing General Hospital

Harlem Hospital Center

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:1520,28:1824,33:6004,127:6992,153:15656,319:33691,605:38945,736:59330,913:62634,953:71821,1116:81654,1224:85994,1264:87456,1292:89262,1323:89950,1336:97908,1538:98260,1543:99404,1560:100020,1568:113794,1689:115039,1707:115537,1715:118193,1752:118774,1761:124994,1854:139484,2123:140128,2131:141769,2144:146729,2212:147450,2220:153322,2293:155672,2322:156048,2327:156612,2334:165590,2498:166790,2519:180201,2762:184326,2808:185614,2846:186718,2861:213370,3179$0,0:4470,33:4830,41:5190,46:6270,68:22040,283:25942,329:27202,352:27790,360:33416,442:35772,500:37292,534:38128,552:38812,564:51290,760:59877,838:60498,853:60843,859:61257,867:66480,942:66790,948:78334,1043:78774,1049:79302,1057:81686,1107:89970,1252:91490,1325:92250,1337:93846,1359:94226,1365:94530,1370:102096,1425:102704,1434:103464,1445:105136,1470:105668,1478:105972,1483:110000,1571:110456,1582:116960,1662:119435,1765:145717,2026:146270,2034:155710,2154:156964,2184:157426,2192:157690,2197:179690,2512:180959,2522:183088,2535:183698,2541:189960,2651:191020,2666:200062,2765:200774,2775:224215,2959:230140,3078:232841,3106:233520,3130:258700,3335
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his mother's upbringing in North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his paternal great-uncle, George Clayton Shaw

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's university education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about his father's medical research

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's social involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his family life in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls travelling with his family as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls Camp Emlen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls moving to Boston, Massachusetts for high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls differences between Boston and Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls the Roxbury community in Boston

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his mother and siblings' move to Boston

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his decision to study medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his internship at Boston City Hospital

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his mentors

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his medical internship and residency

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls joining the U.S. Army as a medical officer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his service in the Korean War

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. remembers segregation in the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls returning from the Korean War

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls moving to Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his medical career in New York City, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls the difficulties of practicing medicine in Richmond

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his medical career in New York

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his social involvement in New York

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the Youth Shelter Program of Westchester, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his wife and his friends at Harlem Hospital Center

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about George Clayton Shaw's writings

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the history of Mary Potter Academy, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the history of Mary Potter Academy, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls serving with black physicians in the Korean War

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his medical duties in the Korean War

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about why he settled in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls Richmond's African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls moving to New York City in 1962

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his early medical career in New York City

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls practicing medicine with his brother

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his community involvement in Harlem, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his involvement in 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his medical career in New York City, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes Westchester County, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the community of Scarsdale, New York

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes African Americans' presence in the medical profession

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the medical issues facing the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his concerns about healthcare for African Americans

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the operations of the Youth Shelter Program of Westchester, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his work with the Westchester Clubmen

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about his Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity membership

