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Betty Neal Crutcher

Executive mentor Betty Neal Crutcher was born on November 21, 1949 in Tuskegee, Alabama to Rosea and Homer Neal. Crutcher graduated from Tuskegee Institute High School in 1967, and went on to receive her B.S. degree in sociology from the Tuskegee Institute in 1971 and her M.P.H. degree from the University of Michigan in 1973. Later, she earned her Ph.D. in educational administration from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio in 2006. Her dissertation is titled, “Cross-Cultural Mentoring: An Examination of the Perspective of Mentors,” and includes her creation of “The Three V’s: Values, Virtues, and Vision,” a special understanding into the heart of cross-cultural mentoring.

In 1980, Crutcher served as the assistant to the chancellor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In 1987 Crutcher became the assistant to the president of Guilford College in Greensboro, North Carolina. Crutcher moved to Cleveland, Ohio in 1991, where she served as the first director of community relations at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. In 1994, Crutcher was hired as a community relations specialist at the University of Texas at Austin. In 1999, Crutcher returned to the Midwest where she was appointed community outreach coordinator for Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. From 2004 through 2014, when her husband, Ronald Crutcher, became the president of Wheaton College, in Norton, Massachusetts, she served as Presidential Spouse and as a Senior Mentoring Consultant. In 2015, Crutcher became Presidential Spouse and Executive Mentor at the University of Richmond when her husband was appointed university president.

Throughout her career, Crutcher has played a cross-cultural mentoring role in health care and at various higher education institutions. She served as a senior fellow at the Oliver Wendell Holmes Society at Harvard University and as a faculty member at the Harvard Medical School Continuing Education Program. Crutcher served as one of the co-founders of the Sowing Seeds of Hope program, a Massachusetts cross-cultural mentoring initiative for high school and college students interested in the health care professions. She served as a faculty member at the 2014 American Association of Blacks in Higher Education (AABHE) Leadership and Mentoring Institute. Crutcher has authored several articles including “A Personal Connection,” Vital Speeches of the Day, January 2018, “Cross Cultural Mentoring: A Pathway to Making Excellence Inclusive,” Liberal Education, a journal of the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AACU), spring 2014; “Why Are We Here? Communal Bad Blood Perpetuates a Legacy of Mistrust,” Journal of Health Care, Science, and the Humanities, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2014, and co-authored the articles “Transforming the Negative Legacy of the Unethical United States Public Health Syphilis Study, Diversity and Democracy, summer 2018; “Transcending the Legacy of Silence and Shame Surrounding the Unethical Syphilis Study at Tuskegee,” Diverse Issues in Education, March 2017; and “The Impact of Cross-Cultural Interactions on Medical Students’ Preparedness to Care for Diverse Patients,” Academic Medicine, November 2012.

Crutcher and her husband, Ronald Crutcher, have one daughter, Sara.

Betty Neal Crutcher was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on January 18, 2018.

Accession Number

A2018.003

Sex

Female

Interview Date

1/18/2018

Last Name

Crutcher

Maker Category
Occupation
Schools

St. Joseph Catholic School

Tuskegee Institute High School

Miami University

University of Michigan

Tuskegee University

First Name

Betty

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

CRU05

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Berlin, Germany, Tuskegee, Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Use Your Initiative.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Virginia

Birth Date

11/21/1949

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Richmond

Favorite Food

Collard Greens

Short Description

Executive mentor Betty Neal Crutcher (1949 - ) was an executive mentor at various higher education institutions including Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro as well as first lady at Wheaton College and the University of Richmond.

Employment

University of Richmond

Wheaton College

Miami University

University of Texas at Austin

Cleveland Clinic Foundation

Guilford College

University of North Carolina

Favorite Color

Blue & Red

Valerie Mosley

Financial executive Valerie Mosley was born on February 5, 1960 in Tuskegee, Alabama to Clara Mosley and Clarence Mosley. Mosley earned her B.A. degree in history from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina in 1983. She received her M.B.A. degree in finance from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Finance in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1986.

Mosley worked as a commercial lending officer at Chase Manhattan Bank until she enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1984. Upon her graduation from the University of Pennsylvania, Mosley worked in institutional bond sales at Kidder, Peabody, and Company until 1990. She then joined P.G. Corbin Asset Management, Inc. as a chief investment officer and portfolio manager. In 1992, Mosley left the firm to join Wellington Management Group, where she worked as a portfolio manager, investment strategist, and senior vice president during her twenty-year career with the company. As a fixed income portfolio manager, she oversaw a $9 billion portfolio and joined the company’s Core Bond Strategy Group and Industry Strategy Group, which handled $20 billion in fixed income portfolios for corporate and public pension funds, endowments, and mutual funds. In 2005, Mosley was appointed partner at Wellington Management Company, LLP. After leaving the company in 2012, Mosley founded Valmo Ventures, Inc., which specialized in trend identification, global wealth management, and corporate advisory. Mosley also founded Heart Beings, a blog devoted to positive articles, informative interviews, and financial advice.

Mosley served on President Barack Obama’s Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Mosley also served on the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s Advisory Board for Diversity, as president of the Wharton Alumni Club of Atlanta, and as director of The Eaton Vance Fund. Mosley was also named as one of the “50 Most Powerful Women in Business” in 2006, as one of the “Top 75 Blacks on Wall Street” by Black Enterprise in 2011, and one of the “Top 50 African Americans on Wall Street” by Black Enterprise magazine.

Mosley has three children: Taylor, Ryan, and Amanda.

Valerie Mosley was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 19, 2017.

Accession Number

A2017.136

Sex

Female

Interview Date

08/19/2017

Last Name

Mosley

Maker Category
Occupation
Organizations
First Name

Valerie

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

MOS06

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard

Favorite Quote

Love yourself unconditionally and in so doing...

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Massachusetts

Birth Date

2/5/1960

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Martha's Vineyard

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Collard greens

Short Description

Financial executive Valerie Mosley (1960 - ) served as a portfolio manager for Wellington Management Company and became founder and CEO of Valmo Ventures, Inc.

Favorite Color

Orange

Clarice Dibble Walker

Professor and commissioner of social services, Clarice Dibble Walker was born on March 31, 1936 in Tuskegee, Alabama. She is the granddaughter of Robert Robinson Taylor, and the daughter of Helen Taylor Dibble, and Dr. Eugene Heriot Dibble, Jr. Walker is the youngest of five children. Her grandfather, Robert Robinson Taylor was born on June 8, 1868. He was the first African American to graduate with a degree in architecture from MIT in 1892. Taylor worked with Booker T. Washington as an architect at Tuskegee University from 1890 until 1930. He has designed several of Tuskegee’s most prominent buildings such as the science buildings, dormitories and the school's chapel. Helen Annetta Taylor was born on October 15, 1901 in Tuskegee, Alabama. She attended Fisk University and graduated with her B.A. in music. Walker’s father Dr. Eugene Heriot Dibble Jr., attended Atlanta University and Howard medical school. He was the head of John Andrew Hospital and served in World War II as Colonel.

Walker attended Chambliss Childrens School in Tuskegee, Alabama and Northfield High School in Massachusetts. She received her B.S. degree from Sarah Lawrence College in Westchester County, New York in 1957. Walker later obtained her M.A. degree from Bryn Mawr Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research. In 1992, she served as Commissioner of Social Services for the Government of the District of Columbia. Walker has worked at Howard University as professor and department chair in the Graduate School of Social Work, Program Development in the Child Development Center, Department of Pediatrics, and the College of Medicine. She has served as visiting lecturer at Bryn Mawr School of Social Work and Social Research. In addition, she has worked as a psychiatric social worker at the University of Montreal General Hospital in Montreal Canada.

Walker has served as Chair of the Distribution Committee of the Survivors Fund, the Research Committee of Prevent Child Abuse America and the Board of Safe Shores. She has also served as Trustee for the Seed Public Charter School, Sarah Lawrence College and Howard University.
Walker is married to George H. Walker, and they have four children together.

Accession Number

A2012.065

Sex

Female

Interview Date

5/1/2012

Last Name

Walker

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Dibble

Schools

Chambliss Children's House at Tuskegee Institute

St. Joseph Catholic School

Sarah Lawrence College

Columbia University

Northfield Mount Hermon School

Tuskegee Institute High School

First Name

Clarice

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

WAL18

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Beaches

Favorite Quote

Let's Move It.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

3/31/1936

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Salmon

Short Description

Social work researcher Clarice Dibble Walker (1936 - ) was known for her research on socio-cultural factors involving children and families in urban environments.

Employment

District of Columbia

Bryn Mawr School of Social Work and Social Research

Howard University

Montreal General Hospital

United Planning Organization

University of Chicago

Capital Head Start, Inc.

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Clarice Dibble Walker's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her maternal grandfather, Robert Robinson Taylor

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls the notable families at Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her mother's education and profession

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her maternal grandparents' grocery store

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her father's education and profession

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her paternal aunts and uncles, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her paternal aunts and uncles, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers the sense of community in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls the segregation of Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her parents' travels with Robert Russa Moton, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her parents' travels with Robert Russa Moton, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about the John A. Andrew Clinical Society, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about the John A. Andrew Clinical Society, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her parents' careers

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her parents' personalities and who she takes after

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes the sights, sounds and smells of her childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers Tuskegee, Alabama's notable families

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her experiences at Chambliss Children's House School in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her early interest in music

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls Tuskegee Institute's entertainment series

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers her teacher at St. Joseph Catholic School in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her teachers at the Tuskegee Institute High School in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her experiences at the Northfield School for Girls in Gill, Massachusetts

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her chores at the Northfield School for Girls

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about the Tuskegee Airmen

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers singing in the choir at Northfield School for Girls

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her experiences at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her experiences with segregation in the South

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her major at Sarah Lawrence College

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers her time at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her field placements at Columbia University in New York City

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers working with the City of New York Department of Welfare

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her first marriage and move to Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers meeting her second husband, George H. Walker III

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls protesting against Benjamin C. Willis in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about moving to Washington, D.C.

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her work with Capital Head Start, Inc. in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes her role as director of Capital Head Start, Inc. in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers the Washington, D.C. riots of 1968

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her professorship at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker remembers her students at Howard University

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her experiences at Howard University and Tuskegee Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about the National Black Child Development Institute

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls her work with the SEED School of Washington, D.C.

