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Roy S. Johnson

Journalist Roy S. Johnson was born on March 19, 1956 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He attended the prestigious Holland Hall Preparatory School in Tulsa, Oklahoma and went on to graduate from Stanford University with his B.A. degree in political science.

In 1978, Johnson was hired as a reporter for Sports Illustrated. From 1982 until 1989, he worked at the New York Times and the Atlanta Journal Constitution, before returning to Sports Illustrated as a senior editor in 1989. Johnson went on to briefly work for Money, and was then hired as an editor-at-large for Fortune magazine. After a short stint at Fortune, he joined Vanguarde Media, Inc. as an editorial director. In 2001, while working at Vanguarde, Johnson conceived and co-launched Savoy Magazine. In 2003, he returned to Sports Illustrated, where he worked as an assistant managing editor. Johnson was then hired as a consultant for Men’s Fitness magazine, and, in 2007, he was promoted to editor-in-chief. He has also written for many other publications and websites, including Life Goes Strong and ESPN.com.

In 2006, Johnson founded RSJ Media Solutions, a company that offers digital content strategy and media training. He also founded Fit! Live! Win! LLC in 2011, a digital corporate wellness communications firm. In 2012, Johnson founded Write on Essays!, and was named editor-in-chief and executive director of the History Channel’s magazine and the History Channel Club. He has been a frequent television and radio contributor on the topics of sports, fitness, nutrition, wellness and healthy living. Johnson has also served as executive producer of several television programs that have aired on national broadcast and cable networks, including NBC, Fox and TNT. He has co-authored three books: Magic's Touch with Earvin Johnson; Outrageous!: The Fine Life and Flagrant Good Times of Basketball's Irresistible Force with Charles Barkley; and Aspire Higher with Avery Johnson.

Johnson has been a longstanding member of the National Association of Black Journalists, and has served on the board of the International Athletic Foundation. He also created the Roy S. Johnson Foundation, which provides financial assistance to minority youth from his hometown in Oklahoma.

Johnson lives in New Rochelle, NY with his wife Barbara and two children, Edwyn and Missy.

Roy Johnson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 16, 2014.

Accession Number

A2014.010

Sex

Male

Interview Date

1/17/2014

Last Name

Johnson

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

S.

Occupation
Schools

Holland Hall

Stanford University

Paul Laurence Dunbar Elementary School

George Washington Carver Middle School

First Name

Roy

Birth City, State, Country

Tulsa

HM ID

JOH46

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches, Golf Courses

Favorite Quote

Always Impossible Until It's Done.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Alabama

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/19/1956

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Birmingham

Country

USA

Favorite Food

All Foods

Short Description

Journalist Roy S. Johnson (1956 - ) was the founding editor of Savoy magazine, and held senior editorial positions at Sports Illustrated, Money, Fortune, Men’s Fitness and The History Channel Magazine. He was the co-author of three books: Magic's Touch, Outrageous!, and Aspire Higher.

Employment

Sports Illustrated Magazine

New York Times

Money Magazine

Fortune Magazine

Vanguarde Media, Inc.

Men's Fitness Magazine

RSJ Solutions

Fit! Live! Win!

Write on Essays!

History Channel Magazine and History Channel Club

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661836">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Roy Johnson's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661837">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Roy Johnson lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661838">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Roy Johnson describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661839">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Roy Johnson remembers his parents' emphasis on education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661840">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Roy Johnson talks about his father's career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661841">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Roy Johnson remembers his neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661842">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Roy Johnson describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661843">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Roy Johnson describes his home life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661844">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Roy Johnson describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661845">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Roy Johnson talks about the riots of 1921 in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661846">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Roy Johnson talks about the Native American and African American communities in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661847">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Roy Johnson recalls transferring to Holland Hall in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661848">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Roy Johnson remembers his father's death</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661849">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Roy Johnson recalls the influence of his uncles</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661850">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Roy Johnson talks about Marques Haynes</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661851">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Roy Johnson describes his experiences of discrimination at Holland Hall in Tulsa, Oklahoma, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661852">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Roy Johnson describes his experiences of discrimination at Holland Hall in Tulsa, Oklahoma, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661853">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Roy Johnson remembers his mother's relationship with his stepfather</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661854">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Roy Johnson talks about his aspiration to leave Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661855">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Roy Johnson talks about his athletic activities at Holland Hall in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661856">Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Roy Johnson recalls his early talent for writing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661857">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Roy Johnson describes his decision to attend Stanford University in Stanford, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661858">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Roy Johnson talks about his transition to Stanford University in Stanford, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661859">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Roy Johnson describes the black student community at Stanford University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661860">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Roy Johnson remembers his summer internships</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661861">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Roy Johnson recalls reporting on the Patty Hearst trial for The Standard Daily</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661862">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Roy Johnson talks about the student activism at Stanford University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661863">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Roy Johnson recalls interviewing for a position at Sports Illustrated</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661864">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Roy Johnson describes his career at Sports Illustrated</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661865">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Roy Johnson remembers his mentors at Sports Illustrated</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661866">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Roy Johnson talks about his experiences of discrimination at Sports Illustrated</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661867">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Roy Johnson remembers joining The New York Times</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661868">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Roy Johnson describes the writing style of The New York Times</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661869">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Roy Johnson describes his relationships with colleagues at The New York Times</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661870">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Roy Johnson describes his experiences as a sports reporter for The New York Times</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661871">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Roy Johnson talks about Al Campanis' impact on professional sports</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661872">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Roy Johnson describes the highlights of his career at The New York Times</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661873">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Roy Johnson recalls his decision to leave The New York Times</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661874">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Roy Johnson talks about his career at the Atlanta Constitution</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661875">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Roy Johnson describes his return to Sports Illustrated as a senior editor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661876">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Roy Johnson remembers writing 'Magic's Touch' with Magic Johnson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661877">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Roy Johnson remembers writing about race at Sports Illustrated</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661878">Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Roy Johnson recalls his transition from writer to editor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661879">Tape: 4 Story: 13 - Roy Johnson describes his challenges as a senior editor at Sports Illustrated</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661880">Tape: 4 Story: 14 - Roy Johnson talks about the increase in African American sports managers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661881">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Roy Johnson talks about the progress toward diversity in professional sports</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661882">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Roy Johnson remembers his transition to Money magazine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661883">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Roy Johnson remembers developing Savoy magazine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661884">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Roy Johnson remembers his position as editor-at-large at Fortune magazine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661885">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Roy Johnson talks about the cover shoot for 'The New Black Power'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661886">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Roy Johnson reflects upon the impact of 'The New Black Power'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661887">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Roy Johnson describes his role as editor-at-large of Fortune magazine</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661888">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Roy Johnson remembers Magic Johnson's HIV diagnosis</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661889">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Roy Johnson talks about the NBA's support for Magic Johnson</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661890">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Roy Johnson describes the founding of Vanguarde Media</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661891">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Roy Johnson talks about his accomplishments at Vanguarde Media</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661892">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Roy Johnson remembers returning to Sports Illustrated as an assistant managing editor</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661893">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Roy Johnson remembers his layoff from Time, Inc.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661894">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Roy Johnson recalls becoming the editor-in-chief of Men's Fitness</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661895">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Roy Johnson talks about founding Fit!Live!Win!</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661896">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Roy Johnson talks about his current projects</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661897">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Roy Johnson talks about the future of the journalism industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661898">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Roy Johnson describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661899">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Roy Johnson reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661900">Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Roy Johnson narrates his photographs, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/661901">Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Roy Johnson narrates his photographs, pt. 2</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$2

