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Courtney Sloane

Interior designer Courtney Sloane was born on June 1, 1962 in Jersey City, New Jersey to John Sloane and Ruth A. Sloane. She graduated from St. Anthony High School in Jersey City, New Jersey in 1980 and earned her B.S. degree in marketing from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey in 1984. Sloane also took postgraduate classes in metal working at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York and in interior design at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, New York.

Sloane began her professional career as a retail merchandiser for J.C. Penny. In 1986, she began working as a specification specialist and specification representative at Formica Corporation/Fabricator Supply. She remained at Formica until 1994, during which time she founded Alternative Design in 1991. She served as the company’s creative director, and handled special requests and customized projects. From 1996 to 1999, Sloane served as a contributing editor for Essence magazine and wrote the “By Design” column. During the 2003 season of America’s Next Top Model, she served as a production designer. In 2005, Sloane established Project INSPIRE, a philanthropic program that created internships for high school and college students in the design industry. Sloane then founded Riley Stone, a design import company, in 2011. The following year, she began serving as a marketing manager for RS Furnishings. In addition to her interior design career in the United States, Sloane joined local artists in Costa Rica in 2013 and designed a collection of pottery. In 2015, Sloane opened her own lifestyle retail showroom boutique store, Sloane Square, in Jersey City.

Sloane became known for her design style, and her work for Queen Latifah, Sean “Puffy” Combs, Mary J. Blige, Sony Music Studio, Black Entertainment Television, and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and Museum. Sloane’s work was also featured on the cover of New York Magazine. Sloane was named by New York Magazine as one of its “99 New Yorkers” and “100 Best Architects and Designers.” House Beautiful also named her as one of the country’s “Top 101 Designers” multiple times.

Courtney Sloane was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 14, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.084

Sex

Female

Interview Date

04/14/2017

04/14/2017 |and| 4/9/2019

Last Name

Sloane

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

Rutgers University

Fashion Institute of Technology

Pratt Institute

The Bergen School

St. Patrick's Elementary School

St. Anthony High School

First Name

Courtney

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

SLO01

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Costa Rica

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New Jersey

Birth Date

6/1/1962

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Newark

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Thai

Short Description

Interior designer Courtney Sloane (1962 - ) was a production designer for America’s Next Top Model and founded Riley Stone and opened Sloan Square, a lifestyle retail showroom in Jersey City, New Jersey.

Employment

Courtney Sloane Design

Sloane Square

Alternative Design

Fabricators Supply Company

JC Penny

Favorite Color

Blue

Marilyn McCoo

Singer and actress Marilyn McCoo was born on September 30, 1943 in Jersey City, New Jersey. Her parents, Mary and Waymon McCoo, were both doctors and moved the family to Los Angeles, California when McCoo was seven years old. She graduated from Dorsey High School and went on to attend the University of California-Los Angeles, where she received her B.S. degree in business administration.

In 1962, McCoo entered the Miss Bronze California beauty pageant where she won the Grand Talent award and met Lamonte McLemore, who asked her to join his singing group, the Hi-Fi’s. She went on to perform with Ray Charles and record the single "Lonesome Mood." The Hi-Fi’s disbanded in 1965, and that same year McCoo, McLemore, Florence LaRue, Ron Townson, and Billy Davis, Jr. formed The Versatiles. The group signed to the Soul City label, changed their name to The 5th Dimension, and recorded their first hit in 1966, "Go Where You Wanna Go." In 1967, they released “Up, Up, and Away,” which won four Grammy Awards and was the title track to the 5th Dimension's first hit album. In 1969, The 5th Dimension released The Age of Aquarius. The album's first single, "Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In," became a mega-hit and occupied the number one spot on the charts for six weeks. It earned the group two more Grammy Awards, including Record of the Year.

In 1969, McCoo married bandmate Billy Davis, Jr., and in 1975, they left The 5th Dimension. Together, they released 1976's I Hope We Get To Love In Time, featuring the single, "You Don't Have to Be a Star (To Be in My Show)." The song went straight to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and earned the duo a Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus. McCoo and Davis went on to host The Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis Jr. Show on CBS in 1977. In the 1980s McCoo hosted the music countdown show Solid Gold. She also had a recurring spot on the soap opera Days of Our Lives in the 1980s, and acted in a number of movies. She appeared on stage in productions of Anything Goes, A...My Name is Alice, Man of La Mancha, and the Broadway production of Show Boat.

McCoo released a solo album, Solid Gold, in 1983, and then a gospel album in 1991 entitled The Me Nobody Knows; its title single went to number one on the gospel charts. She received another Grammy Award the following year for participating as a guest artist on Quincy Jones’ Handel’s Messiah: A Soulful Celebration, which won Best Contemporary Soul Gospel Album. In 2004, McCoo and Davis co-authored the book Up, Up and Away…How We Found Love, Faith and Lasting Marriage in the Entertainment World.

McCoo has also earned a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and The 5th Dimension was inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2002. She has received two honorary doctorate degrees and served on the boards of the Children's Miracle Network, the Los Angeles Mission, and the Cancer Research Foundation.

Marilyn McCoo was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 29, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.178

Sex

Female

Interview Date

6/29/2014

Last Name

McCoo

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

University of California, Los Angeles

Talladega College

University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Arlington Heights Elementary School

Los Angeles High School

Susan Miller Dorsey High School

First Name

Marilyn

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

MCC18

Favorite Season

None

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

9/30/1943

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Singer and actress Marilyn McCoo (1943 - ) is an eight-time Grammy Award-winning singer and an original member of The 5th Dimension. She has also hosted television shows, appeared on Broadway, and acted in a number of movies. McCoo is co-author, with her husband Billy Davis, Jr., of Up, Up and Away…How We Found Love, Faith and Lasting Marriage in the Entertainment World.

Employment

Joseph Magnin

Westminster Neighborhood Association

The 5th Dimension

McCoo & Davis, Inc.

Favorite Color

None

Timing Pairs
0,0:3299,53:5483,94:6120,102:10924,123:26553,353:30490,420:32590,428:32940,434:33500,443:34690,466:36090,502:36440,508:36720,517:37630,530:38050,538:41970,627:47430,655:49183,670:49822,686:51810,723:54224,767:54508,772:57658,801:58154,817:58774,837:60572,868:61006,876:66222,911:66666,920:69245,950:69623,959:70883,984:77750,1179:79199,1231:79640,1239:80018,1247:80333,1253:82160,1294:88118,1313:88610,1321:89266,1337:92710,1476:93448,1486:99290,1588:99650,1593:100280,1602:101090,1615:102170,1649:102800,1657:103250,1663:129671,2050:130252,2058:130667,2064:131829,2098:135896,2171:136394,2180:137058,2191:140808,2205:146733,2342:147049,2347:147365,2352:153448,2476:153764,2481:154238,2489:159980,2516:160330,2524:161100,2541:161450,2548:161730,2553:162570,2579:162920,2585:163340,2593:163970,2604:165230,2625:166280,2650:166700,2657:167540,2669:168170,2681:170130,2721:170620,2729:173998,2751:174818,2764:175474,2774:175884,2780:176212,2785:176704,2795:177032,2800:180696,2834:181950,2859:187109,2910:189090,2920:190533,2938:194117,2963:194651,2971:195185,2978:197160,3007$0,0:13100,202:17020,280:17820,296:19260,322:24090,344:24455,350:25915,376:26207,381:26572,387:28251,409:28908,419:29200,425:29565,432:30149,438:33580,496:36427,561:36792,567:37449,577:42508,686:44770,718:49918,801:51244,844:52648,881:57299,910:60352,979:62553,1044:68217,1121:73350,1272:73763,1284:79304,1306:79794,1314:80676,1327:82310,1333:82578,1338:86933,1425:91382,1471:91678,1476:92566,1494:93306,1512:94120,1524:98338,1602:102393,1639:102711,1648:102976,1655:103559,1668:104330,1674
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Marilyn McCoo's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Marilyn McCoo lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her mother's upbringing and education

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Marilyn McCoo describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Marily McCoo talks about her father's career as a singer

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Marily McCoo describes how her parents met and their move to Columbus, Georgia

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her family's civil rights activism

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Marily McCoo describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Marily McCoo talks about her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Marily McCoo describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Marily McCoo describes her early childhood education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her childhood in Columbus, Georgia and her family's move to Los Angeles, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Marilyn McCoo describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Marilyn McCoo describes her early interest in show business

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Marilyn McCoo describes the role of religion in her upbringing

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Marilyn McCoo talks about the importance of music in her family.

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her early education and her parents' influence on her career path

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Marilyn McCoo describes her early musical education and her mentor Eddie Beal

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Marilyn McCoo describes the music she listened to and how it influenced her

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Marilyn McCoo shares her experience in high school activities

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Marilyn McCoo describes singing with her sisters as a youth

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her early career goals and her decision to attend college

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her private vocal lessons with Florence Russell during her college years

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Marilyn McCoo talks about competing in Miss Bronze California

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Marilyn McCoo talks about meeting HistoryMaker Lamonte McLemore and joining the Hi-Fi's.

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Marilyn McCoo talks about performing with the Hi-Fi's and her mother's reaction.

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her centerfold in Jet magazine

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her friend, actress Vonetta McGee

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Marilyn McCoo talks about working with Ray Charles through the Hi-Fi's

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Marilyn McCoo describes her experience as a woman in the entertainment world

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Marilyn McCoo talks about the music she performed with the Hi-Fi's and Ray Charles

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Marilyn McCoo talks about returning to school to study business administration

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Marilyn McCoo talks about earning money on the road with the Hi-Fi's

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her decision to leave the Hi-Fi's

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Marilyn McCoo talks about her career goals after leaving the Hi-Fi's