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her career at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Clarice Dibble Walker recalls becoming the commissioner of the Commission on Social Services

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about September 11, 2001

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her father's legacy at the John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her children

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Clarice Dibble Walker reflects upon her life

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Clarice Dibble Walker describes how she would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

5$7

DAStory

2$1

DATitle
Clarice Dibble Walker talks about her field placements at Columbia University in New York City
Clarice Dibble Walker recalls becoming the commissioner of the Commission on Social Services
Transcript
So, you graduated in--from Sarah Lawrence [Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, New York] in, what's it--$$Nineteen fifty-seven [1957].$$Fifty-seven [1957], okay.$$Um-hm.$$And so you went--did you go immediately to graduate school afterwards?$$Yes.$$Okay. All right.$$I went to Columbia [Columbia University].$$Okay. So, this is where you go to Columbia in New York City [New York, New York] and so what was your major?$$I went into psychiatric social work.$$Okay.$$And I did a field placement first year in public welfare in New York City, which was very different. I learned to go all over the Bronx [New York] and everywhere. And my field placement was the first year in the department of welfare [City of New York Department of Welfare; City of New York Department of Social Services], so that meant I was in the home visiting and working with people who were on welfare. And then my second year, I was at the Columbia University Presbyterian Hospital [Columbia Presbyterian Hospital; New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York] in the Department of Psychiatry.$$Now, were these--I mean, was it hard to adjust to New York City and, and the, the--you know, the, the real deep urban problems of New York City all at once? 'Cause you, you grew up in Tuskegee [Alabama] in a family like atmosphere, you go to New England to bucolic colleges (laughter), and then you go--you--all, all of the sudden you're in--$$In New York City.$$Yeah.$$Yeah, it was, although I had--you know, I knew a little bit about New York City because we'd go from Bronxville [New York] into New York on the train and we'd go back and forth a lot 'cause it was a short trip. But it, it was very much--it was different for me when I went to Columbia and had my field placement in public housing. And by public housing, I was really trying to work with people who didn't have jobs and, of course, being in New York making home visits is very different in the sense that you may be going to twelve, fifteen story walkup buildings. So, it was difficult but I enjoyed it. And--I shouldn't say I enjoyed it, but I, I learned a lot about the people. I became friends with some of them. And when I say friends, I don't mean I was--I was friends in the sense of they viewed me as being a person that wanted to help. Sometimes they didn't want my help because it meant they'd have to go back to work and that sometimes was problematic. But, I learned a lot. It was a totally new experience as you point out, you know, being in this big city after I'd been in small towns and so forth. But, I, I enjoyed my work very much and I learned a lot.$$Okay. So, did you have--were there any particular instructors or people you met along the way in the, the department of welfare that guided you?$$Yes and I'm--well, I had that first year in, in public welfare and then the second year--right now, I can't think of the names of my two people who were supervising me, but in the second year, I was in the Department of Psychiatry at--they've changed the name of the hospital, but it's the big Columbia University hospital. And I learned a lot and I enjoyed being in an interdisciplinary area because we worked a lot with different disciplines in the hospital.$$Okay.$$And, of course, I was familiar with hospitals since I'd (laughter) grown up in one practically [John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital, Tuskegee, Alabama], but this was a much, much bigger place.$Well, go, go ahead and tell us about that, the, the 9/11 [September 11, 2001] victims of (unclear) (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Well, I was just gonna say that volunteer life has been a very big part of my life, and I have worked on numerous boards here in the city and I will tell you that another experience that we haven't talked about is the fact that, before I get to 9/11, is that I went on loan from Howard University [Washington, D.C.] to be the commissioner of social services in the District of Columbia [Washington, D.C.].$$Okay. And what, what year is this? Do you remember?$$I'll think about it. I'll tell you in a minute. I was at Howard and there was a lawsuit brought against the District of Columbia called LaShawn v. the District of Columbia [sic.], and it was filed by the ACLU [American Civil Liberties Union], and the lawsuit, the plaintiffs asked me to serve as an expert witness in their case in the courts of the district, which I did, and I testified against the District of Columbia, and the lawsuit was won. Subsequently, the mayor of the district called me and said since I had been so vehement about the problems of the system, would I accept a job of commissioner of social services?$$Now, who was the mayor at that--$$Sharon Pratt Kelly [HistoryMaker Sharon Pratt].$$Okay.$$And I did that. And I went to, to this--to the child welfare division even though I had responsibilities for other services in the commission [Commission on Social Services], and it was really worse than I imagined it would be. But, we worked on it, worked on it, and worked on it, and it's still in progress, a work in progress. But, I did do that for three years. And while I was there, I was contacted by Freddie Mac [Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation], the corporation Leland Brendsel [Leland C. Brendsel], who said that they were interested in working with us and what could they do. And we established a partnership with Freddie Mac. The agency was in total disarray. They not only contributed funding for us, but actually put staff in the commission in order to help us just find out where children were, who they were, who their parents were, and so we established a terrific partnership with Freddie Mac, the Freddie Mac Foundation. And when I left the commission, they asked me to join the board of the Freddie Mac Foundation, and I have served on that board ever since.$$Okay. So, so how long--how long have you been on the board of Freddie, Freddie Mac Foundation? Do, do you know or do you have a--$$Since I left the commission--$$Okay.$$--which must've been ten years now.$$Okay.$$Yeah.$$So that's about two- 2002, I guess or so, about the time you retired from Howard, I guess, just about, yeah. Okay (simultaneous).$$(Simultaneous) Yeah.$$What--$$So--$$Oh--$$--that has continued.

Ann Dibble Jordan

Corporate executive and social work professor Ann Dibble Jordan was born to a prominent family in Tuskegee, Alabama in 1934. In 1955, Jordan graduated from Vassar College with her B.A. degree, and in 1961, she earned her M.A. degree from the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. From 1970 to 1987, Jordan worked as an Associate Professor at the School of Social Service Administration, and from 1970 to 1985, she served as the Director of Social Services of Chicago Lying-in Hospital, a maternity and women's hospital at the University of Chicago Medical Center. From 1986 to 1987, Jordan served as the Director of the Department of Social Services for the University of Chicago Medical Center. In 1986, she married Vernon Jordan, who made history when he helped organize the integration of the University of Georgia in 1961.

From 1981 to 2007, Jordan served as a director of Johnson & Johnson, and from 1989 to 2007, she served on the board of directors of Citigroup as the Field Work Director. In 1990, Jordan became a director of National Health Laboratories, now called LabCorp, and one year later she became a member of the Board of Trustees of the Brookings Institution, a non-profit public policy organization in Washington, D.C. From 1993 to 2007, Jordan served on the board of directors of Automatic Data Processing (ADP), a global provider of integrated computing and business outsourcing.

In 1994, Jordan and her husband organized a Democratic fundraiser that raised $3 million for the Clinton Campaign; one year later, they were recognized as a power couple by Forbes Magazine. In 1996, Jordan co-chaired President Clinton’s Inauguration, becoming the first African American to chair a Presidential Inaugural. The recipient of a 2004 American Woman Award from the Women’s Research & Education Institute, Jordan became a Director of Revlon in March 2009. Currently Jordan and her husband, Vernon, reside in Washington, D.C. and have four adult children.

Ann Dibble Jordan was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on June 26, 2010.

Accession Number

A2010.068

Sex

Female

Archival Photo 1
Interview Date

6/26/2010

Last Name

Jordan

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Dibble

Occupation
Schools

Tuskegee Institute High School

Northfield School for Girls

Vassar College

University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

Chambliss Children's House at Tuskegee Institute

Archival Photo 2
First Name

Ann

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

JOR06

Favorite Season

Summer

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

District of Columbia

Birth Date

8/13/1934

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Washington

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Ice Cream

Short Description

Community leader Ann Dibble Jordan (1934 - ) was an associate professor at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration. She served as a director of many companies, including Johnson & Johnson and Revlon.

Employment

University of Chicago Hospitals

University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

Chicago Lying-in Hospital

University of Chicago Medical Center

Johnson & Johnson

Favorite Color

Purple, Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:240,5:880,14:7056,230:8988,268:11968,309:12640,318:17040,329:18579,353:19308,364:20037,375:20685,387:21090,393:21738,409:22143,415:26768,461:27134,468:29208,507:30123,528:30428,534:30977,546:31831,567:32624,587:32990,594:35308,646:35552,651:44552,691:46190,716:51490,775:54429,799:56172,825:56504,830:58247,871:58579,876:59326,887:59990,898:71174,1010:78645,1092:79250,1109:80295,1137:88532,1243:89155,1251:91558,1313:93961,1369:98878,1436:102794,1468:103562,1486:104842,1511:105098,1516:120560,1722:123350,1769:124340,1784:130035,1839:130935,1853:134835,1916:135510,1928:136335,1941:136785,1949:137160,1955:137610,1963:139335,1986:140460,2009:140835,2016:141360,2025:145294,2038:145822,2045:149172,2086:149562,2098:153266,2112:154332,2128:155152,2141:155808,2153:156792,2167:157448,2177:158104,2191:159088,2205:159826,2216:161056,2236:161548,2244:162860,2259:163434,2269:164008,2277:169220,2307:170660,2333:171236,2340:171620,2345:176968,2400:181224,2497:181832,2509:182136,2514:183352,2540:184796,2573:185784,2592:191566,2660:191818,2665:192511,2677:192763,2682:193204,2690:194590,2726:194968,2737:195346,2745:197425,2790:197740,2796:200008,2854:200449,2862:201079,2876:201709,2898:201961,2903:206005,2926:206280,2932:206940,2946:211218,3015:211898,3028:212442,3039:213054,3049:213734,3060:214006,3065:214278,3070:215298,3088:216250,3108:216930,3119:220074,3146:220370,3151:226438,3316:237202,3495:243292,3630:255210,3738$0,0:3010,41:3640,53:3990,59:4270,64:4900,74:5880,91:11945,265:13017,285:20006,350:25783,406:29556,460:40037,542:40313,547:40589,552:44822,658:48920,684:51588,726:51956,731:53244,747:54256,759:54716,785:70398,864:71218,876:71710,883:76876,991:77614,1003:84220,1054:93280,1127:93808,1134:113064,1330:135210,1651
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Ann Dibble Jordan's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Ann Dibble Jordan lists her favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her maternal grandfather, Robert Robinson Taylor

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her maternal family's legacy in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her father's career

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her parents' relationship

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Ann Dibble Jordan lists her siblings

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her earliest childhood memory

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her home in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Ann Dibble Jordan remembers her early independence, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Ann Dibble Jordan remembers her early independence, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her early religious experiences

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her childhood activities

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Ann Dibble Jordan remembers visiting relatives during the summers

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her maternal uncles

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes the Chambliss Children's House School in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls the differential treatment of boys and girls

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Ann Dibble Jordan remembers her childhood friends

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Ann Dibble Jordan remembers the Northfield School for Girls in Gill, Massachusetts, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 10 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her activities at the Northfield School for Girls

Tape: 2 Story: 11 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her academic experiences at the Northfield School for Girls

Tape: 2 Story: 12 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her social life at the Northfield School for Girls

Tape: 2 Story: 13 - Ann Dibble Jordan remembers her decision to attend Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York

Tape: 2 Story: 14 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her experiences at Vassar College

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes the African American community of Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about race relations at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls studying the sociology of race at Vassar College

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Ann Dibble Jordan reflects upon her early experiences of racial discrimination

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about the alumnae of Vassar College

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Ann Dibble Jordan remembers the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her field work in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her experiences on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her marriage to Mercer Cook

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls her role as a social worker at the University of Chicago Medical Center

Tape: 3 Story: 11 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her child abuse casework

Tape: 3 Story: 12 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her career at the University of Chicago

Tape: 3 Story: 13 - Ann Dibble Jordan reflects upon her experiences at the University of Chicago

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Ann Dibble Jordan remembers receiving support from her family in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes her involvement with Operation PUSH

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls Reverend Jesse L. Jackson's role in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Ann Dibble Jordan remembers the campaigns of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her divorce

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Ann Dibble Jordan recalls serving on the board of Johnson and Johnson Products

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her marriage to Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her roles on corporate and charitable boards

Tape: 4 Story: 10 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her relationship with President Bill Clinton

Tape: 4 Story: 11 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about President Barack Obama's healthcare proposal

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Ann Dibble Jordan reflects upon her hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Ann Dibble Jordan reflects upon her legacy

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Ann Dibble Jordan talks about her family

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Ann Dibble Jordan describes how she would like to be remembered

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Ann Dibble Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Ann Dibble Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Ann Dibble Jordan narrates her photographs, pt. 3