DAStory

13$12

DATitle
Roy Johnson describes his challenges as a senior editor at Sports Illustrated
Roy Johnson recalls his early talent for writing
Transcript
Roy [HistoryMaker Roy Johnson], do you remember anything--any, like disappointments or things when you disagreed with how a story was handled and you were at the table? Do you remember, like one or two incidences of that, and how you sort of handled that and--$$I don't know if there were disappointments. I remember being mad--$$I mean, well (simultaneous)--$$--(simultaneous) about, about things.$$Okay. I mean--$$And annoyed. You know, and some may seem relatively small, but this is an instance when we were doing to do--this is at Sports Illustrated, and we were going to do a cover story on a player named Yao Ming, who was this big, you know, seven plus footer coming from China, he's a talented player. And this was early on. He hadn't really done much to deserve a cover other than being tall and from China, but he was a phenomenon. He was a, he was a story.$$(Unclear).$$And I think, you know, there were, there were--this was the beginning of other--obviously, some black players who were, who were talented. This was kind of the beginning of the tattoo era, when people made judgments about you based on the fact that you had a tattoo. And therefore you were X kind of a person versus that kind of a person. So we were--they had decided to do this story on Yao Ming. And I remember leaving the table, the meeting was over, and I asked one of the top editors at the time, I said, "Well, you know, why is it that we're--you're so excited about Yao Ming that we put him on the cover?" He said, '"Cause he's not a thug." And I--sort of stopped me in my tracks. And I wanted to say, "So you mean X player is a thug? I mean, what does that mean he's not a thug? Is somebody else who's a star a thug?" And he, just of course, kind of walked away. But the mentality, you know, again this is, you know, a room of white men covering an industry that is increasingly black. And this dates back to the '70s [1970s] and, you know, the 76ers [Philadelphia 76ers] and teams starting to embrace black culture, the vibe of black culture, the dance, the style of movement. Things were starting--the hairstyles, the wardrobes, you know, Walt Frazier in New York [New York Knicks], and starting to see that permeate sports. And a lot of people were not happy about it. Some of them were commissioners, some of them were owners, and some of them were sportswriters. So again that's an era of change and being at the table and seeing people who were free enough to not--he didn't necessarily know what he said was racist, but he was very clear about the reason he wanted Yao Ming as opposed to another player because he wasn't a thug and, therefore, in his mind, this other player must have been a thug because they had tattoos. That was the kind of attitude that too often permeated some of the decision making, and most of the time I spoke up, which is probably why I didn't get promoted as fast as I wanted to (laughter).$Now what, what about academic interests. What were you good at? Were you on the English, literature side or were you on the, were you on the math and science side? What were you--$$Ironically, I was better at math than English. I mean, I wasn't bad at English, but I was pretty good at math, but I had no interest in pursuing any kind of career that was math oriented. And I mean, and I do believe that God leads you in certain directions, and I clearly had an affinity for writing. I was editor of the junior high paper [at George Washington Carver Junior High School; George Washington Carver Middle School, Tulsa, Oklahoma] and became editor of the high school paper [at Holland Hall, Tulsa, Oklahoma]. And while there was no real path, at least in my mind, for African Americans in that vocation, it was clearly something that I liked to do and seemed to have a bit of a gift for it. What I wanted to do was to be an attorney. You know, that was something that was real. I mean, there were black attorneys on Wall Street. And my icon was Perry Mason. That's who I was going to be. I was going to go off to school--I used to watch Perry Mason, dude never lost a case. I was going to be that guy who got up in the courtroom and, you know, sifted through all of the madness to find out the truth. So I went off to college [Stanford University, Stanford, California] to major in political science with the hope and desire of becoming an attorney. God had other ideas.

Gayle Greer

Cable television executive Gayle Greer was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma on March 11, 1941. After graduating from Tulsa City High School, Greer briefly attended Fisk University and Oklahoma State University before enrolling at the University of Houston. Greer graduated from the University of Houston with her B.A. degree in political science and sociology in 1966, and her M.A. degree in social work in 1968.

Upon graduation, Greer spent ten years working as a case manager, and briefly served as Director of the Fort Wayne, Indiana chapter of the National Urban League. Her career in cable television began when she was hired by American Television and Communications (now a division of Time Warner, Inc.). She held several executive positions during her twenty-year career there, including senior vice president of Time Warner Communications and group vice president of Time Warner Cable. In this capacity, Greer oversaw thirty-five cable systems with over thirty-five hundred customers in thirty-three states. She also managed the integration of telephony and cable operations in several cable divisions. Greer’s career in cable television and internet services made her one of the country’s most prominent business executives. After retiring from Time Warner Entertainment (then a division of AOL/Time Warner) in 1998, Greer went on to become co-founder of GS2.Net, a broadband services provider, and served as chairwoman until 2001. In 2005, Greer was appointed a member of the Board of Directors of eLEC Communications Corporations, and then became an independent director of Pervasip Corp.

Greer co-founded the National Association of Minorities in Cable and Telecommunications in 1980, and later served on the board of directors of ING North America Financial Services Company, eLEC Communications, Inc. and One World Theater in Austin. From 1990 until 1992, Greer served as chair of the Mile High United Way Board of Trustees, and chaired its allocations committee from 1988 to 1990. Greer is the recipient of several awards and recognitions, including Time Warner’s Andrew Heiskell Community Services Award, the National Cable Television Association’s Vanguard Award for Leadership, and the L. Patrick Mellon Mentorship Award. For her achievements, Greer was featured in the Denver Business Journal’s “Who’s Who in Telecommunications.”

Gayle Greer was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 2, 2013.

Accession Number

A2013.038

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

2/2/2013

Last Name

Greer

Maker Category
Marital Status

Widow

Occupation
Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

University of Houston

Search Occupation Category
Archival Photo 2
First Name

Gayle

Birth City, State, Country

Tulsa

HM ID

THO19

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mexico, Dominican Republic

Favorite Quote

Keep Moving.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Colorado

Interview Description
Birth Date

3/11/1941

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Denver

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Fried Chicken, Cake, Pie

Short Description

Media executive Gayle Greer (1941 - ) , co-founder of the National Association of Minorities in Cable and Telecommunications, served as vice president of Time Warner Communications and group vice president of Time Warner Cable for over twenty years.

Employment

Various

American Television and Communications Corporation

Time Warner, Inc.