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$2

DAStory

9$3

DATitle
Marilyn McCoo talks about working with Ray Charles through the Hi-Fi's
Marilyn McCoo describes her early interest in show business
Transcript
So anyway, back to--so the Hi-Fi's are--well, you're still a minor with the Hi-Fi's, and at a certain point Hi-Fi's, they, they mu--they, they're still together until what, '65 [1965], '64 [1964] or '65 [1965]?$$Right, yeah, we stayed-- sa Okay.$$--together until the end of sixty-four [1964].$$And what--$$Yeah.$$Now you had Ray Charles--$$How did Ray Charles--$$Yeah, how did--$$--come into the picture?$$Yeah, yeah.$$Well, I don't remember exactly how we met Ray Charles. And [HM] Lamonte McLemore might have had something to with it because Lamonte was always trying to hook up the group with somebody. But Ray heard the group, and he liked what he heard. And he decided that he wanted to record us, and he did. He recorded us on his label, and we recorded a song called 'Lonesome Mood' and a couple of other things. And it was also during that time--so, Ray started managing the group. And now I was still in school, and Fritz Baskett was still in school, but he guys were ready to go out and work. You know, they wanted to go out on the road, so they went to Ray and said hey, why don't you take us out on the road? You know, you're managing us, and, and we're not doing anything, and you're out on the road. So Ray decided that he would take us out, and we ended up opening the show for him.$$Now this is really, this is like your father [Wayman McCoo] singing with Fletch Henderson [Fletcher Henderson].$$Yeah, well, it was, it was amay--$$Your--$$--it was a wonderful opportunity.$$Ray Charles--$$As a matter of fact, I dropped out of school for a semester to go out on tour with Ray Charles. My mother [Mary Ellen McCoo] was not pleased about this at all. So, and I was not twenty-one yet. And I'm, I'm forgetting Joe, Joe--what's Joe's last name?$$(OFF-CAMERA MALE VOICE): (Unclear)--$$Thank you, baby, okay.$$What, what was it?$$I'm just, I'm--now, my mother was not--$$What's his last name? What was Joe's last name?$$I'm gonna give it to.$$Okay, all right.$$I'm gonna give it to you in--$$Okay.$$So now, my mother was not excited about this at all.$$Okay.$$And I wasn't twenty one yet. But Joe Adams, who was managing Ray Charles now at this time, he came to my mother and he talked to her. And, and you know, he said you know your daughter wants to go out, and the group is gonna go out. And, and we'll, we'll take good care of her (laughter). And my mother didn't believe that at all. As a matter of fact, she told Lamonte, she said you all make sure my daughter is okay. And she made me promise her that when I came back home that I would go right back to school and finish and graduate, because I only had about twenty seven units left at the time that I dropped out. And it was an amazing experience for me. I really got a chance to learn what goes out, what goes on out on the road. I got a chance to sit out in the audience and watch Ray Charles perform. He was so amazing. What a brilliant, brilliant artist. And I really, really enjoyed those three months.$$$I read that you always interested in, been interested in show business. So when did this first manifest itself? Well, I guess always. I, I don't know. I mean, do you have any stories about when you first started thinking about yourself as being an entertainer at some point?$$Well, you know, when I was growing up, my father [Wayman McCoo] would come home sometimes with, with vocal arrangements, usually something from, from a book, because daddy at one time taught, taught choir at, at his church. He would come in with a vocal arrangement, and he would start assigning parts. And my mother [Mary Ellen Holloway McCoo] would sing her part; and my sister, Glenda, would sing her part; and then they'd give me a part to sing, and then we'd all four sing in harmony. And I loved it; I loved the sound of harmony. And we'd get around the piano, and daddy would plunk out the parts and, and play the, you know, play the chords. And I just loved that they included me in it because I was thinking I'm just one. And then they would marvel because I could, I could hold my note. And they'd say well, listen to her. She's holding her note. And I would think, well, of course I'm holding my note. That's what you told me to sing (laughter). It never occurred to me that it was unusual.$$Okay.$$So I just, I just enjoyed music from very on. And then my, my, my parents made sure that we studied piano lessons, that we took piano lessons. All four of us did. And they just wanted us to have, you know, a familiarity with, with music. My mother had studied violin when she was in, when she was growing up, and so they wanted us to have, to have a knowledge of music.

Neil Brown

Businessman and lawyer Clarence O’Neill “Neil” Brown III was born on November 1, 1952 in Jersey City, New Jersey to Clarence Brown and Betty Bascome. After Brown’s father died when he was three, his mother worked as a secretary and then became a loan officer at a bank. He attended Nishuane Elementary school, a public school in Montclair, New Jersey, and then Newark Academy, a private high school in Livingston, New Jersey. In 1974, Brown graduated from Harvard University with his A.B. degree in government. He went on to receive his M.B.A. degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration and his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1979.

Brown moved to New York City in 1980 and worked as an attorney with the law firm of Sherman & Sterling. In 1981, he was hired at Home Box Office (HBO), where he went on to serve as vice president of programming. In 1986, Brown and his wife, Amsale Aberra, launched Amsale Aberra, Inc., a bridal gown company generally known as Amsale, out of their New York City apartment. In 1998, he founded Anavista Entertainment, L.L.C., a music, film and television production, distribution and consulting company. Brown then became chief executive officer of Amsale in 2001, now known as The Amsale Group, and includes the three luxury bridal collections of Amsale, Christos and Kenneth Pool.

He is a member of the Sigma Pi Phi fraternity, and served as Sire Archon of Beta Zeta Boule from 2005 to 2007. Brown and his wife live in Manhattan, New York City. They have one daughter, singer-songwriter Rachel Brown.

Neil Brown was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 17, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.163

Sex

Male

Interview Date

6/17/2014

Last Name

Brown

Marital Status

Married

Organizations
Schools

Nishuane

Newark Academy

Harvard University

Harvard Law School

Harvard Business School

First Name

Neil

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

BRO60

State

New Jersey

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

11/1/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Short Description

Businessman and lawyer Neil Brown (1952 - ) was the CEO of Amsale Aberra, Inc. and coowner and founder of Anavista Entertainment, L.L.C. He also served as vice president of programming for Home Box Office (HBO).

Employment

Amsale Aberra LLC

Anavista LLC

HBO

Sherman & Sterling

Ron Allen

Journalist Ron Allen was born in 1957. His mother, Shirley Allen, was a school secretary; his father, Lindsay L. Allen Jr., was a cargo sales manager at Newark International Airport. Allen received both his B.A. degree and M.A. degree in political science from the University of Pennsylvania.

In 1980, Allen was hired as a desk assistant for a CBS news station in New York City. From 1988 until 1992, he worked as a national correspondent for CBS News based in Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles, California. In 1992, Allen was appointed as a foreign correspondent for ABC News, and served in London until 1996. He was then hired by NBC News in 1996 as a national and international correspondent, where he covered stories of interest across the United States and around the world. Allen was based in London until 2003, when he moved to New York.

As a national and international correspondent, Allen covered the O.J. Simpson trials, the Trayvon Martin shooting, the abuse scandal at Pennsylvania State University, the historic Arab Spring from Cairo, Egypt, and the devastating earthquake in Haiti. He has traveled to South Africa several times to cover the life and legacy of Nelson Mandela. Allen also covered the historic 2008 Presidential election campaign, where he reported from Chicago’s Grant Park the night of President Barack Obama’s victory. In all, he has traveled to more than seventy-five countries, including Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Balkans, Israel and the Palestinian territories, and across Africa, in countries such as Rwanda, South Africa and Somalia, among others. Allen’s reports have appeared on all of NBC’s news platforms including “NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams,” “Today,” and MSNBC.

Allen’s work has earned him many of journalism’s highest honors, including six Overseas Press Club Awards, five Emmys, two Robert F. Kennedy Awards, two George Foster Peabody Awards, and two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Awards. In 1996, the National Association of Black Journalists named him journalist of the year. Allen has also served on the University of Pennsylvania’s Board of Overseers, the Board of the Overseas Press Club, and the Leadership Council of the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Allen lives in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area with his wife, Adaora Udoji, and daughter.

Ron Allen was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on December 9, 2013.

Accession Number

A2014.033

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/18/2014

Last Name

Allen

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Lindsay

Occupation
Schools

P.S. 38 James F. Murray School

St Peter's Preparatory School

University of Pennsylvania

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Ronald

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

ALL06

Favorite Season

Spring, Early Summer

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

Sounds Good.$What's Happening?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

7/22/1957

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Candied Yams

Short Description

Journalist Ron Allen (1957 - ) was a national and international correspondent for over twenty-five years at CBS, ABC and NBC News, and was responsible for the initial coverage of the Rwandan genocide.

Employment

NBC News

ABC News / London

CBS News / Los Angeles, Wash DC

WCVB-TV Boston

WFSB-TV

WBTV

CBS News

US Department of Commerce Census Bureau

Atlantic Community College

Favorite Color

Indigo Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:3440,56:4300,67:4816,75:8342,128:8944,139:16684,319:17200,326:26275,400:26875,409:27625,417:28075,424:30325,460:30700,467:39654,602:45658,693:46950,720:54246,850:55082,884:55462,890:76308,1060:76818,1066:77430,1073:77838,1078:87972,1211:104280,1457:117781,1749:126760,1892:127944,1915:130552,1939:131068,1946:134600,1985:141125,2134:145177,2169:153484,2294:157228,2387:165660,2502:166060,2508:166380,2513:166940,2521:167500,2530:167900,2536:168780,2551:169100,2556:192691,2948:200950,3027:201290,3035:206305,3142:217360,3334:217670,3340:218972,3367:220336,3415:223873,3446:236122,3671:237942,3721:240758,3735:245090,3771:248762,3862:264154,4031:264762,4048:266358,4079:266890,4088:267574,4099:272317,4195:275455,4212:275930,4219$0,0:792,18:4136,77:5368,112:18313,306:18739,323:21011,371:30279,505:36131,661:40289,769:51878,919:54386,995:66831,1202:72840,1355:85524,1566:88973,1603:93499,1695:108330,1876:110330,1903:114076,1960:116818,1982:119922,2038:121183,2054:121571,2059:126033,2138:126421,2146:130220,2164:130540,2169:131580,2202:136490,2240:136986,2245:138150,2296:158808,2572:159132,2577:162777,2662:180821,2880:189190,2986:190796,3031:191599,3056:201016,3292:202257,3322:212260,3431:213100,3446:213660,3457:214220,3467:215480,3506:224470,3587
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ron Allen's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ron Allen lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ron Allen describes his father's influence

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ron Allen remembers adopting his daughter from Ethiopia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ron Allen talks about his father's community in Jersey City, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ron Allen describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ron Allen describes his siblings and extended family

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ron Allen talks about his sister

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ron Allen describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ron Allen describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ron Allen recalls his early experiences of religions, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ron Allen recalls his early experiences of religions, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ron Allen talks about his interest in sports

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ron Allen remembers his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ron Allen describes his family's emphasis on education

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ron Allen remembers enrolling at St. Peter's Preparatory School in Jersey City, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ron Allen describes his activities at St. Peter's Preparatory School

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ron Allen recalls describes his education at St. Peter's Preparatory School

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ron Allen recalls his decision to attend the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ron Allen describes his experiences at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ron Allen remembers playing basketball at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ron Allen recalls his master's degree program at the University of Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ron Allen talks about his summer activities during college

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ron Allen recalls the start of his career in broadcast journalism

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ron Allen remembers joining CBS News

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ron Allen describes the racial demographics of the CBS News room

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ron Allen talks about the minority training program at WCVB-TV in Charlotte, North Carolina

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ron Allen talks about his aspiration to become a foreign correspondent

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ron Allen recalls his transition to WCVB-TV in Boston, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ron Allen describes his work as an investigative reporter, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ron Allen describes his work as an investigative reporter, pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ron Allen recalls his time at the CBS News bureau in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ron Allen remembers becoming a CBS News correspondent in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ron Allen recalls his start as a foreign correspondent, pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ron Allen recalls his start as a foreign correspondent, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ron Allen recalls his transition to ABC News