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about his three children

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$6

DAStory

5$5

DATitle
Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his decision to study medicine
Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his medical duties in the Korean War
Transcript
I'll ask you now, but we'll keep going in chronological order. Well, why was that not an option for you? Why did you not see that as a path for you to take?$$I wasn't interested. I was afraid to fly. I was afraid to ride a horse. I was afraid to ride, I fell off a pony at camp and never rode a horse, and I had no interest in it, and I was active, and I wanted to go to medical school, and I was fortunate, they needed doctors.$$Had you always been interested in medicine?$$I never thought of anything else.$$For how long? How far back can you remember?$$Well, as far as I can remember. That's the only think I knew. I lived in a community of doctors, my father [George Clayton Branche, Sr.] was a doctor, his close friends were physicians. I didn't know what kind I would be, but I never thought, as I said, and I'll get to the, once I got into Bowdoin College [Brunswick, Maine], I had spent almost two years there, 1944, I had finished my, I finished Boston Latin [Boston Latin School, Boston, Massachusetts] in '42 [1942]. I spent two years at Bowdoin and was told that unless I got into medical school that I would be subject to the draft. I only, didn't have enough, yeah, I only had two years, but I took a summer and at that time all, many of my classmates were in the same situation I was. We were only nineteen and twenty and so the colleges, Williams [Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts], Bowdoin, many of us, my friend Garrett [John Garrett, Jr.] at Amherst [Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts], we were allowed to go to medical school and we, and then we accelerated very rapidly, but then in 1945, the war [World War II, WWII] sort of ended and we decelerated so we spent a couple, one six-month period without going to school, and we had to write a little thesis and do something else, and then went on back and finished. And, but the reason, as I said, I was always interested in medicine. And at Boston University [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts], it was a very tiny school. When my father went there, there were only twenty-three students at the medical school. And three of 'em was black, including my father. And when I went to BU medical school, it was still small. There were only fifty-nine and now there're over 160 in each class.$$How many blacks were there when you were there of the fifty-nine?$$Very, I was the only one in my class, just like I was the only one at Bowdoin, except for a young fellow who was there for a year and left to go in the [U.S.] Army.$$Where did you live when you went out to Bowdoin?$$When I went back, when I came back from Bowdoin? My mother [Lillian Davidson Branche] had moved to 71 Highland Street. A family moved out and she moved in the same building, apartment, little apartment in Boston [Massachusetts], and I used to ride a bicycle from my apartment to the medical school. I'd get on my, had my books on the back and I'd get on my little bike and kids would say look, there's a man on a bike. So I rode that and they would let me hook it up inside the building and then I would bicycle back up to, it was a couple, maybe mile and a half, two miles.$But I only spent a, no more than four or five weeks, and then I was allowed, I traded places with this fellow, as I told you I don't like flying, but I was willing to get into a little tiny two-seater with my duffel bag and fly south. And while I was there I was--you had to have a dispensary. You had to have a dispensary for soldiers when they had various problems, whether they're STS [significant threshold shift], sexually transmitted disorders, or various other things, or whether the common cold or whether they were this or that. They would come to the dispensary. Now--$$A dispensary is a pharmacy basically.$$The dispensary is a little tent where I had, had a little desk and things, and I had pills and so forth to treat--injections for certain disorders. But I saw very few sick people in this little--now there weren't, there wasn't a great deal of fighting going on. You remember there were little lulls in fighting. Now we're talking now, we're talking, I got to this hospital and about February of 1993 [sic. 1953], and there were no major battles or anything going on. Occasionally there was a push so to speak when the Chinese became involved and there were skirmishes and so they came, they did bring in, as I said, this was Evacuation Hospital [11th Evacuation Hospital, Korea]. They would bring troops down from the lines and so there were times when there were troops who had to have emergency surgical procedures which is what some of my friends were involved with. But I couldn't help out because I knew nothing about surgical tech. In fact, they would ask all of the officers, medical officers, to come and give a hand, and I recall, I never will forget it, when I got in the operating room, and my friend Wharton [ph.] would be operating, really working hard, and I would try to, he said, "Gee you're all thumbs," he said, "please leave." And I was, I had to leave. But anyhow, as things passed on, what happened was I allowed the Korean civilians to come into the clinic, those who had medical problems that I could handle, and so each morning you would see a line up outside, see it was a gate, not a gate, but a guard would be there opening, letting them into our little ground, camp, whatever you want to call them, you'd find maybe fifteen, twenty or so lined up coming in, and so it was okay. In fact, the U.S., my superiors said, sure, you can see as many as you, so they would line up and take their time and I would see them for various forms of anemia, a lot of parasitic diseases and minor problems that I could handle and they were grateful, and I enjoyed it, because otherwise I wouldn't have been practicing any medicine.$$You wouldn't have had anything to do.$$Very little.$$Very little.$$And so anyhow, I was there for about ten, let's see, from oh about eight to ten months and then I was transferred to the area near Seoul [South Korea], to the 121st Evacuation Hospital. That was in the town across from the Han River from Yeongam-eup [South Korea], I got promoted to captaincy, I was captain, and did primarily--much bigger facility and we, the general medical, we had medical wards and treated more medical problems, I left there. The war ended as you will recall only a few months after I got to Korea actually. And I left Korea in 1954, and came to, back to the states.