Public Service Company of Colorado

Fort Wayne Urban League

Houston Urban League

One America

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45014">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Gayle Greer's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45015">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Gayle Greer describes her career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45016">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Gayle Greer lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45017">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Gayle Greer talks about her mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45018">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Gayle Greer talks about her mother's upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45019">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Gayle Greer describes her mother's disdain for the Chicago Defender</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45020">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Gayle Greer talks about how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45021">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Gayle Greer talks about her father's family background and upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45022">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Gayle Greer describes her family's experience with the 1921 Tulsa, Oklahoma Race Riot</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45023">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Gayle Greer talks about the lack of historical record related to the Tulsa, Oklahoma Race Riot of 1921</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45024">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Gayle Greer talks about State Representative Don Ross' investigation of the Tulsa, Oklahoma Race Riot of 1921</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45025">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Gayle Greer describes how her father and family friends navigated race in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45026">Tape: 1 Story: 13 - Gayle Greer talks about Tulsa, Oklahoma's black business district</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45027">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Gayle Greer describes her father's educational background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45028">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Gayle Greer recalls her father's role as a peacemaker in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45029">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Gayle Greer describes how her parents met</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45030">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Gayle Greer talks about her father's role in the church</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45031">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Gayle Greer talks about her sisters</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45032">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Gayle Greer describes her father's personality, and her likeness to him</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45033">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Gayle Greer shares memories of her childhood neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45034">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Gayle Greer describes the sights, sounds, and smells of her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45035">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Gayle Greer talks about divisons within her childhood neighborhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45036">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Gayle Greer talks about being a troublemaker as a youth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45037">Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Gayle Greer talks about her experiences in school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45038">Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Gayle Greer describes the influence of popular culture on her childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45039">Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Gayle Greer remembers Tulsa, Oklahoma as an entertainment center</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45040">Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Gayle Greer talks about school integration in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45041">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Gayle Greer talks about the industries that fueled Tulsa's economy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45042">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Gayle Greer talks about her extracurricular activities in high school</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45043">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Gayle Greer describes how she and her sisters dealt with being the daughters of a prominent school principal</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45044">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Gayle Greer talks about her father's multiple occupations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45045">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Gayle Greer talks about her family's high regard for higher education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45046">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Gayle Greer recalls visiting Denver, Colorado with her family as a youth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45047">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Gayle Greer talks about the decline of Tulsa, Oklahoma's black community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45048">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Gayle Greer remembers her first visit to New York City, New York</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45049">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Gayle Greer talks about Fisk University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45050">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Gayle Greer recalls Civil Rights activists who attended Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45051">Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Gayle Greer describes participating in the sit-in movement at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45052">Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Gayle Greer remembers the Ku Klux Klan trespassing on Fisk University's grounds</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45053">Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Gayle Greer talks about transferring from Fisk University to Oklahoma State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45054">Tape: 3 Story: 14 - Gayle Greer talks about meeting her husband, Fritz Greer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45055">Tape: 3 Story: 15 - Gayle Greer talks about completing her college education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45056">Tape: 3 Story: 16 - Gayle Greer describes attending Texas Southern University and the University of Houston in Houston, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45057">Tape: 3 Story: 17 - Gayle Greer talks about the impact of her college experiences</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45058">Tape: 3 Story: 18 - Gayle Greer talks about Charles Spurgeon Johnson, former President of Fisk University,</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45059">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Gayle Greer compares her experiences at Oklahoma State University and Texas Southern University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45060">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Gayle Greer talks about her husband, Fritz Greer</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45061">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Gayle Greer describes how attending the University of Houston inspired her activism</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45062">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Gayle Greer talks about working with Houston's Cuney Homes housing project during her M.S.W. program</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45063">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Gayle Greer talks about organizers who influenced her</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45064">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Gayle Greer talks about the power of organizing and impact of community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45065">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Gayle Greer talks about her experiences working for the Houston Urban League pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45066">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Gayle Greer talks about her experiences working for the Houston Urban League pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45067">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Gayle Greer talks about becoming Executive Director of the Fort Wayne Urban League</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45068">Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Gayle Greer talks about fighting the closure of inner-city schools in Fort Wayne, Indiana</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45069">Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Gayle Greer talks about people who helped her fight the closure of inner-city schools in Fort Wayne, Indiana</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45070">Tape: 4 Story: 12 - Gayle Greer talks about being hired by the American Television and Communications Corporation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45071">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Gayle Greer describes being hired by the American Television and Communications Corporation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45072">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Gayle Greer talks about the relationship between minorities and the cable television industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45073">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Gayle Greer talks about the early cable industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45074">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Gayle Greer describes how her community organizaing skills benefitted her work in the cable industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45075">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Gayle Greer talks about her first cable franchising projects and cable franchisers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45076">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Gayle Greer describes how well-known minorities shaped the cable industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45077">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Gayle Greer describes working on projects for the American Television and Communications Corporation in Cincinnati, Ohio and New Orleans, Louisiana</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45078">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Gayle Greer describes the American Television and Communications Corporation's innovative "institutional network" package</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45079">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Gayle Greer talks about the employment opportunities the cable industry offered to minority communities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45080">Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Gayle Greer talks about the Walter Kaitz Foundation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45081">Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Gayle Greer talks about public access television</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45082">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Gayle Greer talks about founding the National Association for Minorities in Cable and Telecommunications</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45083">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Gayle Greer talks about American Television and Communications' support of the National Association for Minorities in Cable and Telecommunications</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45084">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Gayle Greer compares the support and pushback she received from the National Association for Minorities in Cable and Telecommunications</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45085">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Gayle Greer reflects upon becoming Vice President of American Television and Communications Corporation's National Division</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45086">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Gayle Greer describes the impact of the Cable Communications Act of 1984</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45087">Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Gayle Greer reflects upon the evolution of minorities in the cable television industry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45088">Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Gayle Greer reminisces about receiving the National Cable Television Association's Vanguard Award for Leadership</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45089">Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Gayle Greer talks about major cable television mergers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45090">Tape: 6 Story: 9 - Gayle Greer talks about serving as Chairman of the Board for Mile High United Way in Denver, Colorado</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45091">Tape: 6 Story: 10 - Gayle Greer describes the ways in which she has worked to be an individual of influence</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45092">Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Gayle Greer talks about retiring from Time Warner Entertainment</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45093">Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Gayle Greer describes how the landscape of the cable industry has changed for young people</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45094">Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Gayle Greer talks about founding GS2.net and DonorNet with Steve Stokesberry</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45095">Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Gayle Greer talks about moving to Texas and her community involvement there</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45096">Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Gayle Greer talks about serving on the Board of Directors for eLEC Communications</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45097">Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Gayle Greer talks about the impact of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45098">Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Gayle Greer shares her hopes and concerns for the African American community pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45099">Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Gayle Greer shares her hopes and concerns for the African American community pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45100">Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Gayle Greer describes how her volunteer work influences urban childhood education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45101">Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Gayle Greer voices her concerns about the charter school movement</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45102">Tape: 7 Story: 11 - Gayle Greer reflects upon her life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45103">Tape: 7 Story: 12 - Gayle Greer talks about her legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45104">Tape: 7 Story: 13 - Gayle Greer talks about her family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45105">Tape: 7 Story: 14 - Gayle Greer talks about how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/45106">Tape: 7 Story: 15 - Gayle Greer narrates her photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