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ron Allen describes the ABC News bureau in London, England

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ron Allen remembers lessons from his time as a foreign correspondent

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ron Allen talks about his coverage of the Rwandan genocide, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Ron Allen talks about his coverage of the Rwandan genocide, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Ron Allen reflects upon his growth as a foreign correspondent

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Ron Allen talks about his decision to adopt a child from Ethiopia

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Ron Allen remembers meeting his wife at the O.J. Simpson trial

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Ron Allen talks about his transition to NBC News

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Ron Allen remembers his father's death

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ron Allen reflects upon his parents' support for his career

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ron Allen recalls his dangerous experiences as a foreign correspondent, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Ron Allen recalls his dangerous experiences as a foreign correspondent, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Ron Allen reflects upon his transition to domestic news correspondence

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Ron Allen talks about diversity in broadcast journalism, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Ron Allen talks about diversity in broadcast journalism, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Ron Allen describes his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Ron Allen reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Ron Allen reflects upon the legacy of his generation

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Ron Allen reflects upon the legacy of African Americans in the United States

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ron Allen narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$6

DAStory

4$3

DATitle
Ron Allen talks about his coverage of the Rwandan genocide, pt. 1
Ron Allen recalls his dangerous experiences as a foreign correspondent, pt. 2
Transcript
But you've talked about Rwanda when we were off camera, about that being a significant assignment for you. And I think we were looking at your photos I think. Am I right--wrong about that? I think (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, yeah, ra, ra--Rwanda was the genocide. There were close to a million people massacred in a very short period of time and--$$And tell why.$$This was a conflict between ethnic groups, the Hutu, majority, and the Tutsi, minority. And in so many African countries, post-colonial--on a post-colonial situation, what, what the colonizers often did was they would take a minority group and essentially conspire with them to run the show to keep the majority group or majority groups in check. And this happened in many places in Africa, and it happened in Rwanda. And then the lid blew off that when the president's [Juvenal Habyarimana] plane crashed, and over years and years of, of the Hutu, majority, feeling like they were being taken advantage of by the minority, Tutsi. So this war broke out, and, and all these people were massacred. And we were--when, when all this started we are in South Africa, it was 1994, and South Africa wa- was just having their first democratic elections. Nelson Mandela was becoming president, and I believe this is April of '94 [1994]. And that is one of the most memorable things I'll--I've, I've ever experienced as well, just seeing the South Africans voting for the first time. I'd been to South Africa a, a number of times up to that point, and when I moved to London [England] one of the first things I wanted to do was get to South Africa because apartheid hadn't ended. And I wanted to see, and experience, and understand what this place was. And I'd studied a bit about it in school [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania] and for the obvious reasons. And the morning of the election, the enduring images of long lines of people standing in this misty morning waiting forever, if they had to, to go vote. Some (unclear) really didn't understand what they were doing. I was in a place, KwaZulu-Natal [South Africa], which was you know, a fairly rural area. Most people are illiterate, you know, they had no real concept of democracy and all that. But this is what they were doing, and they were told it was gonna make life better, and so here, here it was. And, and that was one of the most profound things I've ever seen as well. So after the election, there are these rumblings about this refugee problem, these people fleeing this country north of South Africa--in the middle of Africa--to Rwanda. Who knew--who--what's Rwanda? Nobody really--I mean, people knew, but I didn't really know about it. And so when it really started, the numbers started getting bad, and people started appearing in camps across the--across the border in Tanzania and in Burundi in the other direction. And so we hopped on a plane and flew first to a, a little remote part of Tanzania, and that's where the first camps were of refugees forming. And people are telling this horrible, awful stories about what was going on inside this country. And you couldn't get in from there. You didn't wanna go in from there because it wasn't safe. The borders were sealed off, and people were just living in, in this, this misery and awful conditions in these camps, because all of a sudden it's--you know, there's like hundreds and thousands of people living in the field where there's nothing to sustain them. You know, there's no--you know, they're just there because that's the safe place the way you could walk to across the border. And then we--at, at one point, after doing that for a while, we flew--we flew to Uganda to the north, and we embedded or hooked up with the Rwandan Patriotic Front, the RPF, which was the, the rebel group--Tutsi led rebel group that was gonna try and liberate the country and, and fight the majority Hutu. And so we came--we came down into, into the capital with this military unit, and we were amongst the first to actually see what was going on inside the country, and it was horrific. I mean, it was just everywhere you looked there were--there were people who--dead bodies.$And then the, the next morning, we were presented--we had to appear before a judge, a court--(air quotes) was a financial court of some, some kind. And in, in my case what they found, in my baggage was--there was a--I was getting all my mail shipped to me because I was in Baghdad [Iraq] so long from the London [England] office. And as part of my 401(k) plan with the company, there's a disbursement of savings bonds that you get, and that, that you--they literally send you a chunk of bonds, and, and that was in my mail, and it came to me in Baghdad. And so when they went through our stuff, the border guards saw these things that had [President] George Washington and Ben Franklin's [Benjamin Franklin] picture and said 100--you know, savings bonds that looked like currency. So that was illegal currency that I had brought in. My colleagues, meanwhile, had, you know--well, greenbacks. They had--you know. Because we were leaving, we shut down the office and everything was done in cash, so they had--they took, you know sixty--we had lots of money. And we had these satellite telephones that they--were illegal there too as well. So, make a long story short, when I appeared before the judge, these are financial people, and they knew what this was, and they knew this was my money. And they said, "Oh, okay, you're fine; that's--you're, you're not guilty. We understand that's your money and we're not gonna penalize, but your colleagues however, they're guilty. They're guilty of smuggling--," or whatever and bat- and so we ordered to pay this huge fine. And we scraped the money together from our colleagues who were still in, in, in, in Baghdad, and NBC sent some money here or there or something and, and, and we got out. The whole thing probably took about thirty-six hours or so. And then the war started like the next day. But that--that's one reason. There have been a couple of close calls along the way and a couple of very tense moments. And I guess, not to over--not to be overly dramatic, but I've always believed that there are--you only get a few of those, and I don't know whether it's three or four or nine lives, but I know there's only a limited number of them. And I kind of felt like, okay, this happened. There are--there were other incidents. There was a, a moment in Rwanda when we were pinned down at--near a border, and there was gunfire going in different directions over us, and there was--there was another moment in Zaire, I think where we were. I think there was a, a soldier didn't like something and took us into detention and--I think it's one of the few times I've actually had a gun to my head, where they were--they were sort of pointing it at me. And so and there have been just bad times (laughter). So the combination of the traveling, and getting married [to Adaora Udoji], and being away from family, and these bad experiences--all of the wonderful experiences as well--we decided we needed to move back to the states. And I also wanted to know, okay, so what do you--what do you cash all this in for? You know, what do you in a--in a job professional sense--what is all this worth, all this stuff? And I--and I wanted a different life than I--than I had. Sometimes we--to honest with you, I've been back not ten years and I wonder why I came back (laughter). I know why I came because the travel just became--after 9/11 [September 11, 2001], we were expected to go places and spend six weeks in Kandahar [Afghanistan] or six weeks in wherever, and it just became too much. So, so that's why we moved back.

Jackie Trescott

Journalist Jacqueline E. Trescott was born on January 2, 1947 in Jersey City, New Jersey to Alfred P. and Adelaide C. Miller Trescott. In 1964, Trescott enrolled at St. Bonaventure University, and was mentored by Dr. Russell Jandoli. As a student, she interviewed Levi Stubbs of the Four Tops and interned at the The Newark Evening News when the urban uprisings of 1967 were raging. Trescott graduated from St. Bonaventure University in 1968, earning her B.A. degree in journalism.

In June 1970, she joined The Washington Star as a staff reporter. Her assignments were primarily for the Portfolio section, covering cultural personalities and events. From 1976 to June 2012, Trescott worked for The Washington Post, reporting for its award-winning Style Section. Her assignments included political and celebrity profiles, National Public Radio and the local radio stations, and arts events. Beginning in 1992, Trescott became the principal arts news reporter, covering Washington’s museums, performing arts centers and theaters. She coordinated the sprawling beat and raised the national profile of the Post coverage. The stories ranged from the attacks on the National Endowment for the Arts, to the rise of arts facilities as economic engines for their communities to the construction of the National Museum of the American Indian. Coverage included fund-raising to administrative changes to investigations of management and building conditions. The Virginia Press Association cited Trescott and James Grimaldi for their reporting in 2007. The use of the Freedom of Information Act by Trescott and Grimaldi in reviewing records at the Smithsonian was a finalist in 2009 in the Investigative Reporters and Editors, Inc. competition.

In her last two years at the Post Trescott helped create the Style Blog – originally called the Arts Post – which combined arts news and culture. The blog has also served as a destination for features on the dedication of the Martin L. King Memorial – Trescott posted a month of civil rights songs to salute the occasion. In her four decades, Trescott has often interviewed musical and literary personalities, who helped define their craft: Toni Morrison, Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones, Chita Rivera, Denzel Washington, Oprah Winfrey and Alice Walker.

Jacqueline E. Trescott was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 28, 2012.

Accession Number

A2012.228

Sex

Female

Interview Date

8/28/2012

Last Name

Trescott

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Elaine

Occupation
Organizations
Schools

St. Bonaventure University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Jackie

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

TRE01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jersey Shore, Martha's Vineyard, New York City, New Orleans, Louisiana

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

1/2/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Lobster Rolls

Short Description

Newspaper columnist Jackie Trescott (1947 - ) , was a reporter in the award-winning Style Section of The Washington Post from 1976 to 2012.