Dr. Linda Rae Murray

Dr. Linda Rae Murray was born in Cleveland, Ohio on August 25, 1948. After graduating from Collinwood High School in 1966, Murray attended the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she earned her B.S. degree in mathematics in 1973. Murray continued her education at UIC, earning her M.D. in 1977. Following the completion of her M.D., Murray attended the University of Illinois School of Public Health in Chicago, where she earned her master’s of public health in 1980; she later returned to school to continue her education in the doctoral program at the University of Michigan School of Public Health.

After completing her medical degree, Murray became a resident physician in internal medicine and occupational therapy at Cook County Hospital, where she remained until 1980. In 1981, Murray left Cook County Hospital for Bethany Hospital, also in Chicago, and in 1983, became the medical director for the Manitoba Federation of Labour in Winnipeg, Canada. Murray returned to the United States in 1985, and began teaching at Meharry Medical College; in 1987, she returned to Chicago to work with the Chicago Department of Health. By 1992, Murray had become the medical director of the Near North Health Services Corporation. After a series of other high-level positions, Murray became the chief medical officer of Primary Care & Community Health: Ambulatory & Community Health Network of Cook County. Later, Murray became the attending physician at the Woodlawn Health Center. Throughout her career of health administration and medical practice, Murray also worked as a teacher, teaching internal medicine and midwifery, among other courses. In 2005, Murray was elected Chief Medical Officer of the Ambulatory & Community Health Network of the American Public Health Association, a position she would hold until 2009.

Murray was also an active member of her community, having been involved with dozens of groups and organizations over the years. From 1981 until 1983, Murray was a part of the First Congressional District of Illinois Health Task Force under Harold Washington; she returned to that role from 1985 to 1992 under Congressman Charles Hayes. Murray has received many awards, including the Daniel Hale Williams Award from the cook County Physician’s Association, and the Distinguished Service in the Health Field Award form the National Association of Minority Medical Educators.

Accession Number

A2004.151

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/30/2004

Last Name

Murray

Middle Name

Rae

Schools

Collinwood High School

Marion-Sterling Elementary School

University of Chicago

University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois College of Medicine

Boulevard Elementary School

First Name

Linda

Birth City, State, Country

Cleveland

HM ID

MUR07

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Ohio

Favorite Vacation Destination

Home

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

8/25/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Sweet Pototo Pie

Short Description

Medical instructor, internal medicine physician, and medical administrator Dr. Linda Rae Murray (1948 - ) held a variety of high-ranking positions in health administration in Chicago, Illinois, and Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Most recently, Murray served as the chief medical officer of the Ambulatory & Community Health Network of the American Public Health Association. Throughout her career of health administration and medical practice, Murray also worked as a teacher, teaching internal medicine and midwifery, among other courses.

Employment

Cook County Hospital

Bethany Hospital - Chicago

Manitoba Federation of Labour- Winnipeg, Canada

Meharry Medical College

Chicago Department of Health

Primary Care & Community Health: Ambulatory & Community Health Network of Cook County

Woodlawn Health Center

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. Linda Rae Murray's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her mother's side of the family, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray shares a story about her maternal great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her maternal great-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her mother's side of the family, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her mother's childhood in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her family's limited educational opportunities

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers the impact of World War II on her family , pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers the impact of World War II on her family, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her early political activism

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her father's upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about cultural institutions in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls the social demographics of Cleveland, Ohio when she was growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers participating in a Marxist study group as a teenager

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray explains how her view of civil rights activism was shaped by her studies of Marxism