DASession

1$1

DATape

1$3

DAStory

5$12

DATitle
Ann Dibble Jordan describes her maternal family's legacy in Tuskegee, Alabama
Ann Dibble Jordan describes her career at the University of Chicago
Transcript
Your mother's family basically was raised--you know grew up around Tuskegee [Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute; Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, Alabama] is that--?$$Yes.$$Okay, did your mother [Helen Taylor Dibble] have any stories in growing up that she shared with you? That you remember?$$No, but I think my mother had great love for Tuskegee because of growing up there and I think they had a very close family and I think she had you know sort of a normal family life where in black families at that time one of the great things that everybody encouraged people to do was to become educated 'cause they saw that a way out or a way to deal with prejudice.$$Okay, did she have any reflections on Booker T. Washington? Did she ever meet him?$$Well, I think she was quite young when he was around and though she had some memories of it. I don't think they were very defined in terms of a relationship.$$Okay.$$Huh?$$(CLARICE DIBBLE WALKER, IV): (Unclear).$$Yeah, her father [Robert Robinson Taylor] worked for him but, yeah.$$(CLARICE DIBBLE WALKER, IV): (Unclear).$$She knew the children and the grandchildren, she knew the next generations.$$Right, right and I--Booker T. Washington lived until 1915, so she was born 1901, about fifteen years ago.$$Yeah.$$Yeah you can see him coming and going, and your grandfather built The Oaks [Tuskegee, Alabama] his residence from what I understand right?$$The what?$$The Oaks?$$The Oaks, yes. He probably was the architect for the most of the buildings in that time period.$$Okay, all right, now, now she didn't--I mean I'm just trying to get you know what she might have shared about growing up in Tuskegee in those days, what it was like for her to grow up on that campus with all that activity?$$I think it was unusual in the sense of here you are in the middle of the South where education for blacks had been very limited and Booker T. Washington had this goal and he achieved his goal in large part of providing a place that people could be, could reach, could be educated and finish college and go onto a better life, and I think that, that idea and that effort was always a big part of the experience of living in Tuskegee, the importance of getting an education, of being able to contribute and work in a society that had not been friendly to blacks, but in fact where blacks were determined to succeed.$$Okay, did she have any stories about meeting any of the celebrities from those days? 'Cause this is not--you may take this for granted but most people don't grow up on a campus where they know Booker T. Washington and the other notables of the--that period of time.$$Well, we did, we had a very interesting life because they of course entertained a lot of people who came to visit Tuskegee, so even though we lived in a small town we heard Marian Anderson sing 'cause she sang at the college campus 'cause they couldn't sing in most places. So we had the great experience of seeing a lot of people from the bigger world who came to Tuskegee to perform, and that was a different experience than most people had in the South living in, in segregated communities.$$Okay now did your mother go to school at Tuskegee herself as a child?$$As a--yeah, she went to school in Tuskegee and then she went to Fisk [Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee] to college.$$Okay, all right and what did she major in at Fisk?$$I think socio [sociology].$$(CLARICE DIBBLE WALKER, IV): (Unclear).$$Music, yeah.$$Okay, so your mother was a music major? Did she play--was she an expert on any particular instrument?$$She's a very good pianist.$$Okay.$$In fact we have her piano, I have it right there.$$Oh you're right--okay (laughter).$$It's in the living room.$$In the living room, okay.$It says that from 1970 to '87 [1987] you worked as a field work associate professor at the School of Social Service Administration [University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration, Chicago, Illinois].$$Um-hm.$$How did that come about?$$Pardon? I did that in conjunction with my job. We had field work students that were placed in our offices.$$Okay, so did you teach? You taught, you were teaching (unclear)?$$Well, I was their advisor there, teaching there. That we--they had--part of their course work was a practicum and they were placed in our offices at the University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois], and I was--yeah I was involved in that.$$Okay so they would report to you as?$$Well we were, yeah, we were responsible for supervising their training, practical training.$$Okay you did that for long time.$$Yeah.$$Um, then you came and--the director of social services at Chicago Lying-in Hospital at the University of Chicago Medical Center [Chicago, Illinois]. Now what is the Chicago Lying-in Hospital?$$That's the obstetrical hospital.$$Okay.$$Women's diseases and obstetrics.$$Okay so you provided social services for women--okay. And yeah in the maternity ward there basically?$$Yeah.$$Yeah.$$But we had a big hospital for that.$$Okay so you were--you did that from--is it correct that you did that from 1970 to '85 [1985], is that?$$Um-hm.$$Okay, I'm sorry I didn't get the--I should've asked. What year did you get married?$$To Vernon [HistoryMaker Vernon E. Jordan, Jr.]?$$No, to [HistoryMaker] Mercer Cook before, I didn't ask that question.$$(Laughter).$$I--you know.$$Fifty-six [1956].$$Oh, fity-six [1956]. Okay.

Eugene H. Dibble, III

Eugene Heriot Dibble, III, was born on July 22, 1929, at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama where he was one of four children born to Dr. Eugene Heriot Dibble, Jr., a physician at A. Andrew Memorial Hospital in Tuskegee. Dibble graduated from the Monson Academy preparatory school in Massachusetts and then received his B.S. degree in chemistry from the Tuskegee Institute in 1952. During his undergraduate career, Dibble also worked in the chemistry laboratory at John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital under the tutelage of famed immunologist Dr. Reuben Kahn at the University of Michigan. Following college graduation, Dibble was called to active duty in the United States Air Force and served as a munitions and demolition officer. He was discharged at the rank of second lieutenant. Following his tenure in the U.S. Air Force, Dibble attended the New York Institute of Finance and completed the broker’s trainee program in 1954. Only a year later, Dibble passed the examination to become a registered stock broker on the New York Stock Exchange.

Dibble worked as a stockbroker for the investment firm of Strauss, Blosser and MacDowell from 1956 until 1962. Dibble was one of only three African American stockbrokers working in Chicago investment firms. In 1965, Dibble and Rufus Cook began the Astro Investment Company. The goal of this business was to expand African American influence within the economy through direct investment. Muhammad Ali was one of his clients. In 1966, Dibble ran as the Republican candidate for Water Commissioner for the City of Chicago and was elected to a six-year term. He also served as trustee and chairman of the Metropolitan Sanitary District’s Committee on Maintenance and Operation in 1972. Following his tenure in this position, he owned numerous businesses including Jackson Parks Storage, Piggley Wrigley Bar-B-Q, New Racks Garage and Olly Trolly. In addition to these business endeavors, Dibble also volunteered for the Salvation Army Canteen Program.

Dibble received numerous civic awards, including Honorary Sheriff of Maywood and the Danny Davis Congressional Roll of Honor. He married Jeanette Campbell on August 6, 1955. She is a graduate of Wellesley College and the Yale University School of Nursing. The couple has five children: Rochon, Chyla, Eugene, Andrew and Hillary.

Dibble passed away on June 6, 2014, at the age of 84.

Dibble was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.085

Sex

Male

Interview Date

7/14/2008 |and| 7/18/2008

Last Name

Dibble

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

H.

Organizations
Schools

Lincoln University

Wilbraham & Monson Academy

Tuskegee University

First Name

Eugene

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

DIB01

Favorite Season

Summer

Sponsor

Aetna

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Get Along.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

7/22/1929

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Bacon

Death Date

6/6/2014

Short Description

Investment banker and city commissioner Eugene H. Dibble, III (1929 - 2014 ) founded the Astro Investment Company in Chicago in 1965. From 1966 to 1972, he served as Chicago's Water Commissioner. He also owned numerous businesses.

Employment

U.S. Air Force

Hornblower & Weeks

Wayne Hummer & Co.

E.H.D. & Sons, Inc.

Straus, Blosser & McDowell

Metropolitan Sanitary District of Chicago

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Orange

Timing Pairs
0,0:924,16:17286,171:38138,531:52518,783:65500,887:67072,950:80614,1141:107961,1540:129128,1991:170660,2374:184160,2507$0,0:87620,937:105170,1166:168560,1896
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Eugene H. Dibble, III's interview, session 1

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Eugene H. Dibble, III lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his mother's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his mother's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers his uncle, Robert Rochon Taylor

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his family's experiences of segregation

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers his paternal great-grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls his father's education

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes how his parents met

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls his mother's role at Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute

Tape: 1 Story: 11 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers his parents' marriage

Tape: 1 Story: 12 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his likeness to his father

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls his family's movie theater in Camden, South Carolina

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls the annual clinic of the John A. Andrew Clinical Society

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his father's medical career

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers meeting African American physicians at Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes patients at the Tuskegee Veterans Administration Medical Center

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers his childhood horse

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his early education

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers George Washington Carver, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers George Washington Carver, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls the presidents of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers his father's community service

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes Monson Academy in Monson, Massachusetts

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls his experiences at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his return to Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers the Tuskegee Advanced Flying School

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls Eleanor Roosevelt's visits to Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers Benjamin O. Davis, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers Tuskegee Airman Daniel "Chappie" James, Jr.

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls joining the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers graduating from Tuskegee Institute

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his experiences in the U.S. Air Force

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers General Curtis LeMay

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls being hired at Wayne Hummer and Co. in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his early experience with investments

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls his early businesses in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 4 Story: 9 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his connection to Muhammad Ali

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers meeting Muhammad Ali for the first time

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his friendship with Muhammad Ali

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls meeting his wife

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes the black business network in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls helping Muhammad Ali and Elijah Muhammad acquire their homes

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about the founding of Seaway Bank and Trust Company in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his disinterest in board service

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about his highest grossing financial deal

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Eugene H. Dibble, III shares his advice for aspiring investors, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 10 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about investment opportunities, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 11 - Eugene H. Dibble, III reflects upon his career

Tape: 5 Story: 12 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers Chicago Mayor Harold Washington

Tape: 5 Story: 13 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls running for Cook County public office

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls the Blackstone Rangers' attempt to rob his garage

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers the 1967 blizzard in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls becoming commissioner of the Metropolitan Sanitary District of Greater Chicago

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Eugene H. Dibble, III reflects upon his life and legacy

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his family

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about smoking a cigar with Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Slating of Eugene H. Dibble, III's interview, session 2

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his early career

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls his brokerage work for Elijah Muhammad

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls founding his own firm, E.H.D. and Sons, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Eugene H. Dibble, III lists the firms where he worked in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes the office of E.H.D. & Sons, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls representing Elijah Muhammad

Tape: 7 Story: 8 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls his brokerage work for John H. Johnson

Tape: 7 Story: 9 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about his children

Tape: 7 Story: 10 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his children's upbringing

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about his children's education

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his car collection

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers his carry out restaurant in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about his father's involvement in the Tuskegee syphilis experiment

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Eugene H. Dibble remembers the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, pt. 1

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls the doctors involved in the Tuskegee syphilis experiment

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about investing in his children's education

Tape: 8 Story: 9 - Eugene H. Dibble, III shares his advice for aspiring investors, pt. 2

Tape: 8 Story: 10 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about investment opportunities, pt. 2

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Eugene H. Dibble, III explains how he identifies potential investments

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his conversations with Chicagoans

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about successful African American businesswomen

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Eugene H. Dibble, III talks about networking in Chicago, Illinois

Tape: 9 Story: 5 - Eugene H. Dibble, III describes his hopes for the African American community