Employment

Washington Post

Washington Star

Favorite Color

Coral, Orange

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Jackie Trescott's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott talks about her mother's education in Hampton, Virginia

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about her great-grandmother, Josephine Matthews

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott talks about her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about her father's military service in the U.S. Army

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott describes Christ the King Catholic Church in Jersey City, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott shares the story of how her parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her mother's support of Catholicism

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Jackie Trescott talks about her likeness to her parents

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Jackie Trescott talks about her brother, Paul Alfred Trescott, and her childhood household

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Jackie Trescott shares her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Jackie Trescott talks about growing up in the Greenville section of Jersey City, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Jackie Trescott describes the sights, sounds, and smells of growing up

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott talks about playing records in the basement of her parents' home and dancing with her friends

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about buying new records every Friday and listening to them with her friends

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about a Girls Scouts leader who took her to Broadway shows

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott talks about going to Broadway plays and museums in New York as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about the black publications of her youth, her exposure to black leaders and her parents' interest in basketball and baseball

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott talks about her education and her early interest in writing

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about attending Catholic school and her cousin, who was a nun

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott talks about celebrities and cousins she admired as a youth

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott talks about her Catholic all-girls high school, Sacred Heart Academy

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott remembers President John F. Kennedy's assassination in 1963 and his significance within the Catholic and black communities

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Jackie Trescott talks about her high school newspaper and her awareness of black journalists

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Jackie Trescott talks about choosing to attend St. Bonaventure University in Bonaventure, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Jackie Trescott talks about a high school mentor

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott talks about working for the newspaper and at the library as well as basketball at St. Bonaventure University

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about Dr. Russell Jandoli, her journalism mentor at St. Bonaventure University

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott remembers news media coverage of the murder of Emmett Till in 1955 and of the 1964 Freedom Summer

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott remembers her shock upon learning of Malcolm X's assassination in 1965 at the Audubon Ballroom, where she attended dances as a child

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about her family's view of the Civil Rights Movement and attending the March on Washington in 1963

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott talks about working for St. Bonaventure's newspaper and radio station

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about her college internships and jobs, and the 1967 Newark Riots

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott discusses the 1967 Newark Riots and the election of minority mayors across the country

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott discusses her senior year in college, the death of her father in 1967 and the assassination of Robert Kennedy in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her first job at Western Publishing after graduating from St. Bonaventure University in 1968

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Jackie Trescott talks about meeting people who integrated media at the Washington Journalism Center

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Jackie Trescott describes her first job as a reporter at the Washington Star in 1970

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Jackie Trescott describes her article at the Washington Star on African American church history

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott describes the Washington Star's closure and other newspapers in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about writing on black history and black cultural figures during the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about reporting on the Black Arts Movement and important figures at Howard University in Washington D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott talks about working at the Washington Star and her interviews with Nina Simone and Marvin Gaye

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about her move from the Washington Star to the Washington Post at the end of 1975

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott talks about working in the Washington Post's style section and her first column

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about covering the National Endowment for the Arts and other arts organizations

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott discusses Washington, D.C.'s black cultural organizations and their subsequent closures

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott talks about the U.S. Bicentennial in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her approach to covering the arts from an administrative and management perspective

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott talks about the development of various African American museums in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about the formation of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC)

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about the acquisition of materials for the NMAAHC

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott talks about her coverage of the authentication of Nat Turner's Bible

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott discusses the conflict over using public funds to support arts and culture

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott describes her views on arts funding in the U.S.

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott discusses her coverage of the Smithsonian secretary's misuse of funds

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott talks about her favorite stories

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott describes her interviews of Kennedy Center honorees including Stevie Wonder and Quincy Jones

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her coverage of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. statue on the National Mall

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott talks about the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on the National Mall

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Jackie Trescott talks about doing a story on family histories at Monticello

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Jackie Trescott talks about Letitia Woods Brown and Maya Angelou, two of her mentors in black history

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Jackie Trescott continues to talk about her mentors, including Eleanor Traylor and Lori Stokes Sims

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Jackie Trescott talks about her art collection

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Jackie Trescott describes her retirement and her planned book on churches in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Jackie Trescott talks about her hopes and concerns for the African American community today

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Jackie Trescott reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Jackie Trescott talks about what she might do differently

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Jackie Trescott talks about her family

Tape: 6 Story: 11 - Jackie Trescott talks about her passion for live concerts and baseball games

Tape: 6 Story: 12 - Jackie Trescott talks about how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Jackie Trescott narrates her photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$6

DAStory

3$2

DATitle
Jackie Trescott talks about reporting on the Black Arts Movement and important figures at Howard University in Washington D.C.
Jackie Trescott talks about doing a story on family histories at Monticello
Transcript
Okay. Now, would you consider yourself to be, to have been a part of the black cultural movement, I guess, in that period of time? Or is this a black arts movement, or--?$$Well, certainly I was, you know, very deeply interested in the black arts movement, and did a lot of reporting, you know, on it. But I think there was a separation between, you know, those who were reporting on what was happening--reporting on, you know, poets and their work--you know, from, you know, Sterling Brown, who was certainly was an established figure at Howard [Howard University, Washington, D.C.] at that point. He was an elder, you know, of the movement. But the younger people in the movement loved him, and made sure that some of his work was again re-issued and stuff. But I think the role of the reporter was to sort of explain, you know, what was happening. But I don't think many of us considered ourselves part, you know, of the movement. We were a part of a different kind of journalism movement.$$Okay, okay. So, yeah. So, you mentioned, like Sterling Brown. Washington, D.C. was like, was one of the, I guess, places where a lot of the black artists and poets worked, were celebrated and housed and--$$Well, the--first of all there were people who were actually teaching in the classrooms at Howard who were famous. You know they were famous for, you know, all sorts of achievements. And it was a real, you know, privilege to, you know to go to their classrooms and you know, to do stories about what they were talking about, and talk about their own achievements. And this went across a lot of fields. Besides, you know, Sterling Brown, there was Montague Cobb who was a doctor, and also was very much a force in recording the history of blacks in medicine and stuff. So, he was someone I interviewed. And then Dorothy Porter was a librarian at Howard at the Moorland-Spingarn Collection. And that had been her job for years, just to document this black history, and to make sure that the Howard library was a leader in research, and you know, people could come and they could read Alain Locke's papers and other, you know, documents of important people. So, she was someone I profiled also, you know, just to have this unique role in black culture. You know, as well as, you know, talking to, you know, the people who were just, you know, getting started. You know, Jeff Donaldson was an artist who had started in Chicago and came to Howard. And he was, you know, one of the people who helped define what the Black Arts Movement [BAM, Black Aesthetics movement]--as far as painting and realistic portrayals of blacks... were. You know, so it was a very exciting time, because there was the growth of black theatre and the people who came through, you know, those kinds of programs. You know, the Howard theater department itself, you know, had produced Phylicia Rashad and Debbie Allen, and other people. And, you know, so they were around, you know, to talk to. And then there were--there was a black book store which was very influential, the Drum & Spear Bookstore [Washington, D.C.]. And all these people who were writing these new books that were being published, would come there to give a talk. So, you had, you know, an opportunity to connect, you know, with a lot of people and to meet people, maybe even if you didn't write a story about them. But you knew who they were, and they became part of the arts vocabulary.$Okay, okay. Now, you did a story--I believe you did a major story on Charlottesville--on Monticello [Charlottesville, Virginia], right? On [Thomas] Jefferson's--?$$Well, this year the people from Monticello and the developers of the African American Museum got together and decided they would do a joint show about the families of Monticello. And, you know, not only focusing on the slave labor, but also on the history of those families. And they were able to, you know, do pretty full histories on about five of those families, you know, who had really interesting jobs around Monticello. You know, carpeting and blacksmithing. And, you know, there was one family that was in charge of driving, you know, all the Jeffersons from place to place (laughter) and stuff. So, there was, there was certainly the rigors of slavery. But there were also some options that people could do different jobs and then be able to see the world, you know, outside of Monticello. So, you know, they did this joint history exhibit which has been really, really popular. And some of the descendents of the slave families of Monticello actually came, you know, to the opening, you know, and added more, you know, to the history. But Monticello is probably the most researched plantation in the country. And they have not only done the white side of Monticello, they've been very diligent about getting the black side right, too, you know, through oral histories, through architectural digs and stuff like that. So, yes, that was a groundbreaking exhibit. You know, and a lot of people's, you know, eyes were open to, you know, the humanization of, you know, that period of history. Because sometimes we don't know, even know people's names. So, it was important to have a human story. "Here's the guy who made the nails," you know.$$Right. I can remember the nail story, for some reason.$$Yeah.$$A nailery, they called it.$$Right, yeah. It was just, you know, fascinating, you know. And then there's been a lot written about the Hemings. And so there were a couple of, you know, descendants of--not Sally Hemings' line, but her--it's her brother's line. Her brother was actually an employee of Jefferson's for years. He went to France with him and he paid--Jefferson paid for him to go to culinary school.$$Yeah, James Henry Jefferson?$$Uh huh, uh huh. So, you know, just interesting to know those facts and to hear some of the stories, you know, from the descendants themselves.

Malcolm-Jamal Warner

Television actor and television director Malcolm-Jamal Warner was born on August 18, 1970 in Jersey City, New Jersey. Warner was raised by his mother, Pamela Warner, in California where he became interested in acting at the age of nine. He attended Angelus Mesa Elementary School in Los Angeles, California and he graduated from the Professional Children’s School in New York City in 1988.

In 1982, Warner was cast as Johnny Randolph on an episode of Matt Houston, and in 1983 he was cast as Lucas Boyd on an episode of Fame entitled Ending on a High Note. In 1984, Warner was cast as Theodore Huxtable on The Cosby Show . In addition to being nominated for a prime-time Emmy Award for best supporting actor in a comedy series, Warner also won two Young Actor Awards for his role as Theodore Huxtable. He also provided the soundtrack for the 1986 season and directed five episodes of The Cosby Show, including the reunion show. Throughout the 1980s, Warner appeared in several television series and television specials including an ABC afterschool special entitled A Desperate Exit and The Father Clements Story In 1989, he authored Theo and Me Get into The Groove. Warner continued to work in television and film during the 1990s as a producer and director. He directed music videos for the R&B group, New Edition. During 1992, he directed a documentary entitled The Truth About You and Me and AIDS. The same year, Warner starred in his own sitcom entitled Here and Now. He appeared in the HBO films The Tuskegee Airmen as well as Tyson, and the feature film Drop Zone with Wesley Snipes. Warner also produced an animated educational series entitled The Magic School Bus. From 1996 through 2000, Warner co-starred as Malcolm McGhee on the sitcom, Malcolm & Eddie. He directed over a dozen episodes and served as show supervisor in 1997.

From 2002-2006 Warner was cast in various television productions including Lyric Café, HBO’s Def Poetry Jam ,Jeremiah and Dexter. In 2007, Warner showcased his musical and spoken word talents by releasing his debut EP The Miles Long Mixtape.

Malcolm-Jamal Warner was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on April 2, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.070

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/2/2008

Last Name

Warner

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Angeles Mesa Elementary School

Hillcrest Drive Elementary School

Coliseum Street Elementary School

Paul Revere Charter Middle School

Professional Children's School

First Name

Malcolm-Jamal

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

WAR12

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Jamaica

Favorite Quote

My Word Is My Bond; Integrity Is All You Have.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Birth Date

8/18/1970

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Los Angeles

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pizza

Short Description

Television actor and television director Malcolm-Jamal Warner (1970 - ) was best known for his role as Theodore Huxtable on "The Cosby Show," which earned him a nomination for a Primetime Emmy Award. His other television and film credits included, "The Father Clements Story," "The Tuskegee Airmen," "Drop Zone" and "Malcolm & Eddie." Warner was also a spoken word artist and musician with his group Miles Long.