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her experiences at Marion-Sterling Elementary School in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls being pestered by a librarian at the Sterling Branch Library in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her experiences at Marion-Sterling Elementary School in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her experiences at Boulevard Elementary School in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her experiences at Boulevard Elementary School in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers being a coach for her little league baseball team in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her involvement in sports growing up

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about moving out of the projects in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls a memorable teacher from Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers taking time off at Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her family's views on religion

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about reactions to her identity as an atheist

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her experience serving on the board of the AIDS Pastoral Care Network in Chicago, Illinois while being an atheist

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about Reverend Bruce W. Klunder's death

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls protests against integrating Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls protests against integrating Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls how Collinwood High School in Cleveland, Ohio was evacuated during violent protests

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray explains why she attended the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers being stopped by the Chicago police her first night at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about majoring in mathematics at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers a controversial instructor from the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers her decision to pursue medicine, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers her decision to pursue medicine, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her decision to pursue medical school while pregnant

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray explains her decision to transfer to the University of Illinois at Chicago in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers a sexist response when she asked for a recommendation to medical school

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers challenges at the financial aid office at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray explains how she received financial assistance for medical school as a research assistant at Cook County Hospital

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her impressions of medical school, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her impressions of medical school, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers the support network of minority students at University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about memorable medical professionals from University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her political involvement as a medical student at University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers specializing in environmental and occupational medicine

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her experiences working at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray details her work with labor unions at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes challenges she faced while working at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about leaving Chicago, Illinois for a position at Manitoba Federation of Labour in Canada

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her decision to lead Meharry Medical College's occupational health program

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray details her involvement with the Chicago Department of Health

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray recalls her return to the Cook County health system

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her involvement in national and local health organizations

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers her involvement on the board of the American Public Health Administration during the Clinton health plan debates

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray reflects upon the factors that make a community healthy

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers Dr. Paul B. Cornely's impact on her public health interests

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about the accomplishments of Dr. Paul B. Cornely

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 1

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes her hopes and concerns for the African American community, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray reflects upon her life experiences

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dr. Linda Rae Murray narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