7$6

DATitle
Gayle Greer talks about her experiences working for the Houston Urban League pt. 1
Gayle Greer describes how well-known minorities shaped the cable industry
Transcript
Now you were work--working for the Urban League?$$I was working for the Houston Urban League.$$Okay.$$And it was the beginning of cable franchising in the urban markets. I had not even heard of cable franchising. And my boss, a guy by the name of Larry Cager, who was executive director of the Urban League there in Houston [Texas] suggested that I go to this conference. And I went to the conference, and we came back and organized what was called at that time Media Action Teams all over the country. As a result of this training that we got from Charles Tate the group there to educate the black community about the franchising process. And when we got back--we knew nothing about cable franchising, but when we got back--'cause we were taught how to find out where your city is as it relates to franchising, whether the ordinance has been developed, where the procedure is on the city council calendar. We learned all that in this conference. And when we got back, we found out that the ordinance had been put together. There were a group of people headed by John Connelly (ph.) that were about to be given the franchise. It was a very powerful group of business people that were behind this and big law firms and etcetera. And we just got extremely active. We went on television; we started going into churches; we--we just educated the community and finally put enough pressure on the city council to open up the process. And that was the beginning of a very long process. But at least a handful of very rich and powerful people didn't walk off with a hundred year franchise, which was in the making practically.$Now, big picture--we mentioned him before we started doing anything, but how did Benjamin Hooks [HistoryMaker] play--well, what role did he play?$$Well he was an FCC [Federal Communications Commission] commissioner at the time and was really pushing for these franchising provisions that would include--he was probably the only commissioner, quite frankly, that I can remember that really was kind of pushing some of these provisions for institutional network and minority businesses--minority cable owners. You know, that, that was a big deal that he really worked on. That's when tapers (sp.) finally moved into, getting more minorities involved in, in the ownership of cable television. And, and, and during my time, you know, which is pre-Bob Johnson and BET [Black Entertainment Television], Bob was a part of the Trade Association when I joined the cable television industry. He was a staff person at the Trade Association, but he was in a very group--you know, he was in the best seat for a young, black entrepreneur in that all the business people, you know, were a part of the NCTA [National Cable and Telecommunications Association]. He was a staff person there, and he pitched his black entertainment television concept to John Malone who, at the time, was running TCI [Tele-Communications Inc.]. And after a lot of negotiating, etcetera, Bob was successful in getting the funding to start BET. And then shortly thereafter, the Newark cable television franchise was given to a black person, Marshall, Barry Marshall, was his name. And he was very active in the--what became the, the National Association of Minorities in Cable. He was one of the co-founders of it. And there were, you know, Don Barton, who was very instrumental--owned the cable system in Canton, Ohio. And then later he owned it in Detroit [Michigan].$$Detroit, right, right. He also owns a lot of casinos now.$$Yes, he did (unclear). He died here not too long ago, by the way. And, so there was a lot of stuff going on and, and there were some people who benefited very well, Bob being one; Don Barton did very well in the business. And then there were a number of us who did fairly well, as it related to moving up into positions of influence in--within the cable industry. It was slow, um-hmm, but, you know, a little of it happened.

Forrest Crawford

Civic leader and educator Forrest Cleon Crawford was born on August 19, 1952 to Hazel and Dorris Crawford in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Crawford attended and graduated from Weber State College with his B.A. degree in sociology in 1975. Afterwards, he earned his M.S.W. degree from the University of Utah in 1977.

Crawford was hired as a clinical counselor in psychological services at Weber State University, and in 1983, he began working as a career and vocational education instructor. Crawford earned his education specialist degree from Brigham Young University in 1985 and then his Ph.D. in education in 1990. He went on to establish the Utah Coalition for the Advancement of Minorities in Higher Education in order to promote quality education for people of color and the disadvantaged.

In 1991, Crawford co-founded and served five years as Governor Michael Leavitt’s appointed chairman of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Human Rights Commission. He was also instrumental in the establishment of the official holiday celebrating the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. in Utah. Then, in 1992, he served as the first assistant to the President for Institutional Diversity. Crawford was one of eight recipients for the highest national honor given by the Federal King Commission and the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change. He has presented at Skakuza, South Africa; Bordeaux, France and Canterbury, England and was also invited to address the Danish University College and Education. Crawford is on the board of directors of the Disability Law Center, the Human Rights Education Center of Utah and the Utah Humanities Council.

Crawford lives in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Crawford was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 14, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.050

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/14/2008

Last Name

Crawford

Maker Category
Schools

Booker T. Washington School

Charles Page High School

Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College

Weber State University

Brigham Young University

University of Utah Graduate School of Social Work

First Name

Forrest

Birth City, State, Country

Tulsa

HM ID

CRA03

Favorite Season

Fall, Spring

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Rocky Mountains, Holland, Copenhagen, Spain

Favorite Quote

Power Concedes Nothing Without A Demand. It Never Has, And It Never Will.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Utah

Interview Description
Birth Date

8/19/1952

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Salt Lake City

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Popcorn, Seafood

Short Description

Civic leader and academic administrator Forrest Crawford (1952 - ) established the Utah Coalition for the Advancement of Minorities in Higher Education, and served for five years as chairman of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Human Rights Commission in Utah. He was also instrumental in establishing Martin Luther King, Jr. Day as an official holiday in Utah.