Tape: 9 Story: 6 - Eugene H. Dibble, III narrates his photographs

DASession

1$2

DATape

5$7

DAStory

1$3

DATitle
Eugene H. Dibble, III remembers meeting Muhammad Ali for the first time
Eugene H. Dibble, III recalls his brokerage work for Elijah Muhammad
Transcript
Tell us how you first met Muhammad Ali.$$I first met Muhammad Ali at our garage. He came in there and filled up his car and didn't have no money to pay for the gas.$$Now this is 69th [Street] and--$$Stony Island [Avenue].$$Stony Island, okay.$$The garage is right there on the curb, next to the funeral home.$$Now, Ali lived, didn't he live in South Shore [Chicago, Illinois] then, near the lake [Lake Michigan]--$$Yeah.$$--around 67th [Street] and the lake?$$He lived over in that high rise.$$Oh, yeah, yeah, okay. So he wasn't that far away.$$No.$$Okay, so, well tell us what happened. He came in the garage to get his car fixed?$$He came in and got his gas and then wanted to drive off and didn't have the money, and I put my dog on him and scared him to death. (Laughter) He left the car. Who was that? Vaughn [Vaughn Chandler (ph.)] took the, Vaughn took the dog and kept him from biting him. Vaughn's the fellow that's worked for me for about thirty-five years. He grabbed the dog and kept him from biting Ali.$$So did he, what kind of car was he driving? A big Cadillac or something?$$Cadillac.$$Cadillac, okay. Now did you realize that was Muhammad Ali at the time?$$I didn't know who he was, no.$$You just knew he didn't pay?$$I knew he didn't pay, and that was a mistake making him 'cause he sure came back after that and then, during his impoverished years (laughter).$$So what happened when you discovered, how did you discover it was him? Did you go out and, after they pulled the dog off?$$Huh?$$I mean, after they called the dog back, then you discovered it was Muhammad Ali?$$Somebody else knew who it was and then told me who it was.$$So what did you do at that point?$$One of my employees knew who he was. I didn't bother him, we became friends and he hung out at the garage every day from then on. I inherited a lot of him.$$You say, a lot of him, who else came by the garage?$$We had four or five of 'em that'd come by, didn't have any money and was down on their--$$(JEANETTE CAMPBELL DIBBLE): Was it--Mahalia Jackson's husband [Sigmond Galloway].$$Mahalia--$$(JEANETTE CAMPBELL DIBBLE): Morris Tynes [Morris H. Tynes].$$Morris Tynes. Oh, and the list goes--$$So these are famous African Americans in the neighborhood, or they have some kind of fame for one reason or another, and Muhammad Ali is the most famous African American in the world in those days, he's coming by, hanging out at the garage.$$That's right. That's the only way he ate, coming by and getting me.$Now at one point you were also a financial advisor to Elijah Muhammad?$$That's correct.$$How did that relationship develop?$$Well, Elijah Muhammad called me and invited me over to his home one day, and we sat down and talked for quite a length of time, and he had a lot of things that he wanted to do and I agreed that I would help him. One of the first things he wanted to do was to buy an airplane, and he hadn't been successful in buying airplanes, so I had some friends down in Nashville, Tennessee that had some planes, and I went down to Nashville and talked with them and was able to get a plane for him. It was a plane that was set up for private individuals. It was really a corporate jet, and I was able to get that for him and he bought it. I think he paid about $7.5 million for it. I know he did. That's what he paid for it. But he wanted to use it as he traveled around the country and for his associates to use and have an opportunity to be up to date in having a facility where they could go back and forth across the country.$$Did you help him get financing for that purchase?$$He didn't need financing; he financed it himself.$$Now you were also involved in the purchase of the mosque on Stony Island Avenue [Mosque Maryam, Chicago, Illinois]?$$That's correct.$$What was your involvement in that?$$Well, I arranged for the financing for it, and I arranged for him the purchase of it.$$(JEANETTE CAMPBELL DIBBLE): Did you select the site?$$The fight?$$(JEANETTE CAMPBELL DIBBLE): The site?$$Yes, the site was the property on Stony Island.$$So you arranged the purchase of that property?$$Yes. I had a garage on Stony Island also, and it was a very large garage, and he came to me knowing that I had this facility and told me that he was looking for a facility on Stony Island, and I located it for him and arranged for the financing of it and for the acquisition of it.

Darnell Eugene Diggs

Research physicist Darnell Eugene Diggs was born on May 20, 1970, in Tuskegee, Alabama to Janie Mae Davenport Diggs and John Diggs. Diggs and his twin sister were the youngest in a family of fifteen children. Diggs attended Pike County Elementary School and Pike County High School, where he was registered in advanced placement classes and played the trumpet in the school marching band.

Diggs followed in his family’s tradition by enrolling at Alabama A&M University in Normal, Alabama. While a freshman, he majored in business management and sang in the university choir. Diggs changed his major to physics at the end of his sophomore year after performing well in a physical science class and graduated with his B.S. degree in physics in 1988. Inspired by members of the National Conference of Black Physics Students and the Society of Physics Students where he served as president, Diggs remained at Alabama A&M University where he earned his M.S. degree in physics in 1997. After internships at the University of Wisconsin and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Alabama, Diggs earned his Ph.D. degree in physics in 2001. Diggs was hired by the United States Air Force Research Laboratory as a research physicist in 2002; there, he worked to improve polymer-based electro-optic modulators that provide critical advantages over devices made from other materials. Through his work, Diggs collaborated with Tyndall Air Force Base, Georgia Tech Research Institute, the Army Strategic Missile Command, the University of Dayton, and Alabama A&M University.

In 2004, Diggs received the Black Engineer of the Year Award in the category of Promising Scientist in Government. Science Spectrum Magazine named Diggs one of the 50 Most Important Blacks in Research Science in 2004, and a Top Minority in Science in 2005. The World Year of Physics 2005 also recognized Diggs as one of five Distinguished African American Physicists. In 2006, Diggs was invited to speak at the U.S. Air Force & Taiwan Nanoscience Initiative held in Taipei, Taiwan. In 2007, he became president of the Dayton Alumni Extension for the National Society of Black Engineers. Diggs also served as an ordained Elder in the Church of God in Christ.

Darnell Eugene Diggs was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on February 25, 2008.

Accession Number

A2008.028

Sex

Male

Interview Date

2/25/2008

Last Name

Diggs

Maker Category
Middle Name

Eugene

Occupation
Schools

Pike County High School

Pike County Elementary School

Alabama A&M University

Search Occupation Category
First Name

Darnell

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

DIG01

Favorite Season

Christmas

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Sydney, Australia

Favorite Quote

I can, and I will.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Ohio

Birth Date

5/20/1970

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Dayton

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Green Beans

Short Description

Physicist Darnell Eugene Diggs (1970 - ) worked at the United States Air Force Research Laboratory, on the United States Air Force's development of new optoelectronic devices.

Employment

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue, Brown

Timing Pairs
0,0:5251,104:5607,109:7921,234:11214,307:11659,313:12638,325:13706,338:14151,344:18423,412:26779,495:30500,515:34820,648:39700,798:45560,844:46169,853:50519,908:52085,926:53042,939:56087,988:56696,997:59393,1045:60263,1056:66474,1082:66929,1088:83075,1269:83675,1278:86000,1327:89284,1367:89900,1376:90285,1383:97985,1559:98524,1568:99140,1575:100372,1597:101219,1610:101835,1619:119425,1903:119936,1911:120593,1921:121907,1941:122564,1951:127254,1970:134476,2075:135214,2085:144080,2241:154420,2337:155300,2347:158648,2366:161097,2413:165580,2473$0,0:8174,94:10126,122:17890,161:18310,167:19234,183:19570,188:21418,209:22510,225:22846,230:24694,253:30282,318:30612,324:30876,329:31470,339:32064,349:32592,358:33054,366:33318,371:33582,376:42344,462:42956,478:43296,483:44180,497:44656,505:46968,549:47648,560:48056,567:48532,575:51380,596:61384,745:69217,835:70883,856:90454,1145:92148,1195:92610,1202:97230,1274:98154,1290:98539,1296:111437,1439:113112,1464:113715,1475:114184,1480:115122,1503:115524,1510:118807,1585:119075,1590:119343,1595:121353,1656:122090,1668:122492,1686:126043,1765:127182,1787:133340,1854:137798,1921:139072,1935:148895,2061:149220,2067:151560,2146:151950,2153:152470,2162:152795,2168:155410,2190:156434,2217:157074,2227:158098,2249:163794,2357:168210,2466:171026,2527:172050,2545:173906,2591:174162,2596:184586,2728:200660,3065:201650,3078:207790,3124:210850,3167:219830,3316:220382,3347:226592,3456:227006,3467:227558,3477:228731,3509:231077,3597:234872,3657:236252,3691:236528,3696:237908,3701:243690,3769
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Darnell Diggs' interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Darnell Diggs shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Darnell Diggs talks about his mother's side of the family

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Darnell Diggs talks about his mother's upbringing

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Darnell Diggs talks about his father

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Darnell Diggs recalls how the Civil Rights Movement influenced his family

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Darnell Diggs talks about his childhood neighborhood and home

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Darnell Diggs describes his childhood activities

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Darnell Diggs talks about his participation in church during his youth

Tape: 1 Story: 10 - Darnell Diggs describes his childhood school experience

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Darnell Diggs tells a story about how his father was hurt by a cow

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Darnell Diggs talks about the culture of blues music in Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Darnell Diggs describes his experience at Pike County High School

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Darnell Diggs recalls his decision to attend Alabama A&M University

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Darnell Diggs talks about his experience at Alabama A&M University

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Darnell Diggs recalls his initial poor performance in physics during college

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Darnell Diggs talks about the development of his interest in physics

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Darnell Diggs talks about a conversation with the black physicist, Bill Gates

Tape: 2 Story: 9 - Darnell Diggs talks about working at NASA Space Camp

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Darnell Diggs continues to talk about space camp and his other jobs during college

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Darnell Diggs talks about his academic and extra-curricular activities during college

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Darnell Diggs talks about his graduate school experience at Alabama A&M

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Darnell Diggs talks about his graduate school mentors and his master's thesis

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Darnell Diggs describes his internship at the University of Wisconsin Madison

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Darnell Diggs describes his Ph.D. research and its applications from Alabama A&M

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Darnell Diggs recalls his difficulties in graduate school

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Darnell Diggs recalls his first job at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

Tape: 3 Story: 9 - Darnell Diggs describes his work with organic materials that have light emitting properties

Tape: 3 Story: 10 - Darnell Diggs responds to a question about being publicly recognized

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Darnell Diggs advises budding scientists

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Darnell Diggs discusses his philosophy on science and religion

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Darnell Diggs discusses the underrepresentation of African Americans in physics

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Darnell Diggs describes his continuing education and plans for the future

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Darnell Diggs discusses his legacy

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Darnell Diggs talks about his colleagues, family, and friends

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Darnell Diggs talks about his church life

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Darnell Diggs talks about how he would like to be remembered