1$4

DATitle
Dr. Linda Rae Murray talks about her experience serving on the board of the AIDS Pastoral Care Network in Chicago, Illinois while being an atheist
Dr. Linda Rae Murray remembers a sexist response when she asked for a recommendation to medical school
Transcript
I was going to tell you one story about the religious--the, the one time in my life where I thought this was really relevant. Early in the AIDS [acquired immunodeficiency syndrome] epidemic, a Baptist minister approached me to, to make a tape that they were using to educate Baptist ministers about AIDS. And he actually was one of the board members of an organization that used to exist in Chicago [Illinois] called the AIDS Pastoral Care Network. And this was a group of Catholic priests and other leaders of religion who came together to work on the AIDS problems and, and to deal with the homophobia in all the churches. The feeling was many of the organized churches were not responsive to the AIDS epidemic early on and this was a group of ministers and priests who were trying to respond. And so after I had worked with them a little bit, they asked me to be on the board. And you know they, they were very careful. They have, you know, rabbis and Baptists and you know all the, you know all the different groups. And I told them, I said well I'll be glad to be on your board, but I, I'm an atheist. And they said, "Oh, [HistoryMaker Dr.] Linda [Rae Murray], don't worry, we're ecumenical. We have Jews and radical faeries and Catholics. We won't mind an atheist or two." So that was their approach. And as a matter of fact when I went off the board, because we would always have these discussions on the board and--I was always the one that would say, I thought you guys were supposed to be spiritual leaders. You know, shouldn't we be doing this and that and the other? And so I, I have a plaque that's in my office and it, and it is from them and it doesn't say I'm an atheist, but it says--but, but they would always say is, "Well, you may be an atheist, but you're very spiritual." That, that's what they would always tell me, you know. "When you talk, you're very spiritual." So I said, well if you say so. So I guess that's where I am, that's what--that's--I suppose if I was pressed against the wall, that's what I would tell people. I'm an atheist, but I guess I'm spiritual enough that the, that the organized religions can tolerate me, so.$$What do you think they mean by that when they say you're spiritual?$$Well--'cause I always referred back to the principles that we worked under, you know and, and you know I mean for lack of a better word, they're the principles of any religion, you know, that you want to be compassionate, that you want to be fair, that you want to take the organization in a direction that fulfilled its mission. So if there was a grant proposal out there that took us in an opposite direction, that we really, you know we were really supposed to be doing, providing spiritual support for people with AIDS, and for their families. And so you know if there was a choice, should we do--be doing pastoral care or should we do something else like spend more time on the AIDS walk. You know I would always say well what are our basic principles say? I think that's what they meant by it, that I would always refer back to what the organization's principles were.$At U of I [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois] they called me in and said, you know, "[HistoryMaker Dr.] Linda [Rae Murray], you have," you know, "you need 200 hours to graduate, you got 250," or what--you know I had, I had way over what, you know and, "you're taking up space. We need you to graduate." I, you know I had long since finished all my math courses and stuff and I said well, the reason I haven't graduated is because I'm really pre-med and I'm applying to medical school and you know and I, you know, just had whatever cell biology. I was in the process of doing that. And they said, "You're never getting into medical school, you know, you need to go on and get out of here. You, you have a degree in math. You have no choice. We're, we're going to make you graduate." It was December or something. So I walked down the hall and I changed my major to art. Filled out the paperwork. I didn't have a art course. I tried to pick something I didn't have a course in. So I changed my major to art so they couldn't force me to graduate. I only had one more semester to go. And that's the, that's the time when I was applying. And I, I remember my organic--you know U of I is a huge place. And so you don't, you know it's not like U of C [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois]. So you don't, you don't know very many fac--I didn't know any of the faculty there, nobody. You're in this huge classroom, three hundred kids, you know, nothing. And you had to have recommendations. And so they had a system where they would, they would give you a generic recommendation that some English major would write, just based on your grades. And, but you had to have it. So I went to my organic teacher and I remember Marcus [Murray]-- Marcus was--my son--was a little baby in arms then, I had had him. And, and I had gotten a good grade in organic chemistry. So I said, well let me, you know go talk to him. And I had, had some interaction with the professor, not very much, but--and I said, you know "I'm trying to go to medical school and you know I, and I need you--I need a recommendation". You know and so, "I, I would like to ask you to give me a recommendation." It was very difficult for me to go ask. And he, and he, you know, looked up his files and he said, "Oh, I remember, I remember you. You were an excellent student. He said I would love to give you a recommendation, but I just can't." So I was--I said well why not? He said, "Because I don't think women should be doctors." I was in shock. We talked for like two hours. I said, "Well why do you say that?" He had grown up in the [Great] Depression. His mother was a stay-at-home mother and she had to go to work during the Depression. You know he--and that just scarred him. He just didn't think women--he thought women should be at home. And I said, "Well do you, do you know who I am?" I said, "I'm a"--I said, "The women in my family all work. First they were picking cotton as slaves, I mean they all--what are you talking about? We're--you have to work," you know. I said, "I'm a single mother. If I don't work, my son is going to starve. I would prefer to work as a doctor than scrubbing out toilets, but I'm going to work. Now the question is"--so we had this big discussion back and forth and I was trying to say, you know, working class women and black women, we've always worked. If you don't work, your kids starve, you know. I couldn't understand. He never budged. So I said--so I finally told him I don't--I guess he didn't do horrible, 'cause I got in. I said, "Well I'll tell you what. I said you know I have to have three recommendations. If you write down exactly what you told me, I could live with that." He said, "What?" I said, "If you just, if you promise me that you'll write down that if I was a man, you would think I would be a great doctor and I was a good student, but you don't think I should--if you just are honest. If you, if you're going to write down I shouldn't be a doctor, I don't want--but if you can promise me that you'll write down the real reason, exactly what you've told me, I'll live with that." He said, "Okay, I can do that," you know. So I was shocked at that time to have somebody verbally say that.