Employment

Bureau of Indian Affairs

Weber State College

Weber State University

Favorite Color

Earth Tones

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613718">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Forrest Crawford's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613719">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Forrest Crawford lists his favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613720">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Forrest Crawford describes his mother's family background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613721">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Forrest Crawford talks about his maternal grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613722">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Forrest Crawford describes his mother's early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613723">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Forrest Crawford talks about the Native American tribes of Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613724">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Forrest Crawford talks about the black cowboys in his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613725">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Forrest Crawford talks about his mother's college education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613726">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Forrest Crawford describes his father's family background, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613727">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Forrest Crawford describes his father's family background, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613728">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Forrest Crawford remembers his father's musical talent</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613729">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Forrest Crawford talks about his father's career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613730">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Forrest Crawford describes his parents' marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613731">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Forrest Crawford talks about his parents' personalities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613732">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Forrest Crawford describes his earliest childhood memory</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613733">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Forrest Crawford describes his community in Sand Springs, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613734">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Forrest Crawford remembers his father's murder, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613735">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Forrest Crawford remembers his father's murder, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613736">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Forrest Crawford remembers his family's shotgun house</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613737">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Forrest Crawford describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613738">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Forrest Crawford recalls his early awareness of racial discrimination</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613739">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Forrest Crawford talks about his early education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613740">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Forrest Crawford remembers his paternal aunt</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613741">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Forrest Crawford recalls the integration of the Sand Springs Public Schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613742">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Forrest Crawford describes his experiences at Booker T. Washington School in Sand Springs, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613743">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Forrest Crawford talks about his older siblings' education</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613744">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Forrest Crawford recalls his experiences at Charles Page High School in Sand Springs, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613745">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Forrest Crawford remembers his aspiration to play college football</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613746">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Forrest Crawford talks about Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College in Miami, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613747">Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Forrest Crawford recalls his decision to transfer to Weber State College in Ogden, Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613748">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Forrest Crawford remembers moving to Ogden, Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613749">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Forrest Crawford talks about Reverend Robert Harris</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613750">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Forrest Crawford recalls his studies at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613751">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Forrest Crawford remembers the Graduate School of Social Work in Salt Lake City, Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613752">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Forrest Crawford describes his role at the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Alaska</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613753">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Forrest Crawford talks about his experiences in Alaska</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613754">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Forrest Crawford recalls his position at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613755">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Forrest Crawford remembers teaching sociology courses at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613756">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Forrest Crawford describes his career at Weber State College in Ogden, Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613757">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Forrest Crawford describes his diversity work at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613758">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Forrest Crawford recalls the ethnic diversity at Weber State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613759">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Forrest Crawford describes the activist groups in Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613760">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Forrest Crawford talks about diversity in Utah</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613761">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Forrest Crawford recalls his international travels</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613762">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Forrest Crawford describes his challenges at Weber State University</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613763">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Forrest Crawford describes the challenges facing Arab American students</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613764">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Forrest Crawford reflects upon his educational philosophy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613765">Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Forrest Crawford describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613766">Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Forrest Crawford reflects upon his life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613767">Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Forrest Crawford reflects upon his legacy</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613768">Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Forrest Crawford reflects upon his family</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613769">Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Forrest Crawford describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/613770">Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Forrest Crawford narrates his photographs</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$4

DAStory

10$1

DATitle
Forrest Crawford talks about Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College in Miami, Oklahoma
Forrest Crawford remembers moving to Ogden, Utah
Transcript
August of, of 1970 I went to, transferred to Northeastern Oklahoma A&M junior college [Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College]. A little small agriculture town in Miami, Oklahoma, and incidentally they had, had actually had a couple of national junior college football championships under their belt at that time. So they, they, they, they recruited a lot in Texas, so more than half of our team were you, you know young guys from Texas, Alabama, Arkansas and so forth. As I mean and these was serious athletes you know, the, the, I mean Texas had such a large system you know. That and in fact, our junior college was kind of seen for lack a better word as a sort as a form as a temporary stop perform team for University of Oklahoma [Norman, Oklahoma]. So once you've established your talents very well as an athlete at NEO that oftentimes you were able to transfer to University of Oklahoma. For myself I knew that wasn't gonna be the case, I knew I wasn't going to University of, of Oklahoma. And if anything if I went to Oklahoma, potentially it might be for wrestling, but even then I wasn't that, I wasn't an exceptional wrestler. I was decent again, but you know Oklahoma was a wrestling school, you know, top notch, so I knew by the time I ended my freshman year at NEO that I knew that I didn't have top talent. And I mean and these guys that were coming from these different states were just three times the speed, three, I mean just exceptional athletes. You know but I knew I could play football and I, I, I was, I was a solid athlete. Junior college experience worked out very well for me, because that's really--not only was I able to kind of establish myself as a decent athlete and as a, and as a good teammate, but also my academic orientation started to kind of come a bit more into focus. Although I wasn't considered a serious academic athlete at that time that you know I begin to see how important academics was. And part of that was driven by you know if you're not taking care of your academics, you're not gonna play football. And so they were sort of connected and so really what inspired me to, to have more discipline in ac- academics is that, 'cause so I wanted to play football. That carried on through junior college and after I finished junior college, 1970, 1972--$Tell us about the experience on the bus, on the way to Ogden.$$Well as, as I was saying earlier that I, summer of 1972 took a Greyhound bus from Tulsa, Oklahoma to Ogden, Utah. Now knowing really sort of going into this Rocky Mountain abyss, not really sure what, what's gonna happen. But our final stop or, or the stop before arrived in Ogden was Salt Lake City [Utah], and as we were preparing to leave, an elderly African American gentleman [Robert Harris] got on the bus and asked could he sit next to me, and I said sure. And we met each other and, and he says, "Where you're headed?" I said, "Well I'm going to a place called Ogden, Utah." And he says, "Oh that's where I live." I'm going like, you've gotta be kidding me, Ogden, Utah? He said, "Yeah, I been there for many years," he said "I have a church there." And, and he proceeded to tell me that he had just returned from the Democratic National Convention [1972 Democratic National Convention, Miami, Florida]. I believe it was in Florida, I'm not sure. But I think it was in Florida. But he said he when involved, he was involved in some protest actions there and he had got beaten up and pushed around. And he might've, they might've even put him in jail for a while or whatever. And I wasn't sure if he was you know, you know pulling my leg or, or whether he was very sincere about the story that he was sharing with me, as we were proceeding in into Ogden. But it, in any event, he had talked a lot about his life, he said he had a church here as a local Pentecostal minister. But as we arrived in Ogden you know he had, he had invited me to his church and invited me to have dinner with his family once I you know settled in. And with the, the, the, you know we were having our three a day or two a day football training before the season started. And he said, "Well once you get settled in," he says, "give me a call and I'll come pick you up and we can have dinner and visit more." The, the short of that is for one it was amazing that I met an African American the first person that I met in U- that was a Utahan was a black man who owned a church. Who also by the way had a local grocery store, and, and, and, and so that relieved a lot of my anxiety about Ogden. Although it was clear that I was going into a very white community that was very different from the community that I had grown up in. That it was a relief to know that at least there was some blacks in, in, in Ogden.

Robert Goodwin

Robert Kerr Goodwin was born on November 15, 1948, in Tulsa, Oklahoma; his mother was a teacher and social worker, and his father was a business owner and attorney. At the age of fifteen, Goodwin became a licensed preacher and planned to pursue a career in the ministry; in 1966 he earned his high school diploma from Bishop Kelley Catholic School where he worked on the school paper, was a member of the student government, year book, and chess clubs, and was the first black student body president.

From 1966 until 1970, Goodwin attended Oral Roberts University, where he earned his B.A. degree. At Oral Roberts University, Goodwin was a member of the student ministering team and traveled around the world preaching. In 1973, Goodwin earned his M.A. degree in philosophy from San Francisco Theological Seminary.

Upon completing his master’s degree, Goodwin was summoned back to Tulsa by his father to run the family-owned newspaper, The Oklahoma Eagle. Goodwin operated the paper until 1981; during his tenure he increased the readership and converted the printing to a more efficient, cost effective process. Between 1981 and 1985, Goodwin sold encyclopedias in Texas, accumulating a million dollars in sales in a five-year period. From 1985 until 1989, Goodwin worked as a printing consultant, lobbyist, director of public affairs, and associate vice president for university relations at Prairie View and Texas A&M Universities. While working at Texas A&M, Goodwin led the Democrats for Bush campaign. Goodwin's activities caught the attention of the Bush Administration and he was offered a position with the Department of Education working on the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges, a position he held from 1989 until 1992. In 1992, Goodwin was hired as the executive vice president of the Points of Light Foundation, an organization responsible for assisting and encouraging citizens to engage in volunteer service; he went on to serve as president and CEO of the organization. In 2007, Goodwin announced his retirement from the Points of Light Foundation, after over fifteen years of service.