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$3

DAStory

6$10

DATitle
Darnell Diggs describes his Ph.D. research and its applications from Alabama A&M
Darnell Diggs responds to a question about being publicly recognized
Transcript
Okay, all right, well, tell us about the Ph.D.. Now, you went to the, you received your Ph.D. from the same school--$$I did.$$--Alabama A&M [Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University, Huntsville, Alabama]. Now, how many, is it unusual for, well, I know it is, because there aren't many traditionally black colleges or historically black colleges that have Ph.D. programs in the hard sciences?$$Right, not many. I wanna say, Alabama A&M, I think Howard [University, Washington D.C.] and, Howard, I wanna say Norfolk State[University, Norfolk, Virginia] maybe and Hampton [University, Hampton, Virginia]. I think those four offer a Ph.D. in physics. I don't wanna say TSU, Tennessee State [University, Nashville, Tennessee]. I think they are in engineering, something like that but not in physics.$$Okay, so that is unusual. So, now, what was your Ph.D. dissertation?$$My Ph.D. dissertation was in chemical sensing, chemical and biological sensing which is relevant for the Air Force in terms of being able to sense and detect harmful biological agents.$$Okay, so that is about that, sensing harmful biological agents.$$Yeah, um-hum.$$Okay, now how, what's the application of that, I guess activity?$$Now, like if they feel that the next wave will be perhaps chemical warfare. So if I come into your environment and release something that you can't see or smell or taste, like carbon monoxide which is very deadly and you can't see it and you can't taste it, you can't smell it. So that's why people succumb to it. But there are devices in place that can detect those harmful agents, although the physical senses can't pick it up. And so like even if Iraq, if someone comes and puts some deadly pathogen in your water supply and you don't know it's there, then you'll drink it unknowingly, and could possibly die. But then there are devices you can make to put in the water and say okay, there's something there or improvised explosive devices which is a chemical. You can say, okay, you can scan the area and say, okay, that's TNT or RDX, which say that's a potential harmful device there, so.$$Okay, so what specific substances did you, were you able to detect through your (unclear)--$$We did, to demonstrate the proof of concept, we did, we detect ammonia and we mixed it in different ambient air, like under so many parts per million because of those, it'd be very sensitive to (unclear) the system, the smallest amount in the greatest volume of air.$$$Okay, all right. Now, what's been, I guess--now, you've been, you've received quite a bit of recognition in the past few years. There's been, you received the Black Engineer of the Year Award in 2004 in the category of the most promising scientist in government. You received, you were recognized as one of the top fifty Most Important Blacks in Research Science that same year. In 2005, you received the top Minority in Science Trailblazer Award. You were also one of the five distinguished African American physicists to appear in a National television public service announcement for the World Year of Physicists in 2005 in celebration of Albert Einstein. I mean there's a lot of--you were profiled at the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry too, I think, for black creativity back in 2005. So what, I mean, do you have a response to all this recognition? I mean, you know--$$When people ask me, I give them the real answer. I mean I like it, but when they say how do you, how did it happen? I just, I tell them God. I mean I don't, God and prayer, and being, I guess being in the right place at the right time. I don't know. That Black Engineer of the Year Award was, that's highly competitive, and I won that, being, only being like, being on the job a year and six or eight months. And I was, you know, in the category competing with people who had been on the job for a while. And the guy who was on the committee that they select, he was telling me that because I was a Sunday school teacher, and I was tutoring, and I was active with the youth, cause you're more than just an engineer or a scientists. You have to be communally responsible also. And he was like, a lot of the applications don't, they highlight all of their educational credentials and never show where they give anything back to the community. He was like, that part of me pushed me over the top. So.$$Okay, I think it's a stereotypical image of scientists, you know, rocket scientists or something, you know, lab coat, in a laboratory all day, kind of myopic in their views, you know, and not really participating in the community, you know, just always thinking about calculations and, you know, that--I mean, so you don't fit that stereotype?$$No, because I agree with Carter G. Woodson, if you do that, then you're clearly not educated. I really believe that because again, I said earlier, that education is not merely the impartation of knowledge. Education is also the communication of experience to a race. So I have a responsibility to educate and a responsibility to help somebody else along the way. You can have a degree and miss the education is what I'm saying, so.$$Okay, do you speak to a lot of young people?$$Often, yeah. I do a lot of public speaking in, here in Dayton [Ohio], Alabama. I spoke to a lot of the universities here too, UD [University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio], Wright State [University, Dayton, Ohio], and on base [Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio]. I do like the Black History. I did the MLK [Martin Luther King] ceremony for another agency here on base in January. So I just did like, did U-D's diversity lecture series a couple of weeks ago.$$And you enjoy speaking?$$I love speaking, love public speaking, yes. I love telling people my story, love telling me what they, you know, encourage people that they can do whatever they wanna do and not to live their lives in the words or thoughts of other people and don't see them as, you know, they're just obstacles, you know, that's all. But find a way to overcome it. They can believe what they want. When someone tells you they can't, you can't do something, what they're saying is that they can't, not you. So. You know, (unclear) I believe like that, yeah.

The Honorable Myron Thompson

Federal District Court Judge Myron Herbert Thompson was born on January 7, 1947 in Tuskegee, Alabama to Lawrence and Lillian Thompson. At age two, Thompson contracted polio and spent much of his time alone, finding solace in jazz and classical music. He attended Tuskegee Institute High School where he was named class salutatorian in 1965. Thompson received his B.A. degree in political science from Yale University in 1969 and his J.D. degree from Yale Law School in 1972.

After graduation, Thompson became the first African American Assistant Attorney General for the State of Alabama. He served in this position for two years before going into private practice in Dothan, Alabama. Thompson’s firm handled labor law, civil rights, school desegregation, sex discrimination and First Amendment cases.

President Jimmy Carter nominated Thompson to the bench of the United States District Court, Middle District of Alabama. He was confirmed by the U.S. Senate and received his appointment in September of 1980. At age thirty-three, he was the youngest member of the bench. Thompson served as Chief Justice from 1991 to 1998.

Thompson presides over the same court room where many landmark civil rights cases were argued and decided. He had the court restored to stand as a testament to history. Thompson also made national headlines when he ordered Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore to remove a monument of the Ten Commandments from the rotunda of the State of Alabama’s courthouse. He remains as much of an active legal scholar as his position permits, often calling for the executive and legislative branches to accept more responsibility for constitutional oversight that too often is left as the responsibility of judges. Thompson has served on the bench for twenty-seven years.

Myron Thompson was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on March 20, 2007.

Accession Number

A2007.100

Sex

Male

Interview Date

3/20/2007

Last Name

Thompson

Maker Category
Organizations
Schools

Tuskegee Institute High School

Tuskegee Institute Middle School

Yale University

Yale Law School

First Name

Myron

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

THO13

Favorite Season

Fall

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Mexico City, Mexico

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Alabama

Birth Date

1/7/1947

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Montgomery

Country

United States

Favorite Food

None

Short Description

Federal district court judge The Honorable Myron Thompson (1947 - ) became the first African American Assistant Attorney General for the State of Alabama. President Jimmy Carter nominated Thompson to the bench of the United States District Court, Middle District of Alabama; he served as Chief Justice from 1991 to 1998.

Employment

U.S. Judiciary

Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
0,0:15102,256:16446,278:28609,364:29241,373:33744,474:39827,613:40301,621:53580,760:56730,828:57220,835:57640,843:62718,911:66518,998:68950,1042:69710,1054:77766,1204:78298,1213:79058,1225:82478,1287:84606,1320:84986,1326:85594,1339:86050,1347:86962,1358:87874,1373:88254,1379:113218,1686:113631,1695:118351,1818:119177,1833:119944,1845:120357,1853:132137,1975:132492,1980:132989,2026:134977,2067:135332,2072:158323,2283:167592,2457:179290,2575$0,0:5684,101:6054,107:7164,141:8126,155:10790,202:11160,208:13898,253:14342,260:16488,298:17080,307:17746,322:20706,379:21372,391:27876,413:28492,421:29020,428:32628,484:33244,492:33860,499:38876,585:48116,756:64281,888:64686,894:65415,910:66468,930:67035,938:68250,964:68898,978:69546,986:70599,1011:70923,1016:71247,1021:78900,1099:80391,1137:82379,1173:97450,1381:97922,1392:98217,1398:98807,1413:99043,1418:99928,1440:100695,1456:109900,1620
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Myron Thompson's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Myron Thompson lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Myron Thompson describes his father's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Myron Thompson talks about his father's occupations and interests

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Myron Thompson describes his maternal grandparents, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Myron Thompson describes his maternal grandparents, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Myron Thompson remembers his maternal step-grandmother

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Myron Thompson describes his mother's experience at the Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Myron Thompson shares his experience contracting polio in 1949

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Myron Thompson remembers being treated for polio at the Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Myron Thompson describes the impact that polio had on his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Myron Thompson shares the lessons he learned from his mother, pt. 1

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Myron Thompson shares the lessons he learned from his mother, pt. 2

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Myron Thompson talks about his step-father and the Butler Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Myron Thompson describes the impact of moving from the Tuskegee Institute to the Butler Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Myron Thompson recalls his experience riding on the bus to Tuskegee Institute High School

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Myron Thompson describes the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Myron Thompson talks about his brother, Lawrence Thompson, Jr.

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Myron Thompson describes the activities he participated in with the group Jack and Jill

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Myron Thompson describes his experience at Tuskegee Institute High School, pt. 1

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Myron Thompson describes his experience at Tuskegee Institute High School, pt. 2

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Myron Thompson reflects on his lack of Civil Rights involvement in high school

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Myron Thompson recalls visiting colleges and his decision to attend Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Myron Thompson describes adjusting to the environment of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 3 Story: 8 - Myron Thompson reflects on his time at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Myron Thompson describes his introduction to culture at the Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Myron Thompson reflects on his lack of political involvement at Yale Law School

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Myron Thompson recalls becoming involved with the trial of Black Panther Bobby Seale

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Myron Thompson recalls becoming the Assistant Attorney General for the State of Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Myron Thompson describes his experience in private law practice in Dothan, Alabama

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Myron Thompson recalls working with Federal District Court Judge Frank Minis Johnson, Jr., pt. 1

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Myron Thompson recalls working with Federal District Court Judge Frank Minis Johnson, Jr., pt. 2

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Myron Thompson recalls his appointment as a Federal District Court Judge, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Myron Thompson recalls his appointment as a Federal District Court Judge, pt. 2

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Myron Thompson reflects on becoming a Federal District Court Judge

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Myron Thompson recalls his first decision, in a case of use of deadly force by a police officer

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Myron Thompson describes a his judicial decision on the special education system in Alabama

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Myron Thompson recalls ordering Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore to remove a monument of the Ten Commandments from the Alabama Judicial Building

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Myron Thompson talks about some of the discrimination cases he decided as a Federal District Court Judge in Alabama

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Myron Thompson describes his prison and voting rights cases

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Myron Thompson talks about his family

Tape: 5 Story: 9 - Myron Thompson shares his message for future generations

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Myron Thompson reflects upon his lack of regrets and his plans for the future

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Myron Thompson talks about his relationship with other judges and balancing his work and home life

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Myron Thompson reflects upon his legacy

DASession

1$1

DATape

4$5

DAStory

3$3

DATitle
Myron Thompson recalls becoming involved with the trial of Black Panther Bobby Seale
Myron Thompson recalls his first decision, in a case of use of deadly force by a police officer
Transcript
But when I got to law school and there was this strong impact of my step-mother and my, I mean, my step-father [Kenneth Buford] and my mother, and the war breaking out, the war movement being at its real height. I remember the [Robert George] Bobby Seale trial and that was my first real involvement on a public level. The Bobby Seale trial, I don't know if you remember that, was when he was a Black Panther and he was tried in New Haven [Connecticut] for murder and the President of Yale [University in New Haven, Connecticut] named Kingman Brewster, had questioned whether he could get a fair trial before a jury in Connecticut, particular for this may--might be an all-white jury. And a lot of editorials were written attacking Kingman Brewster for his comments and indeed Spiro Agnew, who was then Vice President of the United States, with [President Richard M.] Nixon had attacked Kingman Brewster for sort of saying, questioning whether Bobby Seale could get a fair trial. And I wrote a letter to the Montgomery Advertiser here in Montgomery, Alabama, and I, and I remember prefacing it by saying that I am an Alabamian, I didn't say that I was black, I just said I'm an Alabamian and I think that the question of whether a black person can get a fair trial is an appropriate question to ask. And I remember after writing that letter, which they published in a local paper here coming from someone at Yale, my mother [Lillian Glanton Thompson Buford] said that several FBI agents came to see her and said that they had seen the letter, now you have to remember that my mother and I had different last names and, as far as she knew, they did not know that I was her son, and that was really the beginning of my sensitivity of what, what was going on in the world and I guess that's when I admitted, sort of metaphorically speaking, I started looking up from the pages of the book and then decided, you know, what did I want to do with my life, I'd gone to work on Wall Street [New York City, New York], I'd--in the summers, I knew what it was like to be a Wall Street lawyer and then I decided I wanted to do Civil Rights work and to come back to Alabama and to devote my life to, to doing Civil Rights work in Alabama. And I will say this in my behalf, and I'm somewhat proud of it, I was a late bloomer in the sense that I was the one who woke up late, but I was the only one who took--who ran the whole course. (Laughter)$$Okay.$$Many of my friends who were out their demonstrating did not come back to Alabama and do what I did.$$Right, you're exactly right.$It was a promised land, but it was hard. And I--getting a little bit into the judging, I remember my first decision [Ayler v. Hopper, 1981], controversial decision dealt with deadly force and I was the first judge in Alabama to have declared the use of deadly force without probable cause, that is shooting someone like a fleeing felon without probable cause to believe he was a danger, was unconstitutional, and several people told me I invited, I invented that out of whole cloth. Several judges told me that I probably would be reversed on appeal and I remember, this gets back to Judge Johnson, Frank [Minis] Johnson [Jr.] met me in the hall one day and he says, "Myron, he says be prepared to get reversed," but he says, you're right, your ruling is right, but if anything I can do as an appellate judge, I'm gonna make sure that you're ultimately affirmed." And a year after, two years later, after my decision went up in another case, that ended up, same decision, the Supreme Court came down with the very same decision I came down with and the Eleventh Circuit affirmed me in my case and went out of their way to say that the district judge is to be praised for predicting that the law, how the law was going to become out here. But I sweated, and it was rough, but it was definitely worth it. And what we obviously--the undercurrent here is we know who's being shot, these were black defendants who were fleeing and they were routinely being shot whether they posed a danger to anyone or not, you know, the police would just shoot you, and they can't do that. And I said, it's wrong, you just can't do it.

Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr.

Internal medicine physician Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. was born on March 22, 1925 in Tuskegee, Alabama to Dr. George Clayton Branche, Sr. and Lillian Vester Davidson. Branche attended Boston Latin High School in Boston, Massachusetts and graduated in June of 1942. He then attended and graduated from Bowdon College in Brunswick, Maine, earning his B.A. degree in 1946. Branche graduated from Boston University’s Medical School in 1948 earning his M.D. degree.

After earning his medical degree, Branche worked as a medical intern at Boston City Hospital between 1948 and 1949. In July of 1949, Branche started his residency in internal medicine at Cushing Veterans’ Hospital. After his residency ended in 1951, he earned a cancer fellowship at Tufts Medical School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. After his cancer fellowship, Branche entered the U.S. Army. Between October and December of 1952, Branche attended medical field service school at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas in preparation for service overseas during the Korean Conflict. Between December of 1952 and May 15, 1954, Branche served in the U.S. Army as a medical officer. He was honorably discharged in November of 1954, achieving the rank of captain.

Branche started to practice internal medicine in Richmond, Virginia near the end of 1954 after leaving the U.S. Army. The following year, he got married and started a family. After seven years in Richmond, Branche and his family moved to New York City, where he practiced medicine with his brother, Dr. Matthew Branche. Branche worked in the Admissions Department at Columbia University Medical School. Branche also helped found the organization, 100 Black Men. He was involved with the organization for forty-three years and was an active member for many years.

Branche passed away on April 23, 2009 at age 84.

Accession Number

A2006.152

Sex

Male

Interview Date

12/6/2006 |and| 12/12/2006

Last Name

Branche

Maker Category
Middle Name

Clayton

Schools

Boston Latin School

James P. Timilty Middle School

Chambliss Children's House at Tuskegee Institute

Boston University School of Medicine

Bowdoin College

First Name

George

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

BRA06

Favorite Season

Spring

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

Caribbean

Favorite Quote

Do Unto Others As You Would Have Them Do Unto You.

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

New York

Birth Date

3/22/1925

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

New York

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Chicken, Fish, Vegetables

Death Date

4/23/2009

Short Description

Internal medicine physician Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. (1925 - 2009 ) was a medical officer during the Korean Conflict, was a founder of 100 Black Men and had his own internal medicine practice in New York City.

Employment

U.S. Army

Boston City Hospital

Cushing General Hospital

Harlem Hospital Center

Favorite Color

Brown

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr.'s interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his mother's upbringing in North Carolina

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's family background, pt. 1

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's family background, pt. 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his paternal great-uncle, George Clayton Shaw

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's university education

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about his father's medical research

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his father's social involvement

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his earliest childhood memories

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his family life in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls travelling with his family as a child

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls Camp Emlen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls moving to Boston, Massachusetts for high school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls differences between Boston and Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls the Roxbury community in Boston

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his mother and siblings' move to Boston

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his decision to study medicine

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his internship at Boston City Hospital

Tape: 3 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his mentors

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his medical internship and residency

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls joining the U.S. Army as a medical officer

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his service in the Korean War

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. remembers segregation in the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls returning from the Korean War

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls moving to Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his medical career in New York City, pt. 1

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls the difficulties of practicing medicine in Richmond

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his medical career in New York

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his social involvement in New York

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the Youth Shelter Program of Westchester, Inc.

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his wife and his friends at Harlem Hospital Center

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about George Clayton Shaw's writings

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the history of Mary Potter Academy, pt. 1

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the history of Mary Potter Academy, pt. 2

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls serving with black physicians in the Korean War

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his medical duties in the Korean War

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about why he settled in Richmond, Virginia

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls Richmond's African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls moving to New York City in 1962

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his early medical career in New York City

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls practicing medicine with his brother

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his community involvement in Harlem, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his involvement in 100 Black Men of America, Inc.

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his medical career in New York City, pt. 2

Tape: 7 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes Westchester County, New York

Tape: 7 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the community of Scarsdale, New York

Tape: 8 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes African Americans' presence in the medical profession

Tape: 8 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the medical issues facing the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his concerns about healthcare for African Americans

Tape: 8 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes the operations of the Youth Shelter Program of Westchester, Inc.

Tape: 8 Story: 5 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his work with the Westchester Clubmen

Tape: 8 Story: 6 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about his Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity membership

Tape: 8 Story: 7 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 8 Story: 8 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 9 Story: 1 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. talks about his three children

Tape: 9 Story: 2 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. reflects upon his life

Tape: 9 Story: 3 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. narrates his photographs, pt. 1

Tape: 9 Story: 4 - Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. narrates his photographs, pt. 2

DASession

1$2

DATape

3$6

DAStory

5$5

DATitle
Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. recalls his decision to study medicine
Dr. George Clayton Branche, Jr. describes his medical duties in the Korean War
Transcript
I'll ask you now, but we'll keep going in chronological order. Well, why was that not an option for you? Why did you not see that as a path for you to take?$$I wasn't interested. I was afraid to fly. I was afraid to ride a horse. I was afraid to ride, I fell off a pony at camp and never rode a horse, and I had no interest in it, and I was active, and I wanted to go to medical school, and I was fortunate, they needed doctors.$$Had you always been interested in medicine?$$I never thought of anything else.$$For how long? How far back can you remember?$$Well, as far as I can remember. That's the only think I knew. I lived in a community of doctors, my father [George Clayton Branche, Sr.] was a doctor, his close friends were physicians. I didn't know what kind I would be, but I never thought, as I said, and I'll get to the, once I got into Bowdoin College [Brunswick, Maine], I had spent almost two years there, 1944, I had finished my, I finished Boston Latin [Boston Latin School, Boston, Massachusetts] in '42 [1942]. I spent two years at Bowdoin and was told that unless I got into medical school that I would be subject to the draft. I only, didn't have enough, yeah, I only had two years, but I took a summer and at that time all, many of my classmates were in the same situation I was. We were only nineteen and twenty and so the colleges, Williams [Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts], Bowdoin, many of us, my friend Garrett [John Garrett, Jr.] at Amherst [Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts], we were allowed to go to medical school and we, and then we accelerated very rapidly, but then in 1945, the war [World War II, WWII] sort of ended and we decelerated so we spent a couple, one six-month period without going to school, and we had to write a little thesis and do something else, and then went on back and finished. And, but the reason, as I said, I was always interested in medicine. And at Boston University [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts], it was a very tiny school. When my father went there, there were only twenty-three students at the medical school. And three of 'em was black, including my father. And when I went to BU medical school, it was still small. There were only fifty-nine and now there're over 160 in each class.$$How many blacks were there when you were there of the fifty-nine?$$Very, I was the only one in my class, just like I was the only one at Bowdoin, except for a young fellow who was there for a year and left to go in the [U.S.] Army.$$Where did you live when you went out to Bowdoin?$$When I went back, when I came back from Bowdoin? My mother [Lillian Davidson Branche] had moved to 71 Highland Street. A family moved out and she moved in the same building, apartment, little apartment in Boston [Massachusetts], and I used to ride a bicycle from my apartment to the medical school. I'd get on my, had my books on the back and I'd get on my little bike and kids would say look, there's a man on a bike. So I rode that and they would let me hook it up inside the building and then I would bicycle back up to, it was a couple, maybe mile and a half, two miles.$But I only spent a, no more than four or five weeks, and then I was allowed, I traded places with this fellow, as I told you I don't like flying, but I was willing to get into a little tiny two-seater with my duffel bag and fly south. And while I was there I was--you had to have a dispensary. You had to have a dispensary for soldiers when they had various problems, whether they're STS [significant threshold shift], sexually transmitted disorders, or various other things, or whether the common cold or whether they were this or that. They would come to the dispensary. Now--$$A dispensary is a pharmacy basically.$$The dispensary is a little tent where I had, had a little desk and things, and I had pills and so forth to treat--injections for certain disorders. But I saw very few sick people in this little--now there weren't, there wasn't a great deal of fighting going on. You remember there were little lulls in fighting. Now we're talking now, we're talking, I got to this hospital and about February of 1993 [sic. 1953], and there were no major battles or anything going on. Occasionally there was a push so to speak when the Chinese became involved and there were skirmishes and so they came, they did bring in, as I said, this was Evacuation Hospital [11th Evacuation Hospital, Korea]. They would bring troops down from the lines and so there were times when there were troops who had to have emergency surgical procedures which is what some of my friends were involved with. But I couldn't help out because I knew nothing about surgical tech. In fact, they would ask all of the officers, medical officers, to come and give a hand, and I recall, I never will forget it, when I got in the operating room, and my friend Wharton [ph.] would be operating, really working hard, and I would try to, he said, "Gee you're all thumbs," he said, "please leave." And I was, I had to leave. But anyhow, as things passed on, what happened was I allowed the Korean civilians to come into the clinic, those who had medical problems that I could handle, and so each morning you would see a line up outside, see it was a gate, not a gate, but a guard would be there opening, letting them into our little ground, camp, whatever you want to call them, you'd find maybe fifteen, twenty or so lined up coming in, and so it was okay. In fact, the U.S., my superiors said, sure, you can see as many as you, so they would line up and take their time and I would see them for various forms of anemia, a lot of parasitic diseases and minor problems that I could handle and they were grateful, and I enjoyed it, because otherwise I wouldn't have been practicing any medicine.$$You wouldn't have had anything to do.$$Very little.$$Very little.$$And so anyhow, I was there for about ten, let's see, from oh about eight to ten months and then I was transferred to the area near Seoul [South Korea], to the 121st Evacuation Hospital. That was in the town across from the Han River from Yeongam-eup [South Korea], I got promoted to captaincy, I was captain, and did primarily--much bigger facility and we, the general medical, we had medical wards and treated more medical problems, I left there. The war ended as you will recall only a few months after I got to Korea actually. And I left Korea in 1954, and came to, back to the states.

Herman Brenner White, Jr.

Physicist Herman Brenner White was born in Tuskegee, Alabama on September 28, 1948. He attended Macon County public schools and developed a great interest in science at an early age. Growing up so close to the Tuskegee Institute, White was able to talk to the professors there about science. In 1966, he graduated from the Tuskegee Institute High School. He decided to attend Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana for his undergraduate studies where he obtained his B.A. degree in physics in 1970. During graduate school at Michigan State University, White split his time at Michigan State's Cyclotron Laboratory in East Lansing, Michigan and the Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. As an award for excellent graduate research, White became an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and was sent to study in Geneva, Switzerland at the CERN European Laboratory for Particle Physics in 1972. He found a new passion there and shifted his research areas from nuclear and acceleration physics to particle physics. In 1974, he received his M.S. degree in physics from Michigan State University.