Employment

NBC

Miles Long

UPN

Favorite Color

Blue

DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Malcolm-Jamal Warner's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers his father's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes his grandmothers

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers his grandfathers

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about his extended family

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner recalls moving to Los Angeles, California

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers his home in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes Angeles Mesa Elementary School in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 1 Story: 14 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers his neighbors in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 1 Story: 15 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about moving to the Baldwin Village neighborhood of Los Angeles, California

Tape: 1 Story: 16 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner recalls his early influences

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner recalls his busing experience at Coliseum Street Elementary School in Los Angeles, California

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about his early interest in acting

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner recalls his acting experiences at the Inglewood Playhouse in Inglewood, California

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers his high school experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes the challenges he faced as a child star

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about auditioning for 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner recalls his screen test for 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes his mother's home cooking business

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner recalls his move to New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about enrolling at the Professional Children's School in New York City

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers filming the pilot for 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes Bill Cosby's vision for 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about his relationship with his co-stars on 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner recalls Bill Cosby's influence on 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers his relationship with his mother as a teenager

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes the addition of Sabrina Le Beauf to 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes Raven-Symone's debut on 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about the famous guest stars on 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner recalls changes in the later seasons of 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers his mother's role as his manager

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about the differences between actors on the East Coast and West Coast

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers the final season of 'The Cosby Show'

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes 'A Different World'

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about the television show 'Here and Now'

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers the death of Ennis Cosby

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about his film career

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes the quality of black sitcoms

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner remembers starring on 'Malcolm and Eddie'

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes the start of his music career

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about his plans for the future

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner shares his advice to aspiring artists

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Malcolm-Jamal Warner describes his hopes for the African American community

The Honorable Eric Washington

Chief Judge Eric Tyson Washington was born on December 2, 1953, in Jersey City, New Jersey to Gloria Simkins Washington, a social worker, and Eleby Rudolph Washington, a surgeon. He was raised in Newark, New Jersey and attended high school in Maplewood, New Jersey. Washington graduated from Tufts University in 1976 and received his J.D. degree from Columbia University’s School of Law in 1979. Washington began his law career in 1979 at the offices of Fulbright & Jaworski in Houston, Texas. The company is one of the largest law firms in the United States with nearly 1,000 attorneys in over fifty different practice areas. Washington soon relocated to Washington, D.C. to serve as Legislative Director and Counsel to U.S. Congressman Michael A. Andrews of Texas, before assuming a position in the Washington, D.C. branch of Fulbright & Jaworski.

In 1987, Washington served as Special Counsel to the Corporation Counsel, and later as Principal Deputy Corporation Counsel in Washington, D.C. After stepping down from this position in 1989, Washington became a partner at Hogan & Hartson, the oldest major law firm headquartered in Washington, D.C., and remained there until 1995, when he was appointed to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. As an associate judge in the Superior Court, he presided over various criminal trials as well as cases from the Drug Court, Domestic Violence Unit, tax and probate matters on certification from other judges, and cases involving children who were victims of abuse and neglect. Washington was appointed to the Washington, D.C. Court of Appeals by President Bill Clinton in 1999, and six years later, the District of Columbia Judicial Nominations Commission designated Washington to serve a four-year term as Chief Judge of the Washington, D.C. Court of Appeals, preceding Judge Annice Wagner.

Washington has previously served as Co-Chair of the Strategic Planning Leadership Council for the District of Columbia Courts and is also a member of the Standing Committee on Fairness and Access to the Courts. Washington serves on many civic organizations as well, including the Board of Directors for the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington and the Boys and Girls Club Foundation.

Chief Judge Eric Washington was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on September 26, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.274

Sex

Male

Interview Date

9/26/2007 |and| 5/23/2014

Last Name

Washington

Maker Category
Middle Name

T.

Schools

Madison Elementary School

Newark Academy

Columbia High School

Tufts University

Columbia Law School

First Name

Eric

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

WAS04

Favorite Season

Spring

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

It Is What It Is.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

12/2/1953

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Cajun Food

Short Description

Chief appellate judge The Honorable Eric Washington (1953 - ) was appointed to the Washington, D.C. Court of Appeals by President Clinton in 1999. He became chief judge in 2005.

Employment

District of Columbia Court of Appeals

Superior Court for the District of Columbia

Hogan & Hartson

Fulbright & Jaworski

Delete

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Eric Washington's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Eric Washington lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Eric Washington describes his maternal family history, pt.1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Eric Washington describes his maternal family history, pt.2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Eric Washington describes his maternal family history, pt.3

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Eric Washington recalls his paternal family history, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Eric Washington recalls his paternal family history, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Eric Washington talks about his father, Eleby Washington, Jr.

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Eric Washington talks about how his parents may have met

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Eric Washington describes his parents' personalities and how he takes after them

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Eric Washington talks about his father's medical practice

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Eric Washington describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Eric Washington talks about his father's decision to practice medicine in New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Eric Washington describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Eric Washington describes his childhood neighborhood in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Eric Washington describes his elementary school years in Newark, New Jersey

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Eric Washington describes his youthful passion for tennis

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Eric Washington describes his childhood sports heroes, Arthur Ashe, Jim Brown, and Bill Russell

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Eric Washington recalls his parents' attempts at musical training

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Eric Washington recalls the influence of television on his values and aspirations as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Eric Washington remembers professional role models as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Eric Washington talks about his middle school years at Newark Academy in Livingston, New Jersey, pt.1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Eric Washington talks about his middle school years at Newark Academy in Livingston, New Jersey, pt.2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Eric Washington describes his time in the Boy Scouts and the development of black consciousness

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Eric Washington recalls his family's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Eric Washington describes his memories of the 1967 Newark Riots and moving to Maplewood, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Eric Washington describes playing sports and the development of his social conscience at Columbia High School in Maplewood, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Eric Washington remembers role models from his youth like Gus Heningburg

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Eric Washington describes his experience at Columbia High School in Maplewood, New Jersey

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Eric Washington talks about his decision to become a lawyer and his father's view of lawyers

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Eric Washington recalls his decision to attend Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Eric Washington remembers living in the Africana House at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Eric Washington describes volunteer efforts to connect citizens of Boston, Massachusetts' Roxbury and Jamaica Plain neighborhoods to local universities

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Eric Washington talks about playing basketball at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Eric Washington describes how his experience at Tufts University propelled him toward a legal career

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Eric Washington recalls how racial animus in Boston, Massachusetts led him to attend Columbia Law School in New York City, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Eric Washington describes his studies at Columbia Law School and the impact of Professor Kellis E. Parker

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Eric Washington talks about why he joined Fulbright & Jaworski in Houston, Texas after graduating from Columbia Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Eric Washington describes Houston, Texas in the late 1970s

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Eric Washington talks about his work at Fulbright & Jaworski

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Eric Washington talks about his decision to work for U.S. Congressman Michael A. Andrews in 1983

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Eric Washington talks about working for U.S. Congressman Michael A. Andrews, pt.1

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Eric Washington talks about working for U.S. Congressman Michael A. Andrews, pt.2

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Eric Washington describes how he became Principal Deputy Corporation Counsel in Washington, D.C. under Frederick Cooke

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Eric Washington describes why he decided to return to Fulbright & Jaworkski after working for U.S. Congressman Michael A. Andrews

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Eric Washington talks about Texan politicians Mickey Leland and Barbara Jordan

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Eric Washington talks about HistoryMaker Lee P. Brown's tenure as Houston, Texas' chief of police

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Eric Washington recalls George H.W. Bush's presidential campaign against Ronald Reagan in 1980

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Eric Washington talks about the impact of the Reagan Administration on judicial office in Texas and President Lyndon B. Johnson

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Eric Washington talks about his tenure as Principal Deputy Corporation Counsel

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Eric Washington talks about joining Hogan & Hartson and his increasing involvement with the Democratic Party in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Second slating of Eric Washington's interview

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Eric Washington describes corruption charges brought against HistoryMaker Mayor Marion Barry

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Eric Washington contrasts the administrations of Mayors Marion Barry and Walter Washington

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Eric Washington describes the role of the Corporation Counsel in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Eric Washington talks about Herbert O. Reid, Sr., legal counsel to HistoryMaker Mayor Marion Barry

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Eric Washington talks about working at Hogan & Hartson

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Eric Washington talks about his work as Chair of the D.C. Democratic State Committee during President Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Eric Washington talks about HistoryMaker President Barack Obama's political appointments

Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Eric Washington describes President Bill Clinton's reputation as the first black president

Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Eric Washington talks about the financial difficulties in Washington, D.C. created by the city's limited tax base, pt.1

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Eric Washington talks about the financial difficulties in Washington, D.C. created by the city's limited tax base, pt.2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Eric Washington recalls African American judges from his childhood who inspired him to become a judge

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Eric Washington describes his nomination process to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Eric Washington describes the declining trends in presidential judicial appointments

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Eric Washington describes his duties as a judge on the Superior Court of the District of Columbia

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Eric Washington talks about the history of African Americans in the Superior Court of the District of Columbia

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Eric Washington talks about his service on the Standing Committee on Fairness and Access to the District of Columbia Courts

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Eric Washington talks about his focus on domestic violence as a judge on the Superior Court of the District of Columbia

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Eric Washington talks about drug sentencing in the District of Columbia

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Eric Washington recalls his appointment to the D.C. Court of Appeals in 1999

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Eric Washington talks about his work on the Strategic Planning Leadership Council, pt.1

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Eric Washington talks about his work on the Strategic Planning Leadership Council, pt.2

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Eric Washington talks about his work on the Strategic Planning Leadership Council, pt.3

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Eric Washington talks about Annice Wagner, Chief Judge of the D.C. Court of Appeals

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Eric Washington talks about the Access to Justice Commission headed by Peter Edelman

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Eric Washington talks about his appointment as Chief Judge of the D.C. Court of Appeals in 2005

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Eric Washington describes his vision as the Chief Judge of the D.C. Court of Appeals

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Eric Washington talks about using open court cases to promote transparency with the public and educate law students

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Eric Washington discusses the pros and cons of live streaming oral arguments

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Eric Washington talks about judicial process on the D.C. Court of Appeals, pt.1

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Eric Washington talks about judicial process on the D.C. Court of Appeals, pt.2

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Eric Washington talks about appellate judges on the D.C. Court of Appeals

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Eric Washington compares the D.C. Court of Appeals to two-tiered trial courts in other states

Tape: 9 Story: 7 - Eric Washington talks about the use of DNA evidence in trial courts

Tape: 10 Story: 1 - Eric Washington talks about his work as President of the Conference of Chief Justices, pt.1

Tape: 10 Story: 2 - Eric Washington talks about his work as President of the Conference of Chief Justices, pt.2

Tape: 10 Story: 3 - Eric Washington talks about how to reform the American criminal justice system, pt.1

Tape: 10 Story: 4 - Eric Washington talks about how to reform the American criminal justice system, pt.2

Tape: 10 Story: 5 - Eric Washington talks about his hopes for his third term as Chief Judge of the D.C. Court of Appeals

Tape: 10 Story: 6 - Eric Washington reflects upon whether he would do anything differently as a judge