For his civic and community achievements, Goodwin received numerous awards and honors.

Goodwin was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 26, 2004.

Accession Number

A2004.148

Sex

Male

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

8/26/2004

Last Name

Goodwin

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Bishop Kelley High School

Oral Roberts University

San Francisco Theological Seminary

First Name

Robert

Birth City, State, Country

Tulsa

HM ID

GOO04

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Sydney, Australia

Favorite Quote

I Can't Do Everything, But I Can Do Something.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/15/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Potato Chips

Short Description

Foundation chief executive Robert Goodwin (1948 - ) served the George H.W. Bush Administration, working on the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges. Goodwin went on to serve as president and CEO of the Points of Light Foundation for over fifteen years.

Employment

Oklahoma Eagle

Prairie View A&M University

Texas A&M University

United States Department of Education

Points of Light Foundation

Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238259">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Robert Goodwin's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238260">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Robert Goodwin lists his favorites and states his occupation</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238261">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Robert Goodwin talks about his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238262">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Robert Goodwin talks about his father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238263">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Robert Goodwin talks about his father's reputation in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238264">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Robert Goodwin recalls the prominent African Americans that stayed with his family in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238265">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Robert Goodwin recalls life lessons from his mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238266">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Robert Goodwin shares the story of his parents' marriage</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238267">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Robert Goodwin describes his racial background</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238268">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Robert Goodwin remembers his grandparents</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238269">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Robert Goodwin recalls his earliest childhood memories, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238418">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Robert Goodwin recalls his earliest childhood memories, pt. 2</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238419">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Robert Goodwin describes his family's holiday traditions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238420">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Robert Goodwin describes his siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238421">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Robert Goodwin reflects upon his childhood in Alsuma, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238422">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Robert Goodwin recalls the sounds, sights and smells of his childhood in Alsuma, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238423">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Robert Goodwin describes his schooling in Alsuma, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238424">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Robert Goodwin describes race relations while growing up near Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238425">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Robert Goodwin talks about his mother's teaching career</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238426">Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Robert Goodwin recalls his childhood interests and personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238427">Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Robert Goodwin recalls transferring to Bishop Kelley High School in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238280">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Robert Goodwin recalls being elected student body president at Bishop Kelley High School in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238281">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Robert Goodwin explains why he attended Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238282">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Robert Goodwin talks about the perceptions of the newly-opened Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238283">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Robert Goodwin describes his experience at Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238284">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Robert Goodwin talks about evangelist Oral Roberts</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238285">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Robert Goodwin reflects upon his education's impact on his religious life</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238286">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Robert Goodwin talks about his decision to leave San Francisco Theological Seminary in San Anselmo, California to take over his father's newspaper business</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238287">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Robert Goodwin remembers assuming leadership of The Oklahoma Eagle at twenty-three years old</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238288">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Robert Goodwin talks about business changes he oversaw at his family newspaper business, The Oklahoma Eagle</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238289">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Robert Goodwin talks about The Oklahoma Eagle's coverage of school desegregation in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238290">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Robert Goodwin describes what he liked best about running The Oklahoma Eagle</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238291">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Robert Goodwin describes working as an encyclopedia salesman in the 1980s</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238292">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Robert Goodwin talks about working for Prairie View Agricultural and Mechanical University in Prairie View, Texas</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238293">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Robert Goodwin talks about his involvement with the Republican Party</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238294">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Robert Goodwin recalls the circumstances of his firing from the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238295">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Robert Goodwin talks about joining the Points of Light Foundation in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238296">Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Robert Goodwin describes the origins of the Points of Light Foundation in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238297">Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Robert Goodwin explains the Points of Light Foundation's mission and his role in the organization</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238298">Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Robert Goodwin talks about motivations for volunteering and its decreasing prominence in society</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238299">Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Robert Goodwin dispels misconceptions about African Americans' volunteering habits</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238300">Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Robert Goodwin reflects upon his life, pt. 1</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238301">Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Robert Goodwin describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238302">Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Robert Goodwin describes how he would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/238303">Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Robert Goodwin reflects upon his life, pt. 2</a>

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

4$8

DATitle
Robert Goodwin talks about his father
Robert Goodwin remembers assuming leadership of The Oklahoma Eagle at twenty-three years old
Transcript
Let's talk a little bit about your father now, starting with his name, where he was born, same thing.$$My father is--was--Edwin, but, later changed his name to Edward Lawrence Goodwin. He was born also at the turn of the century in Water Valley, Mississippi. He used to say that he left Water Valley as soon as he was old enough to walk. His father [James Henri Goodwin] was a businessman in that community and then relocated to Oklahoma and he went to Fisk [University, Nashville, Tennessee], there he met my mother [Jeanne Osby Goodwin]. He played football there; he was very much the debonair man about town. His, his, nickname growing up, but in college was Sugar man. He left Fisk with a degree in education, came back to Tulsa [Oklahoma], his proposal to and marriage to my mother was somewhat unorthodox but, say, perhaps a word in a moment, but, they decided he couldn't make any money teaching school and so he started a series of small businesses as an entrepreneur. He had a haberdashery, a shop, and an ice cream parlor and a tavern all the sort of steady succession and (clears throat) got involved eventually in the numbers racket in Tulsa and became pretty good at it and became sort of known as the man in, in, in that community. And there are a lot of colorful stories about his life there. He had an opportunity to get in the newspaper business and again, through a series of events where he felt that he wanted to have his own vehicle to communicate with the community and he purchased a small tabloid publication [The Tulsa Star] that became a well-respected weekly newspaper [The Oklahoma Eagle] serving the black community in Tulsa. And, as a matter of fact, during his career in the numbers racket he got into some financial difficulty at one point and he was very close to Senator Robert [S.] Kerr of Kerr-McGee Oil [Industries, Inc.], Bob Kerr was a very prominent and powerful senator and a mentor to L.B.J. [President Lyndon Baines Johnson] and my father used to basically take care of things for him in the black community. So he gets into this financial difficulty and he goes to the senator and I don't know if it was $5000 or $50,000 but for a black man in Oklahoma in the 1940s it was a lot of money. Senator Kerr hearing about his need reached for his checkbook and he said, "Ed, I've got one question for you" he said, "am I giving this to you or am I loaning it to you?" and my father said, "no, Senator, it's a loan," and so he wrote out the check, well, I came out Robert Kerr Goodwin, my, my--that's my middle name, in gratitude for the senator's involvement. He later went to law school and helped to integrate the law school of The University of Tulsa [The University of Tulsa College of Law, Tulsa, Oklahoma]. He practiced law for twenty years before his, before his death in 1978. So, he was a very hard driving, aggressive, community-oriented individual who left his own great legacy in, in our community.$And I remember I, I went to bed early, my mother [Jeanne Osby Goodwin] got me up at the crack of, I mean, even before dawn, had to be five 'o clock in the morning, she had fixed this big country breakfast, grits and ham and eggs and all. My father [Edward Goodwin] was the type that he believed at being at his business [The Oklahoma Eagle] with the crack of dawn and he'd be out on the front yard--front sidewalk sweeping the, the sidewalk and whatever. Well, we went to his--to the office, he gave me a set of keys and showed me what door they opened, he gave me the combination to the safe in the wall in his office and he gave--and when the bank opened at nine o'clock we drove there and we signed the signature card so I can sign the checks and he said, "I'll see ya" (gestures waving good bye) and he went and started raising catfish on the tanks in our property outside of Tulsa [Oklahoma]. And I became, at twenty-three years old, never having had a course in business having (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Or journalism.$$Well, I took one course--$$Oh.$$--of journalism in high school [Bishop Kelley High School, Tulsa, Oklahoma] and worked on the school paper, and I became a publisher of the weekly newspaper. And even though, you know, as I think back on it, you know, again, I've got these seven brothers and sisters, all of whom were older, all of whom were, in my view, perhaps better qualified to assume this business but I guess either they were all doin' their own thing, or for some reason he felt comfortable with my ability because of what I had achieved through my student career and I suppose because of a level of maturity that I had displayed, that I was capable of undertaking this responsibility.$$And how would you describe the paper, The Oklahoma Eagle? Is it conservative paper, how would you describe the paper?$$No, it was known as the liberal rag (laughter), you know, there's a great tradition of black press that we were very part--proud part of, The Chicago Daily Defender [Chicago Defender], The Pittsburgh Courier [New Pittsburgh Courier], The Michigan Courier [sic.], The [Michigan] Chronicle, and The Oklahoma Eagle, now we were not as old as some of those publications and obviously not in as densely populate black community (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Right.$$--one of the problems that we ever had with making money with the paper was that there were only forty thousand blacks in the whole town and that was not a sufficient circulation base to attract national advertising which the other papers I mentioned were able to attract. So, it was never a major financial success, but my father didn't do it for the money and he, he wanted to have a voice in the community. But it was very much a progressive voice and remains today a progressive voice in the community an (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) In the African American community?$$In the African American community and I think over the years has had a certain level of influence in the, the white community as well. You know, the three most persistent, and perhaps important institutions in the black community have been the church, the school and the press and so it took its place in that leadership echelon and I was proud to run it for nearly ten years.