White was initially a neutrino physicist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and has held various positions there since 1974. Fermilab is the highest energy particle accelerator in the world where White has been a senior scientist. He was a university fellow in physics from 1976 to 1978 at Yale University. He taught physics again starting in 1987 during his doctoral studies at Florida State University and received his Ph.D. degree in 1991. At Fermilab he has collaborated on numerous high-energy particle physics experiments in addition to the design of high-energy particle beam and detector systems. One notable collaboration was when White worked as a kaon researcher and diplomat with Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi in Central Mexico.

White has been an adjunct physics professor at North Central College in Naperville, Illinois. In addition to his earlier fellowships, White was selected as an Illinois Industrial Research Corridor Fellow for North Central College in 1994. He has served on various physics communication and advisory panels for governmental agencies and the American Physical Society and has been a member of the American Physical Society’s Public Face of Physics Team.

Herman White was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on November 13, 2006.

Accession Number

A2006.141

Sex

Male

Interview Date

11/13/2006

Last Name

White

Maker Category
Marital Status

Divorced

Middle Name

Brenner

Occupation
Schools

Tuskegee Institute High School

Tuskegee Institute Middle School

Earlham College

Michigan State University

Florida State University

Search Occupation Category
Speakers Bureau

Yes

First Name

Herman

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

WHI10

Favorite Season

None

Sponsor

National Science Foundation

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

Outstanding!

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Illinois

Birth Date

9/28/1948

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Chicago

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Pie (Apple)

Short Description

Physicist Herman Brenner White, Jr. (1948 - ) has worked as a staff scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for over three decades, and is known for his particle physics work regarding mesons and quarks.

Employment

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Main Sponsor
Main Sponsor URL
Favorite Color

Blue

Timing Pairs
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DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Herman White's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Herman White shares his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Herman White talks about his mother's side of the family, part 1

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Herman White discusses the Tuskegee Institute as well as Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Herman White talks about his perception of Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Herman White talks about his mother's side of the family, part 2

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Herman White discusses his family origins on both sides

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Herman White talks about how he takes after his parents

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Herman White talks about his aunts and uncles

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Herman White talks about his sister, Zepherine White Finch, and her name origin

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Herman White describes his earliest memories

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Herman White remembers taking piano lessons and his family's appreciation for music

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Herman White recalls the sights, sounds, and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Herman White talks about how he was perceived in school

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Herman White shares his early interest in science

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Herman White talks about his favorite teachers in high school

Tape: 2 Story: 8 - Herman White recalls the names of his schools

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Herman White talks about growing up in Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Herman White talks about the church community and well-known parishioners

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Herman White recalls how integration was a dangerous and intense time during high school

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Herman White remembers Sammy Younge Jr., the first black college student to be killed during the Civil Rights Movement

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Herman White recalls how the Civil Rights Movement affected his college choices

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Herman White talks about Earlham College

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Herman White talks about his interest in science at age sixteen and choosing Earlham, College

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Herman White talks about his interest in physics

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Herman White talks about his summer job at Chrysler Corporation and his interests in computer programming and engineering

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Herman White talks about how he switched from nuclear physics to particle physics

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Herman White describes his mentor, Professor Henry Blosser, at Michigan State University

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Herman White talks about Michigan State University president, Dr. Clifton Wharton

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Herman White explains his work at the cyclotron lab

Tape: 4 Story: 8 - Herman White explains the difference between a nuclear physicist and a particle physicist

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Herman White discusses atoms and the laws of nuclear and particle physics

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Herman White talks about high energy beams and accelerator laboratories

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Herman White talks about his first two years working at Fermilab and going for his Ph.D. at Yale University

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Herman White talks about his particle physics research at the CERN laboratory

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Herman White explains the kaon

Tape: 5 Story: 6 - Herman White talks about how Fermilab was named

Tape: 5 Story: 7 - Herman White explains the Stefanski and White model for a neutrino production equation

Tape: 5 Story: 8 - Herman White shares how he chose Florida State University for his Ph.D.

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Herman White talks about Fermilab's Illinois location and his number 711 experiment on constituent scattering

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Herman White describes his ten year long experiment

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Herman White talks about the kaons of the tevatron experiment and his essay about how the public needs physics

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Herman White talks about increasing representation for women and other minorities in physics

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Herman White shares his plans for a future neutrino experiment and the international linear collider

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Herman White describes how scientific training could be useful for politicians to make more informed decisions

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Herman White explains why accelerators are underground for safety and regulation

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Herman White talks about employee safety at Fermilab and how his former teachers perceive him

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Herman White talks about employee safety at Fermilab

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Herman White talks about how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Herman White hopes his legacy will be that of an innovator

DASession

1$1

DATape

2$5

DAStory

6$4

DATitle
Herman White shares his early interest in science
Herman White talks about his particle physics research at the CERN laboratory
Transcript
And when actually did your interest in science evolve? Were you up in age or (unclear)?$$It's still evolving. Well I would say my interest in science was--I cannot remember when I wasn't interested in science. And of course, now I call it science but I think certainly when I was growing up it was just curiosity. My concerns was really answering some very basic questions. My--I go back and give my parents a great deal of credit for tolerating some of my eccentricities. I would always try to mix things up in my mother's kitchen and I learned how to clean the kitchen very well as a result of that mixing up experiments. But I was given a great deal of latitude to try to explore and to understand in fact how nature worked around me. I recall actually being in the woods next to my house finding a--the bottom part of one of these old Coca Cola bottles and this effectively turns out to be a lens because these were thick pieces of glass. And it was fascinating to me that I could actually use this thick piece of class to essentially focus down the rays of the sun and start--I'm not a pyrotechnic person but focus down the sun's rays and cause a little heat combustion with some leaves. That was very fascinating to me. I could not understand how it would be possible to do that and I could put my hand, not at the focus, but put my hand underneath this lens and nothing would happen to it. But there would be enough heat concentrated at the focal point to actually cause combustion. And I think this sort of thing was the, sort of the basis by which I actually started to study and to think about how things really work. You know why the sky is the color it is? Why the stars look the way they do? And of course in Alabama in the early 1950s, you could actually see the sky rather clearly. You didn't have as much pollution and that sort of--light pollution or any other type of pollution. So it was very, very fascinating for me to be able to put these things together to see in fact the environment that I lived in and also to understand something about the science that would probably answer some of these questions. And I had a great deal of, how do I put it? I had a great deal of support with regard to the community as well. Tuskegee, Alabama is a real significant place with regard to education activities. Certainly as a young person growing up there and having a university town essentially where you could go and talk to chemists or you could talk to physicists or you could talk to people who were aviation pioneers, this was a very easy thing to do. So it was, it seemed normal to me to be able to actually exercise some of the resources that I had to be able to do things. And I really enjoyed that a great deal. I think once I started down this path of asking these questions and being able to do little, small experiments and so forth, I think that sort of provided the, at least the direction, at some level the motivation as well to continue to do scientific work.$Well at CERN laboratory CERN [Conseil Europeen pour la Recherche Nucleaire/European Council for Nuclear Research's European Laboratory for Particle Physics]in 1972, I--my work there was, it was a great revelation for me to be able to go from a graduate student at Michigan State [University, East Lansing, Michigan] studying nuclear and particular physics to actually the possibility of doing something different. I was in the, what's known as the MSC division which is the nuclear physics accelerator division but I also got a chance to hang out with European students who were over in the PS division which is the proton/synchrotron division and also to study during the summer--well during the fall, spring, fall and--spring, summer and fall with the students who were studying particle physics. And I was very lucky to be able to do this being one of the first Americans who ever was allowed to be in this particular program. I got a chance to essentially interact with some people who were truly textbook named scientists and indeed I studied with a number of people who provided lectures for us. Professor Victor Weisskopf [Victor Frederick Weisskopf] who was chairman of the physics department at MIT [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts], Professor Valentine Telegdi [Valentine Louis Telegdi] who was a professor of physics at the University of Chicago [Chicago, Illinois] and Professor Kurt Gottfried who was a professor of physics at State University of New York [SIC] [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York]. And I had the opportunity to interact with people some of whom I didn't realize who they were. In particular, and I don't mind actually telling this story. We had a meeting after our lecture series that day that Professor Weisskopf invited all the students to come and have lunch with him and so we sat around. And I made some comment at the lunch about the quark theory that I wasn't so sure about this theory. And of course it was interpreted that I was criticizing this theory as opposed to just not being well read in that particular area of particle physics. And Mr. Weisskopf said well perhaps we should all introduce ourselves. We went around the table and just to 2:00 o'clock on the other side of the table from me a man introduced himself as Murray Gell-Mann. And I said you're not the uh--and he says, yes I am the uh. Murray Gell-Mann was the most recent Nobel Prize winner in physics for the quark theory and here was this young, energetic summer student saying he wasn't so sure about it. So I spent about three hours with Professor Gell-Mann after that walking around the laboratory, going to his office, going to the library trying to essentially recover myself in terms of understanding the quark theory and understanding something about the science. He was a very kind person and didn't tell me to go away. I mean this was about three hours with a Nobel Laureate and I was somewhat depressed after that point because I really sort of figured I had blown it pretty well. But actually he understood that I wasn't actually criticizing the quark theory, I was basically expressing a lack of knowledge about it and so I got a real lesson so to speak. My work primarily at CERN was the development of certain types of measuring systems for the MSC, for the synchrocyclotron and I had a very good opportunity to do scientific computing as well as to interact with people from other countries. In particular, my office mate was from the Duvna Laboratory in what was the former Soviet Union [Duvna U.S.S.R. Laboratory of Theoretical Physics]. And that was a very interesting experience of course because we, our interactions with various individuals during those times was somewhat limited, but being an American citizen of course you didn't expect to actually interact--I didn't expect certainly to. But I did research work there and I also did research work in kaon physics as a student assistant to Professor Valentine Telegdi who gave a series of lectures on Kaon physics. And being a summer student and somewhat not in the European tradition I would introduce myself and interrupt the professor during his presentation, which was not done. So at the conclusion of his lecture series, I was asked to be his lecture assistant and write up his lectures on the K0K0 bar complex and little did I know that maybe twenty years later I would be doing an experiment on the K0K0 bar complex.

Walter Theodore Hayden

Entrepreneur Walter Theodore Hayden was born June 24, 1926, in Tuskegee, Alabama, where his father, Rev. Charles Hayden of Greenwood, Mississippi, was chaplain of Tuskegee University. Hayden attended Hudson Elementary School in Birmingham, Alabama, and graduated from Birmingham’s Parker High School in 1944; he was a pre-med student at Indiana University from 1944 to 1947.

In the mid-1950s, Hayden was a driver and broker for PR & R Trucking Company in Birmingham. From 1961 to 1964, Hayden was the owner and operator of Birmingham’s Star Bowl bowling lanes. Star Bowl became a meeting place and a secret sheltering place for civil rights workers during the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham. In 1964, Hayden moved to Fort Wayne, Indiana, where he started Diamond Printing; soon thereafter, he began printing and distributing his own line of African American oriented greeting cards. In 1995, Hayden founded Fort Wayne Black Pages Business Directory.

A lifetime member of the NAACP, Hayden was also a member of the Urban League for twenty years, and for over sixty years was a member of the A.M.E. church. Hayden and his wife, Ernestine, remained in Fort Wayne where they raised nine children.

Accession Number

A2005.122

Sex

Male

Interview Date

5/23/2005

Last Name

Hayden

Maker Category
Marital Status

Married

Middle Name

Theodore

Schools

A.H. Parker High School

Hudson Elementary School

Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW)

First Name

Walter

Birth City, State, Country

Tuskegee

HM ID

HAY08

Favorite Season

Winter

Sponsor

Lincoln Financial Group Foundation

State

Alabama

Favorite Vacation Destination

None

Favorite Quote

None

Bio Photo
Speakers Bureau Region State

Indiana

Birth Date

6/24/1926

Birth Place Term
Speakers Bureau Region City

Fort Wayne

Country

United States

Favorite Food

Barbecue (Ribs)

Short Description

Leisure entrepreneur and printing entrepreneur Walter Theodore Hayden (1926 - ) was once owner of the Star Bowl, which served as a meeting place in Birmingham, Alabama, for civil rights workers during the Civil Rights Movement. After moving to Fort Wayne, Indiana, Hayden founded Diamond Printing; created his own line of African American greeting cards; and began publishing the Fort Wayne Black Pages Business Directory.