Tape: 10 Story: 7 - Eric Washington describes the history of the Historic Courthouse in Washington D.C., pt.1

Tape: 11 Story: 1 - Eric Washington describes the history of the Historic Courthouse in Washington D.C., pt.2

Tape: 11 Story: 2 - Eric Washington describes the history of the Historic Courthouse in Washington D.C., pt.3

Tape: 11 Story: 3 - Eric Washington describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 11 Story: 4 - Eric Washington reflects upon his professional legacy

Tape: 11 Story: 5 - Eric Washington talks about his family

Tape: 11 Story: 6 - Eric Washington talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

8$3

DATitle
Eric Washington talks about his decision to become a lawyer and his father's view of lawyers
Eric Washington describes how he became Principal Deputy Corporation Counsel in Washington, D.C. under Frederick Cooke
Transcript
So, when you were on the verge of graduation from high school, did you have an idea of what you wanted to pursue, career-wise?$$No, I was still torn, I was, you know, torn between that, that real, you know, I--desire to be a, a social engineer, sort of, you know, be involved in helping, which was again, consistent with what my dad [Eleby Washington, Jr.] had done but much more. I was, I was much more of wanting to be out front of that issue, as opposed to being sort of behind the scene, working at, you know. I was, I was much more willing--not much more willing, but much more, you know, much more interested in sort of being on the front line, I think, and working with groups and, and (unclear) primarily antipoverty organizations. I would work the New York City youth services agency, and, and tried to work with, you know, different groups of young people and, and so, sort of be a part of the antipoverty movement and the anti-, and, and try to uplift as much as many people as I could. And so, I sort of had leanings in that way, but I was still the son of a doctor. And still, my brother was going to go to medical school, you know, and he turned out--he, he's an orthopedic surgeon now, like my father was. And, frankly, he freed me up because once my dad got one orthopedic surgeon, I think he was okay with, with me doing something else, although a lawyer is not what an orthopedic surgeon would want his son to be necessarily. You never, never thought, you know, other than those, he, he thought highly of lawyers. But he loved judges and he had good friends who were judges and he, he would draw these distinctions between lawyers and judges in his own mind because he saw lawyers as those individuals who would manufacture malpractice cases against good doctors who had done all they could do to help somebody, and because they hadn't put them together like God--they, that they were somehow negligent in their actions. And so, he thought lawyers somehow were the reason why people brought these lawsuits, as opposed to these people believing they were wrong. And, as I told him, as there being doctors who would testify that they hadn't done everything perfectly 'cause I said, without, without another doctor testifying that you, that you didn't do everything right, they could never find you guilt, you know, they could find you negligent of doing anything right. And then, my father was not talking from personal experience. I don't remember my dad ever being sued, but and maybe once or twice in, in his career, that it might have happened. But I don't remember any of them, but, but he was talking more generally about the medical profession and, and his colleagues and friends who had to, had to endure these unreasonable depositions, and take them away from their patients and go to court, and defend themselves when somebody decides to crash a motorcycle into a wall going 80 miles an hour, break every bone in their body, spend 75 hours in a row putting them back together. And when they're finished, their little pinkie can't straighten up all the way, and they sue you for malpractice. That was, that was--used the classic sort of a story about why lawyers are bad. But my dad, I think, ultimately is very proud that, you know, and, and understood, really did understand and appreciated the important role lawyers played as social engineers, and so I think was very supportive.$$Okay.$$I did promise him I'd never practice malpractice. I'd never be a plaintiff's lawyer doing malpractice work but other than that--$$Okay.$All right, all right. Now, in '87 [1987], you were Special Counsel to the Corporation Counsel of the District of Columbia?$$Right.$$Now, how did that happen?$$One of my good friends, Fred Cooke [Frederick Cooke], who was a partner in another law firm here in town [Washington, D.C.] and, and someone whom, with whom I developed a relationship, was a native Washingtonian, had been put in charge of a search committee for the new Corporation Counsel for the District of Columbia which is akin to an Attorney General in most states. And he had--was, you know, was part of this--leading the search committee when, of course, they, they turned around and asked him, would he be interested in taking the job? So, he calls me up and we have lunch, and he starts saying, ahh, they're asking me to take the job. And I spent probably an hour and a half convincing him that it was the great, it was a great opportunity. It was 300 lawyers. He was going to be in charge of basically his own law firm. They represented municipal corporations that had litigation, legislation, that they, they advise the legislative, you know, advising role. They had all these different roles, and he was going to be the top lawyer in charge of that office. I said, you gotta take that. You know, what a great chance, what a great opportunity for you. And then, at the end of this, like impassioned-hour speech to him, about why he should take it, he looked at me and said okay, well, if I take it, you gotta come. And I couldn't argue against it 'cause I just spent an hour arguing for him to do it. So, I, I agreed to come. And, and the interesting story about why I was Special Counsel, because that was not what I anticipated going in as. I was supposed to be--Fred had wanted me to be his deputy immediately, but I didn't know the mayor. I had not had any real contact with Mayor [Marion] Barry [HM], and I didn't know a lot about the city government. And they didn't know, more importantly, from his perspective, a lot about me. And to be in the second, the second ranking legal officer in the district, I think the mayor wanted to feel comfortable that he at least knew who I was. And so, while Fred had wanted to bring me in as the Deputy Corporation Counsel, it's my understanding that the Mayor was little reticent to do that without having an opportunity to work with me first for a few years to know, to know me, and for his staff that could let, you know, deputy mayors and other staff, getting comfortable with me. So, for the first year and a half or so, I was Special Counsel, and then worked closely with all of the Deputy Mayors and others, and helped run the office. And there was no deputy corporation, Principal Deputy Corporation Counsel. Then I ultimately, apparently, got the word. Fred got the word--oh, it's okay, you can move him up now, and I became the Principal Deputy. So, I always acted as the Principal Deputy, but for the first year and a half, I was given the title of Special Counsel.$$Okay.

Dennis Paul Kimbro

Author of Think and Grow Rich: A Black Choice, Dennis Kimbro was born December 29, 1950, in Jersey City, New Jersey. In 1972, he received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Oklahoma. He later earned his PhD in political science at Northwestern University, researching wealth and poverty in underdeveloped countries.

Kimbro wrote Think and Grow Rich: A Black Choice as an updating and extension of the work of Napoleon Hill, who wrote the 1937 bestseller Think and Grow Rich after researching the practices of highly successful persons, and who left at his death an unfinished manuscript directed towards African Americans. Kimbro was commissioned by the Napoleon Hill Foundation to complete the manuscript. Published in 1991, Kimbro and Hill's book became a number-one bestseller.

Clients of Kimbro’s lectures have included General Motors, Walt Disney, Frito-Lay and Wells Fargo. He has appeared on television shows including Today and CNN’s Larry King Live, and in publications including Success, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times and USA Today. He is listed in Who’s Who in Black America; a recipient of the Dale Carnegie Achievement Award; and a past Director of the Center of Entrepreneurship at Clark Atlanta University. In addition, in 1996, he served as one of eight national judges for the prestigious Ernst & Young USA Today Entrepreneur of the Year, held in Palm Springs, California.

In 2005, Kimbro’s second edition of What Keeps Me Standing: A Black Grandmother’s Guide to Peace, Hope & Inspiration was released. He is married, lives in Atlanta and is the father of three daughters.

Accession Number

A2006.074

Sex

Male

Interview Date

4/12/2006

Last Name

Kimbro

Maker Category
Middle Name

Paul

Schools

University of Oklahoma

G. Washington Carver Institute

Benjamin Franklin Junior High School

Teaneck Senior High School

Northwestern University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Dennis

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

KIM02

Favorite Season

Summer

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Learn How To Say 'I Can.'

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Georgia

Birth Date

12/29/1950

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Atlanta

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Seafood

Short Description

Management consultant and author Dennis Paul Kimbro (1950 - ) wrote the popular books, 'Think and Grow Rich: A Black Choice' and 'What Keeps Me Standing: A Black Grandmother’s Guide to Peace, Hope & Inspiration'. He was highly sought after as a public speaker and management consultant.

Employment

Clark Atlanta University

Texas Instruments

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:326,4:13081,256:13365,261:14075,278:21175,449:23163,505:28843,641:36130,725:38370,787:39490,812:46146,895:46644,904:48802,934:51624,968:52454,987:56687,1067:65032,1180:65477,1186:68770,1241:72241,1345:76691,1421:77047,1426:89958,1617:90282,1622:91254,1638:97475,1690:99554,1732:109872,1961:122960,2184:123590,2197:139935,2490:140586,2498:141423,2508:146560,2582:147113,2590:150194,2649:150984,2660:156666,2734:157406,2746:157776,2752:159330,2780:163104,2831:166138,2893:166730,2904:182410,3139:182710,3174:184885,3224:193585,3354:207403,3595:214510,3807:215062,3919:230236,4110:230576,4116:231052,4128:240204,4280:240649,4286:241094,4292:243942,4335:244832,4356:245722,4367:247769,4395:248303,4403:248748,4409:253973,4468:256297,4510:256795,4518:262522,4624:264016,4650:264348,4655:269340,4717:277100,4899:277420,4904:277820,4910:278540,4924:287680,5100$0,0:630,11:1197,25:1890,43:2268,59:3528,179:4221,356:8820,436:17199,640:35830,866:36425,884:36850,890:51398,1139:52208,1152:52694,1160:54800,1190:57392,1203:58672,1234:61104,1400:61424,1406:62640,1430:62960,1437:63280,1443:63728,1454:74004,1658:74784,1669:78153,1703:79180,1718:79733,1726:83367,1817:83920,1825:90714,2002:97365,2100:97697,2105:106163,2307:106578,2313:107408,2326:109068,2355:137720,3039:146300,3155:148884,3195:149700,3232:161986,3439:165418,3516:165886,3532:168616,3601:169006,3608:170956,3650:176220,3664:181257,3796:186367,3913:186732,3919:187097,3930:195698,4026:198240,4116:208310,4264:208670,4269:209210,4277:211460,4310:212630,4329:212990,4334:223376,4489:228398,4598:230828,4651:233339,4692:233906,4749:254204,4991:262330,5131:262630,5136:263980,5153:264730,5165:265255,5174:265630,5180:266005,5186:274180,5373:274555,5379:283074,5529:286182,5624:286700,5639:289364,5703:289734,5746:298854,5800:299274,5806:299862,5814:301122,5838:308400,5887:308920,5893:311450,5918
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dennis Paul Kimbro's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his father's experience in World War II

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes Kearny, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls Columbia Elementary School in East Orange, New Jersey

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls those who influenced him to pursue education

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dennis Paul Kimbro reflects upon the education of the African American community

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls President John Fitzgerald Kennedy's assassination

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro remembers the assassinations of civil rights figures

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes New Jersey's Teaneck High School

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls New Jersey's race relations in the 1960s and 1970s