Julia Reed Hare

The dynamic motivational lecturer, relationship expert, author, social commentator and educational psychologist Dr. Julia Hare was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Hare has appeared on several television programs offering her expertise and insights on male/female relationships, gender interactions in the workplace, mate selection, toxic relationships and matrimonial harmony. She has appeared on CNN & Company, C-SPAN, Tony Brown’s Journal and Inside Edition. Hare has also spoken before the Congressional Black Caucus, participated in Tavis Smiley’s “State of the Black Family” Conference and spoke at the annual Essence Empowerment Seminars at the Essence Magazine Culture Festival. Her written work has been featured in several magazines and newspapers including The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Miami Herald. Hare and her husband co-authored The Endangered Black Family; Bringing the Black Boy to Manhood: The Passage, The Miseducation of The Black Child, Crisis in Black Sexual Politics and How to Find and Keep a BMW (Black Man Working).

Hare, along with her husband, Dr. Nathan Hare, formed The Black Think Tank located in San Francisco, California. Their consulting firm focuses on issues affecting the black family.

Dr. Julia Hare’s work has brought her many awards and honors including Educator of the Year for Washington, D.C. by the Junior Chamber of Commerce and World Book Encyclopedia in coordination with American University; The Abe Lincoln Award for Outstanding Broadcasting, The Carter G. Woodson Education Award, The Association of Black Social Workers’ Harambee Award; the Scholar of the Year Award from the Association of African Historians; and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Black Writers and Artists Union. Hare has been inducted into the Hall of Fame of her high school alma mater, Booker T. Washington High, was given a Presidential citation from the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education and was named one of the ten most influential African Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area.

During graduate school, Hare taught elementary school in Chicago, Illinois integrating music into the student’s lessons. Following a move to California, Hare served as the director of educational programs at the Oakland Museum and later hosted talk shows for both ABC television and KSFO radio stations. She also served as the public relations director in the local federal housing program in San Francisco.

Her formal education includes a B.A. in music from Langston University of Langston, Oklahoma; a M.A. degree in music education from Roosevelt University located in Chicago, Illinois and a Ph.D. in education from the California Coast University in Santa Ana, California.

Hare passed away on February 25, 2019.

Accession Number

A2004.040

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

4/5/2004

Last Name

Hare

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Reed

Occupation
Schools

Booker T. Washington High School

George Washington Carver Middle School

Booker T. Washington Elementary School

Langston University

Roosevelt University

California Coast University

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Julia

Birth City, State, Country

Tulsa

HM ID

HAR06

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Oklahoma

Favorite Vacation Destination

Florida, San Francisco, California

Favorite Quote

Do You Remember When Common Sense Was Fairly Common?

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

California

Interview Description
Birth Date

11/7/1939

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Bay Area/San Francisco

Country

USA

Favorite Food

Watermelon

Death Date

2/25/2019

Short Description

Psychologist Julia Reed Hare (1939 - 2019) was the former director of educational programs at the Oakland Museum and hosted talk shows for both ABC television and KSFO radio stations. Hare also co-founded The Black Think Tank located in San Francisco, California and appeared on several television programs offering her expertise and insights on male/female relationships and other issues.