Employment

Fort Wayne Black Pages

U.S. Army

Diamond Printing

Star Bowling Lanes

Main Sponsor
Favorite Color

Red

Timing Pairs
0,0:3100,43:6399,65:34620,456:40333,602:60892,844:62052,863:78660,929:82698,992:85470,1082:90680,1119:91080,1125:93858,1160:99342,1245:100994,1269:115525,1394:116035,1401:125819,1544:129585,1566:135011,1643:147680,1764:156832,1882:158312,1909:162604,2034:182425,2194:182765,2199:187842,2274:188187,2312:230666,2695:231250,2704:234243,2793:234973,2847:237747,2957:270720,3341:271320,3353:280760,3521$0,0:3465,92:5544,132:18156,385:36048,661:37434,875:46135,963:56222,1142:64238,1228:66492,1272:76625,1321:86104,1398:87754,1437:105324,1667:105714,1674:106260,1682:106962,1691:107352,1702:107742,1708:108288,1717:114112,1769:125045,1885:131334,1935:131774,1941:134590,2006:137230,2051:138902,2076:139342,2082:141278,2123:141630,2128:146434,2178:170648,2449:170952,2454:171864,2467:172852,2494:173156,2499:181766,2659:182330,2667:182706,2678:183270,2685:184116,2695:187200,2722:187704,2727:194888,2776:195333,2782:197710,2794:200090,2831:209589,2888:213572,2909:214502,2927:215370,3015:238660,3158:245678,3207:251255,3230:252515,3333:252767,3395:253397,3407:267840,3517:275480,3611:278216,3628:324176,3990:334547,4121:334895,4126:340176,4207:347520,4328:354838,4427:355126,4432:357625,4448:358815,4472:361110,4513:362680,4519
DAStories

Tape: 1 Story: 1 - Slating of Walter Theodore Hayden's interview

Tape: 1 Story: 2 - Walter Theodore Hayden lists his favorites

Tape: 1 Story: 3 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his mother's family background

Tape: 1 Story: 4 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his mother's personality

Tape: 1 Story: 5 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his paternal great-grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 6 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his paternal grandfather

Tape: 1 Story: 7 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his father's career and personality

Tape: 1 Story: 8 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his childhood family life

Tape: 1 Story: 9 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his earliest childhood memory

Tape: 2 Story: 1 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his early childhood in Tuskegee, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 2 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls moving frequently during his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 3 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his father's work as an A.M.E. minister

Tape: 2 Story: 4 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes the sights, sounds and smells of his childhood

Tape: 2 Story: 5 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his childhood activities in Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 6 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his school experiences in Birmingham, Alabama

Tape: 2 Story: 7 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes influential teachers from grade school

Tape: 3 Story: 1 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls his interest in chemistry at A.H. Parker High School

Tape: 3 Story: 2 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes playing football at A.H. Parker High School

Tape: 3 Story: 3 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls his ambitions to attend college

Tape: 3 Story: 4 - Walter Theodore Hayden explains why he chose not to become a minister

Tape: 3 Story: 5 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes serving in the U.S. Army during World War II

Tape: 3 Story: 6 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls his decision to leave the U.S. Army

Tape: 4 Story: 1 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls his travels during his U.S. Army service

Tape: 4 Story: 2 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his early work experiences after college

Tape: 4 Story: 3 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls the Civil Rights Movement in the early 1960s

Tape: 4 Story: 4 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his involvement in civil rights in Birmingham

Tape: 4 Story: 5 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes the dangers faced by civil rights activists

Tape: 4 Story: 6 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham

Tape: 4 Story: 7 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes the tradition of civil rights protest marches

Tape: 5 Story: 1 - Walter Theodore Hayden talks about why he left Birmingham, Alabama in 1964

Tape: 5 Story: 2 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls entering the printing industry in Fort Wayne, Indiana

Tape: 5 Story: 3 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his company, Unique Greeting Cards

Tape: 5 Story: 4 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls working with black-owned businesses in Fort Wayne

Tape: 5 Story: 5 - Walter Theodore Hayden recalls publishing the Black Pages in Fort Wayne, Indiana

Tape: 6 Story: 1 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes why he doesn't support black chambers of commerce

Tape: 6 Story: 2 - Walter Theodore Hayden explains why black businesses have difficulty obtaining loans

Tape: 6 Story: 3 - Walter Theodore Hayden offers advice for African American businesses

Tape: 6 Story: 4 - Walter Theodore Hayden reflects upon the legacy of Willie Lynch

Tape: 6 Story: 5 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his hopes and concerns for the African American community

Tape: 6 Story: 6 - Walter Theodore Hayden reflects upon his life

Tape: 6 Story: 7 - Walter Theodore Hayden reflects upon his legacy

Tape: 7 Story: 1 - Walter Theodore Hayden talks about volunteering at area schools

Tape: 7 Story: 2 - Walter Theodore Hayden reflects upon his relationship with his parents

Tape: 7 Story: 3 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes his children

Tape: 7 Story: 4 - Walter Theodore Hayden describes how he would like to be remembered

Tape: 7 Story: 5 - Walter Theodore Hayden narrates his photographs

DASession

1$1

DATape

3$5

DAStory

4$5

DATitle
Walter Theodore Hayden explains why he chose not to become a minister
Walter Theodore Hayden recalls publishing the Black Pages in Fort Wayne, Indiana
Transcript
When I came home from the prom that night, that night, about one o'clock in the morning, he [Hayden's father, Charles Hayden] was sitting on the porch rocking, you know. And I came home, he says, "I wanna talk to you," I said okay. We sat on the porch, there was two rockers there on the porch him and hers, you know. And he says, "You don't have to go to the [U.S.] Army." He said, "I can get you deferred." And he said, "I could get you enrolled in school, and you don't have to go to the Army," he said, "you can be a minister." Of all the boys my dad had, he didn't have a minister.$$Was it, that had to be troubling for him because his great-grand, his grandfather [Charles Hayden] had been a minister, his father [Charles Hayden] had been a minister, he was a minister, right?$$Yes, it might have been troubling for him.$$And not a single one?$$Not a single boy, and there were eight of us, eight. Now there was one that preached, wasn't a minister, so he picked me. I had good grades and I pleaded with him, I told him, "Dad, I know how you feel but I don't wanna go through what you've gone through. I don't think I can handle it and come out like you."$$Now what did you mean by that, what did you mean by that?$$In all of the years I had watched him operate, that's what I called it, he did things, took care of things, all the time. One thing that always bothered me is on Monday morning he'd come in there early and wake us up, "You, Walter [HistoryMaker Walter Theodore Hayden]," I said oh, no, I knew what was going on, somebody had got into trouble and he bailed 'em out so they could go to work Monday. That means I didn't have carfare to ride the bus to school. I had to hike it over that mountain the rest of the week, you know. But that, we did it. And we knew what was happening, what was going on. And like you said he was a fixer, and there was always some little problem going on at the church or he was gonna move to another church and da, di, da. And I just didn't think I could handle people that well, (laughter) you know. I, he could have been in any other profession, he could have been quite a force, could have made a lot of money because he was well educated. And I thought, oh, you kind of mistreated us I thought over the years, but later he gave me something that you can't equate with money. And I can do whatever I decided to do. And I can. And I've had that now, tried to instill my kids with it. And, of course, you don't always succeed. Now, my grandfather, my father, would have been very proud of some of his grandchildren and I have two ministers (laughter). So it didn't go for naught, I have two.$$So did you, was it just the economic factor or did you feel like you really (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) I thought it was later on, but that soon dispelled because I found out that after I got out on my own, I had no problem making my own way because I had been taught how to do that. That goes back to the time when this guy told me his kid was home from school, from school and he was gonna work, drive a truck all summer, and he would call me in the winter, I said um-hm, forget it. So I haven't worked for anybody else since.$$But you didn't feel, you didn't feel like any calling to be a minister at all, you didn't really feel that was a--$$Although I'm heavily involved in church.$$Okay. I thought it probably would have been since all this tradition, you know, you probably would have (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) Yeah, but none, pfft.$I did that, I printed the book for her, she said, "Why don't you start one?" And I thought about it, I started thinking about that here and (simultaneous)--$$(Simultaneous) There's a young lady here in town [Fort Wayne, Indiana] who was--already had a Black Pages [Fort Wayne Black Pages]?$$No, no, no, we didn't have one. But I was dealing with, Rae Pearson. Rae Pearson is, has a personnel company [Alpha Rae Personnel, Inc., Fort Wayne, Indiana]. And we always talked with each other and so we, we were trying to get a meeting where everybody knew everybody. And so people started bringing me copies of Black Books from, Black Pages from all around the country, so I said, okay, I can put one of these together, I got a print shop [Diamond Point Printing; Express Print and Copy, Fort Wayne, Indiana], so I did. It took me two years to get the first one through but after that, I put out five good ones after that. The first one well, it's typical of a first book and then the rest of them look like it was done right.$$Okay. Now is this a, is the Black Pages like a franchise or something--$$No.$$--or anybody can start their own version of it then?$$Yes.$$It's not a copyrighted idea where--$$No.$$--you can get in trouble if I wanted to start one, I just go start one?$$No. It's just a matter of, I've got this here and it can only support one, you can start one in another city but like Chicago [Illinois], Chicago could support two Black Pages, pages, okay. French [Arnette D. French] up there, nobody wants to get in French's way 'cause can't, printing fifty thousand books a year. And the advertising from that is tremendous in Chicago. What he gets a page up there, I can't even think about it here, most I can get for a full color page would be about eight hundred dollars. He can get two, three thousand for a full page because of the coverage and people who keep these books. And I have created mine to the point where it was really something. And the young man that bought it from me is doing the same. In fact, the new edition will be out some times this week, I think. I was up to see him last week in his, this year's book is coming out this, this week.$$Okay.$$So the Black Pages is a way for you to find any service that's in the black community that you wanna spend your money with. That's what it's all about.$$Now it probably has more significance, tell me if I'm right or wrong, I would guess it would have more significance today than it, even in the past because the black--$$That's right.$$--community is scattered around, people don't even know what the other black businesses are.$$That's right. That's right. This is what it's, that's basically what it's supposed to be. It's your avenue to everything that's going on in the black community. Unfortunately, there's a downside to that, okay (laughter). Everything has a downside. Some people want the very first issue right away as soon as they can get it. And they are using it as a hit list.$$A hit list?$$By that, yes, a hit list. Same as telemarketing, they know where the black community, the black businesses are so they can reach them real quick like they know where all of them are, they're in that book. They don't have to go out, government agencies get them, the city gets them, all government agencies have to have them because they're looking for suppliers, you see. They're looking for suppliers and they're used for more than one purpose what I'm showing you. It became quite a book because of that; they're using it for more than one purpose. Some use it as a hit list, some use it for information, and some use it for use, basically. And they are all over the country doing well. And like you said about it, what's the difference then, I can just start, yes, you can. But there's this thing about what you can do and what you shouldn't do. For instance, this city cannot support two Black Pages. It can support two black newspapers because the advertising in newspapers are here today and gone tomorrow, whereas on this book you see it once a year. And the people who are in that book are very stable, the advertising you see in the newspaper is hit and miss because the guy that puts it in there today he puts in two issues that's it. You won't see it again for some time until he gets another budget maybe. But whereas the Black Pages are full of people who are stable, they're not going in that directory for a seasonal thing, they're going in it because on the long run it's there.