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls his decision to attend the University of Oklahoma

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the process of writing his first book

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dennis Paul Kimbro remembers pledging Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his studiousness

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls his parents' thoughts on him attending college

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 3

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls his interview with Johnnetta B. Cole

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 4

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the nine values of greatness, pt. 5

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Dennis Paul Kimbro remembers a lesson from William Clement Stone

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the publication of 'What Makes the Great Great'

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro remembers how he struggled financially in the 1990s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his book 'Daily Motivations for African-American Success'

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the impact of 'What Makes the Great Great'

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the inspiration for 'What Keeps Me Standing'

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes 'What Keeps Me Standing,' pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes 'What Keeps Me Standing,' pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls Janey Coverdale's letter on forgiveness

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dennis Paul Kimbro recalls his decision to become a professor

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes his future projects

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dennis Paul Kimbro reflects upon the success of Barbara L. Thomas

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dennis Paul Kimbro describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Dennis Paul Kimbro reflects upon his life

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$4

DAStory

7$5

DATitle
Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the process of writing his first book
Dennis Paul Kimbro describes the inspiration for 'What Keeps Me Standing'
Transcript
And then, right when I finished in 1972, I graduated in 1972, my first job, I worked for Texas Instruments [Texas Instruments Incorporated] in Dallas, Texas, okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Doing what?$$I was a front line supervisor. Back then, they were just starting to manufacture Texas Instruments, the silicon chips, okay. That was used for the TI [Texas Instruments] calculator. Remember the two calculators that they had, one was the financial calculator and the other one was--there was a financial and scientific calculator and the other one was a regular calculator. I can't gloss over this--got married my senior year in college. Yup. Me and my wife got married by a justice of the peace. We were both seniors at the University of Oklahoma [Norman, Oklahoma], got married and went back to class after we got married (laughter), had our first child, okay--$$While you were still in school?$$Yeah, um-hm, and got married. Several months later my first daughter was born, went to Dallas, Texas, worked for Texas Instruments, worked there for one year, but I knew that I wanted to go to grad school.$$Did you know what you wanted to do?$$Yes. Back then I was still studying wealth and poverty, okay? And I went to grad school. I got a free ride from Northwestern [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois]. They had a program in political science, of all things, and I took it because it was a free ride, okay? Because I don't know what I actually want to do. I want to do international business and this, that, and the other, so I took it and they had a three-year program, and it was a free ride, but I was looking at wealth and poverty among under-developed countries, okay? And, all that time, the three years that I was at Northwestern, I just started collecting data and I started looking at why is one country, you know, impoverished while another one is wealthy. What are the linkages, what are the mindsets, what are the institutions that these wealthy countries, you know, particularly in sub-Sahara [Sub-Saharan Africa] and Africa, what do they produce? How are they galvanized, you know, how are they pulled together? Who organizes them? Well, by the time I got to my third year and I defended my dissertation, I didn't want to study countries. I still wanted to ask that question about wealth and poverty. I didn't want to study countries. I wanted to study individuals, and I didn't want to study anything about Africa. I wanted to study African Americans here in the United States, and so, I did a 180. I started looking at the wealthy African Americans here in the United States, and I started collecting data, you know, because there weren't any books, and no one had published anything on these individuals. Again, at the time it was get a job, work on a job, work for the government, that type of whole mindset, and I was, there were only a few people that were creating wealth, and I was collecting data on them, and so I had all this data, all this research that I conducted, and I turned to my wife and I said, "Pat [Patricia McCauley Kimbro]," I said, "I think there's a book here and I'm not sure, but I think that maybe I could write a book off of everything that I learned on the surface, you know, circuitous with these individuals, but I won't know," and she said, "Well, when will you know if you have a book or not?" And I said, "Well, you gotta conduct face-to-face interviews," and she said, "How do you do that?" And I said, "Well, maybe I'll apply for a grant or somebody will blah-blah-blah," and she says, and it was really my wife's idea, she said, "Don't wait for a grant. Go ahead and do it now." I said, "Well, you don't understand. I mean, you gotta fly to these locations, you have to stay in a hotel, and we don't have money for that." She said, "Well just get started. Maybe some people around here, you can drive to with this, that and everything, and somehow, some way, the money will come." Well, that's one year ordeal. I thought I could finish this book in eighteen months, Shawn [Shawn Wilson]. That book took seven years of my life. It took me longer to write what became 'Think and Grow Rich: A Black Choice,' [Dennis Kimbro and Napoleon Hill] than to finish my Ph.D., and the money never came (laughter) but I just went around the country interviewing successful African Americans. I had a list of fifty individuals. What did I know? I said these are the fifty that I've got to interview and you can go back to this particular time. We're going back to late '70s [1970s], early '80s [1980s], and you can imagine who were the fifty, you know, John Johnson [HistoryMaker John H. Johnson] of Ebony magazine, Don King, the fight promoter, Wally [Wally Amos], Famous Amos chocolate chip cookies, you know, those type of individuals--Ernesta Procope [HistoryMaker Ernesta G. Procope], she was the only black woman on Wall Street, E.G. Bowman investment company [E.G. Bowman Company, Inc., New York, New York]. So, those were, Ral--those were the individuals that I was going to meet and interview.$So, by the time that the third book, 'What Makes the Great Great' ['What Makes the Great Great: Strategies for Extraordinary Achievement,' Dennis P. Kimbro], has come out, you've become a motivational speaker and you're speaking (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) And I never see it in myself. I don't even claim being a motivational--people may, you know, they may hear me, you know, and they might say, man, your words are inspiring. Your words motivate me. But I'm just a college professor. I've never said that I was a motivational speaker. I mean, you may capture me and you may pigeonhole me into that, and I have no problems with that, okay, but I teach. That's what I do for a living. People come up to me all the time, Shawn [Shawn Wilson], "Man Dr. Kimbro [HistoryMaker Dennis Paul Kimbro], I wanna do exactly you want to do." I said, "You--you're a teacher?" "No, I don't teach." "Oh, you're a writer?" "No, I don't wanna write." "You're a college professor?" "No, I don't wanna--." "What is it that I do that you wanna do?" "Man, I wanna be a motivational speaker." I said, "Okay, go do it," (laughter).$$So, the reason I say that is because out of you travelling country, the book, the standing--what's the title?$$'What Keeps Me Standing' ['What Keeps Me Standing: Letters from Black Grandmothers on Peace, Hope and Inspiration,' Dennis Kimbro].$$'What Keeps Me Standing' comes about--$$Yup.$$And it's just a great idea for a book.$$And that was the idea of my youngest daughter. Again, you gotta rewind the videotape and go back to this time period where Bill Clinton [President William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton] is running for reelection against Bob Dole, okay, and I was about to go on another wing of the tour for 'What Makes the Great Great,' and I knew that I was gonna be gone for several days, blah-blah-blah, and this, that and everything, so my wife [Patricia McCauley Kimbro] said, "Well, takes a mini-vacation. Let's get all the girls together." I had one in college, one was about to go in college, and I had my youngest daughter, who was about to go into high school and the girls always loved going up to North Carolina, this, that and the everything, so no one wanted to fly. They wanted to drive and this, that and everything, so we're driving, I've got the three girls in the back, my wife is reading USA Today, and I'm driving, and when she gets through reading it, she just throws it in the back to the girls, and my youngest daughter, MacKenzie [MacKenzie Kimbro], she gets a hold of it and right there on the first page, it's about the impending, upcoming presidential election, and while I'm driving she says to me, she says, "Dad, who you gonna vote for?" And I said, "MacKenzie, that's a good question. I don't know. You tell me, who should I vote for?" And she said, "Well, if I could vote, I know exactly who I'd vote for." I said, "Who would you vote for?" She said, "I'd vote for Grandma Mary [Mary Anderson Kimbro] for president and Grandma Ruby [Ruby McCauley] for vice president." I was driving and I said, "And why would you want to do that?" She said, "Because Dad, man, they know everything, man. Grandma Mary helps me with this, Granma Ruby helps me with that," and these are two black women. If you put their entire education together, you still wouldn't get a high school diploma, but in the mind and in the eyes of a young child, they know everything. So I just thought about that and even when I'm on tour and signing books at 'What Makes the Great Great,' and blah-blah, and it just stayed in my mind, days turned to weeks, weeks turned to months, I guess about six months later, this thing just wouldn't let me go, so I turned to my wife and I said, "Pat, you know, I'm thinking about this grandmother book and even if I were to write this book, even if I were to write this book, I can't go around the country interviewing all these folks. It would take me forever. How would I get this information?" And my wife says, completely passe, completely off the cuff, in passing, she says, "That's easy." I said, "What do you mean, easy?" "Tell them to write you a letter." And I said, "What do you mean?" "Tell them to write you a letter." I said, "Who, in this day and age, will write a letter, in this day of emailing, faxes, phone call, call waiting, (laughter) voicemails?" I said, "No one takes the time to write a letter." She said, "Yeah, they'll write you a letter." So, whenever I gave a presentation, if I thought the audience would lend itself, the audience was apropos to that type of setting, people would ask me all the time, "What book are you working on now?" And I would share that with them and I would say, "By the way, if there are any black grandmothers in the audience who would love to write a letter, blah-blah-blah." And I, did I received letters over a five-year period. Oh, my God, did they respond. Over a five-year period I received letters from every type of black grandmother under the sun. I received letters from black grandmothers, Ph.D.s from Harvard [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts], high school dropouts, doctors and lawyers, third grade education, grandmothers whose children and grandchildren are thriving and surviving, to one grandmother, her name is Flora Kelly, she lives is Waterloo, Iowa, in Waterloo, Iowa. She has seven children. The day that she wrote my letter, five were incarcerated in prison. She told me, she told me right there in the letter, that she would go down to the correctional facility and she would see her sons, but she just got to the point in life where she just hated to see her sons caged up like animals, and she would write 'em letters. She sent me one of the letters that she would write to her sons. I received three letters from white women, white grandmothers raising black children (laughter). Every type of letter out there.

Sister Patricia Ralph

Sister Patricia Anne Ralph was born on August 15, 1960, in Jersey City, New Jersey. Ralph attended elementary and junior high school at Blessed Sacrament Catholic School in Newark, New Jersey. While attending junior high school, in the eighth grade she decided she would dedicate her life to God and become a nun. In 1979, she earned her high school diploma from Benedictine Academy, a private Catholic school in Elizabeth, New Jersey. While in high school she was a cheerleader, baton twirler and a member of the dance team.

In 1985, Ralph graduated from Jersey City State College where she earned her degree in teaching. This same year she entered the Community of St. Joseph to begin her journey as a nun. There, Ralph became known as “Sister Patty” to her friends and the hundreds of students she’s taught. Currently, out of 1200 nuns, she is the only African American nun in the St. Joesph community.