Employment

Black Think Tank

Oakland Museum of California

ABC

KSFO Radio

National Committee against Discrimination in Housing

District of Columbia Teachers College

Favorite Color

Black

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505784">Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Julia Reed Hare's interview</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505785">Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Julia Reed Hare lists her favorites</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505786">Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Julia Reed Hare describes her mother</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505787">Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her father</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505788">Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her relatives and holiday family traditions</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505789">Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Julia Reed Hare describes her early childhood memories of playing the piano</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505790">Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her siblings</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505791">Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Julia Reed Hare talks about the 1921 Tulsa race riot and its aftermath</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505792">Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Julia Reed Hare describes her childhood neighborhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505793">Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Julia Reed Hare describes the sights, sounds and smells of growing up in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505794">Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Julia Reed Hare describes her household responsibilities as a child and her religious upbringing</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505795">Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Julia Reed Hare talks about going to Booker T. Washington Elementary School in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505818">Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Julia Reed Hare describes her teachers and the culture of Booker T. Washington Elementary School in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505819">Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Julia Reed Hare remembers prejudiced African American teachers</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505820">Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Julia Reed Hare describes her childhood personality</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505821">Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Julia Reed Hare describes her childhood aspirations</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505822">Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Julia Reed Hare describes the segregated schools in Tulsa, Oklahoma, her teachers and her extracurricular activities as a child</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505823">Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Julia Reed Hare describes deciding to go to college and keeping in touch with her friends from Booker T. Washington High School in Tulsa, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505824">Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Julia Reed Hare describes her experience at Langston University in Langston, Oklahoma</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505825">Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Julia Reed Hare describes going to Roosevelt University's College of Music in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505846">Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Julia Reed Hare describes teaching elementary school while in graduate school at Roosevelt University's School of Music in Chicago, Illinois</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505847">Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her work for the District of Columbia Teachers College in Washington, D.C.</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505848">Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Julia Reed Hare describes being director of education for the Oakland Museum of California in Oakland, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505849">Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Julia Reed Hare describes her work for the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Inc. and as a radio host</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505850">Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Julia Reed Hare recalls people she interviewed on the radio and teaching others about radio broadcasting</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505851">Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Julia Reed Hare describes the content of lectures she gives across the country</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505852">Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Julia Reed Hare talks about getting her educational and social psychology degrees at California Coast University and her lectures</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505853">Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Julia Reed Hare describes what The Black Think Tank does, with HistoryMaker Nathan Hare, in San Francisco, California</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505854">Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Julia Reed Hare describes the book she authored with HistoryMaker Nathan Hare, 'Bringing the Black Boy to Manhood: The Passage'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505855">Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Julia Reed Hare describes the book she published with HistoryMaker Nathan Hare, 'Crisis in Black Sexual Politics'</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505864">Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her research on African American families</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505865">Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Julia Reed Hare describes the changes she would like to see for African American students in the schools</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505866">Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her love of playing piano</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505867">Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Julia Reed Hare talks about reading</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505868">Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her desire to write a romance novel and her spiritual growth</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505869">Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Julia Reed Hare describes her hopes for the African American community</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505870">Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Julia Reed Hare talks about her proudest accomplishments and her values</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505871">Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Julia Reed Hare describes how she would like to be remembered</a>

<a href="https://da.thehistorymakers.org/story/505872">Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Julia Reed Hare narrates her photographs</a>

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DATitle
Julia Reed Hare describes being director of education for the Oakland Museum of California in Oakland, California
Julia Reed Hare talks about the 1921 Tulsa race riot and its aftermath
Transcript
So, I became the first director of education for the Oakland Museum [of California, Oakland, California], because the museum was opening. Now, the museum was not exactly alien to me, because as the language arts and the college--and the supervisor at the college and--the University of the District of Columbia [Washington, D.C.], which was at the time the District of Columbia Teachers College [Washington, D.C.]--I had to do a lot of work with the curators of the Smithsonian [Institution, Washington, D.C.]. Because we tried to bring the museum to the kids, in addition to taking the kids to the museum. So, when Oakland--it was opening, this was a new museum that had never opened, hadn't had it there. And so, I was speaking at something at San Francisco State [College, later San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California], talking about the Smithsonian. I had no idea that some curators were there and asked would I come there and work with them on getting other people--blacks, ethnic minorities, women, whoever, involved in the museum. And I said, "I'd be delighted to do that." But I said, "I must develop something that you probably haven't had before, and that was a museum on wheels because a lot of people are not coming here. You're going to have to take the museum out to them." So, we had what we call traveling exhibitions that went out. And we had, we got all of this from the changing exhibition galleries. Because we had permanent galleries that you have to come there to see that, because that's borrowed from museums all over the world. But we would take the museums out to underprivileged areas. We would take them to middle class areas, any group of people that we felt would not on their own come there. We had things that they could handle and touch in the museum. It was not a hands-off, you know, you can pick this up, it's not going to break. Before we knew it, then they were coming to the museum. Because I would always dangle the carrot, "There's more of that over there at the museum if you come over to us." So, we would arrange for them to come there when I felt--then I developed a board and brought in people--these were adults, blacks who had never had the opportunity to sit on a board of a museum. Because you know, that's kind of a playground of the rich and the affluent. And so we brought them in and established a board for them. Well, they were surprised. Well by doing this, then we brought in black artists who had never had an opportunity to display their work in a museum. We brought in black scientists, because we also had a specialty there in the natural sciences. And the other specialty was California history. We were able to bring in black historians that never thought that they would have an opportunity to be in a museum. So, when the national museum meetings took place--and Thomas Hoving at that time was the director of the Smithsonian [sic, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York]. And we would meet at all of the fancy, great museums, Santa Barbara [Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, California], you know, there are good ones all over the country. These people that we brought into the museum were able to come with me, down, and meet other curators. So, now they are dispersed over the country.$You, you grew up in Tulsa [Oklahoma]?$$Yes.$$And Tulsa has a very interesting history.$$Yes, it does.$$Very interesting. Did your parents [Will Reed and Beatrice Brown Reed] ever talk, or did they experience the riot, the [1921] Tulsa [race] riot?$$No, my mother wasn't living there. She came to Tulsa when she was sixteen. The riot took place I think in 1921. But my father was living there, and he would tell it to us in the house because believe it or not, did you know that black people and black teachers were afraid to talk about that riot when we were growing up in school? Because I mean that was punishable by lynchings, or whatever it might be. That had to be swept under the rug. And the major newspaper of the day, the Tulsa Tribune, that fanned the flames by simply saying that a black man looked at a white woman on an elevator. Well, by the time that hit the radio news--it was not the television--and that went out, then the riot was on. And so, we're talking about concentration camps. They put the black people in that. My father said you could stand and look all across the country--the city and see everything that was burning. Well, the [U.S.] National Guard was called out, and they locked all the black people up in something called the Convention Hall. They locked them up, burned down the houses, destroyed the businesses. One of the reasons that was done is because Tulsa's black community had a self-contained community. They had black--doctors had their own hospitals and businesses. You didn't have to go to the other side of town to purchase anything; it was all done there. In fact, the whites had to come over to the black part of town to purchase a lot of things. And I guess someone just did not like that. And the papers, you know, the newspapers, really fanned that up. And the only church that has ever been bombed from the air in the United States was Mount Zion Baptist Church [Tulsa, Oklahoma], which was the church of my youth, and the church had recently been built, but about a million bucks [dollars] back then in 1921, you know, you can imagine the value of that now. Well, they bombed the church because they said they were destroying, in today's language, weapons of mass destruction but then they said they had an arsenal of weapons that were destroyed. And then after they bombed the church, they later learned that there were no weapons in the church. That church still stands, and they would like to get rid of that church now so that they can build a white university on that land, because they're trying to move now the blacks that are out of North Tulsa. It was often said the reason why--that was the only place blacks could live. It's often said that the reason why they want them out of North Tulsa is because the hurricanes that always visit Tulsa never went through North Tulsa. It always went through the other side of town. And so, they were trying to move them out. The school there that they built for blacks because of segregation, Booker T. Washington High School [Tulsa, Oklahoma], now they're trying to put all of them out and turn that school into a white preparatory school and move the blacks out of Tulsa. I just wrote an editorial for one of the newspapers back there on that situation. So, the reparations movement that they were trying to get for them, the State of Oklahoma ruled that it's so few of them living that we should not pass the reparations on to them or to their heirs, nor has there been an apology. So, the city is about to go up again anytime. Don't be surprised if you hear that.