In 1988, Ralph received and her first teaching assignment at St. Martin De Porres Catholic School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she taught first grade. Two years later, she was missioned to Holy Family Catholic School in Hilcrest Heights, Maryland where she was a first and second grade teacher. The following year, Ralph accepted a teaching position at Holy Name Catholic, School in Washington, D.C. She continued to teach at Holy Name for the next five years until she was named principal, a position she continues to hold today.

In 1994, she made her final vows in Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania, thus completing her journey to become a nun. Surprisingly, her twin sister, Lynne Marie, decided to follow in Ralph’s footsteps and also became a nun although entering a different community, the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament.

Ralph currently resides in Washington, D.C. Her twin sister is also a teaching nun at an elementary school in Memphis, Tennessee.

Accession Number

A2004.049

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/17/2004

Last Name

Ralph

Organizations
Schools

Blessed Sacrament School

Benedictine Academy

Jersey City State College

Xavier University of Louisiana

Trinity College

First Name

Patricia

Birth City, State, Country

Jersey City

HM ID

RAL01

Favorite Season

Fall

State

New Jersey

Favorite Vacation Destination

Hawaii

Favorite Quote

Little rugrats.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/15/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Hamburgers

Short Description

Elementary school principal and nun Sister Patricia Ralph (1960 - ) is the only African American nun in the Community of St. Joseph. Ralph is currently a school principal in Washington, D.C.

Employment

Holy Name School

St. Martin De Porres High School

Holy Family Parish Elementary School

Blessed Sacrament School

Favorite Color

Periwinkle

Timing Pairs
0,0:616,7:1155,15:1771,25:2464,36:6006,78:8162,145:8470,150:9086,159:10626,189:11319,200:11704,206:12012,211:13013,227:16093,299:16940,315:17556,324:18634,341:19250,351:19866,360:20174,365:20790,375:22253,395:22946,405:24178,426:25025,439:25795,452:31906,479:34846,525:35182,530:36106,551:36862,565:39214,597:41314,640:41734,646:43498,680:43918,686:49042,766:51310,801:52234,814:52654,820:53242,828:54166,846:67582,1007:71640,1037:72120,1045:72840,1057:73160,1062:74840,1094:75960,1123:76520,1130:78040,1153:78600,1162:79560,1179:79960,1185:87400,1316:87960,1324:88920,1340:91720,1425:92120,1431:93080,1447:93640,1455:93960,1460:94680,1470:96280,1493:96840,1501:97480,1510:105030,1519:105660,1529:106290,1541:107550,1564:113590,1633:114878,1651:123793,1756:124148,1762:129189,1878:130396,1905:134852,1947:142252,2104:158855,2301:164890,2350:171010,2443:171370,2448:179398,2527:180300,2540:181202,2554:193050,2728$0,0:720,12:1200,19:2080,32:2400,37:2960,73:3520,82:3840,87:4320,96:4640,101:5280,110:5680,116:8080,162:8800,172:9680,187:10240,199:11200,215:12640,241:13200,250:22510,375:24190,399:26626,440:26962,445:28558,470:28978,477:29314,482:29818,489:32338,529:32758,535:33430,543:34102,552:35026,565:35362,570:35698,575:43050,618:43515,624:44259,632:45747,655:48036,672:54597,766:56136,792:56865,803:57513,814:58404,829:59376,843:60024,852:66741,915:67073,920:69231,956:70393,974:76992,1036:83440,1145:84376,1155:87392,1214:92939,1299:100890,1349:109451,1426:109727,1431:110486,1446:111521,1467:111797,1472:112349,1483:118973,1617:119249,1622:120146,1637:120560,1644:122768,1685:123527,1703:123803,1708:130412,1752:132320,1771:132850,1777:133274,1782:133910,1789:140300,1879
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Patricia Ralph interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Patricia Ralph's favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Patricia Ralph remembers her mother

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Patricia Ralph remembers her father

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Patricia Ralph remembers her grandparents

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Patricia Ralph discusses her family life, part I

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Patricia Ralph recalls her childhood environs

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Patricia Ralph talks more about her family life

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Patricia Ralph reflects on her early school years

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Patricia Ralph discusses her calling to the sisterhood

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Patricia Ralph reflects on her junior high school years

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Patricia Ralph recalls her high school years

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Patricia Ralph describes her high school activities

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Patricia Ralph discusses her parents' occupations

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Patricia Ralph recounts her college years

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Patricia Ralph discusses her beginnings with the Sisters of St. Joseph

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Patricia Ralph discusses her trials in the sisterhood

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Patricia Ralph describes her coursework at Xavier University of Louisiana

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Patricia Ralph discusses her advancement in the Sisters of St. Joseph

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Patricia Ralph reviews her career as an educator

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Patricia Ralph recalls making her final vows

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Patricia Ralph reflects on her sister's similar occupational choice

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Patricia Ralph shares her experiences as an African American nun

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Patricia Ralph discusses her tenure as principal of Holy Name School, Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Patricia Ralph describes the environs of Holy Name School, Washington, D.C.

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Patricia Ralph describes interactions with her students

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Patricia Ralph reflects on her life's course

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Patricia Ralph describes life in the sisterhood

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Patricia Ralph discusses her relationship with her students

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Patricia Ralph discusses changes in the Catholic Church

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Patricia Ralph discusses her twin sister

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Patricia Ralph talks more about her life's course

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Patricia Ralph expresses her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Patricia Ralph reflects on how she wants to be remembered

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Patricia Ralph shares her thoughts on history

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Patricia Ralph considers her legacy

Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Patricia Ralph reflects on life obstacles

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Photo - Patricia Ralph and her twin sister as infants, ca. 1961

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Photo - Patricia Ralph's mother, aunts and uncles, 1980s

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Photo - Patricia Ralph's grandparents and uncle, 1920s

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Photo - Patricia Ralph's aunt, Daisy Fleming's eighth grade graduation portrait, ca. 1940-1959

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Photo - Patricia Ralph's grandparents, ca. 1960-1979

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Photo - Patricia Ralph's mother on her wedding day, January 29, 1954

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Photo - Patricia Ralph's aunt, Daisy Fleming as a child, ca. 1920s

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Photo - Patricia Ralph's great aunt Lila Mae, ca. 1940s

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Photo - Patricia Ralph's Aunt Lily and her husband, ca. 1940s

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Photo - Patricia Ralph and U.S. Congressman John Boehner of Ohio at an event dinner, Washington, D.C., 2003

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Photo - Patricia Ralph and U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy at an event dinner, Washington, D.C., 2003

Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Photo - Patricia Ralph with her twin sister on the day of her final vows, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1994

Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Photo - Patricia Ralph with her twin sister and two priests at a conference, 1996

Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Photo - Patricia Ralph with her superior general at her final vows ceremony, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1994

Tape: 4 Story: 15 - Photo - Patricia Ralph celebrates with other sisters after making final vows, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1994

Tape: 4 Story: 16 - Photo - Patricia Ralph celebrates with family members after making final vows, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1994

Tape: 4 Story: 17 - Photo - Patricia Ralph's grandfather, ca. 1967-1968

Tape: 4 Story: 18 - Photo - Patricia Ralph with her mother and twin sister outside of Kless Diner, Irvington, New Jersey

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$3

DAStory

7$1

DATitle
Patricia Ralph discusses her advancement in the Sisters of St. Joseph
Patricia Ralph discusses her tenure as principal of Holy Name School, Washington, D.C.
Transcript
We had started talking a little bit about when--in 1985--when you entered the community of [Sisters of] St. Joseph [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], what happened next? So after--so tell us a little bit about what that process is like.$$Well once I entered, I was a postulant, and that's the beginning stages. And we attended classes with our director, learning more about the community and doing community services. One of my services was working at a shelter, getting on the el train and going, going there. I think we did that once a week. But we also took the responsibilities of leading the community in prayer and I think there were about seventeen of us that lived in the house with professed sisters and the postulant sisters. And, once again, some of the sisters were older sisters and you listening to their stories also that were an influence on me and they would say, "Oh Patty, you just don't know." (laughs) And I'd say "Okay, Sister Elizabeth." You know, and just--just their gentleness, that was their present.$$And, tell me what it was like when you made your final vows. When did that happen?$$Well, before final vows, then we--I became a novice, and so I moved from St. Michael's to the motherhouse, and--as I call the corporate headquarters. And, again, we had a novice directress. We had classes with her and we also went out to a place called Marian [Convent, Scranton, Pennsylvania], and we met other people who were novices from different communities and we had classes together with the different groups, and that was, like, once a week, every Thursday. And, being at the motherhouse, we had to lead morning prayer or evening prayer and had to get on the altar into the mic, and I'm looking out, "Oh, my God," (laughs) the first time I did it. But I remember one sister saying to me, she said, "I always like it when you do prayer, cause I can always hear you." And she sits in the back--an older sister. So, I guess it was the way I was projecting my voice, or something, I don't know. But, we used to do fun things with the older sisters--cause there were a lot of sisters that lived at the motherhouse. So I was there for one year and then we were missioned--we were still novices but we were missioned. So I was missioned to St. Martin de Porres [School], in Philadelphia, and I taught--no, I interned there first, with first grade--first grade, fifth grade and kindergarten. And kindergarten was my best experience. I mean the teacher, Joanne, she was excellent. And, that was for September to December, and then I had to decide--.$$(Simultaneously) Of what year?$$Of what year? I would say late '80s [1980s]--I wanna say '88 [1988]--between '87 [1987] and '88 [1988] of that year.$How did you become principal of Holy Name [School, Washington, D.C.] and when did that happen?$$That happened three years ago. Sister Owen was the principal for seventeen years, and she knew it was time for her to move on and she wanted to pass the torch. And, she asked me if I would consider it, and my first response was "No, I do not want that job." But she wanted to keep a religious in the school and I finally said, "Yes." And I keep telling her it must have been a weak moment when I said yes. So, actually, I'm the first African American principal at Holy Name School.$$Are you the--and, assumingly, the first African American religious, as well?$$In--?$$At Holy Name School.$$At Holy Name, yes. And we--the school was established in 1924, so I'm the first one.$$And tell me a little bit about your students, your kids and your families here.$$I love my kids and I love my families. My families are very supportive. Anything I need, I can always call--call them up. The kids I love, and with Pre-K and Kindergarten, I call 'em--"I'm not going down there--I'm not going down there." (Laughs). But my Pre-K, Kindergarten--she's excellent with them and I give her a lot of credit. I say, "You are going to heaven--that--that's an automatic--you are going to heaven." But the kids, they come from Maryland, Virginia--one comes from Baltimore [Maryland], and, a lot from [Washington] D.C.--the D.C. area, and, they bring a lot to school. And you can tell from their family whatever it is that they're going through that they're carrying a heavy burden on us, but they know that they're safe here in this environment no matter what surrounds them. And they also know that the teachers care about them, also, and they can feel free to come to anyone and speak with anyone about anything that's going on. And just being--being there for our kids is so important.